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Samsung F4500 Plasma TV Review

Reviewed Jul 14, 2013 By Cedric Demers

The Samsung F4500 is a great entry level plasma with beautiful blacks and shadows. If you are sitting close to the television though, its low resolution (720p) will bother you. Also, the panel reflects a lot of ambient light so this television is more suitable for a basement or watching the television at night.

7.7
Overall
  • Good overall picture quality, especially considering the price.
  • Average input lag.
  • Only 720p. If you sit close to the TV, you will notice a screen door effect.
  • A lot of reflections.
Samsung F4500
Overall
7.7
Dark Room
9.3
Bright Room
5.0
Video Games
7.6
43" PN43F4500 Reviewed
MSRP: $600 Out of stock Amazon
51" PN51F4500
MSRP: $850 Out of stock Amazon

Design

Borders
Samsung F4500 Borders

1.14" (2.9 cm)

Thickness
Samsung F4500 Thickness

2.05" (5.2 cm)

Dark Room

Samsung F4500 Dark scene
Black: 0.018 cd/m2
White: 92.2 cd/m2
Contrast: 5122 : 1

The F4500 performs really well in a dark environment where you can benefit from its deep blacks.

Viewing angle: 70 °

There is no problems with the viewing angle.

Samsung F4500 Uniformity

The screen uniformity is perfect.

Bright Room

Samsung F4500 Dark scene in a bright room
Reflection: 4.3 %

If you have a lot of windows, you won't be able to appreciate this TV during the day. It reflects too much light.

Samsung F4500 Bright scene in a bright room
Max white: 92.2 cd/m2

Even on a bright scene the reflections are a problem.

Video Games

There is very little motion blur on the F4500.

7.7
Samsung F4500 Input lag
Input lag: 50 ms

The input lag is average.

Software

Side inputs
Samsung F4500 Side inputs

2 HDMI
1 USB

Rear inputs
Samsung F4500 Rear inputs

1 Component In
1 Composite In
1 RF In
1 Digital Audio Out (Optical)

Remote
Samsung F4500 Remote

Misc

Pixels
Samsung F4500 Pixels

Alternatives

Conclusion

If you are sitting closer than 8-10 feet, get the Samsung F5300 Plasma TV instead. Otherwise, this Samsung F4500 Plasma TV is a very good budget plasma TV, assuming you do not have a lot of lights in your room.

Questions

Jan 23, 2014
Please share your settings for f4500 in this review.
Our calibration settings of the F4500:
Picture Mode: Cinema
Color Tone: Warm2
Cell Light: 20
Contrast: 85
Brightness: 44
Color: 50
Tint: G50/R50
Gamma: 0
White Balance:
Red: Offset: 31 Gain: 25
Green: Offset: 25 Gain: 25
Blue: Offset: 24 Gain: 25

All processing settings turned off.
33
Sep 01, 2013
We sit between 4 and 8 feet away from the TV. So is sitting 4 feet away too close where the 720 resolution will be a problem? How close is too close?
It depends which size you get. For the 51", you will definitely see the pixels at 4' and slightly at 8'. For the 43", you will only start noticing it at about 6'. So overall, yes, you are sitting a bit too close for this TV. If you are wondering what too close will look like, check out our full resolution picture. Notice the screen door effect.
7
Jan 09, 2014
You measured the F4500 having a White luminance of 92.2 cd/m2. I saw in a different review (from a fairly respected tech website) of the F4500 a luminance measure of 41.91 ftL with a 100% white window. A conversion of ftL to nits shows that number 41.9 as equal to 143.5 nit or cd/m2. Do you think that site was measuring the same luminance as rtings was measuring? The PN43F4500, right now, is my TV of choice, but I will be watching some afternoon sports in a somewhat bright (but not overpowering) room. Majority of viewing is at night with dim lights. I like the picture quality of plasma, but want to make sure a plasma I get has the ability to get somewhat bright if needed. But as you can see, I'm not in the high budget category, thus looking at the F4500. I have a PG LN5300 in another room that does get bright, and it is fine there. This will my TV for mainly sports.

The different results can be explained by using a different picture for measurements and the Automatic Brightness Limiters (ABL) of plasma TVs. A 100% white window like they used means a true white (100%) displayed in a 'window', which is a square at the middle of the screen. Usually, that square covers between 10% and 15% of the total screen. In our tests however, we measure the brightness on a 100% white check board pattern, so the white portion covers about 50% of the screen. On a LED TV, we would get the same measurement as them. However, things are different on a plasma TV. Plasma TVs change the brightness of their white depending on the total brightness of the picture (the ABL feature). The more white it needs to display, the darker it will be. Therefore, because our test picture has more white in it, it is darker than them.

The reason we measure both the white and black luminance on a checkboard pattern is to not give an advantage to plasma TVs. If we used a 100% white window like them, our maximum white luminance of plasma TVs would have been the same as some LEDs. This is misleading because in real scenarios plasmas clearly cannot get as bright as LEDs. If you are watching hockey (where the majority of the screen is white), this is a major issue.

7
May 12, 2014
I looked at an F4500 at Best Buy. Compared to the other LED TV's, letters on the screen of the F4500 (for example, the Sony logo in white on a black background), don't look as smooth/crisp as they looked on the LED's. For example, the letter S (of the white Sony logo against a black background) on an LED was perfect. On the plasma F4500, however, the edges of the S looked like steps. Is it a marker of poor quality? Was I standing too close? Is it related to the 720 pixels? I want a plasma because I think it would be nice to get the best picture quality, but I'm worried I'll regret having the 720p (because of the issue described and because I'm worried the plasma wouldn't be future-proof with only 720p).
This is indeed due to the 720p resolution. If you are far enough like in a normal viewing distance, you won't notice this. If you will be sitting closer than 10 feet though, get a 1080p TV instead.
1
Mar 19, 2014
Between the UN43F4500 plasma and UN40F6300 LED TV, which has overall better picture quality especially on 1080p movies? I sit around 7-10 ft from the screen and glare is not a problem as the room is quite dark. I just want better full hd viewing.
Even though the F4500 is only 720p, at your distance you won't really notice it. Overall, it definitely has a better picture quality than the F6300 in a dark room, so go for that one.
0
Apr 07, 2014
Which Panasonic Plasma model of life like picture and deep black is available on market now?
Panasonic stopped producing plasma TVs at the end of last year, so they are out of stock almost everywhere now and won't be available again.
0
Apr 10, 2014
On the Samsung PNxxF5500, does turning CinemaSmooth on overcome the defective 24p video processing?
Yes.
0
May 14, 2014
I recently purchased a PN43F4500. It's just been used for maybe 10 hours or so. On black screens (such as opening or closing credits), I notice a light cloudiness on the right side and a smaller bit in the middle. This seems consistent whenever I see a totally black or very dark image. Is this a defect and would you recommend that I exchange the unit? Or is this maybe part of the "breaking-in" process?
This is a defect and you should exchange it if it bothers you enough.
0
May 22, 2014
Any idea of when we might expect the next plasma TV models to come out which might include 42 inch plasmas with 1080p?
Most likely never, or at least for a new 1080p 42". Samsung didn't refresh their plasma TV line for 2014, they just carried the 2013 F series over. With Panasonic not producing them anymore, Samsung don't invest anymore in developing them. And because Samsung already didn't have a 1080p 42", it is unlikely to develop a new one.
0
Dec 04, 2014
Was your input lag measured in Game mode or PC mode?
On that one, neither. The TV was left on Cinema mode.
0

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