ASUS ROG Swift PG348Q vs Dell S3220DGF
Side-by-Side Comparison

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Test Bench
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Review

Main Differences
Threshold

Full Comparison

- Ratings
Mixed Usage
What it is: General purpose. The monitor will be used for a variety of content and uses. Office work, gaming, media creation, as well as watching movies and TV shows.
Score components:
Office
What it is: How well the monitor performs in an office environment. The monitor will be used for productivity, in a bright room, and shared with colleagues at different viewing angles. The content consists of lots of text and uniform colors.
Gaming
What it is: The monitor will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast-paced games where refresh rate, response time, and input lag are most important.
Multimedia
What it is: How well the monitor performs when viewing multimedia, such as videos, movies, and TV shows.
Media Creation
What it is: When using the monitor to professionally create media. Will be used straight on, in a light-controlled environment, with an emphasis on picture quality and color accuracy. Resolution and size are important for maximum productivity.
HDR Gaming
What it is: The monitor will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. The monitor will be used head-on, in a dark environment, with HDR features enabled, such as local dimming.
- Main
Size
Resolution
Max Refresh Rate
What it is: The maximum supported refresh rate of the monitor. This includes the factory overclock that comes built-in with many gaming monitors.
When it matters: For fast-paced content, such as FPS or racing games.
LCD Type
What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the monitor.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Variable Refresh Rate
What it is: Feature that allows the monitor to synchronize its refresh rate with the input device's output and reduces stuttering and screen tearing.
When it matters: Almost every use, but is most noticeable in gaming where constant fluctuation in framerate causes distracting artifacts.
- Design
- Style
Design Picture
Curved
Curve Radius
Weight (without stand)
What it is: The weight of the monitor when mounted. This is with the stand removed and, if necessary, any VESA mounting bracket attached.
When it matters: When choosing a mount for a monitor.
Weight (with stand)
What it is: The weight of the monitor, including the stand and any input covers.
- Stand
Stand Picture
Width
What it is: The width of the stand.
When it matters: When using a small desk, for those who require a monitor with a small footprint.
Depth
What it is: The depth of the stand.
When it matters: When using a small desk, for those who require a monitor with a small footprint.
- Ergonomics
What it is: How much the position of the screen can be adjusted to match the viewing preference of the user.
When it matters: All uses, but especially office and gaming use.
Score components:
  • 46% Height Adjustment
  • 18% Switch Portrait/Landscape
  • 18% Swivel Range
  • 18% Tilt Range
Ergonomics Picture
Height Adjustment
What it is: The amount of vertical travel or adjustment of the display.
Switch Portrait/Landscape
Swivel Range
Tilt Range
- Back
Back Picture
Wall Mount
- Borders
Borders Picture
Borders
What it is: The distance from the left edge of the display to the start of the image.
When it matters: When using multiple monitors side-by-side.
- Thickness
Thickness Picture
Thickness (with stand)
What it is: How far the front of the screen protrudes when placed as far back as possible against a wall.
When it matters: When the monitor is placed back against a wall.
Thickness (without stand)
What it is: How far the front of the screen protrudes when the stand has been removed. For monitors that require a bracket to VESA mount, this measurement includes the thickness of the bracket.
When it matters: When mounting a monitor with the stand removed.
- Build Quality
What it is: How well built and sturdy the monitor is, and how good the materials used to build it are.
When it matters: All uses.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Build Quality Picture
- Picture Quality
- Contrast
What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Checkerboard Picture
Native Contrast
What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
Contrast With Local Dimming
What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with local dimming turned on (maximum) with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
- Local Dimming
What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming Video
Local Dimming
What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darken the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED monitors only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Backlight
What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit monitors have more uniform blacks than some full-array monitors.
- SDR Peak Brightness
What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Real Scene
What it is: The maximum luminosity the monitor can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. Our Real Scene was selected to represent a more regular movie condition. All measurements are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming on, max backlight and with an SDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies and TV shows in SDR.
Good value: > 300 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 30 cd/m²
SDR Peak 2% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time.
SDR Peak 10% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time.
SDR Peak 25% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: When watching in a bright room.
SDR Peak 50% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: When watching in a bright room.
SDR Peak 100% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: When watching in a bright room.
SDR Sustained 2% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent during a scene.
SDR Sustained 10% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent during a scene.
SDR Sustained 25% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: When watching in a bright room.
SDR Sustained 50% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: When watching in a bright room.
SDR Sustained 100% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: When watching in a bright room.
SDR ABL
What it is: The standard deviation of the SDR sustained brightness, after linearizing for noticeable differences in luminosity.
When it matters: Content with large bright areas, such as for PC or video game use, and sports such as hockey.
- HDR Peak Brightness
What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with HDR content.
When it matters: HDR content.
HDR Real Scene
What it is: The maximum luminosity the monitor can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more realistic movie condition. All measurements are made with the monitor set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over HDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV shows in HDR.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Peak 2% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Peak 10% Window
What it is: TThe maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Peak 25% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Peak 50% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Peak 100% Window
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 2% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 10% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 25% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 50% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR Sustained 100% Window
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the monitor set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 550 cd/m²
Noticeable difference: 80 cd/m²
HDR ABL
What it is: The coefficient of variation of the HDR sustained brightness, after linearizing for noticeable differences in luminosity.
When it matters: HDR content with large bright areas, such as HDR gaming.
Good value: <0.07
Noticeable difference: 0.01
- Horizontal Viewing Angle
What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
Horizontal Viewing Angle Video
Horizontal Chroma Graph
Color Washout From Left
What it is: The angle at which some colors drop to 80% of their original chroma.
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Color Washout From Right
What it is: The angle at which some colors drop to 80% of their original chroma.
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Horizontal Hue Graph
Color Shift From Left
What it is: The angle at which some colors hue shift by 3° (meaning they change color, such as becoming more blue-ish).
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Color Shift From Right
What it is: The angle at which some colors hue shift by 3° (meaning they change color, such as becoming more blue-ish).
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Horizontal Lightness Graph
Brightness Loss From Left
What it is: The angle at which the monitor's lightness drops to 75% of its original lightness.
When it matters: When viewing any content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Brightness Loss From Right
What it is: The angle at which the monitor's lightness drops to 75% of its original lightness.
When it matters: When viewing any content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Black Level Raise From Left
What it is: The angle at which the black level doubles its lightness, leading to dark shades looking washed out.
When it matters: When viewing dark content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Black Level Raise From Right
What it is: The angle at which the black level doubles its lightness, leading to dark shades looking washed out.
When it matters: When viewing dark content from the side.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Gamma Shift From Left
What it is: The angle at which some grayscale shades shift by 3% of their relative position between the black and white levels.
When it matters: When watching any content at an angle.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Gamma Shift From Right
What it is: The angle at which some grayscale shades shift by 3% of their relative position between the black and white levels.
When it matters: When watching any content at an angle.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
- Vertical Viewing Angle
What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the top or bottom.
Vertical Viewing Angle Video
Vertical Chroma Graph
Color Washout From Below
What it is: The angle at which some colors drop to 80% of their original chroma.
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from the below.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Color Washout From Above
What it is: The angle at which some colors drop to 80% of their original chroma.
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from above.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Vertical Hue Graph
Color Shift From Below
What it is: The angle at which some colors hue shift by 3° (meaning they change color, such as becoming more blue-ish).
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from below.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Color Shift From Above
What it is: The angle at which some colors hue shift by 3° (meaning they change color, such as becoming more blue-ish).
When it matters: When viewing colorful content from above.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Vertical Lightness Graph
Brightness Loss From Below
What it is: The angle at which the monitor's lightness drops to 75% of its original lightness.
When it matters: When viewing any content from below.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Brightness Loss From Above
What it is: The angle at which the monitor's lightness drops to 75% of its original lightness.
When it matters: When viewing any content from above.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Black Level Raise From Below
What it is: The angle at which the black level doubles its lightness, leading to dark shades looking washed out.
When it matters: When viewing dark content from below.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Black Level Raise From Above
What it is: The angle at which the black level doubles its lightness, leading to dark shades looking washed out.
When it matters: When viewing dark content from above.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Gamma Shift From Below
What it is: The angle at which some grayscale shades shift by 3% of their relative position between the black and white levels.
When it matters: When watching any content at an angle.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
Gamma Shift From Above
What it is: The angle at which some grayscale shades shift by 3% of their relative position between the black and white levels.
When it matters: When watching any content at an angle.
Good value: > 45°
Noticeable difference: 10°
- Gray Uniformity
What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
50% DSE
What it is: Dirty Screen Effect. High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
5% Uniformity Picture
5% Std. Dev.
What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 5% gray.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 1.15%
Noticeable difference: 1%
5% DSE
What it is: Dirty Screen Effect. High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 0.116%
- Black Uniformity
What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: <2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
Black Uniformity Picture With Local Dimming
Std. Dev. w/ L.D.
What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks with Local Dimming enabled.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: <2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
- Pre Calibration
What it is: Monitor's color accuracy before a full calibration. The measurements are taken with the out-of-the-box settings. The picture mode that gives the best uncalibrated results is normally chosen.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated monitor. This represents most people's uses.
Score components:
Pre Calibration Picture
Pre Gamma Curve Picture
Pre Color Picture
Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode that was used to do the pre-calibration reading. We normally choose the picture mode that gives the best uncalibrated results.
Luminance
What it is: The luminance at which the pre-calibration reading was done. This represents the luminance of the monitor when it is at the factory default settings.
Luminance Settings
What it is: The luminance settings, often named 'Brightness' on monitors, usually range from 0 to 100.
Contrast Setting
What it is: The monitor contrast setting, usually ranging from 0 to 100.
RGB Controls
What it is: This is the value for each color (red, green, and blue) used in the monitor internal RGB cuts/gains controls. If the monitor does not have an internal RGB cuts/gains controls, then the color temperature setting will be used instead, and the color temperature that gives us the best result will be used.
Gamma Setting
What it is: The gamma setting the monitor was on when the measurement was taken.
Color Temperature
What it is: The color temperature is a measure of the color of light. A colder color temperature (7000K) will look bluer and a warmer color temperature (4000K) will look yellower/redder. 6500K is the standard color for PC monitors and also for the sRGB color standard.
When it matters: When you care about color reproduction and accuracy.
Good value: 6500K
Noticeable difference: 400K
White Balance dE
What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
Color dE
What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
Gamma
What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
- Post Calibration
What it is: Monitor's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All graphics and video content on a monitor that has been professionally calibrated.
Score components:
Post Calibration Picture
Post Gamma Curve Picture
Post Color Picture
Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode that was used to do the calibration reading. We usually go for the picture mode that gives us the more control over all the picture quality setting.
Luminance
What it is: The luminance at which the calibration was executed. We aim for a luminance level of 100 cd/m².
Luminance Settings
What it is: The luminance settings, often named 'Brightness' on monitors, usually range from 0 to 100.
Contrast Setting
What it is: The monitor contrast setting, usually ranging from 0 to 100.
RGB Controls
What it is: This is the value for each color (red, green, and blue) used in the monitor internal RGB cuts/gains controls. If the monitor does not have an internal RGB cuts/gains controls, then the color temperature setting will be used instead, and the color temperature that gives us the best result will be used.
Gamma Setting
What it is: The gamma setting the monitor was set to for post-calibration.
Color Temperature
What it is: The color temperature is a measure of the color of light. A colder color temperature (7000K) will look bluer and a warmer color temperature (4000K) will look yellower/redder. 6500K is the standard color for PC monitors and also for the sRGB color standard.
When it matters: When you care about color reproduction and accuracy.
Good value: 6500K
Noticeable difference: 400K
White Balance dE
What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
Color dE
What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
Gamma
What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
- SDR Color Gamut
What it is: The palette of colors the monitor can display.
When it matters: General content consumption or production.
Score components:
Color Gamut sRGB Picture
sRGB xy
What it is: Coverage of the sRGB colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Almost all content. Includes websites, standard Windows environment, and SDR movies.
Good value: > 95%
Noticeable difference: 5%
Color Gamut ARGB Picture
Adobe RGB xy
What it is: Coverage of the Adobe RGB colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Professional photography.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
sRGB Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the SDR Color Gamut was measured in. This is measured with our calibration applied.
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the Adobe RGB Color Gamut was measured in.
- SDR Color Volume
What it is: How much of the SDR color spaces the monitor can reproduce.
When it matters: General usage and SDR media creation.
Score components:
sRGB Color Volume ITP Picture
sRGB In ICtCp
What it is: How much of the sRGB colorspace a monitor can display at different luminosity levels.
When it matters: Most content, including web, SDR video games, and SDR media creation.
Adobe RGB Color Volume ITP Picture
Adobe RGB In ICtCp
What it is: How much of the Adobe RGB colorspace a monitor can display at different luminosity levels, normalized to the monitor's peak brightness.
When it matters: Professional media creation.
sRGB Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the sRGB Color Volume was measured in. This is measured with our calibration applied.
Adobe RGB Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the Adobe RGB Color Gamut was measured in.
- HDR Color Gamut
What it is: The monitor's ability to reproduce HDR color spaces.
When it matters: HDR content consumption or media creation.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
What it is: Whether the monitor can support wider color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content and media creation.
Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy. Tested with the primaries limited to the DCI-P3 color space.
When it matters: When consuming or producing HDR content.
Color Gamut Rec.2020 Picture
Rec. 2020 xy
What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: When consuming or producing HDR content.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
DCI P3 Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the DCI P3 Color Gamut was measured in.
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the Rec. 2020 Color Gamut was measured in.
- HDR Color Volume
What it is: How much of the HDR color spaces a monitor can display at different luminosity levels.
When it matters: HDR content consumption and production. Includes streaming services, UHD Blu-rays, and HDR games.
Score components:
P3 Color Volume ITP Picture
DCI-P3 In ICtCp
What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a monitor can display at different luminosity levels, normalized to the monitor's peak brightness output.
When it matters: HDR content.
Good value: 80%
Noticeable difference: 5%
2020 Color Volume ITP Picture
Rec. 2020 In ICtCp
What it is: How much of the Rec. 2020 colorspace a monitor can display at different luminosity levels, normalized to the monitor's peak brightness output.
When it matters: HDR content.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
DCI P3 Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the DCI P3 Color Volume was measured in.
Rec. 2020 Picture Mode
What it is: The picture mode the Rec. 2020 Color Volume was measured in.
- Image Retention
What it is: How much a static image is retained on a monitor screen after a certain amount of time.
When it matters: When working or playing video games on your PC monitor.
Image Retention Picture
IR After 0 Min Recovery
What it is: Image retention measured right after the static image exposure, without recovery time.
When it matters: When changing use or right after changing the type of on-screen content (i.e. stopping playing a video game to watch a movie).
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
IR After 2 Min Recovery
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 2 minutes.
When it matters: When changing use or right after changing the type of on-screen content (i.e. stopping playing a video game to watch a movie).
Good value: 0 is perfect
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
IR After 4 Min Recovery
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 4 minutes.
When it matters: When changing use or right after changing the type of on-screen content (i.e. stopping playing a video game to watch a movie).
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
IR After 6 Min Recovery
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 6 minutes.
When it matters: When changing use or right after changing the type of on-screen content (i.e. stopping playing a video game to watch a movie).
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
IR After 8 Min Recovery
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 8 minutes.
When it matters: When changing use or right after changing the type of on-screen content (i.e. stopping playing a video game to watch a movie).
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
IR After 10 Min Recovery
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 10 minutes.
When it matters: When changing use or right after changing the type of on-screen content (i.e. stopping playing a video game to watch a movie).
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
- Gradient
What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky, and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Gradient Picture
Color Depth
What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like HDR video games or HDR UHD movies. Won't matter for regular Blu-ray movies, SDR video games, or desktop environment content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
- Color Bleed
What it is: How much the color from one area of the screen affects the color in another area of the screen.
When it matters: All uses, but especially media creation.
Score components:
Color Bleed Horizontal
Pixel Row Error
What it is: The amount of bleed that appears across the screen horizontally.
When it matters: General usage of a PC monitor, can appear when browsing the web or with media creation like graphics.
Good value: <0.2%
Noticeable difference: 0.1%
Color Bleed Vertical
Pixel Column Error
What it is: Amount of color bleeding that appears across the screen vertically.
When it matters: Most uses of a PC monitor. Can appear while browsing the web or when editing images or graphics.
Good value: <0.2%
Noticeable difference: 0.1%
- Reflections
What it is: How much light is reflected by the monitor.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Average Room
Average Room Off Picture
Bright Room Off Picture
Screen Finish
What it is: The type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path of the monitor.
Good value: A matte coating is preferred in an environment with bright objects in the direct reflections, such as sunlight or lamps. A glossy coating is ideal in an environment with no bright objects in the direct reflections.
Total Reflections
What it is: The amount of light that is reflected off the screen, in all directions.
When it matters: When using the monitor in a bright room, with lamps, windows, or walls which reflect directly off the screen.
Good value: 4.5 %
Noticeable difference: 0.5 %
Indirect Reflections
What it is: The amount of light reflected off the screen, ignoring direct (mirror-like) reflections.
When it matters: Using a monitor in a bright room, without sunlight or lamps directed at it.
Good value: 1.0 %
Noticeable difference: 0.5 %
Calculated Direct Reflections
What it is: The amount of light reflected off the screen from direct (mirror-like) reflections. This is calculated by subtracting the measured Indirect Reflections from the measured Total Reflections.
When it matters: Using a monitor in a room with bright light sources, such as sunlight or lamps.
- Text Clarity
What it is: How clear text appears on screen. The top picture is taken with Windows ClearType on, and the bottom is taken with Windows ClearType off. Windows ClearType is a feature that can give more detail and smoothness to text, but its implementation may be bothersome to some.
When it matters: When reading any text on the monitor.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
ClearType On
ClearType Off
Pixels
Sub-Pixel Layout
What it is: How the sub-pixels are arranged on the display.
When it matters: When displaying text on the monitor. Layouts that aren't RGB may have less compatibility with operating systems, thus affecting text clarity.
- Motion
Score components:
- Response Time @ Max Refresh Rate
What it is: The performance of the pixel response time at the maximum supported refresh rate of the monitor. This includes the factory overclock that comes built-in with many gaming monitors. Poor response time causes trails to follow moving objects. Response time is one of a few sources of motion blur.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Motion Blur Picture @ Max
Response Time Table @ Max
Best Overdrive Setting @ Max
What it is: If the monitor has adjustable pixel overdrive settings, which one produces the best response time with minimal overshoot at the maximum supported refresh rate of the monitor. This includes the factory overclock that comes built-in with many gaming monitors.
When it matters: When adjusting the monitor's settings to get the least possible motion blur.
Rise / Fall Time @ Max
What it is: How quickly pixels transition from 10% to 90% of one color to another.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 8 ms
Noticeable difference: 4 ms
Total Response Time @ Max
What it is: How quickly pixels can fully transition from one color to another.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 12 ms
Noticeable difference: 10 ms
Overshoot Error @ Max
What it is: How much further a pixel transitions past its desired color.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 10%
Noticeable difference: 10%
Dark Rise / Fall Time @ Max
What it is: How quickly pixels transition from 10% to 90% of one dark color to another dark color. A dark color is considered 0% - 40% gray.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with dark colors, such as during video games and sports.
Dark Total Response Time @ Max
What it is: How quickly pixels can fully transition from one dark color to another dark color. A dark color is considered 0% - 40% gray.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with dark colors, such as during video games and sports.
Dark Overshoot Error @ Max
What it is: How much further a pixel transitions past its desired color. From one dark color to another dark color. A dark color is considered 0% - 40% gray.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with dark colors, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 10%
Noticeable difference: 10%
- Response Time @ 60Hz
What it is: The performance of the pixel response time at 60Hz. Poor response time causes trails to follow moving objects. Response time is one of a few sources of motion blur.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with 60Hz content, such as when gaming on a console.
Motion Blur Picture @ 60
Response Time Table @ 60
Best Overdrive Setting @ 60
What it is: If the monitor has adjustable pixel overdrive settings, which one produces the best response time with minimal overshoot at 60Hz.
When it matters: When adjusting the monitor's settings to get the least possible motion blur.
Rise / Fall Time @ 60
What it is: How quickly pixels transition from 10% to 90% of one color to another.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 8 ms
Noticeable difference: 4 ms
Total Response Time @ 60
What it is: How quickly pixels can fully transition from one color to another.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 12 ms
Noticeable difference: 10 ms
Overshoot Error @ 60
What it is: How much further a pixel transitions past its desired color.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 10%
Noticeable difference: 10%
Dark Rise / Fall Time @ 60
What it is: How quickly pixels transition from 10% to 90% of one dark color to another dark color. A dark color is considered 0% - 40% gray.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with dark colors, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 8 ms
Noticeable difference: 4 ms
Dark Total Response Time @ 60
What it is: How quickly pixels can fully transition from one dark color to another dark color. A dark color is considered 0% - 40% gray.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with dark colors, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 12 ms
Noticeable difference: 10 ms
Dark Overshoot Error @ 60
What it is: How much further a pixel transitions past its desired color. From one dark color to another dark color. A dark color is considered 0% - 40% gray.
When it matters: When there's fast movement on-screen with dark colors, such as during video games and sports.
Good value: < 10%
Noticeable difference: 10%
- Image Flicker
What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images.
When it matters: Nearly all the time during PC monitor use, but especially during fast movement such as video games.
Score components:
Backlight Picture
Flicker-Free
PWM Dimming Frequency
What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300Hz). Frequencies that are multiples of 60Hz are better.
- Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames.
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in motion.
Score components:
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames.
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in motion.
Good value: Yes
BFI Picture
BFI Frequency Picture
BFI Maximum Frequency
What it is: Highest possible frequency of flickering pattern.
When it matters: Reduces eye-tracking blur in motion.
Good value: Matches the native refresh rate.
Noticeable difference: 20 Hz
BFI Minimum Frequency
What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern.
When it matters: Reduces eye-tracking blur in motion.
Good value: 60Hz
Noticeable difference: 20Hz
- Refresh Rate
What it is: How frequently the monitor can refresh and show new frames, and whether it can vary its refresh rate in real-time using technologies like G-SYNC and FreeSync.
When it matters: Mostly for gaming, but does provide a little better motion during normal use.
Native
What it is: The native refresh rate the monitor supports out of the box, without applying any factory overclock.
When it matters: Gaming and other usages where high frame rate content is consumed.
Max Refresh Rate
What it is: The maximum supported frequency at which the monitor is capable of displaying images every second. This includes the factory overclock that comes built-in with many gaming monitors.
When it matters: General usage, but better results are most important for gaming.
Good value: >100Hz
Noticeable difference: 15Hz
Variable Refresh Rate
What it is: Feature that allows the monitor to synchronize its refresh rate with the input device's output and reduces stuttering and screen tearing.
When it matters: Almost every usage, but is most noticeable in gaming where constant fluctuation in framerate causes distracting artifacts.
G-SYNC Compatible
What it is: We test for G-SYNC compatibility with an NVIDIA GTX1060. We check for any excess blur, screen blanking, or excess tearing, and confirm the variable refresh rate range.
When it matters: If you have an NVIDIA graphics card.
Good value: Yes
VRR Maximum
What it is: The maximum frequency covered by the Variable Refresh Rate feature of the monitor.
When it matters: Any time the VRR feature is enabled.
Good value: Matches Refresh rate
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
VRR Minimum
What it is: The lowest frequency covered by the monitor's Variable Refresh Rate feature.
When it matters: When using the VRR feature of the monitor at lower frame rates.
Good value: 30Hz
VRR Supported Connectors
- Inputs
Score components:
- Input Lag
What it is: Delay between input and on-screen reaction.
When it matters: General use of the mouse and gaming.
Native Resolution
What it is: Lowest input lag possible at the center of the screen, when the monitor is displaying its native resolution at its native refresh rate.
When it matters: General use and while playing video games.
Good value: < 15 ms
Noticeable difference: 5 ms
Native Resolution @ 60Hz
What it is: Lowest input lag possible at the center of the screen, when the monitor is displaying its native resolution at a refresh rate of 60Hz.
When it matters: General usage as well as gaming.
Good value: < 15 ms
Noticeable difference: 5 ms
Variable Refresh Rate
What it is: Lowest input lag possible at the center of the screen, when the monitor is using its Variable Refresh Rate feature at its native resolution.
When it matters: General usage as well as gaming.
Good value: < 15 ms
Noticeable difference: 5 ms
Variable Refresh Rate @ 60Hz
What it is: Lowest input lag possible at the center of the screen, when the monitor is using its Variable Refresh Rate feature at 60Hz.
When it matters: General usage as well as gaming.
Good value: < 15 ms
Noticeable difference: 5 ms
10 Bit HDR
What it is: Lowest input lag possible at the center of the screen, when the monitor is displaying an HDR signal at its native resolution and highest refresh rate that supports 10 bit.
When it matters: General usage as well as gaming.
Good value: < 15 ms
Noticeable difference: 5 ms
Black Frame Insertion (BFI)
What it is: Lowest input lag possible at the center of the screen, when BFI is enabled and the monitor is displaying a signal at the highest supported BFI refresh rate.
When it matters: General use as well as gaming.
Good value: < 15 ms
Noticeable difference: 5 ms
- Resolution And Size
What it is: The number of pixels the monitor can display, and the surface area of its screen.
When it matters: All usages, but especially for office and media editing.
Score components:
Native Resolution
Aspect Ratio
Megapixels
Pixel Density
What it is: How many pixels per inch there are on a display. Is a combination of both the megapixel count and screen size.
When it matters: Looking at content that requires fine detail, such as text.
Good value: > 100
Noticeable difference: 25
Screen Diagonal
Screen Area
- Inputs
Inputs 1
Inputs 2
- Total Inputs
DisplayPort
Mini DisplayPort
HDMI
DVI
VGA
DisplayPort Out
USB
USB C
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm
Microphone In 3.5mm
Digital Optical Audio Out
Analog Audio Out RCA
Power Supply
- Features
- Additional Features
What it is: Additional features found on the monitor.
RGB Illumination
What it is: Lighting effects that can display a multitude of colors.
When it matters: When you want to give your monitor a cool or unique look. Can also be used for bias lighting.
Speakers
What it is: Whether or not the monitor features standalone speakers.
When it matters: When using your computer without headphones or a dedicated pair of speakers.
HDR10
Multiple Input Display
What it is: Whether or not the monitor has a PiP (Picture In Picture) or PBP (Picture by Picture) function.
When it matters: When multitasking on the monitor with multiple sources (eg. using a monitor with two PCs).
- On-Screen Display (OSD)
OSD Picture
- Controls
Controls Picture
- In The Box
In The Box Picture

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