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    Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Borders
    3. Thickness
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. Gray Uniformity
    5. Viewing Angle
    6. Black Uniformity
    7. Pre Calibration
    8. Post Calibration
    9. 480p Input
    10. 720p Input
    11. 1080p Input
    12. 4k Input
    13. Color Gamut
    14. Reflections
    15. 3D
    16. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Ads
    2. Remote
    3. Misc
  8. Conclusion
  9. Q&A
Reviewed on Sep 10, 2015

LG EC9300
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
7.8Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.2Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
7.9TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
8.1Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
7.8Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
6.0HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
5.3HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
6.8PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
This tv has been discontinued.
It was replaced by the LG EG9100

Type : OLED
Resolution : 1080p
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz

The LG 55EC9300 OLED TV provides excellent picture quality and overall performance. The blacks and response time are perfect, but the uniformity of the colors could be improved. There is temporary image retention, but this should not be a problem for most people.

Test Results
Design 9.5
Picture Quality 8.2
Motion 9.1
Inputs 6.2
Sound Quality 7.0
Smart Features 9.0
Pros
  • Perfect blacks
  • Perfect motion (although flicker free)
  • Great viewing angle (but with a yellow tint)
Cons
  • Not ideal in a bright room (purple reflections and doesn't get very bright)
  • Varying luminosity depending on the scene (ABL)
  • Poor dark colors uniformity
  • Prone to temporary image retention after displaying static images

Check Price

9.5

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 Design Picture
Curved : Yes

The LG EC9300 OLED TV has a curved screen. The borders are very small, and the stand is stable, with a small footprint.

Stand
LG EC9300 Stand Picture

Dimensions of the 55" stand: 12" x 8"

Borders
LG EC9300 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.35" (0.9 cm)

Thickness
LG EC9300 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 2.05" (5.2 cm)

8.2

Picture Quality

With its perfect blacks, the LG 55EC9300 provides really good picture quality. You will need to play with the settings a little bit though, because by default it crushes shadows a bit too much. The uniformity is very good, and the picture quality remains good even when viewed at an angle. It supports a wide color gamut but unfortunately does not get very bright.

It is also only a 1080p TV, but given the 55" size, that's only a big deal if you sit relatively close.

10 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Native Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
Inf : 1

Our luminance meter (Minolta LS-100) gave us a perfect 0.000 cd/m2 reading on a checkboard pattern, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio.

10 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
No
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
N/A

Of course, it doesn't have a backlight, so there is no local dimming. But for the sake of comparison, we ran our local dimming test. As expected, there is no blooming.

5.9 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
343 cd/m2
SDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
336 cd/m2
SDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
334 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
191 cd/m2
SDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
95 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
343 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
336 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
334 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 50% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
191 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
95 cd/m2

When HDR arrives, one of the elements that will distinguish the performance of TVs is how bright it can make the highlights of a picture. Like plasma TVs, OLEDs have an automatic brightness limiter (ABL). The less whites the TV needs to display, the brighter those whites will be. We measured the luminosity of a 2% white window at 342.7 cd/m2, which isn't particularly impressive. Due to the ABL, a white fullscreen is even less, at only a maximum luminosity of 94.6 cd/m2. See the Q&A section of our review for a full table of the luminosity of different window sizes.

8.8 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
LG EC9300 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
1.652 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.115 %

The 50% gray uniformity is better than all LED TVs. You can see a few bars of discoloration, but there is almost no DSE like you see on other TVs.

The darker the color, the worse the uniformity gets. It is also constantly changing. More details in the Q&A section of the review.

8.0 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
N/A
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
35 °
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
68 °
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
75 °

The viewing angle is great, better than every LCD TV. We measured a drop of half the luminosity at 82 °, which is excellent. However, there is a yellow tint at an angle, something that our current test doesn't factor in.

Update 01/06/2017: We have changed the methodology of testing. Since this is an old TV which we don't have anymore, we extrapolated the results from 2016 TVs.

10 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
LG EC9300 Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
0.327 %

The blacks are also perfectly uniform. Note that this is only for a pure black. The uniformity isn't perfect for solid colors (more on this later).

7.8 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
LG EC9300 Pre Calibration Picture LG EC9300 Pre Gamma Curve Picture LG EC9300 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
5.49
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.5308
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.28

9.7 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
LG EC9300 Post Calibration Picture LG EC9300 Post Gamma Curve Picture LG EC9300 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.57
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.3668
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.2

8.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 480p Picture

Standard TV content or DVDs looks good without any major image quality problems.

8.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 720p Picture

Upscaled cable and other 720p content looks good and is in line with other 1080p TVs.

10 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 1080p Picture

Blu-rays and other 1080p looks good without any image quality problems.

0 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned

7.6 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
Yes
LG EC9300 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
86.23 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
91.67 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
60.97 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
64.02 %

You can increase the color gamut by changing 'Color Gamut'.

9.0 Reflections
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What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 Reflections Picture LG EC9300 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
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What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
0.4 %
Screen Finish
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What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Glossy

The glossy finish is very aggressive. It is actually very good at cutting the ambient reflections, but gives everything a purple tint. The curve of the TV also zooms in on the reflections. If you have a window directly behind you (facing the TV), it is really bad.
The maximum brightness of the screen varies depending on the scene you are watching, due to the ABL. At a 50% window, the luminosity is lower than what you would get from an LED TV.

9.0 3D
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What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 3D Picture
3D
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What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
Yes
3D Type
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What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
Passive

Its passive 3D has no crosstalk issue, but it comes at the cost of half the vertical resolution. This is a bit more noticeable than on LED passive 3D TVs, due to the smaller pixel sizes (see pixel close up picture at the end of the review).

Pixels
9.1

Motion

The EC9300 deals with motion very well. It is able to interpolate 30Hz and 60Hz content. The response time is almost perfect, resulting in very clear images with no following trail. Movies from a blu-ray player play smoothly.

9.9 Motion Blur
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What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
LG EC9300 Motion Blur Picture LG EC9300 Response Time Chart
Response Time
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What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0.3 ms
Overshoot
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What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
1.7 ms

Motion is very interesting on the LG 55EC9300. The response time cannot be better. It is almost instant, so there is no motion blur trail at all. You can see that our moving logo is perfectly symmetrical, while there is a shadow to the left of the logo on nearly all LED TVs.

That does not mean it is blur free, though. See the Q&A for more details.

4.0 Image Flicker
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What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components:
LG EC9300 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
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What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
0 Hz
BFI
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What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
No
BFI Frequency
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What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
0 Hz
BFI In Game Mode
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What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
No

7.1 24p Playback
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What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
No
Judder-free 24p via 60i
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
No

It handles a direct 24 fps input without judder, which is good for movies outputted via a Blu-ray player. For 24p via 60i or 60p though, it couldn't consistently do the reverse 3:2 pulldown. Of course, if you enable 'TruMotion' it removes the judder, but at the cost of introducing the soap opera effect.

10 Motion Interpolation
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What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
LG EC9300 Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
LG EC9300 Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

6.2

Inputs

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Score components:

The input lag is quite good, and should not be an issue for most people. It is a 1080p TV and so doesn't support higher resolutions. It does have a wide range of inputs.

6.9 Input Lag
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What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
40.7 ms
1080p With Interpolation
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What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
105.9 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
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What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
106.0 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
40.7 ms
4k @ 60Hz
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.
When it matters: PC Monitor
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz + HDR
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz with HDR.
When it matters: HDR Video games.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + 8 bit HDR
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 with HDR enabled at 8 bit
When it matters: PC Monitor with an HDR capable graphic card
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A

Under game mode, the input lag is 47.5 ms. If you label the HDMI input to PC, you can further reduce it to 40.7 ms.
Update 07/25/2016 We've received a report that the input lag is now 29.6 ms after the firmware update 04.01.00. We don't have that TV anymore to confirm this unfortunately.

2.0 Supported Resolutions
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What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
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What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
No
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz
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What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
No

Chroma 4:4:4 is enabled if you set the HDMI input to PC.

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 4
USB : 3
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 0
Component In : 1 (incl. adapter)
Composite In : 1 (incl. adapter)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
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What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
No
Dolby Vision
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What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : No
ARC : Yes (HDMI 1)
USB 3 : No
HDCP 2.2 : No
CEC : Yes
MHL : Yes (HDMI 4)
Variable Analog Audio Out : No

7.0

Sound Quality

The LG 55EC9300 has better sound than the average TV. It doesn't get loud and doesn't have a lot of bass, but at least the distortion is almost nonexistent.

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

7.1 Frequency Response
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What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
LG EC9300 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.98 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
5.08 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.14 dB SPL
Max
Show Help
What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
88.7 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
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What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
100 Hz

Good frequency response at all levels and no pumping seems to be present either. However it doesn't produce a lot of bass.

6.9 Total Harmonic Distortion
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What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
LG EC9300 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.036
Distortion @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.013
Distortion @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.045

Very good distortion results at all levels, but the TV doesn't get loud.

9.0

Smart Features

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EC9300 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : WebOS

WebOS is a great smart TV platform and it is very easy to use. The remote can control the on-screen pointer, but it doesn't have a dedicated number pad.

0 Ads
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What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
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What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No
Opt-out
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What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No

Remote
LG EC9300 Remote Picture
Remote : Smart

Misc
Power Consumption : 61 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 121 W
Firmware : 04.45.35

Conclusion
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

7.8Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
Very good all-round TV. The OLED panel has great picture quality for movies and TV shows. Unfortunately it doesn't get very bright.
8.2Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
Great movie performance. Lots of details in the shadows and perfect blacks. Unfortunately there is some vignetting in dark scenes.
7.9TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
Excellent for watching TV shows in a living room. Great picture quality, even when viewed from the side and deals well with reflections. Unfortunately can't get very bright to compete with a light room.
8.1Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
Very good sports performance. Almost perfect motion handling for fast plays. Unfortunately for hockey the ABL changes the screen luminosity.
7.8Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
Very good video game performance. Input lag should not be an issue for most people. Excellent motion handling for fast paced games.
6.0HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
Disappointing HDR performance. Highlights cannot get very bright and average-good color gamut.
6.8PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Pretty good PC monitor. Great picture quality and displays crisp, clear text at 1080p. Unfortunately there is some temporary image retention.
Questions Found an error?

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Questions & Answers

22 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
25
Additional Review Notes

Pixel size

The size of one of the LG 55EC9300's individual pixels is small. And because it is a 1080p TV, you can see a screen door effect if you sit relatively close. This isn't as bad as the screen door effect on old 720p plasma TVs, but it could bother some people. This is also why all of the pictures in our review have slightly more moiré than usual.

To illustrate this, compare the following close-ups of the pixels on the EC9300 OLED vs the LF6300 LED (both displaying a white picture).

LG OLED EC9300

LG OLED ec9300 pixels

LG LED LF6300

LG LED lf6300 pixels

ABL (Automatic Brightness Limiter)

OLEDs have an ABL that behaves very similarly to plasma TVs. The more white it needs to display on the screen, the darker it will be. Here is a table for a few measurements we took at varying window size (a white square that covers a certain % of the whole screen).

Window sizeLuminosity
2%342.7 cd/m2
5%337.5 cd/m2
10%335.7 cd/m2
18%335.1 cd/m2
25%334.0 cd/m2
50%191.0 cd/m2
100%94.6 cd/m2

You can see that the luminosity stays constant up to about a 25% window, then it drops rapidly.

For most content, you can't really see that issue. For watching hockey though, it is quite noticeable because the whole screen gets darker. You can also see it when a bright commercial starts after a dark movie.

Also, it messes up the gamma curve, which makes calibrating more difficult.

It also explains why the brightness of the pictures in our review doesn't match other TVs that we reviewed.

Dark gray uniformity and image retention

While the 50% gray uniformity was good, the darker shades of gray had more problems. Not only that, but they were also changing over the course of a few hours/days. When we first turned on our set, it had very big spots and bands all over the screen (unfortunately, our camera setup wasn't ready to capture it). Fortunately, it cleared up after a few days. Here are a few pictures that were taken after a few days of usage.

10% gray #1

LG OLED ec9300 10p 1

10% gray #2

LG OLED ec9300 10p 3

20% gray #1

LG OLED ec9300 20p 1

20% gray #2

LG OLED ec9300 20p 2

The #2 pictures were taken a few hours after the #1. You can see something very interesting in the #2 pictures: image retention of our checkboard pattern. We only displayed the checkboard pattern for a few minutes before taking the picture, but it still produced a little bit of image retention. It went away after about 10 minutes of normal content.

You shouldn't really worry about image retention. We got a similar effect on a lot of plasma TVs that we tested in the past, and even a few LCD ones.

Motion Blur

The LG 55EC9300 has an almost instant pixel response time (we measured 0.3ms on average on it, see full measurements). This translates to absolutely no motion blur trail following moving objects, which is great. That doesn't mean you won't perceive motion blur, though.

There are two components of motion blur left:

  • Blur inside the footage itself. A lot of movies use a slow shutter speed to give the impression of something moving fast. The TV can't do anything about this.
  • The frame time. This is related to the frame rate of the video. The lower the frame rate, the more blur we perceive. This is why motion interpolation works at reducing the perceived blur (it increases the frame rate). But even without increasing the frame rate (if you don't like the soap opera effect), TVs can do something about this kind of blur. Something that the EC9300 can't do, because it uses the sample-and-hold display method, without black frame insertion (BFI) or pulse width modulation (PWM).

The EC9300 is flicker free (see our oscilloscope measurement here, at varying values of 'OLED Light').

This is similar to all 2015 Sony TVs by default:

Sony X930C default

Sony X930C default blur

Sony X930C default

Sony X930C default blur backlight

But the Sony TVs can make the screen flicker if you want, which clarifies the movement (at the cost of darker picture and visible flickering).

Sony X930C Clearness 5

Sony X930C  Clearness 5 blur

Sony X930C Clearness 5

Sony X930C  Clearness 5 backlight

Samsung does it by default, although via a PWM, and the effect is not as strong as what Sony TVs can do. So the variation depends on your backlight luminosity.

So while the EC9300 has perfect motion from a response time perspective, your perceived blur will depend on the frame rate of the video you are watching. And unfortunately, you cannot make the EC9300 flicker to clarify things further, the way you can with some LED sets.

10
Looking at the LG EC9300 1080p vs Samsung JS8500. Both 55". I can get both at the same price. Mainly watch movies or sports. We sit 9-10' from screen. Which would you advise I get?
At that distance, you likely not benefit a lot from the 4k resolution, so get the EC9300. The better overall picture quality (deeper blacks, less blur, wider viewing angle) is more worth it.
9
I am so excited rtings finally reviewed this TV. Although, it's rather hilarious since this model is about to be retired for the 55EG9100 (2015-2016 updated version). I work for an electronics store, and I always use rtings as a reference for my customers. Glad to see the OLED didn't disappoint. Do the UHD OLEDs next!
Hehe, yes we are late to the party for this TV. At least, it will serve as a good baseline for the future OLED TVs we will review (but there are a few holes in our coverage of LED TVs that we want to fill before doing more OLEDs).
Update: The review of the EG9100 is up, as well as the EF9500.
6
Please tell me you have reviews coming soon on the LG UF8500 and UF9500? I cannot wait much longer and I base my TV purchase on your ratings. Keep up the great work.
We'll be getting to those within the next month or so.
5
How are the shadows on this TV? I've heard that LG's OLEDs suffer a lot from black crushing.
By default yes, it had a lot of crushed shadows. But it was fixable via calibration. For example, increasing 'Brightness' to 55 helped for this issue.
5
As an avid hockey fan, just how 'not great' is this TV for watching hockey? I love the specs, and am leaning heavily towards purchasing either this TV or possibly the 55EG9100, but if hockey is unwatchable, it may steer me in a different direction. Thanks a lot!
We tested out some hockey clips on the EC9300 and the picture was very dim, a bit like the arena didn't have all the lights on. Not unwatchable, but far from ideal. For hockey, we do think LED is a better buy, but OLED is still better for most other things.
5
I just bought this TV because the ratings blew everything out of the water. I'm mainly going to use the TV to watch sports and with the 9.4 rating, I thought it would be something really special. I'm not sure if it's because of my cable provider or what but it really has not impressed me. My cable provider streams at 1080i (at&t uverse) and I'm not sure if that is the cause. I played with the image settings and just couldn't get a clear image or anywhere close to it. Watching football and PPV boxing all in HD, it has a blur, the color is not so good and the quality of the image is not too impressive. Is it defective? Is it my cable provider? Is it my image settings?
We couldn't spot any real problem with 1080i on our set. To make sure it has nothing to do with your settings, try to duplicate ours first. Although this TV doesn't show motion blur trails, it doesn't mean that blur cannot be perceived and since this TV doesn't flicker like some other TVs there is no settings to play with to alleviate the perceived blur. Try the TV with a 720p channel like ESPN and also a different source if you can (like a blu-ray player) and see if motion and colors are any better. Keep us posted.
5
What do you think is better for regular cable watching and video games, the Samsung JS8500 or the LG EG9100? And what do you think will be better a year from now?
The EG9100, for both. The overall picture quality is just better (deeper blacks, wider viewing angle, less blur on fast movement), and that's not going to change (although technically, OLED degrades over time, but it is a bit too early too tell if this is an issue or not).
4
Thank you for a very informative site. I am trying to choose between the 55" JS8500 and the EC9300, I can get them for the same price. We watch HD TV and sports, including hockey from cable provider, FIOS. Our viewing distance is 8-12 feet with a 30 degree or less viewing angle. My concern is with the lifespan of OLED. My previous TV, Samsung DLP lasted almost 10 years, will the OLED last several years or is the safer bet for many years of use the LED?
Technically, like plasma TVs, the picture quality of OLED TVs can degrade over time. But it is a bit too early too tell if this is an issue or not in a normal time frame.
3
In your pixel picture, only the white sub-pixel is illuminated. Is the screen door effect worse depending on the color?

It varies per color displayed. Here are a few more pictures for all pure primary and secondary colors (at 100% saturation):

White

White

Red

Red

Blue

Blue

Green

Green

Cyan

cyan

Magenta

Magenta

Yellow

yellow
3
Thank you so much for amazing website and all the work/research. I'm struggling to choose between the JU7500 and EC9300. As of today, for a 55" TV, they both cost exactly the same. Any worth in going for 4K vs 1080p? I'm not a big gamer, but I'll use it for gaming. Would the higher lag of the EC9300 be considerably noticeable?
For 4k, it depends. If you really want to be able to watch 4k media, then you'll need to get a 4k TV. If you don't really care, or won't be able to watch 4k media, then there's no point, and a 1080p TV will be best.
For lag, you probably won't notice a difference. It's usually only competitive gamers who really need an edge that will be able to notice lag in that range. For your needs, the EC9300 should be perfect.
2
This TV is rated a 2.0 for PC Monitor, I suppose, because it is only 1080p and not 4K. You said in another answer that you would not be reviewing the 4K cousin, the EF9500, anytime soon. However, given your experience, would you expect the EF9500 to be suitable as a PC monitor, given that the EC9300 is an all-around great TV otherwise? I don't know if the EF9500 can do 4k @ 60hz @ 4:4:4.
As a matter of fact, we will be reviewing the EF9500 in the coming month. The 'PC Monitor' score of the EC9300 is affected by the fact that the TV doesn't support much of the listed features including 4k. The score isn't a representation of how it performs in a specific mode. If you use the TV as a PC monitor and stick to 1080p@60Hz@4:4:4 then it works great as a PC monitor. We will make sure to test 4k@60Hz@4:4:4 on the EF9500 in our upcoming review.
Update: The review of the EF9500 is up.
1
Debating whether to get this or the X810C. Is the better picture quality of OLED worth an extra $600?
It depends. If you're not too concerned about the extra price, then it's worth it. The picture quality is a step up right across the board. If $600 extra is difficult to justify in your budget, then stick with the X810C, since it does still have good picture.
1
Can you turn off the ABL or reduce it in some way?
No, unfortunately. This is just how OLED TV works.
1
Your test procedure is flawed. You move the camera along with the subject on the TV. This builds in the inherent blur that you are seeing with the OLED TVs. In real world use your eyes are in a fixed position. There is no blur caused by your eyes moving.
Instead, the only blur that appears is due to the pixel latency that all LCD based TVs inherently have. In addition, the sample and hold method that Sony uses by default will give the appearance of blurring or less defined outlines like you correctly note.
However, the OLED TVs do not have inherent pixel latency. They are instant on, instant off. This instant transition time means that even with the sample and hold method they will never show any more blur than what is recorded in the video.
Your test procedure should not move the camera along with the subject. That inherently builds in motion blur that is not realistic for how we watch TV. It masks the motion blur that the Sony TVs have by default and makes it look like all TVs have that when they actually don’t.
Your test procedures and conclusions for motion blur have misled people into thinking that the Sony TVs excel at motion handling when that is not the case. When you enable the BFI in the Sony TVs you drastically reduce the brightness to unacceptable levels and can introduce flicker issues. With most other TVs they use PWM to reduce the inherent motion blur effects by default and they can still achieve close to their maximum brightness in this manner.
All of the Sample and Hold Sony TVs should be rated much lower because there simply is no way to adequately fix the “sample and hold” issues with those TVs without adversely causing other issues. The OLED TVs do not have this issue because they have instant on and instant off pixels. Sample and Hold works perfectly for the OLED TVs without the need for further adjustments.
This is on purpose. This is exactly why we measure both the response time, and take the tracking shot. That way, we cover both the case where your eye stays static, and the case where you follow a moving object.
The response time (what we use to score TVs) is a representation of the blur when your eye stays static. OLEDs excel at this, hence our great motion blur score for them.
We still take the tracking shot to represent the other component of blur: frame persistence (which includes frame rate). This component, while it greatly depends on the framerate of the content, is still affected by the TV. This is useful for games especially, because we often follow moving objects with our eyes. Even for sports it is useful, for example when you follow the ball with your eyes, but the camera stays static (tennis especially). This isn't part of the motion blur score though.
0
When you calibrate the color gamut, do you calibrate at (75% saturation, 100% stimulus) or (100% saturation, 75% stimulus), or something different?
100% saturation, 75% stimulus.
0
Will you be reviewing the LG 55EF9500 anytime soon? I see one on sale for $2,500 and appreciate your amazing site's input.
It's not in our current lineup of upcoming reviews. If we do review it, it won't be for a while.
Update: The review of the EF9500 is up.
0
I love this site and I just noticed LG released another Nano Dot TV here in America in the UF8600. First off, what are your thoughts on this set? It looks very similar to their flagship 9500 series. Also, is there any chance you would be reviewing this TV? I literally use this site to determine all TV purchases. Keep up the great work!!
We currently don't have plans to review the UF8600 but we will review the UF8500 in a month or so. It probably has an IPS panel, so it will rate about the same as the other LG TVs we reviewed. The extended color gamut is nice though.
0
Did you mean to say at 9'-10' you'll likely **not** benefit a lot from the 4K resolution? (Oct 07 question)
Yes, thanks for catching that. We've corrected the error.
0
I've read that OLED has image retention issues similar to Plasma, is this true? How about the potential for true burn in? This would be a major issue for gamers.
It's true. As with plasma TVs, we have seen image retention on our EC9300 but it went away after watching a few minutes of different contents. We wouldn't worry about it too much unless you always have the same static content on screen.
0
Is this TV able to pass through Dolby 5.1 or DTS 5.1 via optical connection from HDMI sources? Thank you.
Yes.
0
I was so disappointed with the motion blur. Why does it use ABL? Why not use flickering?
The ABL use isn't related to the motion blur. Instead, it's probably to limit the current passing through the OLED sheet. If they wanted, they could probably make the OLED flickers. But the main problem with this is the reduced luminosity, which OLED is already struggling with on full screen.
We are not taking any more questions for this product because we no longer have it in our lab.