Reviewed on Nov 11, 2015

LG EF9500
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
8.5Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
9.3Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
8.1TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
8.2Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
8.4Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
7.8HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
8.6HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
7.8PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Type : OLED
Resolution : 4k
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz

The LG OLED EF9500 4k TV has a very sleek design and excellent overall picture quality, especially in a dark room. Motion handling is excellent, and smart features work very well. It isn't perfect, though. Notably, the input lag is higher than average.

Test Results
Design 9.0
Picture Quality 8.6
Motion 9.2
Inputs 6.5
Sound Quality 7.3
Smart Features 9.0
Pros
  • Perfect blacks
  • Perfect flicker-free motion
  • Great color accuracy at an angle
Cons
  • Prone to temporary image retention after displaying static images
  • Constantly changing luminosity based on the scene (ABL)
  • High input lag
  • Poor color uniformity in the shadows

Check Price

55" 55EF9500 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
65" 65EF9500 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
9.0

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 Design Picture
Curved : No

The EF9500 has a flat screen (the only one in LG's OLED lineup). The back of the TV is a white cream color. The borders around the screen are really thin.

Stand
LG EF9500 Stand Picture

Dimension of the 55" TV stand: 28.5" x 8.5"

Borders
LG EF9500 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.35" (0.9 cm)

Thickness
LG EF9500 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 1.46" (3.7 cm)

8.6

Picture Quality

With its perfect blacks, the picture quality for movies is really great. The color uniformity could be better, especially with darker shades, but the issues aren't really noticeable with normal content. The TV can be enjoyed from anywhere in the room, and 3D is a nice bonus.

10 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Black
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What it is: How much light pure black emits.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 0.040 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 0.010 cd/m2
:
0 cd/m2
White
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What it is: White brightness of our calibration.
When it matters: It doesn't matter much. This is mainly to standardize our black and contrast ratio measurements.
Good value: Close to our 100 cd/m2 target.
Noticeable difference: 20 cd/m2
:
102 cd/m2
Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
Inf : 1

The blacks are really black on this TV, because the pixels self-emit the TV's light.

10 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
No
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
N/A

For reference, we took a video of our local dimming test.

6.1 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
365 cd/m2
SDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
367 cd/m2
SDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
366 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
230 cd/m2
SDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
131 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
365 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
367 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
366 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 50% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
230 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
131 cd/m2

The SDR peak brightness is bellow average and is similar to the HDR peak brightness, and the same comment about the 'ABL' apply. The overall peak brightness is a bit less than what you can achieve while in HDR mode, though.

6.2 HDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; HDR content.
HDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
402 cd/m2
HDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2
HDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
399 cd/m2
HDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
226 cd/m2
HDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
135 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
402 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
399 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 50% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
226 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
135 cd/m2

Like other OLED TVs, it has ABL, which means the maximum luminosity of the screen varies depending on the content of the image. You can see a table of our full measurements in the Q&A section.

8.1 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
LG EF9500 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
2.046 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.141 %
5% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 5% gray.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 1.15%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
1.335 %
5% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 0.116%
:
0.117 %

In terms of uniformity, this is the worst OLED TV we've seen so far. Even the edges are slightly darker than the rest of the screen. This varies by unit though, so don't look at this number meaning there will be a definite problem, but more as a general indication.

8.0 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
N/A
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
35 °
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
68 °
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
75 °

It can maintain its picture quality at an angle without major problems (the colors change slightly, though).

Update 01/06/2017: We have changed the methodology of testing. Since this is an old TV which we don't have anymore, we extrapolated the results from 2016 TVs.

10 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
LG EF9500 Black Uniformity Picture
Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
0.329 %

On a purely black screen, the uniformity is perfect. However, dark grays are not as good (more on this later).

9.5 Gradient
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What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Color Depth
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What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
10 Bit

9.0 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
LG EF9500 Pre Calibration Picture LG EF9500 Pre Gamma Curve Picture LG EF9500 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.97
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.5044
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.09

9.7 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
LG EF9500 Post Calibration Picture LG EF9500 Post Gamma Curve Picture LG EF9500 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.33
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.7689
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.20

8.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 480p Picture

Lower quality content like DVDs or SD channels are displayed without any problems. You might want to turn on 'Noise Reduction' though, to reduce a little bit the noise.

8.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 720p Picture

Cable TV and other 720p content looks good on the LG EF9500.

9.0 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 1080p Picture

Blu-rays looks good on this TV.

10 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 4k Picture

Native 4k content looks good and sharp on the LG EF9500.

7.4 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
Yes
LG EF9500 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
84.71 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
85.70 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
61.26 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
64.05 %

9.0 Reflections
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What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 Reflections Picture LG EF9500 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
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What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
0.4 %
Screen Finish
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What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Glossy

The screen finish has a purple tint, which is a little bit annoying, but not a deal breaker. The screen is glossy, though, so if you have a window directly opposite the TV, your eye will be distracted.
The varying luminosity is not as bad on this OLED as the others we reviewed. With half the screen displaying white, a luminosity of 219.9 cd/m2 is not bad. See the Q&A for a table of measurements at different window sizes.

10 3D
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What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 3D Picture
3D
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What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
Yes
3D Type
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What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
Passive

The passive 3D on this TV is great. You don't see the alternating lines the way you do on the 1080p OLED TVs.

Pixels
9.2

Motion

The motion performance on the EF9500 is excellent. There is absolutely no motion blur trail following fast objects, and the TV can interpolate 30fps and 60fps content. Most movie sources play without judder.

9.9 Motion Blur
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What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
LG EF9500 Motion Blur Picture LG EF9500 Response Time Chart
Response Time
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What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0.3 ms
Overshoot
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What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
1.3 ms

Interestingly, the transitions look more like the EC9300 than the EG9100. It is not noticeable to the naked eye, though. Unfortunately (or fortunately for some), the screen doesn't flicker.

4.0 Image Flicker
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What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
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What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
N/A
BFI
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What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
No
BFI Frequency
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What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
N/A
BFI In Game Mode
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What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
No

8.6 24p Playback
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What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
No
Judder-free 24p via 60i
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
Yes

Update 1/25/2016: We installed new firmware (04.20.75) and no longer have judder via 24p or 24p via 60i, which means this TV is now equal to the LG EG9600 for judder-free playback. You can find the firmware and installation instructions here.

10 Motion Interpolation
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What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
LG EF9500 Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
LG EF9500 Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

6.5

Inputs

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Score components:

The TV supports a wide range of resolutions and supports chroma for sharp text. There is a slightly higher input lag time than average. There is a wide range of inputs to plug devices in.

6.2 Input Lag
Show Help
What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
53.5 ms
1080p With Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
120.1 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
54.5 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
56.7 ms
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
51.9 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.
When it matters: PC Monitor
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
63.3 ms

The good news is you don't need to be in any special mode to get lower input lag. You simply need to make sure 'TruMotion' is disabled.

8.0 Supported Resolutions
Show Help
What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Show Help
What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
No
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
Yes

As with all LG TVs, it doesn't support a 120 fps signal. To get chroma 4:4:4, you need to set the input icon to PC. For 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4, you also need to turn on UHD Color.

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 3
USB : 3
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 0
Component In : 1 (incl. adapter)
Composite In : 1 (incl. adapter)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Show Help
What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
Yes
Dolby Vision
Show Help
What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : Yes
ARC : Yes (HDMI 2)
USB 3 : Yes (1)
HDCP 2.2 : Yes
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : No

7.3

Sound Quality

The sound is pretty good, for a TV. The sound is pretty accurate, has good bass, and gets relatively loud. There also isn't much distortion.

7.7 Frequency Response
Show Help
What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
LG EF9500 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 75
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 75 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
3.56 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 85
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
3.35 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.83 dB SPL
Max
Show Help
What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
91.3 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
Show Help
What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
84 Hz

Good bass extension and loudness. The frequency response is good too, and no pumping is present.

6.6 Total Harmonic Distortion
Show Help
What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
LG EF9500 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 75
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 75 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.013
Distortion @ 85
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.034
Distortion @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.050

Very good distortion results all-around.

9.0

Smart Features

Show Help
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EF9500 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : WebOS

LG's WebOS smart platform is great and very user-friendly. You can control the onscreen cursor with the remote by pointing at the screen. See our full review of WebOS here.

0 Ads
Show Help
What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
Show Help
What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No
Opt-out
Show Help
What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No

Ads can be found on the main page of the LG content store.

Remote
LG EF9500 Remote Picture
Remote : Smart

Misc
Power Consumption : 101 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 149 W
Firmware : 03.01.15

Conclusion Amazon CHECK PRICE Right

8.5Mixed Usage
Show Help
What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
Great all-round TV. Excellent picture quality and motion handling for a range of different content. Unfortunately the screen can't get very bright and fluctuates depending on the content.
9.3Movies
Show Help
What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
Great movie performance. OLED panel provides perfect blacks and great dark scene performance. Picture quality is excellent.
8.1TV Shows
Show Help
What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
Great for watching TV is an an open room. Excellent picture quality can be enjoyed from all angles. Deals very well with reflections. Unfortunately can't get very bright to overcome ambient light.
8.2Sports
Show Help
What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
Excellent sports performance. Almost perfect motion handling to minimize blur. Uniformity of screen could be better.
8.4Video Games
Show Help
What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
Very good video game performance. Excellent picture quality, and motion handling. Unfortunately the input lag is above average for fast-paced games.
7.8HDR Movies
Show Help
What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
HDR looks great. Supports a wide color gamut and brighter highlights. Unfortunately the whole screen can't get bright.
8.6HDR Gaming
Show Help
What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
7.8PC Monitor
Show Help
What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Works well as a PC monitor. Supports a wide range of resolutions at up to 60Hz. Unfortunately there is some temporary image retention after static images.
Questions Found an error?

Let us know what is wrong in this question or in the answer.

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Questions & Answers

30 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
55
Will the 24p judder issue be fixed by firmware updates, or is that something that will be there forever?
There's a good chance that it will be fixed with an update - it's currently the only OLED model with this problem - but only time will tell.
Update: The judder issue has been fixed with a firmware update. Check the judder section of our review for an explanation of how to install it.
39
Additional Review Notes

Screen Door Effect

One advantage of a 4k OLED vs a 1080p one is the screen door effect is less of an issue, which was quite noticeable on a 1080p OLED. This results in less apparent aliasing for video games, and a more pleasant, softer picture. Here is a closeup of the pixels on the EF9500, vs the EG9100.

LG OLED EF9500

LG OLED ef9500 pixels

LG OLED EG9100

LG OLED eg9100 pixels

ABL (Automatic Brightness Limiter)

The EF9500 also has ABL, but to a lesser degree than the EG9100. Here are measurements of pure white, with 'OLED LIGHT' set to the max. Varying sizes of the screen are covered by the white window.

Window sizeLuminosity (EF9500)Luminosity (EG9100)
2%346.2 cd/m2336.4 cd/m2
5%347.3 cd/m2336.0 cd/m2
10%345.6 cd/m2331.2 cd/m2
18%346.8 cd/m2330.8 cd/m2
25%349.1 cd/m2330.0 cd/m2
50%219.9 cd/m2172.1 cd/m2
100%126.7 cd/m280.6 cd/m2

You can see that the luminosity stays constant up to about a 25% window and then drops rapidly, but less so on the EF9500 than on the EG9100.

On the EF9500, this problem was barely noticeable, unless we were actively looking for it.

Dark gray uniformity

As with other OLED TVs, the uniformity of dark colors is worse than that of brighter colors. It is also constantly changing, not only due to image retention, but also just by itself. In the pictures below, you can see the edges are darker. You can also see a few horizontal lines.

10% gray

LG OLED ef9500 20p

20% gray

LG OLED ef9500 20p
23
I contacted LG to ask if they've fixed the judder issue and they swear the TV doesn't have it. Have you reached out to them, and have there been any updates since Nov. 26?
We just retested our TV and there is still judder, and our firmware is up-to-date.
Update: We have downloaded and installed a firmware update that has fixed the judder issue. A link to the fix is included in the judder section of the review.
11
I purchased an LG 65EF9500 smart TV on Nov 23, 2015. It was installed Dec 9, 2015. The TV is beautiful as was working very well until Feb 25, 2016 (effectively working for 3 months). On this date a thin line appeared and ran across the bottom 3rd of the TV and is seen on every medium (cable, Apple TV, Chromecast). The $5,000 TV is defective and after verification from an LG approved TV repair person that the unit is in fact defective, LG refuses to replace the 3 month old $5,000 TV, telling me they will only replace the panel in a repair. Initially I was told by their representative Daniel that their process for replacement was to have a 2nd repair person come to my home and inspect the unit again. The appointment was emailed to me followed by a phone call from Daniel confirming the next day appointment. When I contacted the repair shop they informed me that the correspondence they received from LG was to order a panel for repair. I called LG for the third time only to be told by Robert (Rep#10243) that they use to replace the TV but now only repair it with a panel. As a consumer who paid $5,000 for an LG TV that only worked for 3 months, this is unacceptable. I will never consider an LG product again and I will tell my horrible experience and LGs tone deafness to their customers to everyone who will listen. Is this model so defective that they created a repair vs a replacement? Has anyone else experienced similar poor customer service from LG? RG-
Your frustration is understandable, but in this case, it looks like LG handled the case properly. They will repair your TV. Whether it is a repair vs a replacement doesn't really matter because you will have a functional TV at the end. There are far worse customer service scenarios than this one.
9
Noticed your review says firmware version 03.01.15. Not sure when you reviewed but 04.20.07 Is available through update on the tv and manual download of 04.20.08 is available on lg's website. Maybe that would help with the 24p judder ?
The TV says it's current (maybe they are doing a partial roll out, like Vizio). We'll try the manual download and report the results.
Update: We manually updated the firmware to 04.20.08, but unfortunately it didn't fix the issue (see result here).
Update: We have updated our firmware again and the issue has been resolved. Please see the judder section of the review for the link to the firmware and the installation instructions.
9
I understand this TV has RGBA subpixels instead of RGB, and I fear that the RGBA clusters don't line up exactly with the input pixels, making the display unable to fully represent the color detail in a 4:4:4 4k image. Could you take a close-up picture when displaying an image like this one with no scaling?

This isn't an issue like the 'fake' 4k LG UF6800 that has WRGB. The left picture is the one you requested on the EF9500, the right one is our chroma test.

8
Would it be possible for you to post shots of 2% and 5% gray slides on the EF9500 to go with the 10% and 20% gray slides you already have up? Most of the vignetting/"black flame" issues that users are experiencing with these panels are primarily visible at 5% or lower grayscale.

Sure, there you go (we had to change the shutter time on our camera from our normal 1/15s to 1/2s, to make them more obvious).

2% gray EF9500

LG OLED ef9500 2p

5% gray EF9500

LG OLED ef9500 5p
8
Is there a way to turn off the ABL? I think it's such a horrible feature. If not, is there a way to limit it? I only see it being an issue if I watch hockey, and right now my Flyers stink, so I am not watching much.
Unfortunately, no, there's no way to disable or limit it.
7
Firmware 04.20.75 is available. You need to use a USB Flash Drive to update. The LG USA servers for updating directly by TV have not been working for months, and 04.20.60 should have fixed the problems you mentioned, according to AVSForum.
You can find the firmware and installation instructions here.
Thanks for letting us know! We tried the new firmware and it did indeed correct the judder issue. We'll update our review accordingly, and mention the steps necessary for installing the update.
6
Hi, can this TV do 3D in full 4K resolution or does it split it to 2K? Can this TV convert 2D content to 3D? Have you experienced any dead/bad pixels or screen burn-in with this TV?
4k 3D content will loss half its vertical resolution (down to 1080), but you do also get that same 1080 vertical resolution for 1080p content, which is great, and means no loss of resolution.
It can convert 2D to 3D, and we haven't had any issues with burn-in or dead pixels.
5
Hello dear Rtings friends. I got to say I love your reviews and have been relying on those for quite some time. I've been eyeing the OLED 55 EF9500 for quite a while, but decided to wait for the 2016 lineup instead mostly due to the new HDR formats being a part of all LG 2016 models. So my question is, do you guys have any idea when will you be reviewing the upcoming B6 and C6 models? Thanks.
We will buy them as soon as they get released and our reviews will follow shortly after. Something between 1 to 3 months from now.
5
Bought a 55EF9500. After calibration i noticed that some scenes were so dark that images were hard to see & some were extremely bright. Tried everything & even LG sent out a tech to check my set, the tech said everything was fine. I returned the set & bought a Sony x850c. Is the ABL you talked about have anything to do with this problem.
Probably not. We have noticed this behavior on all LG OLED TVs where depending on content, some dark scenes were too dark and crushes the blacks. Adjusting 'Gamma' to 1.9 fix that problem and give the same look as other LED TVs set to gamma 2.2 (of course, with the deeper blacks of OLED TVs).
5
When will you have test results for the new 2016 OLEDs?
The LG E6P will be reviewed within the next few weeks.
4
I have seen a bunch of requests asking if you have re-tested the judder after new firmware updates, but I'm more curious as to what series you have and if the newer series' could have fixed the issue. I work in an electronics store and on display we have a 507 series, while at home I have a 511 series and while in store I see judder, at home playing the same movies I have been judder free. In both instances I have adjusted the de-blur and de-judder settings.
Our serial number begins with '510'. In the past, we have seen different series act differently, so it may be the case here too. But just to be clear, we never use motion interpolation settings such as De-Blur and De-Judder for our 24p test. This is to avoid the soap opera effect. That said, we did further testing today on the EF9500 and found out that if you set TruMotion to 'User' and leave De-Judder and De-Blur to 0, motion interpolation (and the soap opera effect) is none existent and 24p becomes judder-free. We still think there is a bug in the firmware since this TV would be expected to be judder-free without the aid of TruMotion. For that reason, we won't change our 24p test result to be fair with our methodology (and other TVs) but if you are an owner of the EF9500, feel free to use the aforementioned settings for judder-free 24p.
Update: A firmware update solved the judder issue for us. The judder section of the review now has a link to the firmware and instructions for how to install it.
4
Thank you so much for your detailed answers! I was told by a BB salesman that LG OLEDs won't be HDR-capable. How important is that to have now or in the future, and does it matter for OLED? Does it hinder anything not having HDR?
The EF9500 has at least partial HDR support, so the salesman is not quite right. The EF9500 has HDMI 2.0a, so it can read HDR files over HDMI. It also has the ability to display a wider range of colors than average, which is one of the major parts of HDR. It doesn't have the ability to display bright highlights, but how important this is remains to be seen.
At present, we consider the benefits you get from OLED to outweigh the potential downside of not being able to brighten highlights, so if you're interested in this TV, go for it.
3
You mention the screen door effect. How is this any different than an LCD at the same resolution? (1080p based on the 1080p OLED) Is it because the spacing between individual LEDs/Pixels in the OLED is further apart than normal? Or just the sub pixel structure causing the illusion of it being so? Based on your pictures, the pixels/subpixels do seem to look farther apart than LCD pixels/subpixels.
It is more noticeable than on LCD TVs. The distance between the pixels is the same, but the size of the pixels isn't. The pixels are smaller on OLED TVs, leaving more empty space between them.
3
Excellent info here! Could you offer some additional insights and check my research please? I fear my requirements translate to an expensive TV. Brightly lit living room with large windows on the adjacent wall, and I need a large viewing angle of 40 degrees or so. Movies and sports are important. Don't need the best gamer. The 9500 appears to meet these requirements better than any other TV in 65" category. Do you think 2016 will offer anything better/cheaper? I'm also confused about image retention in OLED panels. Is it permanent or not?
There is compromise to be made on picture quality and viewing angle. Most of the TVs that have the best picture quality don't have a wide viewing angle. TVs that have a wide viewing angle (the very few that have more than 40 °) have bad picture quality. The exception to this rule is OLED TVs. They have the best picture quality and viewing angle. The downside is that they are mainly available in 55" size and the 65" size is still very expensive. For no compromise, any of the LG OLED 65" (EF9500 or EG9600) are the best. If you go that way, don't worry too much about image retention. Any regular viewing won't be a problem. For a LED, the Samsung LED JS9500 is great but if you find it too expensive, the JU7100 offer a similar picture quality and is a good chunk cheaper. We don't expect too much difference for next year TV performance but OLED TVs might become a little cheaper.
3
Great work on everything your team does and thank you for identifying all that's important for us!
I have a LG 65" EF9500 that I just purchased before the Superbowl. I'm very worried about the gray uniformity issue as I believe that my set has more than "normal." I know that you only test one panel but do you have any knowledge on the percentages that one could trade in their set for another and have better luck with this issue?
Also, it doesn't look like you test the network adapter in these panels. First, do you have any information on my set and the wireless signal strength? The wired strength? I'm seeing 20% of my homes total bandwidth with 5GHz, 15% with 2.4GHz and a measly 30% with direct ethernet. The distance from panel to router is negligible as they are 30' from each other sitting in the same great room with no obstructions. When checking with the only thing I have, my phone w/speedtest app, I'm getting full strength on that device. It's still strong enough to stream 4K, luckily, but one has to wonder about this.
Going forward and with how many sets going towards streaming via "smart" software baked in and with streaming apps (Netflix, Prime, etc) offering 4K, it might be worth testing these sets' and their built-in network cards. If I missed this part of your tests, please excuse as there's a lot to absorb with your extensive reviews.
Thanks RTINGS!
If you send us a photo of the problem, we can give you an idea of your odds of getting a better panel by exchanging.
Unfortunately, because we don't currently test the network adapter, we don't have that information for you. But you're right that this is becoming more important for TVs, so we'll definitely think about doing so in the future.
2
What are your thoughts on using this TV as display for a Mac Pro? I can buy this TV for less than NEC's best 32" display. I do Photoshop, web design and audio engineering with ProTools for a living. Thanks, Jeff.
An OLED TV would work nicely as a PC monitor because of its wide viewing angle. The EF9500 also support chroma 4:4:4 on all resolutions so text and graphics will always look sharp. A little lower input lag would have been better (more responsive mouse cursor) but it shouldn't be a deal breaker. All in all, it's a good choice.
2
I was told that the OLED 65EF9500 65-Inch 4K Ultra HD Smart 2015 model TV manufactured in early to mid year 2015 experience judder and motion blur so significant that one would not want to watch sports programming. Further it was said that this condition did not occur on units manufactured late in 2015. Is that true? Please advise as I am awaiting your response before I move forward with purchasing a model made in the first half of 2015.
At the beginning, our set had some judder on 24p or 24p via 60i, but a firmware update fixed the issues. So if you buy this TV, just be sure to update to the latest firmware and it should be okay.
1
I have a very tight fit. Given that the inputs are on the side, will that cause the effective width of the TV to be more than the stated spec of 48.3 inches? Every millimeter counts.
The inputs are about 3.5" away from the edge of the screen, closer to the middle, so you should be fine.
1
Have you had a chance to retest the LG ES9500 OLED for judder? You mention that it does occur and it is probably an issue in the firmware. You say it doesn't happen in the LG 9600 OLED. I am considering buying the 9500 and wonder if I should wait until the newer model becomes available later in the year.
We have, and there has been no solution released via firmware. It's not impossible that there will be a fix eventually, but it seems less likely now.
Update: A firmware update did solve the issue. Please see the judder section of the review for instructions explaining how to install the new firmware.
1
The firmware you are using is old; it's now at version 04.20.60. Please see the following for more info and see if they fixed the problem: link.
The firmware we listed is just the firmware the TV had at the time of our testing. We have installed updates as they have come, and our problems still have not been fixed.
1
Can you post the sound settings you used to get the best sound possible?
We did not touch the sound settings before testing, and the correct EQ settings will depend on your room and layout. There will also be no change to the low end cutoff of the bass, no matter what settings you change.
1
I found the LG EF9500 OLED had a beautiful picture in store, though one set had both a diffuse vertical shadow on highlights and a line of bad pixels across 50% of the screen. I worry about image retention when watching aspect ratios other than 16:9, particularly old 4:3 movies, as well as static Time Warner Cable pause frames, guide and menus. I am still using a Panasonic plasma, and have never had trouble with burn in. Is OLED safe to buy in this case? Thanks.
Yes. We don't expect OLED TVs to be any worse than plasma or to take any additional special care. Like for any new TVs, just make sure there isn't any obvious issues in the first couple days or else just return it. We do recommend the OLED TVs for their excellent picture quality so if you are interested by one, don't hesitate to buy.
1
I have returned two 65" EF9500s. The first had perfect, even blacks, but had uneven bright pink and blue patches that did affect the bright video color. I exchanged it and checked the new TV at the store for bright color uniformity, and it looked very good.
The first movie I watched on it when I got it home was Star Wars: the Force Awakens and I immediately saw massive lines in the dark video - very distracting. So I ran a 10% dark gray test on it and it had startling amounts of banding. So I returned it.
I will check the next one at the store both for bright and dark colors before I leave the store with it. Best Buy said they have a three-time return policy. I guess that by three times I will be frustrated enough that I won't really care, but this is awfully silly. I just can't figure out how to get a good TV in this market, something that works the way it's supposed to. I am temporarily watching an old CCFL direct-lit 40" LG TV that produces an excellent, even, uniform picture, with good colors. This TV is 10 years old.
Are those color imperfections something that owners just have to live with if they want OLED? My old 60" plasma blows this thing out of the water as far as quality and build. I just want a high-quality TV that works right. These manufacturers are not making it easy. You would think for for $5,000 that you would pretty much have a shoe-in. It makes me wish they would bring plasma back and just charge more for it.
Unfortunately, those kinds of color uniformity issues are very common for OLED. It's nearly a certainty that any OLED unit will have them to some degree. Your choices are either to live with those problems or to get LED and live with the problems that technology has. A perfect TV does not exist yet.
1
Why does the score keep changing on this model? I just checked a few days ago it was an 8.9. Thanks.
The scores do change, as we are always trying to improve our scoring system. The weightings have been adjusted for all TVs to better reflect our experience using them. Our opinion of the TV has not changed.
1
Hey love y'alls site y'all do a really great job. I'm a gamer and I'd like to have the picture quality of a OLED TV but I'm wanting to try to future proof myself by getting a 4K wide color gamut TV but all the ones y'all have reviewed has a kinda high input lag (that's in my budget anyway XD) but I was wondering if y'all had any plans to test anymore OLED TVs this year or if you'd just recommend I get a LED TV I don't know if it helps but my budget is $2500 and if it's a really good TV I might be able to go to $3000 sorry if I over explained myself but thanks for your help
At the moment, there aren't really any TVs within your budget that meet those requirements. We plan to review the LG OLED C6 in the coming months, but this is also more expensive. There are advantages to an OLED, such as the almost perfect pixel response and excellent picture quality but for the moment, go with an LED TV. The Samsung KS8000 is a great pick, it has excellent picture quality with good motion blur and input lag. The biggest downside is that this picture quality rapidly degrades when viewed from the side, unlike an OLED TV.
0
So if you bought an expensive car that has serious issues or breaks down within three months, you are okay with repair? Screen to TV is like transmission to car, so you would happily have a repaired car. Please don't be such a hypocrite.
The frustration is understandable, but after replacing the panel the TV will perform as it should. The result is the same whether it is repaired or replaced.
0
I decided to finally step up to a 65 inch and give into 4k. Coming from a plasma I know I'm going to give up on inky blacks for brighter whites. After looking up your reviews I had the Samsung ks8000 as a primary option and the Samsung KS9000 (if given the right price) as a second option. But just recently I found the lg EG9600 in 65" (brand new) for a whopping $2500. Almost seems to go to be true but seeing that I saw the TV on Amazon, I don't think I will have issues pertaining to quality. I will be using my Xbox One S as my main hub for 4k HDR. I will be playing games, streaming mostly shows (Netflix, Amazon). I also have a lot of Windows in my living room but only keep a few open. My question is should I stick with the Samsung or take a second look at the OLED considering the price?
If you want HDR with the LG OLED EG9600, be warn that there is 2 versions of this TV, The UA and UB and only the UB version support HDR via HDMI. So if you want to use the Xbox One S as your main hub for 4k HDR, buy it only if you can be 100% sure that you will get the EG9600 version UB (it is written on the box). If not you will be better with the Samsung KS8000 or KS9000.