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    Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Borders
    3. Thickness
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. Gray Uniformity
    5. Viewing Angle
    6. Black Uniformity
    7. Gradient
    8. Pre Calibration
    9. Post Calibration
    10. 480p Input
    11. 720p Input
    12. 1080p Input
    13. 4k Input
    14. Color Gamut
    15. Reflections
    16. 3D
    17. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Ads
    2. Remote
    3. Misc
  8. Conclusion
  9. Q&A
Reviewed on Mar 27, 2015

Vizio E Series 2015
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
6.7Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
6.4Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
6.5TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.0Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
7.6Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
5.2HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
4.8HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
5.0PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
This tv has been discontinued.
It was replaced by the Vizio E Series 4k 2016

Type : LED
Resolution : 1080p
Refresh Rate : 60 Hz (except 65" and above)

It looks nicer than the 2014 version, but on the inside there's not much different about 2015 Vizio E-series TVs. It has good picture quality for the price, but like most LED TVs, it loses picture quality when viewed from the side.

Test Results
Design 6.0
Picture Quality 6.9
Motion 7.7
Inputs 7.3
Sound Quality 5.7
Smart Features 6.0
Pros
  • Good picture quality, for the price.
  • Great gaming TV. The input lag and motion blur are both minimal.
Cons
  • Poor gray uniformity, with several issues present onscreen.
  • Poor viewing angle.
  • The local dimming feature is ineffective. At best, it doesn't make a difference, and at worst it makes the whole picture look worse.
  • The stand is wide-set, and is not adjustable. You'll need very wide surfaces for bigger E-series TVs.

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6.0

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio E Series 2015 Design Picture
Curved : No

The design of the Vizio E is quite nice. It’s not the thinnest TV in the world, but its bezel is quite slim, and the feet for the stand are pretty good-looking.

The feet are not adjustable, and they are set far apart. For larger TVs, this will necessitate a big surface on which to set the TV. It’s a stabler solution than the old Vizio E mount, but could be inconvenient.

Stand
Vizio E Series 2015 Stand Picture

Dimensions for 60" TV stand: 46.75" x 11"

Borders
Vizio E Series 2015 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.47" (1.2 cm)

Thickness
Vizio E Series 2015 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 2.4" (6.1 cm)

6.9

Picture Quality

This is a great budget TV for movies. The blacks are dark, and cloudiness is only really visible with fully black screens. It's also able to play DVDs, Blu-rays, and streaming movies smoothly, which is great.

It loses a few points, though, because it's not 4k and because most sizes (all but the 65" and 70" models) don't have a motion smoothing option. This is to be expected, given how inexpensive the E-series is, but still something people who want those features should keep in mind.

8.5 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Native Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
4404 : 1

The contrast is great, on the better end of even VA TVs.

3.0 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
Yes
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
Full-Array

The local dimming feature on this TV is ineffective. The entire screen gets darkened, bright spots included. With small objects like the circle in our test, there is no backlight blooming, but something a bit bigger will introduce a large amount of blooming. See the Q&A for more details.

The number of E-series TVs' dimming zones varies by size. 40-43" TVs have 5 dimming zones, 48" TVs have 6, 50-60" TVs have 12, and the 65" & 70" TVs have 16. Since the feature doesn't work well, the number of zones doesn't matter.

6.0 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
276 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
275 cd/m2

6.7 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
3.765 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.212 %

It's an improvement over last year's E-series gray uniformity, but you can still see each of the TV’s LEDs in the gray uniformity test, which makes it look like there is an ugly grid on the TV. The right and left sides of the screen, and especially the corners, are darker than the rest of the image, and there is noticeable dirty screen effect, too.

4.3 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
VA
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
20 °
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
30 °
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
21 °

You get a bit more leeway with the Vizio E than with the more expensive Vizio P (the P loses picture quality at 19 degrees), but the viewing angle on this TV is still not ideal for off-axis viewing.

Update 01/06/2017: We have changed the methodology of testing. Since this is an old TV which we don't have anymore, we extrapolated the results from 2016 TVs.

8.1 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
1.452 %

Our set has some clouding, but nothing horrible. It's only noticeable with fully black images.

9.5 Gradient
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What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Color Depth
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What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
10 Bit

8.8 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Pre Calibration Picture Vizio E Series 2015 Pre Gamma Curve Picture Vizio E Series 2015 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.84
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.4813
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.24

9.6 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Post Calibration Picture Vizio E Series 2015 Post Gamma Curve Picture Vizio E Series 2015 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.31
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.1079
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.2

7.5 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio E Series 2015 480p Picture

Upscaling of standard TV channels is below average for the E series. Setting 'Reduce Block Noise' to 'High' helps a little for removing h.264 artifacts.

7.5 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio E Series 2015 720p Picture

720p upscaling is a bit better than 480p, but the result is sill soft and not as good as other TVs.

10 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio E Series 2015 1080p Picture

Blu-rays content looks good and sharp like it is supposed to be, without any image quality problems.

0 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned

6.1 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
No
Vizio E Series 2015 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
68.99 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
72.41 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
49.50 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
52.76 %

8.0 Reflections
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What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio E Series 2015 Reflections Picture Vizio E Series 2015 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
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What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
1.8 %
Screen Finish
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What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Semi-gloss

There isn’t too much reflection off of this TV, so it will be fine for watching with a couple of lights on.
Its maximum brightness is about average. Unless your room is very, very bright, this TV should work fine.

0 3D
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What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
3D
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What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
No
3D Type
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What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
No

Pixels
7.7

Motion

This TV is pretty good for sports. It doesn't have much blur, which means the fast movement of players, balls, pucks, or whatever else, will look good.

You may notice the field, court, or rink looks a bit smudgy, or it may look like there is a grid across the screen. Unfortunately, these kinds of issues are common with TVs from all brands. For this kind of problem, only make a return if the problem is so bad that it is ruining your viewing experience.

8.4 Motion Blur
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What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Motion Blur Picture Vizio E Series 2015 Response Time Chart
Response Time
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What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
14.6 ms
Overshoot
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What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0 ms

By default, the motion blur on this TV is very good. You can also make use of the 'Clear Action' feature to clarify the image even more. Enabling 'Clear Action' will dim the screen and add a bit of flickering to the picture, but it does have a noticeable effect on the blur. See the Q&A for an image of the 'Clear Action' setting's effect on blur.

9.2 Image Flicker
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What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
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What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
480 Hz
BFI
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What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes
BFI Frequency
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What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
60 Hz
BFI In Game Mode
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What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes

7.1 24p Playback
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What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
No
Judder-free 24p via 60i
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
No

There is no judder when watching a movie via 24p (on a Blu-ray player for example). However, it couldn't consistently do the reverse 3:2 pulldown when the signal is sent over 60p or 60i (this only matters for movies, not sports or gaming). Also, there is no motion interpolation (soap opera effect) on models 60" and lower. The 65" and 70" have that feature.

0 Motion Interpolation
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What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
No
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
No

7.3

Inputs

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Score components:

There's not much blur, which is great for fast-paced games. Games will be nice and responsive, too, which is especially crucial for people who are competitive.

Because of the low price and the overall strong gaming performance, this is one of our favorite 1080p gaming TVs of this year.

8.5 Input Lag
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What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
29.5 ms
1080p With Interpolation
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What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
N/A
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
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What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
29.5 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.
When it matters: PC Monitor
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz + HDR
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz with HDR.
When it matters: HDR Video games.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + 8 bit HDR
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 with HDR enabled at 8 bit
When it matters: PC Monitor with an HDR capable graphic card
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
N/A

By default, the input lag for this TV is low, and that's constant across picture modes and inputs. Enabling 'Game Low Latency' did not affect our input lag, but using the Clear Action feature did increase input lag to 34.7 ms – a negligible difference.

Other reviewers have noted that the input lag time is higher for different sizes of this model. The 65" and 70" models are said to have particularly high lag times. Gamers looking at the largest sizes of the E-series may want to consider going with another TV.

0 Supported Resolutions
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What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
No
1080p @ 120Hz
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What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
No
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz
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What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
No

Update: From further testing we have concluded that all current Vizio TVs that we have reviewed do not display 4:4:4, but 4:2:2. This is due to the TV inputs accepting 4:4:4 but actually displaying 4:2:2. 4:2:2 is better than 4:2:0, but slightly blurrier for text than 4:4:4.

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 3
USB : 1
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 1
Component In : 1 (shared)
Composite In : 1 (shared)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

The number of side HDMI-in ports changes by size. 32-40" TVs have 0, 43-60" TVs have 3, and 65-70" TVs have 4.

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
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What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
No
Dolby Vision
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What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : No
ARC : Yes (HDMI 1)
USB 3 : No
HDCP 2.2 : No
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : Yes

5.7

Sound Quality

This TV's sound isn't the best, and gets pretty distorted at high volumes. This TV's bass isn't great, either.

Lower volumes sound okay (for TV speakers), but you should definitely invest in a speaker set if you want to crank it up. That said, this TV can get to a pretty high volume, so if you're not too concerned about quality and just want loudness, this TV has you covered.

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

6.5 Frequency Response
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What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.28 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.11 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
6.09 dB SPL
Max
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What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
91.3 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
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What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
134 Hz

The frequency response is good at lower volumes, but it gets bad at higher volumes. There will also be noticeable pumping and compression artifacts present when pushed hard. The bass extension is not great for a TV, but it does get relatively loud.

3.9 Total Harmonic Distortion
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What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
Vizio E Series 2015 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.083
Distortion @ 80
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.532
Distortion @ Max
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.575

Low distortion at very low volumes, however, there will be a significant rise in distortion at moderate volumes. There may also be some aliasing present in high frequencies.

6.0

Smart Features

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio E Series 2015 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : Basic

The remote is decent, and there are just enough HDMI ports for most people to get by.

The smart features are so-so. There aren't that many apps available, but you'll have access to most of the main services (Amazon, Netflix, YouTube, Hulu Plus, etc). If you don't need a huge and varied software library on your TV and just need something for the occasional streaming movie, this is a fine choice.

10 Ads
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What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
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What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
Yes
Opt-out
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What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
N/A

Remote
Vizio E Series 2015 Remote Picture
Remote : Basic

You don’t get the QWERTY remote on the back of this like you do with the Vizio M and P-series, but the slimness and feel of this remote almost makes up for that. The glossy finish might be a nuisance for some – our remote picked up smudges and fingerprints very quickly. Note: The remote for the Vizio M and P will also work with this TV, and vice versa.

Misc
Power Consumption : 56 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 122 W
Firmware : 1.60.30.0180

Conclusion
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

Like the 2014 version, the 2015 Vizio E is a pretty good TV, and especially good for the price. It doesn't have all the bells and whistles you get from some competing brands, but the picture quality is good. It's a great option both for those looking for a general use TV and those who want a good budget gaming TV.

Usage Ratings
6.7Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
6.4Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
6.5TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.0Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
7.6Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
5.2HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
4.8HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
5.0PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Questions Found an error?

Let us know what is wrong in this question or in the answer.

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Questions & Answers

156 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
82
How far apart are the bases?
The stand for our 60" TV was 46.75" x 11".
46
So are all the 2015 E series vizios input lag the same, or are they different?
We expect that they will all have similar input lag times. We will confirm this in a few weeks when we get to play with more sizes.
39
Additional Review Notes

Active LED Zones

The 'Active LED Zones' feature does not work well on this TV. With our black uniformity test, it made everything look darker, but the inaccuracy of the feature meant that a strip of the black screen surrounding the cross in the middle remained brighter than the rest of the black screen.
On normal footage, you can't really see the difference local dimming makes.
Using the 'Calibrated Dark' preset has an effect on the 'Active LED Zones' feature, making everything look a bit darker. But even then, it is not much more effective.
Expect the same results from the other sizes of the Vizio E-series, which have different numbers of zones.

Clear Action

The 'Clear Action' feature on this TV is quite effective at clarifying moving images. It only adds about 5 msecs of input lag, so it’s a good option for gamers who don’t mind the dimmer backlight or the flickering.

Screen Defect

The TV we reviewed is defective. It has two horizontal lines across the screen, near to the top, which you can see in our gray uniformity test. We purchased the TV at Walmart and could have returned it in exchange for a different unit, but because this sort of defect does not affect the results of our tests, we decided to keep it anyway. If you receive a unit with this sort of defect, you should really exchange your TV.

Difference between sizes

We tested the 60" (E60-C3). All sizes of the E should have relatively the same picture quality, but the bigger the TV, the more prone it is to uniformity issues. As mentioned previously, the number of zones doesn't matter because the local dimming is ineffective anyway. The number of HDMI inputs varies between sizes. Also, only the 65" and 70" are actually 120Hz TVs with the motion interpolation feature. The other sizes are only 60hz (Vizio, like other manufacturers, always inflates their refresh rate numbers on their specification sheets).

28
I've been looking to purchase the 2015 E series 55" and noticed that Vizio offers two options. The E55-C1 and the E55-C2. Do you have any idea what the differences are and why Vizio might be providing the two options?
It's likely that the last number refers to the panel provenance, which would mean each TV's panel was made by different companies. Unfortunately, we don't yet know what this means in terms of differences in picture quality. It's even possible that one is a VA panel and one is IPS.
23
Thank you for this site! I've used your calibration settings and it looks better, but some dark areas are pixelated and blocky. Most of our content is streaming from a Roku 3, and PS4. Games on the TV from the PS4 look great. Is there any way to help this look a bit better for streaming content? Thanks.
If you have already enabled 'Reduce Signal Noise' and 'Reduce Block Noise,' there isn't anything else you can do. Compressed video always has less definition in dark areas, so the only fix is to find better quality streaming content.
14
How did you get your TV to accept a 120hz input? I have a E70-C3, which is a native 120hz panel with motion interpolation, but I cannot get it to accept a 120hz signal (tried all timing standards using nVidia custom resolution).
The TV accepted a 120 hz signal, but it only displayed it at 60 fps. The 120 hz signal was one of the default available output options in the NVidia Control Panel for our GTX 960 graphics card.
14
How many of you guys rate these tvs? Because if it's 1 dude, then you blind as hell for rating a crappy Vizio. I work in retail and Vizio is the worst tv for a budget you can get, picture quality degrades over time, turn on that vizio u guys tested and look for that beautiful signature green line the Vizios get on the edge of their screen. The money people waste on this tv is stupid and I hate to see that, then see the same people come back crying that their tv is sh*t a few months later.
We are currently a team of 5. Vizio TVs are of course not the best overall, but they are great for their price. None of our Vizio have the problem of the green line you mention. Also, unlike plasma or OLED TVs, the picture quality of an LCD TV doesn't degrade over time and that's true for Vizio TVs as well.
13
Would you recommend the 2015 over the 2014 E series since they are both available right now?
They're both pretty much identical TVs. If anything, unless you like the aesthetics of the 2015 model, you're better off saving money by getting last year's instead.
13
Which is the better Vizio: 2014 M422i-b1 or the 2015 Vizio E43-c2.
The M has slightly better uniformity, but apart from that they're nearly the same. Go with the cheaper of the two.
12
Reading a CNet review of the Vizios, they show that some models can include one of two different panel types. They're distinguishable by the fourth character of the serial number (J or 7 = IPS). The only information they provide is VA or IPS.
Does anyone have any comparison information on the two different panel technologies? How do I pick the best?
VA panels have strong contrast and a narrower viewing angle. IPS TVs have weaker contrast, but a wider viewing angle. If you sit directly in front of your TV, get a VA panel. If you want to be able to watch from off to the side, get an IPS version.
12
I am quite disappointed to report that my experience with the Vizio E40-C2 has not been good.
I purchased it primarily for use as a PS4 gaming display, and everything about it was quite good - except for the annoying hum coming from the back of the set. I just got back home from Best Buy with a replacement and it is even worse than the first one. There is also a high-frequency noise I get when in Game Mode with Clear Action turned off, but it's the humming sound that bothers me most.
I couldn't reproduce either sound on my 2014 Vizio set, so I'm left to think the backlights might be faulty in the E40-C2. Very disappointing, as this seemed like the solid gaming display that you recommended, but it's just too disconcerting given Vizio's reputation for quality control. Back to Best Buy tomorrow, but I will be taking home a different brand. Hopefully, you can learn what is going on with this model and pass along any news to your readers.
What we've pieced together, but have been unable to confirm for ourselves, is that the sound issue affects at least the 40" and 43" models, may not happen when Clear Action is turned on, and that Vizio has acknowledged the problem (though we don't know what they are doing about it).
Thanks for writing in with your experience. We'll definitely create a post when we have some concrete information.
11
The 2014 E series had different input lag results depending on panel size; CNET reported 27ms for the 50" and up, but 43ms for the 48" and smaller. Do you have reason to believe it's different this year?
We will be testing the various sizes for input lag differences within the next few weeks. We will update our review with the information once we have it.
8
What budget TVs are good for watching NHL hockey without having the dirty screen effect or motion problems? By budget I mean $400 for 40" or $500 for 48". Or any suggestions outside of that budget range. Thanks for your help.
The smaller Vizio E TVs should have less DSE than the 60" we tested, so they are good budget options. You cannot be too picky about DSE issues in this price range.
8
Does this TV have the "soap opera" effect? Can it be turned off if it gets too annoying?
Only the 65" and 70" versions have the motion interpolation/soap opera effect feature, and it can be turned off. Just disable the 'Reduce Judder' and 'Reduce Motion Blur' options in the 'More Picture' menu.
7
Hi, thanks for all the help. This site is great. Just wondering why the 2014 version has a higher rating. What is the main difference? It seems to me they're the same, other than the base. Is the older model a better TV? I'm looking to buy the 70". Thanks again!
They're pretty much identical TVs, so it doesn't really matter which one you buy. The main difference is that this year, we've added a score for TVs' upscaling capabilities - a category in which the E-series falls a bit short.
7
So this TV is OK for gaming right?
Yes.
6
Quick question: Would you go with the 50" E-series (2015) or the 50" M-series (2015)?
They're both good TVs. If you want 4k, get the M-series. If you don't care about 4k, get the E-series.
6
What are the key differences between the E65-C3 and E65x-C2? From what I can tell, the x-C2 has better sound but the C3 has better picture quality. Which one would you recommend?
The C3 has a 120 hz panel and motion interpolation, as well as an additional HDMI port. We can't confirm whether it has generally stronger picture. The E65x-C2 is 60 hz and does have more powerful speakers. Even 'good' TV sound isn't great, though, so we recommend taking the E65-C3 for the interpolation option and the HDMI.
5
Will you be going back to doing video reviews on some TVs?
Yes, we will do all 2015 TVs that we review in video too, and it includes this Vizio E. The videos are currently delayed because we've moved to new offices, and we are waiting to sound treat the room before filming.
5
Hi there. I have the 32" model used mostly for gaming and streaming. Any recommended settings? Does the Clear Action feature make a difference with this 32" model? Thanks.
Our suggested settings can be found here. If the Clear Action feature is available, it should clarify movement by strobing the backlight. This will add some flickering, and will also dim the screen.
4
What is the difference, aside from the two inches, between the E48-C2 and E50-C1? Is one recommended over the other?
The 50" TV has 12 LED zones vs. the 48" TV's 6. Since local dimming doesn't work well with the E-series, that's not an important difference. Beyond that, it's unlikely that there's any substantial difference between them.
4
Does this or any comparably priced TV have a picture-in-picture feature? I want to be able to use my antenna input and the Roku at the same time (side by side or large/small; I am not picky), with the option to change the audio. Is this possible with current budget TVs?
Most Sony and Samsung TVs support PIP, but they tend to be a bit more expensive than Vizio TVs of the same size. We have not seen any budget options that have PIP functionality.
4
Are there buttons on the TV itself? Like ones for power, volume, channel, etc? If so, where are they?
There is a single button, a black square, on the back right of the TV. Pressing it once will power the TV on. When the TV is on, pressing it will cycle to the next input. Holding it down will power the TV back off.
4
So is the gray uniformity grid noticeable while gaming? And is the black uniformity the same on all 2015 E-series models? Thanks.
Unless you go looking for it, you probably won't notice the gray uniformity issues while you're gaming. Both black and gray uniformity will be different for every individual unit.
4
Will this TV detect/auto support full RGB signal properly?
Yes.
4
Incredibly helpful site, many thanks. I am about to buy my first LED TV and have the E40-C2 in mind. However, it will be receiving a 480p source much of the time (SD satellite receiver), so I am concerned about the kind of upscaling quality that will result. Should I be swayed to a different TV because of Vizio's less than stellar upscaling on the E40-C2? I will be viewing primarily in dim lighting, if that matters any. Also, the random buzzing issue from the E-series has me concerned as well, but apparently this hasn't yet been fully understood.
The upscaling isn't great, but your TV won't be unwatchable. If you'd prefer to avoid that problem altogether, consider getting the Samsung UN40J6200. It's not that much more expensive, and its 480p upscaling is better.
We still don't have a confirmed explanation for the buzzing problem, but we haven't noticed any buzzing with our Vizio TVs.
4
Hey I was wondering what tv i should buy. Im currently looking at the Vizio e43-c2, Vizio D43-C1, Sony kdl40r510c and the LG 42lb5600. The LG is currently on rollback at Walmart for $278 so it has caught my eye. The money isn't a huge issue but I want one of these four. I'm going to be using it for gaming on PS4 and watching sports.
In terms of picture quality, which one of these is the best? Also, what is the difference between the Vizio D43-C1 and the Vizio E43-C2 besides the fact one is smart and the other isn't? any picture quality differences between them? thank you.
Of those we have reviewed, the Vizio E43-C2 is the best. It has deeper blacks than the LG and its viewing angle isn't as narrow as the R510C. It's good for everything you'll want to watch.
We haven't reviewed the Vizio D-series, but we expect the uniformity won't be as good as the E-series.
3
Does the 43" model have clear motion?
It does have Clear Action (backlight flickering), but not motion interpolation.
3
Good Morning! I purchased the Vizio E43-C2 43 inch for our spare room. Two things; one, the picture appears grainy - upon calling manager at Best Buy, he said that was because we had the cable going straight to the TV versus using a cable box (which the thought kills me that I'd have to pay to rent yet ANOTHER box!) Secondly, and this is driving me nuts - there is a high pitched, constant hum when the TV is on. The only time it goes away is if you go in to the Menu and access the User Manual. Do you think both of these issues are due to cable coming from the wall versus using the HD box from the cable company. Thanks so much for your time!
We've heard similar complaints of a hum/whine from the 2015 E-series. We haven't experienced it ourselves, but it doesn't appear to be caused by direct cable connections.
As for the grainy video, it might just be that the source is of poor quality, which likely would be improved by using a cable box and HDMI instead of a regular cable. If you don't want to get a cable box, you might be able to improve the look a little bit by enabling the 'Reduce Block Noise' and 'Reduce Signal Noise' options.
3
How many zones would the 32" have? It doesn't say. Would the 32" have a contrast ratio of 4400:1 as well?
The 32" version doesn't have active LED zone local dimming feature. The contrast will be about the same, though, since we didn't use local dimming when taking our measurements.
3
Can I use a remote with a QWERTY key pad? It would be helpful with this set! I have a E48-C2, but don't know if the M QWERTY remote would work.
Yes, the QWERTY remote from M and P-series TVs will work with the E-series.
3
Thanks for your review of Vizio E-series. I was hesitant to get a 60Hz HDTV prior to reading your info, as I watch a lot of sports. I got the E48-C2 just in time for the final games of the Stanley Cup and NBA playoffs. I was very satisfied with picture quality and handling fast action.
Sound was initially disappointing, and not as good as my older Vizio with front-facing speakers (I know you haven't reviewed sound). I was able to improve sound significantly by adjusting the Audio settings-> Leveler to the "On" position, and Equalizer to the "Bass Boost" option.
I had connected my TV to my old stereo receiver by using the Audio Out and RCA connectors, but now I don't feel the need for this in regular viewing. People choosing the Vizio E might try these settings before purchasing a soundbar.
Thanks for sharing your preferred settings. Dedicated speakers will still be a better option, but it's good to know that a little tweaking of the audio settings can help.
3
Will the E70-C3 be good for gaming, or should I get the M65-C1? What will be best? Thanks.
Get the M65-C1. There are reports that the largest E-series TVs have very high input lag, and while the M-series has more blur with gaming than is ideal, it's better to have that than to have little blur and a ton of lag.
2
I wanted to use this tv for the 4:4:4 color. But so far I am unable to get this working on my AMD card. Is there a particular HDMI port you used to get the 4:4:4 working? Any advice on how to work this with an AMD card? (I tried a 7950 via HDMI and DisplayPort using active adapter) Thanks : )
No, there was no particular port that we needed to make 4:4:4 work. The 1080p @ 120 hz option necessary for Chroma 4:4:4 was not initially available to us. We went to our graphics card's control panel, created a custom setting for 1080p @ 120 hz, and then applied that, which got us Chroma 4:4:4. If you're not able to create a custom resolution and frame rate setting, or the TV does not accept it, then you're not going to be able to get Chroma 4:4:4.
2
Wow the black uniformity raised from a 7.3 to an 8.7. Why's that?
The TVs are scored automatically in relation to each other, and the LG UF7700 did so poorly on the test that it bumped up some of our other ratings by quite a lot. We've adjusted the scale, and the E-series is now a 7.8.
2
I plan on using this TV in the bedroom and it will be on while I fall asleep to it. Can it be dimmed so it is easier on the eyes? If so, how dim?
Yes, you can lower the backlight to a very low level. Minimum backlight is around 26.62 cd/m2, and you can enable Clear Action to drop that down to around 25.04 cd/m2.
2
You said the legs are 46.75" apart. The "table" (if you will) mine would be going on is 47", maybe a hair over. Would you call this too close to comfort? Should I just get the E55 instead? Would it be worth it to go down to the 2014 E60? In essence, should I get a 2015 E55, or would the extra 5 inches of a 2014 E60 be worth it? Is there much difference between the years?
The 2014 version has somewhat worse uniformity, but apart from that, the two are similar TVs.
Our table is only about 47.25", and our TV was stable. The 2015 E60 is the best choice, but if you're worried about your TV being jostled and falling over, then go for the 2014 E60. The extra 5" is worth the potentially worse uniformity.
2
On the Vizio E-series E32-C1, is there any way to change the base stand or buy an alternative stand? Thank you.
No, not that we know of. You could try mounting the TV instead.
2
Has the humming of the sets been narrowed down at all? I have E43 and it hums only on input 1 (ARC) AND when no sound is playing. Soon as the game or show is being streamed, the humming stops. Think I'll exchange the set, but just wanted to add this in, as I know it's been mentioned once or twice already.
We still don't know how many of the E-series TVs have the humming issue, or when. We'll keep track and hopefully have something concrete soon.
Thanks for writing in to let us know.
2
After much research and with the help of the awesome info on your site, I narrowed down my selection to the VIZIO E65-C3 or E70-C3 (just determining if the extra cost was worth five more inches). But then I came across a refurbished E700i-B3 for less than the cost of the new E65-C3. In general, I don't mind refurbished electronics, and have never had (more) issues than with new products. From your site, it sounds like the packaging of this older model might not look quite as nice, but is generally made of the same quality stuff on the inside. In particular, I'm having difficulty confirming the older 70" is really 120hz. Are you able to confirm that, or have any other input on choosing this over the newer models?
The older 70" is a 60 hz TV. The E70-C3 should also have somewhat better uniformity. Apart from that, the two are more or less the same, so if you don't mind giving up the interpolation feature and the slight increase in screen uniformity, you'll be fine with the E700i-B3.
2
Hello. I was wondering if you will be reviewing the new 50" 7H series - 4K TV by Hisense. I heard good things about it, but would like to have your opinion on what you think about it. Thank you.
We don't currently have plans to review it, because we don't get a lot of requests for this brand. If enough people request it, we will do it.
2
I'm confused about the Vizio E60-C3. Is its refresh rate 60 hz or 120 hz? I've seen both on your site.
It's a 60 hz TV.
2
Which one is better, the Vizio E70-C3 or Phillips 65pfl4909? Mainly for gaming, movies and Netflix/Youtube? Are there variants for the E70, like C2 and C3?
We haven't reviewed any Philips TVs, so we can't speak to how good it is. The Vizio E-series is good for all of those uses, though. At present, the E70-C3 is the only 70" E-series TV.
2
Appreciate the detailed reviews. Based on price, I'm heavily leaning towards a Vizio E vs the J6300. I intend to play DVDs on a connected PS4. Can you clarify if that makes the E's poorer upscaling irrelevant, since it's actually the PS4 doing the upscaling? Or would the E still show DVDs fuzzier than the J6300 regardless of the device used to play the DVDs?
Yes, the PS4's upscaling would send the 'higher resolution' signal to the TV, which means you don't need to worry about the E-series' subpar upscaling performance.
2
Could use your advice. So much conflicting information and many trade-offs to be made. Replacing a 12-year-old, 50" 1080i projection TV, and it will be another 10 years before I get another, so want to be sure I make the best choice. Please let me set the scene:
$750 ideal up to $1,000 (waiting for Black Friday)
Living Room with 14-15 foot seating
View exclusively Comcast X1 cable - HD Channels mostly from DVR (1080i - 720p ?)
Prefer sports and action TV with little motion blur - Picture quality important
Purchase with Visa Signature 2 year warranty
Will purchase a 2.1 Vizio sound bar for audio
Choices:
55" Samsung 1080P = Good quality and video upscaling
55" Vizio M55-C2 = Future ready for 4K broadcast - Up scale existing resolution to 4K
65" Vizio E65-C3 = Largest screen size available for available dollars
Thanks, really appreciate your advice.
At that distance, you'd need an enormous 4k TV to get real benefit from the higher resolution, so the M isn't the best choice. We recommend getting the E65-C3, since the large screen size will be the biggest benefit for you in that setup.
2
Is there any major difference between the Vizio e28h-c1 and the Vizio e32-c1? I mostly care about the input lag and motion blur because I am a gamer. I was also wondering something about the problem this tv has with lower resolutions like 480p and 720p. I play new games on Xbox One and PS4, but I also play older Xbox 360 games. I also own a lot of movies on dvd. So some games on the 360 are in 720p and dvds are in 480p, and I'm curious how they would look on this tv. I believe the Xbox 360 and the Xbox One both upscale everything to 1080p so shouldn't everything look ok or not. The main reason I was considering the 28in Vizio instead of the 32in was because the legs on the 32in are too wide to fit on the table in my room. Thanks.
The two TVs should perform about the same. If you set the Xbox 360 to output at 1080p then you will get the best quality for your games and DVDs than if you leave the TV do the upscaling. In that case, you don't have to worry about the sub-par upscaling of the TV.
1
Does the 32 inch TV have clear action too?
No.
1
Which TV is better, the 2014 60" M-series or the 2015 60" E-series?
The 2014 M-series has very slightly better gray uniformity. Beyond that, the two are nearly identical, so just get whichever is cheaper.
1
Why isn't the 2015 Vizio E-series rated as one of the best TVs for gaming? It has the single best straight out of the box input lag without using low latency mode. Your review also says that low latency game mode has no affect and that Clear Action mode works well with almost no input lag hit.
Most TVs will shut off the Motion Interpolation function when the low latency mode is enabled. Those TVs have poor input lag when the low latency mode is enabled. Therefore, you have to put up with either motion artifacts or input lag. With this TV you can have exceptional results with both parameters.
You explicitly say "When MotionFlow is turned on, the fluidity is increased and the blur reduced. This option can't be used in Game Mode though, because of the increase in input lag," for the Sony W850B, yet you still rate it as exceptional for gaming. From your review it looks like the W850 only has exceptional motion blur results if it isn't in game mode, which will cause you to have very high input lag.
We still need to update our 'The Best Gaming TVs' article for this year's models, but last year's Vizio E was our pick for the best budget gaming TV, and as things stand, this year's edition will be replacing it in that spot.
Most MotionFlow options can't be used in Game Mode, but 'Impulse,' which is Sony's version of the 'Clear Action' feature, can. We also do not take those features into account when scoring the TVs for gaming, because many people do not want the loss of luminosity that you get with backlight flickering. It's also important to note that backlight flickering (Clear Action & Impulse) is not the same as interpolation, which is the TV's processor increasing the frame rate.
Since the W850B has less motion blur and lower input lag than the Vizio E, it scores higher for gaming.
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If the prices were similar between the Vizio E48-C2 and Sony KDL48W600B, which one is the better option for someone who doesn't care about gaming, but rather about watching TV and using smart TV features for Netflix/Amazon Prime TV?
They're very close - especially in terms of picture quality - but the Sony has better black uniformity and somewhat better smart features, so it would be a better choice.
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I'm thinking of getting the 50" E-series. Would you say this is the best TV for this price range and size? I want to get a 48-50" TV and spend less than $600. I plan to use it mostly with a Fire TV for Netflix, XBMC, and Plex.
Yes. Go for it.
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Would you recommend the 48 inch version of this TV over the LG lb5900 47 inch? I'm buying specifically for a PS4 and Blu-ray movies.
Yes. The LB5900 has poor contrast and poor motion handling, whereas the Vizio E does well in both of those categories. The Vizio E is a better gaming TV, so go for it.
1
I noticed on the 65 and 70 sizes that Vizio lists a "V6 processor," the same as on the Vizio 4k sets. Would this have any positive effects with upscaling, lag time, or other elements, or would it just help with the smart functions?
The sub-1080p upscaling for all Vizio TVs is about the same, so the processor won't make much difference. It's possible that there could be a slight improvement in input lag. More than likely you won't notice any difference, except perhaps snappier menus and smart features.
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This or the 2014 Vizio M552i-B2? They are both $600 right now.
The Vizio E-series has good contrast, but a narrow viewing angle, whereas the Vizio M-series has poor contrast and a wide viewing angle. Apart from that, they're pretty similar, so choose between those differences.
1
Given the choice between the Vizio E50 on the one hand, and a 2014 LG 50PB6650 Plasma on the other, am I better off with the Plasma under any measure besides cost?
Aside from luminosity, plasma TVs are better across the board. They have better contrast, uniformity, and motion handling, as well as wider viewing angles. They can't get that bright, so stick with LED if you need a TV for a bright room, but for dark rooms they are pretty much perfect.
1
Are there any problems plugging a laptop into the HDMI?
No, it will work fine.
1
Do you plan to review Best Buy's Insignia 55" TV? I'm wondering what its motion blur rating is.
We don't currently have any plans to review the Insignia brand this year unfortunately.
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I am considering the 65" E-C3. It has that advertised "effective refresh rate of 240hz". I see that you have covered this, but it is a built-in technology such as interpolation that gets them to that "effective" rate? Would I recognize the difference between a true 240hz refresh rate and this "effective 240 hz refresh rate?"
Also, I plan to get most of my content by streaming via a Skystreamx media player. Will I run into problems with the upscaling if I pull from sources that have a lower resolution, such as 720p or less? If I pull some old show from the 70's such as Taxi, will it look like a cartoon? If this is a problem, should I be looking at a set that is better at upscaling?
It's not interpolation, but rather backlight scanning (flickering). It's a feature that is used to clarify movement, which is why Vizio can make the claim that it makes the effective refresh rate of their TV higher than the real refresh rate. Realistically, though, you wouldn't notice the difference between a 120 hz and 240 hz TV in action.
You won't run into real problems, but the image won't look as crisp as it would on a display with the same native resolution (or a TV with better upscaling). In all likelihood, you'll be fine with the upscaling capabilities of this TV, but if you're concerned, or sensitive to this kind of issue, you should look at a TV with better upscaling.
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I recently bought the Vizio E55-C1 and was surprised to see that it was able to actually output 24hz/24p when I connected it to my PC or when I played a Blu-ray disc with the 24p output on the player set to 'auto'. In both cases, I confirmed the refresh rate through the TV's 'system information' display.
Do you know if this is indeed the case, or is there some other 'trick' going on that I'm not aware of? I find it odd that this wouldn't be a more widely advertised/noted feature in TVs: several internet searches just kept coming up with information saying that you MUST have a native 120hz panel TV to properly display film cadence, with little mention of TVs being able to switch to the lower 24hz refresh rate for the same effect. The "What is 24p playback on TVs?" section of your site is really the closest I've seen, but even that doesn't specifically say that TVs physically switch to 24hz.
Thanks!
That is the case. The confusion arises because some 60 hz TVs are able to display 24 hz signals properly, but others can't. There's no reason they can't nowadays - TVs can be made so that they can display any refresh rate below their max - but despite that, many can't.
This year, near the bottom of each review, we now point out whether a TV can display 24 fps properly.
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Please help! Take a look at the image here. You see those horizontal lines? That's what I'm seeing on my TV, but only on bright white images.
If you look closely, you can see that I have scribbled out the other vertical lines, cause my naked eye doesn't see those, but my camera does. Also, if you look carefully, you will see that those lines that my arrows are pointing to are kinda green, but again, that's what my camera is seeing. To my naked eye they are completely see through and have no color. My TV is only a few weeks old and I just noticed this a week ago.
I'm thinking of returning it, but I need to know if this is a defect. Is this normal? I mean, it really is subtle, and most of the time it doesn't show, but when it does I can notice it and I get pissed off because I want a perfect viewing experience.
Also, the camera couldn't show it, but I see those horizontal lines in a couple of other places as well, just for your information. So, what is it? Thanks so much.
P.S: My TV is a brand new Vizio E-series 60". I thought that maybe I'm just seeing these artifacts because it's a bigger screen. For instance, people can notice uneven screen uniformity with bigger screens more often than they can with smaller ones. This is really bothering me, because at first I thought my nice, brand new 60" TV was perfect, and then I notice these lines and now I'm bummed.
I don't really see it from your picture, can you take a picture on a solid color, like our uniformity picture?
Our Vizio E 60” does have a lot of uniformity problems. A bunch of small spots scattered all across the screen, in a grid pattern. This is due to the FALD of the E series. Last year our unit had the same issue, as well as the M and P to an extent.
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Hello, I just purchased an E series Vizio 55 inch. I finally got the colors to satisfaction, but on white or very light backgrounds, I see light grey or almost black lines on the middle of the screen, which go across about four or five rows. Almost looks like an egg carton. Can you please explain if you have any recommendations on a setting I missed? Or do I have a faulty TV? Thank you!
That doesn't sound normal. You should exchange for a new unit.
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Amazing site and reviews! How does the VIZIO E48-C2 compare to the Samsung 48J5200? I read your review of the J6200, but can't find much information about the J5200 and the price is very similar to Vizio E. Thanks!
We haven't reviewed the J5200 yet, but we expect it's similar to the Samsung J5500. Overall, the E48-C2 is a better bet.
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Thank you providing us with these reviews. My question: For gaming and sports, which is the better TV, the 60" Samsung J6200 or the 65" Vizio E65-C3?
Both TVs have good overall picture quality, but we recommend the Samsung J6200. It has the least blur of any TV we've seen, and its input lag isn't too high.
We've heard reports that the E65-C3 has higher input lag than ideal, and so wouldn't be a great choice for gaming.
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Does the E50-C1 and E48-C2 have the same low input lag as the review listed here? I am mostly concerned with gaming. The 50" would be preferred if it would have the same input lag as the 48".
They won't have the exact same input lag, but they should be in the same ballpark, which is good.
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I've been going back and forth trying to decide between the Vizio E-50 and last years Sony 48W600B. If the prices were even, which would you recommend? They seem pretty even.
Also, does the extra 2" on the Vizio make a big difference or is it about the same? Thanks.
It depends on what you want to do. If you play lots of video games, the E50 is better, because it has less blur. If you watch lots of broadcast TV/sports, the Sony has better upscaling, which is important. Both are about equally good for 1080p video.
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Is the Vizio E65-C3 good for Xbox One gaming?
We've heard that the 65" model has higher input lag than ideal, so it may not be the best option for gaming. A good alternative would be the Samsung UN65J6200. It's a bit pricier, but its overall picture quality is a bit better, and the input lag isn't too high.
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I was planning on buying the E24LI-B1 for my Xbox One. Do you have any information on the input lag on it? I noticed that 32" is the smallest you list on your site. Thank you for any feedback.
That's a 2014 model, so the input lag should be about 29.7 ms. It may be a bit different, but probably not much.
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My question is for the Vizio E60. I am very pleased with gaming on it, and with the overall picture quality when streaming or playing 1080p content.
Upscaling of 720p content is not bad either, and football looks amazing, with no motion blur that I can notice. However, I was watching a movie via my Apple TV at 1080p and while the picture looked good, there was a distracting amount of motion blur, or at least what I think is considered motion blur.
For example, an object moves and there is a trail/ghosting effect behind it. I tried playing the same movie on Blu-ray and there was not much improvement. Is this what's considered motion blur? And if so, enabling Clear Action should reduce it considerably? Also, if it is motion blur, I thought this TV was supposed to have good motion blur.
Finally, would upgrading to a 120 Hz model improve this? Thank you!
Yes, that does indeed sound like motion blur. This TV doesn't have that much blur when compared to other LED TVs, but you might be noticing it a bit more if you're coming from a CRT or plasma screen. What was your last TV?
Some 120 hz TVs will have less blur, but not all do. If you want a similarly-priced TV with less blur, the Samsung UN60J6200 would be the best option. It has the least blur of any LED TV we've reviewed this year, with great picture quality overall.
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What wireless protocol does the E-series utilize for streaming? I'm in the market for a new router and wonder if I should get an AC router or just stick with one that supports wireless N. Thank you for all the informative answers you post to peoples' questions!
The Vizio E supports the AC protocol but should be fine using any 'N' speed router.
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If you had to choose between the Vizio e400i-b2 or the Vizio e40-c2 which is the better choice for watching movies and TV dish HD.
They offer the same picture quality so go with the cheapest of the two.
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First of all, thanks for all the hard work measuring these tvs! I'm looking at 55" TVs and considering the Vizio E55-C1, the Samsung UN55J6200, the Sony KDL55W800C, and the Vizio M55-C2. I like the price of the Vizio E55 but the response time of the Samsung is tempting. I'm considering the Sony because I've always had Sony TVs and they seem like a good brand. I'm considering the Vizio M55 because it's on sale right now. I'm not exactly partial to 4k cause it's seems a little too soon to commit to a technology that there's barely any content to support, or at least that I would use, and for a 55 inch, my seat is right on the verge of being too far to see the difference according to your handy little graph. I need a little help deciding which one to go for. Uses would be about 40% TV, both streamed via Apple TV and live over the air, 40% video games, and 20% movies in a room with low lighting and a pretty narrow viewing angle. As I mentioned already, I like the Vizio E55 for the price and it seems like a pretty fair compromise between input lag and response time for gaming but using your comparison chart, I noticed a much warmer color from this TV next to the other three. I don't know if that is due to a setting or the camera you guys used to take the picture. I'm also concerned about the quality of the components used to make the TV. Do you have any clue about the reliability of Vizio TVs? I really like the response time of the Samsung as I have an allergy to motion blur. (Jk) After reading about the Sony on your site, I guess its strength is its design. Even though I don't watch movies all the time, I like them to look great. Any help here would be awesome. Also, I'm wondering about the right time to buy a new TV. I'm planning to look for these TVs on sale after Thanksgiving but if new models come out early next year, could I be missing out on added technology or a better picture on the new version? Sorry for the really long question/life story but I figure the more information you have, the better you can help me.
We don't expect the quality of TVs to change that much for next year LED TVs so now is a good time to buy. The Vizio E seems like the better choice here. Vizio has made a good reputation of itself over the years so you can buy with confidence. The only downside of this TV is it's upscaling of lower resolution content like cable. Since a good portion of the shows you watch comes from the Apple TV, this won't be a problem if you set the Apple TV to 1080p. It will do the upscaling instead of the TV. This TV has the best contrast compared to the other TVs you are comparing it to so movies will look best. This is also one of our favorite gaming TV for this year.
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I've discovered an odd issue with my new E43-C2 - with Active LED Zones on, on some videos the whole backlight appears to dim to minimum brightness and never comes back up. It's pretty terrible. Turning the feature off fixes it, but that's frustrating. Is this a known issue?
Easy reproduction - first thing I did was launch the YouTube app and watch the new "Force Awakens" trailer, and saw this problem. Other videos, including earlier trailers for that movie (i.e. with similar desert scenes) did not show the issue. It seems random which videos are affected, but is consistent for an affected video (e.g. "The Matrix" from Amazon Prime).
Update:
Update on my previous question regarding extreme Active LED Zone dimming: My TV informed me yesterday that it had downloaded an update, and when I tested I could no longer reproduce the issue - the update appears to have resolved the problem. So, yay for Vizio.
Good to know! Thanks for sharing.
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I just bought a Vizio E 55 C2, 2015 model. According to serial number nomenclature they use, as confirmed by salesman, mine has an IPS, not VA panel. Can I use the calibration settings from your review for this model having the VA panel to calibrate my IPS panel? If not, is there somewhere you can direct me for the correct settings? Not sure I will like the IPS panel and can return it, but need to calibrate it and see.
Our settings will work fine with the IPS version. Just don't apply the 2 point grayscale. Let us know how it goes.
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Is there any chance that the E65-C3 would be able to do the reverse 3:2 pulldown necessary to get judder free 24p via 60p. I am wondering because the 60 inch unit that you reviewed is a 60hz panel where the E65-C3 is a 120hz panel and I am hoping that this makes a difference.
The reverse 3:2 pulldown isn't related to the refresh rate. Our E60-C3 is actually doing the reverse 3:2 pulldown sometimes, but not consistently, which is why we considered it a fail for our test. It's just not very good at detecting and removing the 3:2 pulldown.
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I was looking at getting a new TV on Black Friday 2015, and I seen walmart had a E70-c3 for a pretty good price, 898 I believe. I also seen Best buy had a Samsung 4k 55 inch TV, for 800 (can't find reviews on this unit anywhere). I am pretty much looking for a TV mostly for watching sports and video games. I probably won't be streaming too much. Can you guys recommend a TV for me? My only thing is I don't wanna go over a thousand bucks. Thanks for this great website, I have learned a ton!!
The E70-C3 is a pretty good deal. As for the Best Buy's black friday special, keep in mind that special Black Friday models are usually not as good as normal models, because they were built specifically to get to the lowest price possible.
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What is the input lag of the Vizio E70-C3?
We haven't had the chance to measure the input lag of the 70" yet but we would assume it would still be in range of the 60" we measured, around 29.5 ms.
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Did you ever get results for input lag on the 48" model? I'm deciding between that and the Samsung J5000. Thank you!
Unfortunately, no. We have not yet been able to verify input lag for any of the other sizes.
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Very informative information and quite helpful. With the two legs so far apart and most TV stands about 48" wide, could the legs be reversed to accommodate a 48" TV stand without losing stability on either the E65 or M65? Any chance you might give her a go and let us poor chaps know your findings?
Unfortunately, because of the positioning of the screw holes on the legs, reversing them is not an option.
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I have a Vizoi E60-C3 and it will not to 4:4:4 chroma at 1080p60. It will, however, do 4:4:4 at 1080p@61hz and anything above 60hz up to 120hz, though it is undocumented. The TV will display 1920x1080 under info when the TV is in the mode, instead of just 1080P. I have also observed that when the E-series is forced into 4:4:4, you loose three selections from the picture options: Film mode, Active LED Zones, and Black Detail.
Right on all counts. We had previously confirmed that the E60 could do chroma 4:4:4 at 120 hz, but we hadn't thought to check at 61 hz as well. Thanks for the tip!
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I am playing The Division on PS4 and in dark scenes that have a lot of detail (ie. indoors) there is so much motion blur that I can't stand playing the game. This screen is not good for dark games, so please update your review. I should have known this after seeing the high response time...
Thanks for the feedback. Our response time measurements (this one for the Vizio E) show that problem. The 0% to 20% transition is very long. We usually don't comment on the problem when only 1 transition is affected, but we will do it more in the future.
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So the Vizio E40-c2 would be good for gaming? And would the calibrated gaming settings for the Vizio M series work for the Vizio E40-c2?
Yes, the E40-C2 is a good gaming TV. Since it has low input lag no matter which settings are used, you should stick with the settings we used in our review of the 2015 E-series; the picture will look better than if you used the Vizio M settings.
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I'm looking for a good budget TV and I'm stuck between the Sony 40w600b and the Vizio E40-C2. Which TV would you prefer for gaming, the Sony 40w600b or the Vizio E40-C2? Thanks.
They both have good picture and low input lag, but E40-C2 has less motion blur, so it's a better choice as a gaming TV.
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You indicated that it wouldn't display 120fps @ 1080, but did you guys try 720p also?
We tested for it, but it didn't work. Since this TV is 60 hz, (except for the 65" and 70" models), it doesn't support 120fps.
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Hello. I'm planning on purchasing the 55 inch E-series. I know that you said only the 60" and above had 120hz panels, but will this make a significant effect if I'm planning on using this TV for gaming? I do not want any weird flickering or ghosting. I really appreciate your input and this site as a whole. Thank you!
Only the 65" and 70" models have a 120 hz panel, but that doesn't make a difference vs. 60 hz when it comes to gaming. The 55" E-series TV has little motion blur, and the backlight flickering feature is optional, so go for it.
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I have the E70 from 2014 and had issues, and through warranty I am receiving the above model as a replacement. Is there a difference between the 120 hz reviewed model and the 240 hz model I will be receiving? Will it be a better quality picture?
The model we reviewed is actually a 60 hz TV, and yours will be a 120 hz TV (the 'Effective Refresh Rate' number is double the real refresh rate).
The main difference, apart from the refresh rate, is that the E70 has 16 LED zones, whereas the one we reviewed only had 12. The local dimming feature doesn't work very well, though, so that's not very important.
Apart from that, we expect the TVs to have pretty much identical picture quality. The E70 will also have motion interpolation capabilities.
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How does the Vizio E70-C3 compare to the Sharp LC-70EQ10U? These are my choices.
Unfortunately, since we have yet to review any Sharp TVs, we can't offer a direct comparison between the two.
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How good is the clear action feature? I've noticed that the RTINGS logo has sort of a black/grayish trail. Will that affect gaming and TV?
The clear action feature works quite well for clarifying movement. You'll be able to distinguish more detail with it enabled. It does not change the length of the motion blur trail, though. The E has very good motion handling to begin with, and Clear Action would only improve it. You don't need to worry about a trail or blur while gaming or watching TV.
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Why is the dark room rating so low (7.9) if it's pretty much the same as last year's E-series in contrast?
We have changed our method for calculating and scoring the black uniformity and gray uniformity scores. They used to be subjective, and now we calculate the standard deviation of the values of the pixels, which is more accurate. We are also stricter with our scores. We didn't change last year's results, so the numbers don't match, but the TVs are still very similar.
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I look forward to you checking out the smaller models, particularly the 43", 48", and 50". I noticed that on Vizio's website the "dynamic contrast ratio" is 2M:1 for the 43" and 48" models, while the 50" model's is 5M:1. I'm curious if this would result in much of a real-world, perceptible difference, if any.
There won't be any major difference between them. Vizio is likely listing the 50"+ models as having higher contrast because they have more LED zones. The local dimming feature doesn't work very well, though so even if there's a noticeable difference between the picture of a 43" and a 50" with that feature enabled, we don't recommend using it. They should all have the same picture without local dimming.
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The audio on my E43 is not working at all. I've tried everything. Is this common?
That's not normal. If you have tried everything (try a different input, different cable, play with the audio settings, check source audio settings, perform factory reset) and have not been able to fix the issue, either contact Vizio for direct assistance or return the TV for a replacement unit.
0
Some reviewers on Amazon are saying they're hearing a buzzing noise from these TVs. Did you experience this? If so, was it much different from other TVs you've reviewed?
We haven't noticed any buzzing with ours (a 60" model).
0
Between the Vizio E60-C3 and Samsung H7100 (h7150), which would you choose? I do game on PS4 quite a bit. Is the input lag between the two really that much of a difference? The room would be relatively dark, with no windows, and I would be sitting 10 feet away. I don't care for 3D. I can get the H7100 for the same price as the E60-C3. Thanks for your help.
The difference is noticeable, but the Samsung won't be bad. The H7100 has better picture quality than the E60-C3, so if it isn't too much smaller, get the 7100.
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In your recommendations for a 65 inch TV, the E70-C3 is preferred over the E65-C3, and you mention that the black and gray uniformity levels are not great for the 65 inch. Does that mean that the black and gray uniformity levels are superior on the 70 inch despite the size increase? Why would that be? Thank you for the extremely helpful reviews.
Uniformity actually tends to be worse with larger sizes. It's really just a case of the language being a tad more enthusiastic for that one entry, and not an indication of higher quality. We've adjusted that recommendation to bring its tone more in line with the others.
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I am looking to buy a D-series 65" TV for $750, but you have no reviews of the D-series. Do you know the differences between the D-series 65" and this E-series 60"? Thank you.
The E65 has a 120 hz panel and local dimming, whereas the D65 is 60 hz, and does not have local dimming. We also expect the D65 will have worse uniformity.
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You originally said that the 65" and 70" models have a 120 refresh rate, but you say later that the E65x-C2 model does not have 120hz rate, but 60hz; everything I have read about this model says that is has a 120hz refresh rate when buying a 65" model. Could you clarify please? I'm planning on buying a 65" TV, but I need a TV that has a refresh rate of at least 120 hz. Thank you.
There are a couple of different 65" E-series TV models. The Vizio E65-C3 has a 120 hz refresh rate, and the Vizio E65x-C2 has a 60 hz refresh rate (but Vizio lists a 120 hz 'Effective Refresh Rate,' which is an invented number). You'll need to go for the E65-C3.
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For watching soccer & tennis, which 50" LCD 1080 TV has less motion blur; Samsung J6300 or Vizio E50-C1?
They're very close, but we saw a bit less blur with the Vizio E.
0
You say in the specifications that the E-series TVs are only 60hz (except the 65" and 70"), but on Vizio's website, it actually says that 32" to 60" are all 120hz effective and 240hz Clear Action. I'm a bit confused.
Manufacturers nearly always list misleading numbers with their TVs. The 'Effective Refresh Rate' for the 32" models and larger is twice the actual refresh rate, and then they add the 'Clear Action' backlight strobing to arrive to 240 hz for the 'Clear Action' number.
For 32"-60", the real refresh rate is 60 hz. The 65" and 70" sizes are 120 hz.
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Which would be the better option and have the better picture for movies: the 60" Vizio E60-C3 or the 55" Sony W800B? The Sony is only $30 more right now. Thanks! I appreciate your site!
They're about equal for overall picture quality, so you might as well save some money and get the E60-C3.
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First, great site. I have narrowed my search down to the Vizio E55-C2 or Samsung UN55J6300. Which would be best for a large room with windows and viewing distance of 10-12 feet? My wife and I mainly watch streaming services and over the air TV. No gaming, but occasionally we watch DVDs.
The Samsung UN55J6300 is the better choice. It has better upscaling and better black uniformity, so you'll get better picture overall by choosing it. Apart from those, the two TVs have very similar picture.
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Between the Vizio 48E-C2 and the Sony KDL48R510C, which would you recommend for just watching HD content and streaming movies? I just bought the LG 49LF5500 and the motion blur is making me dizzy. HD content looks fuzzy to me, so I'm looking for a replacement set. Unfortunately, found your site after I made the purchase. Thank you!
Definitely the Vizio E48-C2. It doesn't have much blur, and its contrast and uniformity are quite good. It isn't the best at upscaling lower resolutions, so 720p and under will look a bit fuzzier than ideal. Still, the R510C has such a limited viewing angle that the picture quality is bad even from directly in front, so it's better to go with the Vizio's slightly worse upscaling.
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How far apart are the legs on the 70" E70-C3? My stand is 55" wide and I'm worried it is too tight a fit.
We haven't been able to measure the stand width for that size. For reference, our 60" version's stand is 46.75" x 11". Even if it can fit, the 70" E-series likely won't be stable on your stand.
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I primarily watch baseball and I occasionally game, and family watches movies and shows. Of models that are 65" or greater would the Vizio E series or the Samsung J6300 be better?
Do you have any idea how the Samsung JS8500 compares to the JU7100?
The E-series is a better choice. Its picture is similar to the J6300, but it has less input lag, which is better for gaming.
We haven't reviewed the JS8500 yet, so we can't speak to its capabilities in full. We expect it will be nearly the same as the JU7100, but likely with somewhat better color depth.
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Have you heard anything about the humming noise that comes from the E40-C2? I was thinking about making a purchase, but this issue is kind of scaring me away.
We've heard a few complaints about this problem, but we haven't had any issues with our 60" Vizio TVs, and we haven't yet found out the cause and solution of the issue for the E40-C2.
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Thank you for your insightful reviews. How does the Vizio E50-C1 compare to the Samsung UN50H6201?
We didn't test the Samsung H6201, but we expect that they'll have similar overall picture quality. That said, the Vizio E-series has much faster smart features and lower input lag, so we recommend going with that.
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I am going to purchase a 55 inch smart tv. Which is the better overall for picture quality, vizio, samsung or lg?
As a rule of thumb, Samsung has better overall picture quality, but it really depends on the model.
0
There are also a 24" and 28" versions of the E series listed on the Vizio website.
- Do these smaller sizes, and the 32", also have 24p playback?
- The 28" and the 32" are listed as having "Full Array LED" - is that accurate?
Yes on both counts, though it's worth noting that there are very few zones in the smaller TVs.
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What is the actual width of the 70 VIZO? What is actual with of the stand for the 70" VIZIO?
Vizio lists the width of the E70-C3 as being 61.70".
Unfortunately, they don't list the stand size, and since we're only reviewing the 60" version this year, we don't know how wide it is.
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Trying to figure out my firmware version. How do I get to the menu that shows this information? I've looked in the system info and can't find anything other than version 1.0.12.
That is the firmware version.
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Here are a couple of things I'd like to know about this (and any) TV:
1. Will the TV function without an internet connection? e.g. Can I treat this as a dumb TV and pretend it has no "smart" features?
2. Assuming the TV's current input is being fed from a cable box or HTPC that is currently on, how long does it take from turning on the TV's power to seeing and hearing the signal? Will it go there automatically, or do I have to navigate some smart menu to display the signal?
Yes, the TV will work without an internet connection, and you don't need to use the smart features.
This TV defaults to the last input you used, so you'll see it as soon as you power on your TV. Some other TVs go to a menu instead.
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Is the input lag of the 32" E-series 29ms as well, or is that only the larger 40"+ sizes?
We've heard that the various sizes have different input lag numbers, so the 29 ms number is likely not even accurate for all the sizes 40"+. So we don't know for sure, but we do expect its lag won't be bad enough to ruin your gaming experience. We'll be updating once we are able to test it out and get concrete results.
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Is the Vizio E43-C2 worth the extra $50 over the E40-C2 model? Does the 3" diagonal gain really make a difference?
It's not a big difference. If you don't mind spending the extra, then you might as well go for it. Otherwise, just stick with the cheaper of the two.
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I can't get it. This TV is rated high for gaming, but you are saying this can't show 120hz@1080p on PC. So how is it good for gaming? Do you mean just console gaming? You mean a console can support 120hz for this monitor, but a PC can't? I'm confused. I want to pick a TV for PC gaming. It's important to me that it handles sport games smoothly. Do I have to pick a smaller monitor?
We rated it highly because it has little blur and low input lag, which are two of the main elements to look for in a gaming TV. For 120 fps gaming, you should check out our article about the best TVs for use as a PC monitor. We picked the Sony X850C as the best TV for 120 fps gaming.
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Just want to thank you for such a great site! Your reviews helped me narrow down my TVs and I believe this was the right choice, as the Vizio E-series is perfect for my gaming. I have noticed that Blu-ray movies have a good amount of "graininess" to them (especially dark scenes). Is this normal? I don't seem to get the grain when streaming HD on Twitch.tv or cable. Thanks again!
Yes, it's normal for some movies to have grain.
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I have a Vizio E40-C2. Can you tell me if it has Bluetooth?
It doesn't.
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Hey again.
I just picked up the Vizio E43-C2 at Walmart and I like it so far. A couple questions would be 1: I noticed when I switch to game mode, it seems like the screen is almost flickering a little, but that seems to go away after a minute and might just be my eyes adjusting.
2: I noticed 2-3 pixels at the very top of the screen are red. They are only noticeable when the screen is a dark color, and even then you have to look for it. Should I go ahead and exchange my TV for another? Do you think this pixel thing is just the start of my problems with this particular TV? Thank you.
We expect that you're right that you're just adjusting to the picture, so the temporary flickering look isn't anything to worry about.
The pixels are a real concern, though, so you should definite exchange your TV. It's not necessarily an indication of worse issues to come, but it's still something that warrants an exchange.
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I recently purchased an LGUF7700 65" 4k TV, and must say I am not all that impressed. Based on your reviews, seemingly you would agree it's not the best TV, especially at a $2k price tag. But the more I research, the more confused a become. Please help!
I am purchasing the TV primarily for sports (hockey, football) and have a DirecTV signal. Main couch is about 12' from the screen, with a couple chairs off to the side about 8-10'from TV, in a fairly large room with a couple windows.
With the current LG, really not seeing a lot of benefit with the 4k upscaling of 1080p content. So the more I look into it, the more it seems the 1080p TV are a better choice, given the price and lack of 4k content.
The Vizio 70" E70-C3 is only $1,300, and Samsung a couple hundred more. Would it make more sense to go this route, and if so which one is better, compared to keeping the LG or going up to almost $2,500 for a 65" JU7100 4k? Seems like from the reviews the 1080p pics are worse on the 4k TV's even with the supposed upscaling. Am I missing something?
Upscaling just makes images of a smaller resolution fit screens with a higher resolution. That process makes the image a little fuzzier, which is why a good 1080p TV will be better for 1080p images.
The only disadvantage to the Vizio and Samsung TVs is that they looked washed-out at wider angles. If you don't mind that, they're better for overall picture.
The Samsung J6300 is the best 1080p TV overall, but the E-series is almost as good, and costs a good deal less. If you don't care about 4k, then the JU7100 isn't really worth getting. The J6300 has better picture quality for general viewing.
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Looking to buy the E70-C3 and use as a display for advertizing in our Bowling Center. We will produce the video or slideshow and use it on the E70 from the USB using a USB flash drive. Will I have any problems playing the content?
You should be fine with a video, but a slideshow file won't work. Try to make sure the video uses H.264 encoding and is saved as a .avi file, as that will ensure it works on the TV.
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Hi, I have a 2014 M series and 2015 E series. They are set in adjacent rooms, whenever you turn one on, the other will do the the same, or the opposite. I know they use the same remote, but is there a way to set it to different frequencies? Thank you
Unfortunately no. Vizio's remote work by IR, so you will need to block the visual path, so the remote is only visible to the TV that you want to control.
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I just got the E65-C3 and when I view 1080p movies, they seem to have video stutter. The audio stream flows right thru, but the video seems to stutter or skip frames randomly thru the movie. I've tried several movies that played fine on my older 42" Sony flat screen tv. They are .mp4 files that were encoded using h.264 codec. Is this normal to have video stutter or frame skipping with this tv? Would another brand of tv be a better choice?
Our E60-C3 too is having sometimes problems playing video files smoothly. It's like if the processor is too slow to decode it in real time sometimes. Try disabling the motion interpolation features and see if it helps. If you are still having problems, the only other solution would be to return your TV and get another brand. Codec wise, Samsung TVs usually are stronger (both in number of codecs and decoding speed), but even them are not as strong as having an HTPC connected to the TV.
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I'm noticing more compression artifacts in E65-C3 than my last 61" DLP TV. Areas with a gradation of shade has what I'd describe as "contour-plot-like look", as if the color shades are "quantized" and not smooth. Which setting or combination of setting would minimize this effect?
Try coping all the settings that we posted here. From your description, 'Black Detail' is probably the culprit here (a software based contrast enhancer, which could create color banding in some situation).
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I recently purchased a LG 55LF6000 and have been really taken back by the amount of DSE when watching sports like hockey and football. There are 2 gray bars on either side of the tv that are noticeable during panning from left to right whenever there is a light colored background on the screen. I am considering returning the TV and going for the E-50 or E-55. Will these be an improvement over what I am noticing when it comes to sports? I see they got a similar DSE score as the Lf6000 but I am wondering if maybe they are not as jarring as the two side bars that I am experiencing now. Thank you very much.
The DSE is a little bit different on the Vizio. The screen is more uniformed as a whole, but the full array backlight creates a kind of grid pattern. It is more subtle than on the LF6000, but more consistent.
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Thanks for all of this great info! My question is regarding the different panel types. I've been reading that a VA panel is overall a better panel than an IPS. Could you explain the difference and provide your thoughts/opinions, or attach a link if you already have? I've read that I should avoid the E55-C1 with an IPS panel, which, of course, I've already purchased:/ thanks!
Essentially, VA TVs have deeper blacks, but narrower viewing angles. IPS TVs have weaker blacks, but retain their picture quality at wider angles.
If you sit directly in front of your TV, you'll want a VA panel. We recommend making an exchange if that is the case. If you want to be able to watch from far off to the side, though, keep your IPS TV.
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I'm trying to use the DLNA server, because in order to use Plex on this TV, I need to pay a monthly fee for Plex Pass.
To get there, I use the Multimedia smart app, and then choose DLNA. My Plex server shows up, I can navigate to the movies, it will show the movies, but it won't play them. I have messed around with it and put only two movies in a folder on the Plex server, and it loads them (shows the runtime duration in the menu) and then plays them.
In my main movies folder I probably have 100 moves, and the TV seems to bog down when trying to get the information beyond just the movie list. I know this should work because I just had an E65-C3 and it loaded movies just fine, but I ended up returning it because no matter what I tried, I would get a headache after about an hour of watching it.
In any case, is my E60-C3 defective? Can you confirm this feature working for you on your model?
It is working with our TV. Verify that your PC's sharing settings are still correct, and try disabling your firewall and see if that helps. If those steps don't solve your problem, contact Vizio to see if they have a suggestion.
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I purchased an E65-C3 this past Sunday (6 days ago) and my husband and I have experienced "Random Reboot" too many times to count. Is this a faulty set or an issue that won't be resolved with an exchange? We can't even watch the set for the rebooting at times! We've contacted Vizio and tried their troubleshooting suggestions with no improvement. Should we opt for a different brand?
If Vizio was unable to help you fix the issue, then you likely have a faulty set and should exchange for a different unit. You should be fine with a different E65, but if you run into the same issues, a completely different model would be a good choice.
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I have a 2013 Vizio e601-a3 that has a red vertical line from top to bottom. TV tech replaced all internals and determined the panel defective. Are there great improvements in the 2015 60" that I should consider or go with a different brand? Thanks. Great site.
Yes, there have been some improvements, particularly for the backlight (the 2013 one was edge lit, and the 2014 and 2015 are now full array). Vizio TVs are our favorite budget options, so if you're looking to get the best deal you can find, we do recommend the 2015 E-series.
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I've always gotten chroma 4:4:4 by just labeling the input PC or Game and should have paid more attention to the 120 hz input requirement. I can create a custom resolution at 120 but the TV wont accept it. It will sometimes accept 119 hz and look a little better, but still isn't quite right.
So I just ordered an EVGA brand GTX 960 and had a few questions. What brand was your 960? Also, will the E65-C3 with a native 120 hz panel display 120 fps? You initially reviewed the 60" with a 60 hz panel, so I wouldn't expect 120 hz to work. You mention several times you planned on testing more sizes. Did you actually try 120 hz on a native 120 hz panel?
Thanks so much for this site and your work.
We have an ASUS brand card, and we don't guarantee that the 120 hz trick will work with every size. It worked for our 60", but other sizes may be different.
Unfortunately, we have not been able to test the 65" or 70" for 120 hz playback capability, so we can't say whether the 65" will display 120 fps.
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I am deciding between this TV (E48-C2) and the previous version (E480I-B2), almost exclusively as a gaming TV. My budget is $400. Here's my question: Are the active LED zones still a detriment on the E48-C2? Or has there been a firmware update that fixed this?
The issue with the zones is just that you can see the distribution of the LEDs, which makes a grid pattern on the screen. Unfortunately, that's not something that can be corrected with a firmware update. This issue is still present with the E48-C2, but much less than it is with TVs from previous years. We recommend the E48-C2.
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If I turn on the Clear Action feature on the E48-C2, should I increase the brightness and/or backlight so that it equals the calibrated settings, since the clear action makes it darker? If so, to what levels should each be increased?
Only the backlight, which you should adjust to whatever you like. It doesn't affect picture quality.
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For the E series on the lower end, I have read there is no way to turn off the "soap opera effect." Is this true? I don't want to see this when watching older shows, but want a TV that displays PS4 games well. Specifically, I'm looking at the Vizio E50-C1.
The E50-C1 can't do the soap opera effect, so you don't need to worry about that.
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Can you please clarify (no pun intended) the difference between the two "reduce noise" settings? In layman's terms, if possible. Thank you!
'Reduce Signal Noise' is for getting rid of 'speckles' you can see with analog video sources (VHS and other older video sources).
'Reduce Block Noise' helps get rid of pixellation of digital video (DVDs, Blu-rays, satellite/cable/antenna).
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My question is for the 50" (E-50 C1). It says that the video quality diminishes greatly when you watch at lower video qualities, what about streaming content like Netflix, YouTube, and things like PlayStation's Video Services? I know for at least some of those the quality is based on your WiFi's strength, how bad does that affect the TV's ability to produce quality images?
All those factors combine for picture quality but the most important one is the quality of the signal coming from the different streaming services. A weak connection to your internet provider could weaken the picture quality but a standard high speed connection should be enough for most content. For example, Netflix suggest 3 Megabits par second for standard definition content, 5 Mbps for HD and 25 Mbps for Ultra HD. As for the WiFi's strength from your router to your TV, standard "G" network speed is enough even for Ultra HD.
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I purchased a e48-c2 today at Walmart. Best price even compared to Amazon. Thought all was good. 480 from the fios box is only okay. HD content is great except only on CBS. Both on football and CSI there were noticeable black pixels in a line about 6 inches from the top of the screen. Haven't found another channel yet do it. Do you think I just have a bad new set? Maybe I should just get the 48j6300 after all. Thanks.
You could have stuck or dead pixels that may only show in some resolutions. CBS broadcast in 1080i so you should see the same problem on other 1080i channels like CNN or BBC (you can easily see the incoming resolution on top of the screen if you press the 'Info' button on the remote). In any case, it is unlikely that you run into the same problem again if you just exchange the TV for the same model. Although it is not very common, you could run in the same problem with the J6300 so no need to upgrade.
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Hi.
The E43 I bought from Dell finally arrived, but based on the Serial# (fourth character is a 'J') it's an IPS panel. Ideally, I would want the VA panel because viewing angles are not a concern- I'm going to be watching in front of the TV at a distance of 12 ft, so I'd prefer better picture quality. My question is, is the difference in picture quality large enough for me to notice, or even care (I also don't have any reference to compare to)?
I got a good deal from Dell ($150 GC, plus an additional 5% back) and if I return it and try and buy a VA panel from elsewhere, I'd lose the promotion. However, if the difference between panels is significant enough, I'd rather sacrifice those promotions for quality. I'd be using the TV to watch movies, sports, and play video games.
Any advice on whether to keep the TV or return it would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Ultimately, it comes down to you. Use the TV for a couple of days and see if you like it. If you do, there's no reason to make a return.
The main area you might not be happy with is the contrast, as IPS TVs don't have dark blacks. If you dislike the look of the blacks, then yes, make the exchange.
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I am interested in a 65" Vizio. The E-series sounds like it would be fine, but the M-series does better with lower resolutions. Comcast is what is most often used, hence low resolution. Is it worth paying the extra $500?
The M-series doesn't really do better with low resolutions. 720p and 480p look pretty much the same on both the E and the M. If you don't plan on watching 4k material, save money and get the E-series.
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I'm needing a 32" TV for our bedroom and main viewing is sports,movies, etc. via DirecTV. Our old 4:3 Panasonic has a ON/OFF timer which comes in so handy. It's much more convenient to have an OFF timer set than to manually use the sleep timer each night. Anyway wasn't sure if certain brands tended to include ON/OFF timers and others didn't, or you had to go up the line a bit to get them. I'm not sure if the Samsung UN32J6300 has timers or not, but its a little more than I wanted to spend and the VIZIO E32-C1 only has a sleep timer.
Are there any TV's you can recommend that fall between the Samsung UN32J6300 and VIZIO E32-C1? One that rated a little bit higher than the Vizio, but not quite as good as the Samsung, yet has ON/OFF timers? If not then I guess I'll have to go with the E32-C1.
No, nothing as good as those. The Samsung J6300 does have the On/Off timers you're looking for, though, so if you can find the room in your budget, it's the ideal choice.
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Thanks for steering me in the right direction! Just purchased this TV (32" version) from Best Buy for $218 because it was open box. The screen was comparable with the more expensive Samsung set they had on display. Very happy with it so far.
I just want to note for those who may be wondering, the feet/legs on the 32" version are just over 23" apart where they sit, so you'll need about a 24" wide surface for the TV to safely rest on. An alternative would be to purchase a universal TV stand to mount it on, which run around $50.
Thanks for letting us know about the stand! It's much appreciated. Enjoy the TV!
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How would the picture quality and viewing angle on a 55" E-series compare to a 7-8 year old Samsung 52" L52A550 (which I believe is a CCFL-LCD)? The 21 degrees of the E-series seems really small, but I have no idea how that compares to my Samsung.
The viewing angle of CCFL-LCD TVs is comparable to current LED TVs. It won't vary much from model to model so expect it to be similar.
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Between the Vizio E series 48 inch or 55 inch, which would you recommend?
Picture quality wise, they should be very similar. So go as big as you can afford.
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Does the 32" have problems with 480p and 720p too? Does it also have the same amount of motion blur and input lag as the bigger sizes? Does upscaling help with the resolution problem? If I watch a dvd or play a video game that is upscaled to 1080p would it look fine? I have lots of dvds and also some older games that are in 720p. Also is 32" a good size if I sit about 6ft to 9ft away?
The 32" is the same as the bigger versions. The upscaling of the TV isn't good so use your other devices to upscale lower resolutions to 1080p then you will be fine. Any resolutions that are upscale by the TV itself will look a little sub par. As far as the size of the TV at that distance, 32" would be a little small so go as big as you can.
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In the review you say "The local dimming feature is ineffective. At best, it doesn't make a difference, and at worst, it makes the whole picture look worse." So why on other review sites do they say they like the local dimming feature, and that it works?
One review site did mention "occasional over-aggressive behavior" for the local dimming feature. Is it really that bad and not worth it, or does it improve contrast, and is therefore worth it? I ask this because I am looking at the Samsung J6300 also, but the blacks are not as deep in the 'Contrast' review and I would like deeper blacks, but a cheaper TV. Does the local dimming help at all for a better viewing experience?
We stand by what we said. We found it dimmed the entire picture, and while that does make for darker blacks, the fact that everything else got darker ruins that benefit.
We can't speak to the other sites' opinions or testing methodologies, but we do think that even without great dimming, the E-series is a very good option for a cheaper TV. We recommend that you get it.
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Hi There, firstly thank you for this site - without it I would have made a major error! Right now I am very torn between the J6200 and the vizio E serie (both size 55"). I do watch sports and watch streaming tv but am also an avid gamer. Its only 200 difference right now, so i don't care about the price difference, but i guess my question is the j6200 seems better in every way other than input lag, is it really that much of a difference? Also what would you pick if money was not an objection? Many thanks
The J6200 is better yes. It is worth the price difference if you care about picture quality. If you are only a casual watcher though, the Vizio E is still great.
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Have you guys seen anything about the new D65U-D2 floating around for black friday? It would be incredible if you could review that one :)
Unfortunately, we won't have time to review one before Black Friday. It looks like a cheaper Vizio M, given the fewer number of zones and only 60Hz.
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Info only: My wife and I were just at Best Buy and the E55 display had the green lines visible on the left side and bottom of the screen. Salespeople just shrugged.
It's just a defective unit. An unfortunate choice for their display, but nothing to worry about. Thanks for writing in!
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Thank you for all of the valuable information! I'm wondering if this Vizio will work well for streaming from a Roku box exclusively? If not, then what is a better model in a similar price range?
Yes, it will work very well for that.
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I have the option of getting the Vizio 55" E55-C1 for $568 or the Samsung 55" H6203 for $424. After reading both sets of your reviews, I'm having a hard time deciding. Which would you get in this situation and why? Thanks!
Get the H6203. It has better upscaling, more features like the soap opera effect and is cheaper on top of that.
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I just discovered this site and I'm blown away by your informative, comprehensive reviews.
I picked up an E43 based on your recommendation, but I'm a bit unsatisfied with it. Colorful scenes look great, and the motion blur is very smooth, but it has a serious case of flashlighting, and the blacks are pretty weak.
I used your recommended calibration, but dark scenes tend to look really washed-out, and it's hard to make out the details. The aforementioned flashlighting means the colors at the corners are sometimes distorted. It doesn't seem like these issues can be fixed by tweaking settings. Did I just get a bad panel, or will I need to spend a bit more for better dark-scene performance?
Vizio has started shipping some of its E-series TVs with IPS panels like the 43", and it sounds like you got one (explains the weak blacks and exaggerated backlight uniformity issues). You should exchange to get a different unit. If you don't want to take a chance, the 40" doesn't have IPS.
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It seems as though this entire review is assuming that the purchased model will be VA instead of IPS. I have tried four weeks to find a VA model of the E55 and I can only find IPS. Would you still state that the IPS variant of the E55 is the best buy for ~$600?
No. Instead, we recommend getting the Samsung UN55J6200. It's a bit more expensive, but it has very good picture overall. IPS really isn't worth it if you'll be sitting right in front of your TV.
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Based upon your recommendation I upgraded from an older Vizio 32 (don't know which series) to the E32-C1 and couldn't be happier. Right out of the box the TV's picture was amazing by comparison. That said, I have found that the skin/flesh tones, particularly on faces, appears to be flat, somewhat glossy, and lacking detail, as though the actors are wearing thick pancake makeup. I have toggled through the various Picture options and even played with the adjustments but I just don't seem to be able to get it quite right. Speaking of adjustments, I really don't care for the settings you recommended and actually prefer the picture on the factory "Game" setting - maybe because I spend so much time on my computer that it looks the most "normal" to me. But I digress so back to my question on flesh tones and faces. One big difference between this TV and my previous one is the screen. The E32-C1 is more like a large computer monitor while the older version had a dull matte screen. (is that the correct term?) Long story short: is there an adjustment that addresses my problem or is this simply the nature of this "cheaper" TV, the different type of screen, Vizo in general, or the inherently inferior picture of LED vs. Plasma? BTW, as others have mentioned, the sound volume is not that great compared to the previous model which had a much wider bezel and two pretty substantial speakers mounted under the screen, but my hearing has gotten so bad I use closed captioning anyway so it doesn't bother me. Once again, thanks for the recommendation. Great TV for the price.
Our values may seem dull to people that prefer bright colors so using a different picture mode is the good thing to do for you. It seems that you may have tried our white balance settings that would result in the kind of problems you are seeing on flesh tones. Reset the values under 'Color Tuner' and that should fix the problem.
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Which TV is better, the 2015 60" M-series or the 2015 60" E-series? I dont have a TV and dont want to break the bank but want a good TV that will last. Will I notice a difference if I see the two?
They have very similar picture quality. It comes down to 4k, if you plan on watching any content in the future or not. If not, save the money and get the Vizio E.
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Long time reader, first time questioner. Don't know if this is something easily answered, but I'm looking for perspective on the last 5-6 years of TV tech. Comparisons online are almost always between sets from the same model year, but I'm wondering how this 2015 Vizio would compare to a top of the line 6 year old TV. I bought an LG 55LHX90 on sale in 2010, and it was a top of the line set then, like one of the Samsung 9ks today. Now that six years have gone by, how would it compare to a 2015 Vizio E, a high-quality budget TV? Has the across the board improvement been great enough that I'll be wowed by the Vizio, will it be a wash, or a step down? I know the Vizio contrast is very good, and I'd be upgrading to a 65 or 70 inch set- but the LG was a higher quality to begin with and has much better full-array dimming, and more zones. tl;dr: has technology improved enough that today's budget TV is better than 2009's flagship?
Generally speaking, a high end 6 year old TV could be comparable to a new good budget TV. But it mostly depends on what specific models we compare. In this case, since we weren't in the business 6 years ago, we can't say much about how your LG compare to the newest Vizio E. What we can say is that the local dimming feature of the Vizio E doesn't work well independently of the number of zones (65"-70" have 16). It does have great contrast that makes for a big part of picture quality and handles motion pretty well. The uniformity isn't that good though and this is usually something that gets better with higher end TVs like yours. Also, the Vizio E most probably have a way better input lag too, if ever you are into gaming. This is as much as we can say without having reviewed your LG TV.
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I like the website very much. I have an E55-C1 with an IPS (according to the serial #) and to be honest I still think it is very good; in my situation I would weight view angle and black depth equally. I also got it at a really great price. I want to ask how much price influences the ratings. With all the dynamic pricing that goes on now, it would seem difficult to really factor price into these scores.
Happy that you like your TV. We agree that taking price into account would be too difficult and this is why we don't weight this factor into our scores. We measure the TV performance only. Take a look at our scoring chart here.
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Your site is awesome!! Thank you! Btw, did you get the chance to test out the input lag times for the E70-C3?
Unfortunately, no, we have not had the opportunity. We're going to be focusing on the upcoming 2016 models now, so it's very unlikely we'll be revisiting other sizes of the 2015 E-series.
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Hi, I recently purchased a Vizio E55-C1 and am somewhat disappointed in the picture / audio qualities when watching streaming video through one of the installed apps. In particular when I watch a movie on Netflix, the picture is far too grainy and it's difficult to watch. When I watch the same movie on Netflix through a Blu-Ray player connected to the E55-C1, the picture quality is much better. This behavior is consistent across a few movies I've watched. Is this behavior to be expected ? The other question has to do with audio quality. Is Dolby Digital 5.1 supported through the digital optical output ? It could be with my stereo, but all I can get out of the digital optical output is ProLogic. Thank you for all the good work you are doing on this web site.
For low quality sources (anything under 1080p), the Vizio E doesn't have the best upscaling capabilities so it would be normal that your bluray player give a better picture if it does the upscaling instead of the TV. To get 5.1 out of the optical output, you need to turn off 'TV Speakers' and set 'Digital Audio Out' to 'Bitstream'.
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The difference in price between the E48-C2 and the E50-C1 is approximately $70. Is it worth it for the bigger unit?
Not really. The difference isn't going to be noticeable.
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When playing back 24p content with the Clear Action setting on, does the backlight strobe at 48Hz or 120Hz?
Turning on Clear Action on 24p content won't make the backlight strobe. Unfortunately, you won't get different results from what happens when you just dim the backlight - there is no extra clarity produced. This is not the case with 60 hz video, for which 'Clear Action' does clarify movement.
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Do you expect that the 2016 models, besides the 4k, Will be better than or the same as the 2015 models? I want to get the E65u-d3. And I love the input lag on the d series 4k, But then again I love the contrast ratio of the 1080p series. But neither of them have motion interpolation, and for me, I need that.
We don't expect the picture quality of the 2016 E series to be very different, however the E65U-D3 advertises a (fake) refresh rate of 120Hz and clear action of 240. This is the same as the smaller models of the 2015 E series that have a 60Hz panel which doesn't support motion interpolation, so expect this feature to be absent.
We are not taking any more questions for this product because we no longer have it in our lab.