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When you say "4k @ 60Hz + HDR" in Input Lag tests, does that mean it's using 4:4:4? I know that...

When you say "4k @ 60Hz + HDR" in Input Lag tests, does that mean it's using 4:4:4? I know that HDMI 2.0 doesn't support that, but perhaps some TVs accept it as unsupported resolution. Those of us who want to use a 4k TV as PC monitor might interpret that as supporting 4k @ 60Hz + HDR + 4:4:4, and buy an expensive TV only to end up disappointed because they are stuck with 8-Bit colors, even though they have high end graphics cards. A 4k TV can replace 4x 1080p monitors, and with a product like HDHomeRun Prime, one can watch cable TV (including HBO) on a window, while working on an app next to it. If it matters, the TV I am interested in is the latest Samsung QLED Q9FN. I have an Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti, which supports HDMI 2.0 / DisplayPort 1.2. I don't really care about 60 Hz, I could live with 30 Hz, as long as I get 10-Bit colors with 4:4:4 subsampling. I hope that you add a new entry: "Maximum or Supported refresh rates for 4K + HDR + 4:4:4". Groups that would be interested on this are photographers and video editors who want the best color accuracy without any compression or subsampling. Thank you.
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    All 4k @ 60 Hz input lag tests are done with 4:2:0, and all 1080p @ 60 Hz tests are done with 4:2:2, except when the test explicitly mentions that it's done in 4:4:4. Similarly, all HDR tests are done with 10 bit color except where explicitly mentioned. I've now added this information to the (?) tooltips of each test, which should help clear up the ambiguity.

    Our (4k @ 60 Hz + HDR) test is done at 4k @ 60 Hz @ 4:2:0 @ 10 bit + HDR, but we also have a (4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + 8 bit HDR) that is meant for HDR PC use. Unfortunately 4k @ 60 Hz @ 4:4:4 @ 10 bit is beyond the bandwidth of HDMI 2.0, so no current TV will accept such a signal; 4k @ 50 Hz @ 4:4:4 @ 10 bit is technically possible over HDMI 2.0 (according to Wikipedia), but we currently have no equipment that can send this. Luckily 4k @ 30 Hz @ 4:4:4 @ 10 bit (or 12 bit) has been supported on every HDR TV a full-bandwidth port we've ever tried, so you can consider that a safe bet. Because of this you can consider our HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwidth test an equivalent test for what HDR signals you can send. Also I just added "Maximum refresh rate for 4k @ 4:4:4 @ 10 bit + HDR" to our internal Test Bench Suggestions list, we'll consider it during the next test bench update.

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