Reviewed on Apr 04, 2015

Vizio M Series 2015
TV REVIEW

SCORES ?
7.4 Overall
7.7 Movies & TV
7.1 Sports
8.0 Video Games
6.9 Living Room
6.4 Sound
Type: LED
Resolution: 4k
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz (except 55" and smaller)

The new Vizio M-Series for 2015 is a good budget 4k TV, and in some cases, even better than the P Series. As long as you don't expect a perfect TV, it is a good purchase.

Pros
  • Great contrast ratio.
  • Very low input lag.
Cons
  • Long motion blur trail on certain transitions (not all).
  • Poor viewing angle.

Check Price

43" M43-C1 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
49" M49-C1 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
50" M50-C1 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
55" M55-C2 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
60" M60-C3 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
65" M65-C1 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
70" M70-C3 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
75" M75-C1 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right
80" M80-C3 Amazon CHECK PRICE Right

Design

Vizio M Series 2015 Design
Curved: No

The 2015 Vizio M looks higher-end than last year's did. It even feels slightly more premium than the P Series.

This TV has a very wide stand with cast metal feet. It is very sturdy, but you will need a table as wide as the TV itself.

Stand
Vizio M Series 2015 Stand

Dimensions for 60" TV stand: 47" x 10"

Borders
Vizio M Series 2015 Borders
Borders : 0.59" (1.5 cm)

Thickness
Vizio M Series 2015 Thickness
Max Thickness : 2.6" (6.6 cm)

7.7 Movies & TV
Show Help
X
Score components:

Vizio M Series 2015 Movies

The Vizio M is a very good TV for watching movies. The blacks are very deep, and very uniform. You don't have to worry about any judder while watching 24 fps movies, so Blu-rays, streaming movies, and other movie sources will all look great.

You don't get 3D or HDR (which brightens the lighting of highlights), but the local dimming, which dims the backlight for dark portions of the picture, works pretty well.

7.8 Dark Scene
Show Help
X
Score components:

8.5 Contrast
Show Help
X
What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Black
Show Help
X
What it is: How much light pure black emits.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 0.040 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 0.010 cd/m2
:
0.024 cd/m2
White
Show Help
X
What it is: White brightness of our calibration.
When it matters: It doesn't matter much. This is mainly to standardize our black and contrast ratio measurements.
Good value: Close to our 100 cd/m2 target.
Noticeable difference: 20 cd/m2
:
101.3 cd/m2
Contrast
Show Help
X
What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
4233 : 1

This TV's contrast ratio is great. The local dimming feature did have an effect on the black level of our checkboard pattern, but it also affected the white boxes, which isn't good.

9.6 Black Uniformity
Show Help
X
What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Black Uniformity
Std. Dev.
Show Help
X
What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
0.633 %

The black uniformity was great, even when local dimming was turned off.

6.0 Local Dimming
Show Help
X
What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
Show Help
X
What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
Yes
Backlight
Show Help
X
What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
Full-Array

As with the E series, the local dimming dims the highlights. It darkens brighter objects on the screen considerably when they are alone on a dark background. In our test video, you can see that the white dot is darker than it should be. Of course, there is less blooming that way, but it's not good to have the object appear too dark. The P Series handled our test pattern better, and it has more zones, too.

0 3D
Show Help
X
What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Not Available
3D Type
Show Help
X
What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
No

10 Judder
Show Help
X
Score components:

10 24p Playback
Show Help
X
What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
Show Help
X
What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
Show Help
X
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60i
Show Help
X
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
Yes

10 Motion Interpolation
Show Help
X
What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps):
Show Help
X
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
Yes
Motion Interpolation (60 fps):
Show Help
X
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
Yes

5.3 HDR
Show Help
X
Score components:

6.1 Color Gamut
Show Help
X
What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Color Gamut
Wide Color Gamut
Show Help
X
What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
No
DCI P3 xy
Show Help
X
What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
69.20 %
DCI P3 uv
Show Help
X
What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
73.09 %
Rec 2020 xy
Show Help
X
What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
49.65 %
Rec 2020 uv
Show Help
X
What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
53.26 %

6.2 Peak Brightness
Show Help
X
What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; HDR content.
Peak 2% Window
Show Help
X
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
310 cd/m2
Peak 50% Window
Show Help
X
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 250 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
310 cd/m2

9.5 Gradient
Show Help
X
What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Color Depth
Show Help
X
What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
10 Bit

0 HDR Format Support
HDR10
Show Help
X
What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
No
Dolby Vision
Show Help
X
What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No

8.8 Color Accuracy
Show Help
X
Score components:

This TV's color capabilities are fine. A calibration would help make the colors look their best, as they're a bit too far off from ideal.

To improve the picture for free, use our suggested settings. They get you 95% of the way to ideal picture, and you can find them here.

8.5 Pre Calibration
Show Help
X
What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Pre Calibration Vizio M Series 2015 Pre Gamma Curve Vizio M Series 2015 Pre Color
White Balance dE
Show Help
X
What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.94
Color dE
Show Help
X
What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
3.4118
Gamma
Show Help
X
What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.25

The white balance calibration is really good by default under the 'Calibrated' picture mode. However, the colors are a bit off.

9.8 Post Calibration
Show Help
X
What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Post Calibration Vizio M Series 2015 Post Gamma Curve Vizio M Series 2015 Post Color
White Balance dE
Show Help
X
What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.17
Color dE
Show Help
X
What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.6420
Gamma
Show Help
X
What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.2

The red and blue colors couldn't be completely fixed, but the rest is great.

8.2 Resolution
Show Help
X
Score components:
  • 18% 480p
  • 29% 720p
  • 36% 1080p
  • 18% 4k

We had to increase sharpness to 25 for our 480p and 720p test, as otherwise it was really blurry. See Q&A for more details. The P Series didn't have that issue. The noise reduction features work, but they are not very effective. Also, setting 'Reduce Block Noise' to 'High' resulted in a drastic loss of sharpness, so we used Medium instead.

Upscaled 1080p content looks a lot better than on the P Series, under the exact same settings.

7.0 480p
Show Help
X
What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2015 480p

We had to increase sharpness to 25 for our 480p and 720p test, as otherwise it was really blurry. See Q&A for more details. The P Series didn't have that issue. The noise reduction features work, but they are not very effective. Also, setting 'Reduce Block Noise' to 'High' resulted in a drastic loss of sharpness, so we used Medium instead.

7.0 720p
Show Help
X
What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2015 720p

9.0 1080p
Show Help
X
What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2015 1080p

Upscaled 1080p content looks a lot better than on the P Series, under the exact same settings.

10 4k
Show Help
X
What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2015 4k

7.1 Sports
Show Help
X
Score components:

The screen has some darker patches, which could be a bit annoying when you're watching sports.

This TV also has more blur than is ideal, but that shouldn't be a problem for sports.

7.4 Motion Blur
Show Help
X
What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Motion Blur
Response Time
Show Help
X
What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
15.1 ms
Overshoot
Show Help
X
What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
16.4 ms
Backlight
Show Help
X
What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensible to flickering.
:
picture

Unfortunately, like the P Series, this TV has a very long trail following moving objects. In our picture, you can see that the brighter trail even continues outside the picture. This shouldn't be an issue with normal content, but it could be a problem for video games.

6.7 Gray Uniformity
Show Help
X
What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Gray Uniformity
Std. Dev.
Show Help
X
What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
3.743 %
DSE
Show Help
X
What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.198 %

With solid colors, you can see some dirty screen effect caused by the full array backlight. There's also a pretty significant amount of deviation to the uniformity.

8.0 Video Games
Show Help
X
Score components:

The sub-par motion handling is more obvious when gaming, so the Vizio M isn't the best choice for gamers looking for great picture from their TV.

The delay is very, very low, though. If you're less concerned with the look of the game and just want a TV that responds quickly when you input a command, this is a great option.

Included scores: 7.4 Motion Blur

9.6 Input Lag
Show Help
X
What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Input Lag
Input Lag
Show Help
X
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 50ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
18.5 ms
With Interpolation
Show Help
X
What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 50ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
43.9 ms
Outside Game Mode
Show Help
X
What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 50ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
103.6 ms

The input lag is really low when using the HDMI 5 input and turning on 'Game Low Latency'.

4.0 PC Monitor
Show Help
X
What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
X
What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
No
1080p @ 120Hz
Show Help
X
What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
X
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
X
What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
X
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
No

It doesn't support chroma 4:4:4 unfortunately at any resolution/refresh rate. This doesn't matter for movies or even video games, you will only see a difference for a PC monitor. 4:2:2 works though.
1080p @ 120fps works (although only for the 60" model and up), which is great for gaming on a PC.

6.9 Living Room
Show Help
X
Score components:

This TV doesn't reflect too much light, and it's able to get pretty bright. If you want a budget TV that performs really well in a bright room, this is a good pick.

The same issue that is present in most LED TVs is an issue with this set. Colors begin to fade when you view this TV from the side, so if you need to watch TV from off to the side, a different set will be a better fit.

Included scores: 6.2 Peak Brightness

8.0 Reflections
Show Help
X
What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2015 Reflections Vizio M Series 2015 Bright Room
Reflection
Show Help
X
What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
1.8 %
Screen Finish
Show Help
X
What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Semi-gloss

It reflects an average amount of light.
It can get bright enough that it should be able to handle almost any room.

6.6 Viewing Angle
Show Help
X
What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
Show Help
X
What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
VA (except 49")
Viewing Angle
Show Help
X
What it is: Angle where the contrast drops to 50% of the contrast directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 30°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
19 °

This TV loses saturation when you are off-axis.

6.4 Sound

The sound is fairly accurate, with little distortion at normal listening volumes. Louder volumes do get quite distorted, though, and the accuracy suffers.

This TV's bass isn't great.

6.6 Frequency Response
Show Help
X
What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Frequency Response
Std. Dev. @ 75
Show Help
X
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 75 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.53 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 85
Show Help
X
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.64 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
Show Help
X
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
6.02 dB SPL
Max
Show Help
X
What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
92.1 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
Show Help
X
What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
126 Hz

Relatively good frequency response and loudness. However, at higher volumes, the frequency response gets worse and pumping artifacts may be present. The bass extension is not the best.

6.0 Total Harmonic Distortion
Show Help
X
What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2015 Total Harmonic Distortion
Distortion @ 75
Show Help
X
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 75 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.021
Distortion @ 85
Show Help
X
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.029
Distortion @ Max
Show Help
X
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.170

Low distortion at lower volumes, but the distortion becomes significant when the TV is pushed hard.

Software and Inputs

Vizio M Series 2015 Smart TV
Smart OS: Basic

Vizio's app selection is limited, as is its codec support. There is no web browser.

The back of the remote is a QWERTY keyboard, which is handy for inputting text. A smart remote like you get with higher-end LG and Samsung TVs would be better, though.

Remote
Vizio M Series 2015 Remote
Remote : QWERTY

Side Inputs
Vizio M Series 2015 Side Inputs

Rear Inputs
Vizio M Series 2015 Rear Inputs

Total Inputs
HDMI : 5
USB : 1
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 1
Component In : 1 (shared)
Composite In : 1 (shared)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
Show Help
X
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
Show Help
X
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
Show Help
X
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
Show Help
X
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : No
ARC : Yes (HDMI 1)
USB 3 : No
HDCP 2.2 : Yes (HDMI 1,2,5)
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : Yes

Misc

Pixels
Vizio M Series 2015 Pixels

Other
60i: Yes
Power Consumption : 113 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 250 W
Firmware : 1.0.6

Conclusion Amazon CHECK PRICE Right

For the price, the new M Series for 2015 is a really good 4k TV. It upscales 1080p better than the P Series, however, its local dimming is not as good. The two main downsides to this TV are the long motion blur trail and the loss of saturation at an angle.

SCORES ?
7.4 Overall
7.7 Movies & TV
7.1 Sports
8.0 Video Games
6.9 Living Room
6.4 Sound

Other Recommendations by Size

The Vizio M43-C1 is a great budget option, and is the best choice if you're looking for a 4k TV at a lower price point.

For better picture quality, pick up the Samsung UN40JU7100. It has a great smart remote, better motion handling, and is also better at upscaling low-resolution media. It’s not a huge step up for those who only plan on watching 1080p or 4k content, though. See our review

The Samsung UN40JU6500 is somewhere between the Vizio M and the UN40JU7100. It has better overall picture quality than the M, but fewer features than the JU7100. Pick this up if you don’t mind a TV without a movie playback option or 120 hz interpolation. See our review

Pick up the Vizio M50-C1 if you want a good budget 4k TV. Its picture quality isn't as good as more expensive models, but it's very close.

The Samsung UN50JU7100 is an upgrade, if you’re willing to spend the money. It has better overall picture quality and a more impressive (and still improving) smart TV platform. If you want the best 4k TV in this size range, this is the TV to get. See our review

If you want a Samsung TV but don’t want to pay quite as much as the JU7100 costs, the Samsung UN50JU6500 is a pretty good choice. It has less blur than the M, but doesn’t have as many viewing options. Its picture quality is similar to the JU7100. See our review

You can get a better 4k TV for more money, but the M55-C2 is the best option for the price. Pick it up if you want a good budget option.

The Samsung UN55JU7100 is a better TV, though it costs a lot more money. Gamers and sports fans in particular will appreciate the lower amount of motion blur, and its superior upscaling means TV and DVDs will look great. This is the best 4k TV we’ve seen so far this year. See our review

You could also opt for the Samsung UN55JU6500. It has picture quality that is nearly as good, but it only has a 60 hz panel, and no 24p playback option. If you don’t mind having limited viewing options, this isn’t a bad choice for a 4k TV. See our review

The Vizio M60-C3 is the best budget 4k TV available, so stick with it if you're just looking for a good deal.

The best overall choice for a 4k TV, though, is going to cost you. You’ll pay a lot more for the Samsung UN60JU7100 than you would for a Vizio M, but you get better overall picture, better smart features, and a smaller stand. Given how wide the M’s stand is, that’s a big plus. See our review

The Vizio P602ui-B3 is nearly identical to the Vizio M, but with worse upscaling and better local dimming. If you really want to use local dimming (though we don’t recommend it), pick up this TV instead of the M. See our review

There's no better deal for a 65" 4k TV than the M65-C1. Unless you want the absolute best picture quality, or a wide viewing angle, it's a good choice.

The Samsung UN65JU7100 is the best 4k TV we’ve seen this year. It costs a bit more than the Vizio M, but the better upscaling, overall picture quality, and smart features are worth it. You also get the point-and-click remote, which is a great way to navigate the menu. See our review

If you really want a TV that maintains color accuracy at an angle, the LG 65UF7700 is an option. Its overall picture quality is not great, though. It has poor contrast, bad uniformity, and more blur than is ideal. Don’t grab this TV unless you really want the wide viewing angle. See our review

The price for the Vizio M70-C3 is very low for a 4k TV of this size, so it's the best deal for most people. You can get a better overall 4k TV, but you'll be paying a lot more money.

If you want an enormous, top-quality TV, pick up the Samsung UN75JU7100. It has less blur than the Vizio M, better upscaling, a snazzier design, and a great smart remote. You’ll pay quite a lot more for the JU7100, but it’s worth the upgrade – especially if you’re a gamer or a sports fan. See our review

We don’t recommend picking up the LG 70UF7700 unless you need to watch your TV off-axis. It has a wide viewing angle, but it reflects too much light and its contrast and black uniformity are bad. In short, it doesn’t look great in any lighting situation. See our review

Questions Found an error?

Let us know what is wrong in this question or in the answer.

Email:

Questions & Answers

231 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
89
RTINGS you guys have phenomenal reviews. The Vizio M50-C1 is the single lowest quality product I have ever bought, electronic or not.
They're both a dull, foggy picture. Yellow and green lines occasionally and literally slice through video on both Vizio televisions. This is not a quality product unless I bought two duds. Overall, this level of quality is unacceptable, and the lauding Vizio has received is spurious at best, from RTINGS as well.
We've not encountered that issue of yellow and green lines, and since it's happening on both TVs, it seems likely that it might be an issue with the source. What are you watching when you're encountering this issue?
66
Do you know if the 2015 Vizio M55-C2 uses an IPS panel?
We will be checking that out as soon as we see an M55-C2 in stores, and we'll post an update with our findings.
61
Can you please tell me your honest opinion? Which one is better, the new M-series or the P-series? I really can't decide.
To make it short, get the M, unless you really care about local dimming.
56
Was your review unit supplied by Vizio?
No. We always buy the TVs ourselves. We don't want manufacturers to cherry-pick the review samples to get a better review. We bought our Vizio M 60" on Amazon.com.
46
Additional Review Notes

E-Series vs M-Series vs P-Series

We are keeping all TVs that we review for a few months after our reviews, so we were able to do a side by side comparison of the Vizio E60-C3, the M60-C3 and the P602ui-B3 (in that order in the picture).

Overall, the E isn't as good as the M or P. It is only 1080p and it has worse screen uniformity. It also doesn't have motion interpolation. However, the E actually has less motion blur than the M and P, which is a bit of a surprise.

The M and the P are very similar. They have the same motion blur and overall picture quality. The only differences are the stand, the design (the M feels higher-end), the 1080p upscaling (better on the M), the maximum luminosity (the P can get 25% brighter) and the local dimming (better on the P). The differences are minimal, so unless you specifically care about one of those elements, get the cheaper of the two.

As a side note, if you want to know something that isn't covered in our review (or is not covered as well as you would like), let us know and we will test it out.

HDMI 1-4 vs HDMI 5

HDMI 5 behaves differently than the rest of the HDMI inputs. It has lower input lag:

HDMI 1-4HDMI 5
Game Low Latency Off 103.6 84
Game Low Latency On 45.2 18.5
Motion Interpolation 105.4 83.9

Also, the upscaling behaves differently:

HDMI 1-4 480p Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 480p Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 480p Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 480p Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 480p Sharpness 25

HDMI 1-4 480p Sharpness 25

HDMI 5 480p Sharpness 25

HDMI 5 480p Sharpness 25

HDMI 1-4 720p Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 720p Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 720p Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 720p Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 720p Sharpness 25

HDMI 1-4 720p Sharpness 25

HDMI 5 720p Sharpness 25

HDMI 5 720p Sharpness 25

HDMI 1-4 1080p Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 1080p Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 1080p Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 1080p Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 4k Sharpness 0

HDMI 1-4 4k Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 4k Sharpness 0

HDMI 5 4k Sharpness 0

Clear Action

As with the P, the 'Clear Action' feature doesn't work. It only slightly reduces the backlight, without making any visible change to the motion blur. The feature works well on the E.

Blur reduction features

Vizio split the 'Smooth Motion Effect' feature into sliders: 'Reduce Judder' and 'Reduce Motion Blur'. Both settings interpolate motion and create the soap opera effect (even 'Reduce Judder').

Note that the long lighter motion blur trail problem is the same no matter the settings you choose for those options.

'Reduce Judder' affects 24Hz and 30Hz inputs. Here are pictures of all different values, when fed 30 fps.

Reduce Judder 0

Reduce Judder 0

Reduce Judder 1

Reduce Judder 1

Reduce Judder 2

Reduce Judder 2

Reduce Judder 3

Reduce Judder 3

Reduce Judder 4

Reduce Judder 4

Reduce Judder 5

Reduce Judder 5

Reduce Judder 6

Reduce Judder 6

Reduce Judder 7

Reduce Judder 7

Reduce Judder 8

Reduce Judder 8

Reduce Judder 9

Reduce Judder 9

Reduce Judder 10

Reduce Judder 10

'Reduce Motion Blur' affects a 60Hz input. Here are pictures of all the different values, when fed 60 fps.

Reduce Motion Blur 0

Reduce Motion Blur 0

Reduce Motion Blur 1

Reduce Motion Blur 1

Reduce Motion Blur 2

Reduce Motion Blur 2

Reduce Motion Blur 3

Reduce Motion Blur 3

Reduce Motion Blur 4

Reduce Motion Blur 4

Reduce Motion Blur 5

Reduce Motion Blur 5

Reduce Motion Blur 6

Reduce Motion Blur 6

Reduce Motion Blur 7

Reduce Motion Blur 7

Reduce Motion Blur 8

Reduce Motion Blur 8

Reduce Motion Blur 9

Reduce Motion Blur 9

Reduce Motion Blur 10

Reduce Motion Blur 10

Firmware issues

Reviewed version: 1.0.6

Very often in our testing, even if 'Reduce Motion Blur' and 'Reduce Judder' were set to 0, the picture became interpolated. We had to reset it by setting 'Reduce Motion Blur' to 1 and then 0 again. Hopefully Vizio fixes this issue in a future firmware update, because it was frustrating.

Update: As a workaround for the soap opera effect issue turning on by itself, turn on 'Game Low Latency'. The downside of this approach is it will also disable 'Film Mode'.

Update: Firmware version 1.2.23-UHD appears to have fixed the interpolation issue.

Also, we are not sure if it is intended or not, but another slight issue is that we had to increase 'Sharpness' in our 720p and 480p upscaling test to 25 (from 0). With the P Series, we could leave it at 0 for these tests, but it was blurrier on the M if we didn't increase it on those resolutions.

Local Dimming

The local dimming on the M behaves slightly differently under the 'Calibrated' picture mode than it does in 'Calibrated Dark'. It is more aggressive under 'Calibrated Dark', but the difference is very subtle:

Local dimming off

Local dimming off

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated'

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated'

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated Dark'

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated Dark'

Local dimming off

Local dimming off

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated'

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated'

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated Dark'

Local dimming on under 'Calibrated Dark'

The local dimming looks a lot more like on the E than the P. Like the E, it dimmed our white dot and cross in our tests, probably to reduce the appearance of blooming. The P keep the original brightness of the white elements. Therefore, if you care about the local dimming feature, the P is better, because it doesn't mess with the picture as much.

Differences between sizes

[Section coming soon]
46
Not a question but rather a comment. I own the 55 inch version of this TV and find that the "Clear Action" feature actually does improve motion blur quite dramatically. It does not merely dim the backlight but rather activates a strobing effect. It's distracting in bright rooms but quite tolerable in a light-controlled environment. It has a big impact on video games and deserves to be highlighted.
It's possible that Clear Action works on different sizes. If you don't mind sending us an email with your TV's firmware version, we'd like to investigate this further.
33
The 60" M/P series are likely Sharp panels. I have seen in most cases trailing has been fairly significant with Sharp-based VA panels. Will you ever likely test a 43"-50" version of the M-series to see if panel manufacturer has any bearing on motion quality?
It isn't practical for us to test every size as in-depth. However, once the demo models are in stores, we will bring a USB drive with our test materials and test multiple sizes on site. We will report back with results and comment on the differences.
23
You guys have the best reviews by far! I have a question: how about HEVC support?
The M and the P played our HEVC test file (4k@60fps), but they were having problems with it. It had judder and the sound cut a few times. In comparison, the Samsung JU7100 handled the same file perfectly.
20
Can you change the 4:4:4 spec to say "Yes" and add the same note as you put on the Sony X850C? The Vizio can do 4:4:4 4K @ 30 FPS just like the Sony does. Also can you add a note that says that the Vizio M-series smaller than 60 inches cannot do 1080p @ 120 FPS?
Our unit can't do chroma 4:4:4 @ 30 fps, but we will add the note about 1080p @ 120 fps. Thanks for pointing that omission out to us.
18
My M50-C1 was just updated to firmware version 1.3.15. I haven't seen any release notes from Vizio for this update. I noticed that under the picture settings on my TV that the option for 'Reduce Motion Blur' is missing. Other than that, have you found any other changes?
We have not received that update on our 60" model. We'll keep our eyes peeled and we will post if we notice any major changes if/when we do get the update.
17
Was this tv tested at 120hz, 1080p, running from a computer? If so, what video card was used? Thanks.
Yes, and it works on HDMI 5 only. We are using a GTX 960.
15
What devices do you recommend plugging in the HDMI 5 port in the Vizio M60-C3? For example, would the PlayStation 4 be a good choice?
The PS4 would be a good choice, particularly since you get lower input lag. It would also be good for connecting a PC, for the same reason.
13
I did not see this mentioned here or elsewhere: ARC only works with HDMI input 1. You cannot use port 5 with ARC.
Yes, that's a good point. Something buyers may want to keep in mind.
12
Why does there seem to be a decrease in quality when using HDMI port 5, compared to the other 4 HDMI ports? Could this be a software bug? Do you think the same over-sharpening bug that was affecting the P series is affecting the other HDMI ports?
This is not really a software bug. It is intended, which is why Vizio says to use HDMI 1-4 for better picture quality (for example, when you plug a 1080i source into HDMI 5, there is a warning on the screen that advises you to use 1-4 instead). HDMI 5 probably has a simpler processing pipeline to allow for additional bandwidth, as well as lower input lag. The over-sharpening bug that you mentioned on the P Series was only present in a earlier firmware version last year. Vizio fixed it in a firmware update.
11
I tried to get 1080p @ 120 FPS to work on my 2015 55" Vizio M55 TV. However, it doesn't allow 1080p @ 120 FPS even when I set the graphics card to show resolutions that the TV was not reporting that it could handle. You said that you had to force 1080p @ 120 FPS in order for it to work. Can you post the timings that you used for that? It locked up on me when I tried to force 1080p @ 120 FPS. Also did you see any issues when you tried 4K @ 60 FPS? The mouse disappears on a white background when I try it with my M55. I tried many different certified 18 MB/sec cables and cable lengths. None of them worked properly for those two resolutions and frame rates. Do you think it is possible that 2015 M-series TVs under 60" do not support 1080p @ 120 FPS while sizes bigger than that do?
1080p @ 120Hz worked with the timing set to Automatic. It didn't required anything special except creating the custom resolution in the nvidia panel. 4k @ 60hz worked no problem (no chroma 4:4:4 though).
It is possible that smaller sizes don't support these frame rates. If somebody else confirm this problem too, we will update our review with that information.
10
Just wondering if you contacted Vizio about the soap opera effect bug, and if so, did they have a response?
We have not spoken to Vizio about the bug.
10
I'm concerned about the reported difference between the upscaling of sub-4K content to 4k on HDMI 1-4 compared to HDMI 5 which happens to be the only HDCP 2.2 port that can handle 4K@60Hz. Furthermore, are the last set of pictures in the QA section labeled 4K indicating the PQ resulting from native 4k sources on HDMI 1-4 and HDMI5?
Are these latter pictures saying that inputing a 4K source into HDMI 5 will result in a significant decrease in picture quality than if it was input into HDMI 1-4? The reason I ask is because I have an Onkyo TX-NR636 which I can simply use as my upscaler, but it won't matter if PQ of HDMI 5 sucks regardless of the input resolution. I'm very concerned that buying the M80-C3 will mean that in the future my UHD blu-ray device will be relegated to HDMI 5 b/c it's the only one to accept HDCP 2.2, and that as a result the PQ will be sub-par.
Thanks for your help!
Yes, the pictures labeled 4k means with a native 4k input. It's not a significant difference, and not really a of decreased quality on 4k input. The biggest difference is for the lower resolutions, especially interlaced 1080i.
You'll be fine to use your Onkyo for upscaling. The overall picture will be good.
9
I have switched two M50-C1 TVs now because in almost all scenes that have a uniform color and contrast, a vertical separation is very evident directly in the center of the screen. It is only evident on Calibrated and Calibrated Dark picture settings. I took this picture. I can't figure out if it's a color processing issue, brightness of the LEDs, or something else. Regardless, I now understand that this is not an issue limited to a random defective TV. it is endemic in the entire line. Is anyone else noticing this, and is there anything that can be done?
That looks bad. Our M60-C3 doesn't have that problem. While you are the first that report this issue to us, the fact that you have exchanged it for another unit and still have the same issue means it is not just a one off problem. Thanks for letting us know and sharing your photo. If other visitors also report this issue, we will update our review to mention it on the 50" size.
8
I was wondering if you would expect any difference in performance between different size panels of this model, and if so, what? Also, how many of the negative issues that you experienced with this model could potentially improve with a software update? Thank you so much for your awesome reviews!!
For the differences between sizes, we will investigate more and update the review to include them. Usually, it's only uniformity and sometimes motion blur that varies, unless there is one size that has an IPS panel (like the 55" P for example, or last year's M 49" and 55"). In that case, the viewing angle is better, but the contrast ratio is worse.
Vizio doesn't have a good track record of stable firmware. They release updates often, but they sometimes introduce new issues. They will probably fix the motion interpolation feature turning on by itself, and maybe (but less likely) the under-sharpening of 480p and 720p. It wouldn't change the score of our review though, because we just worked around these flaws.
Update: The interpolation issue has been fixed in firmware version 1.2.23-UHD.
7
I don't understand the 4:4:4 issue and using as a computer monitor. HDMI 5 works, but not well?
Chroma subsampling is a process used to reduce the bandwidth of an image by removing some of the color information. Normally, it's not noticeable, but if you are using a TV as a PC monitor, that extra information can be the difference between blurry and sharp, clear text.
Chroma 4:4:4 means that no color information is sacrificed, and a TV that supports it can work well as a PC monitor.
HDMI 5 behaves differently from the other inputs on this TV (different input lag & upscaling), but it still does not support Chroma 4:4:4.
7
For the 2014 Vizio selection, it was said that there wasn't a huge difference between the E series and M series. It was recommended for the average user to go for the E series instead because of the small difference in quality for the substantial price increase.
With 2015 upon us, Rtings has reviews for both the E and M series respectively. My question is, how substantial of a quality increase is present considering the roughly $350-450 price increase between these offerings?
Do you think there is a considerable jump in quality for this year's lineup that I should purchase the M-series instead of the wallet-friendly E-series?
The biggest differences are that the M is a 4k TV, and it also has worse motion blur than the E.
The M also has slightly better uniformity, but not enough to justify the upgrade. On the whole, not a big difference between the two. If you don't care about 4k, or if you want a TV with less blur, the E is still a better deal.
7
A simple question,the USB is it 2.0 or 3.0? And what processor is used on the M50-C1? Thank you.
The USB is 3.0, and the processor is a 'V6 Six-Core Processor' (quad-core GPU + dual-core CPU).
7
I'm considering getting an M49 to use as a PC monitor. I was wondering if you tested the 4:4:4 chroma capabilities on the IPS panel models. Would the panel technology even make a difference in 4:4:4 support, or is it strictly a firmware issue? Can you recommend a low input lag 48-50" TV that supports 4:4:4 chroma subsampling at 4k@60Hz.
It's more to do with the chipset than anything, so we don't expect any IPS versions of this TV to support 4:4:4. That said, you can find IPS and VA TVs both that have chroma 4:4:4, and IPS TVs actually work better for use as a monitor, because the viewing angle is important when you're sitting close to a large screen.
The best TV we've seen this year, in terms of low input lag and support for chroma 4:4:4, is the Samsung JU7100. It doesn't have an IPS panel, but the picture quality is very good (good contrast, decent uniformity, little motion blur), and it can do 4:4:4 at 4k@60hz, which not that many TVs we've seen can.
6
As of today April 2015 it seem like both the 2015 M series and the 2014 P series are pretty much the same prices or within a couple hundred of each other so the recommendation of going for the cheaper doesn't really help me try to figure out which one to choose. I would have thought prior to reading your excellent review of the new M Series that the P series having more zones in which to local dimming and would have an edge over the 2015 M series. The big unknown for me is what improvements in software can be done to improve either series and will Vizio commit to making the investment to improve them on older models like the P vs the advantage of the hardware in each set i.e. M's 32 zones vs P's 64 zones. Is it too early in the 2015 model year to answer that?
It is a bit too early to answer that. We don't really know what Vizio has planned for the P this year. Maybe they will announce it at their press event next week? As of today, they are really too close together, both in terms of price and picture quality. That doesn't seem right, but it makes sense if they plan to renew and improve the P later this year (probably in fall, like the P was released last year).
6
I purchased a M702i-B3 about a month ago. I have been very disappointed in the picture quality, particularly the dirty screen effect (i.e. poor grey uniformity) while watching hockey. It is nearly as bad with soccer and football. I have decided to return this Vizio TV, as I am not happy with how the picture compares to our plasma HDTVs, particularly for sports.
I had read on this website that grey uniformity on the 2014 P series was much better, and that the score was even better than the 2015 M series. Is the picture on the 2015 M series (current firmware) superior for sports than the 2014 P series?
Thanks, and keep up the good work. Your website is the best for impartial picture quality reviews that I have found.
Regards,
Ryan Bray
The 2015 Vizio M and the Vizio P currently have identical picture quality. They both have good uniformity, but they also have a long motion blur trail on fast-moving objects. Because of that blur, they're not the best option for watching sports. Keep in mind that while there are better LED TVs for sports viewing, no LED TV can match a plasma TV for motion handling or uniformity.
6
Quick Question. Yesterday while testing Netflix at my house, I couldn't seem to get 4k resolution. I have an AC router with 100mbps internet speed. I pay for Netflix 4k and have playback set to High. Did you find any issues while testing? Any suggestions?
We didn't have any trouble streaming 4k Netflix. Try disconnecting your other connected devices from the network and see if you get improved streaming. It might also be that the signal is weak, in which case relocating the router might get you a stronger connection.
5
I have a Pioneer SC-77 receiver with 4k upscaling. What is your recommendation - use the upscaling from the receiver or what is built into the TV?
Try both and see which you like better. There's no hard rule about receiver vs. TV upscaling; it depends on how good both devices are. The M's 1080p upscaling is quite good, but lower resolutions aren't great.
5
How does the M-series 4k compare to the LG uf7600 4k? Which would you recommend?
We haven't reviewed the UF7600 yet, so we can't offer a direct comparison. The biggest difference will be that the M has a VA panel (good contrast, poor viewing angle) and the UF7600 has an IPS panel (poor contrast, good viewing angle). If you're between those two TVs, that should be the main deciding factor.
5
Is this a 8-bit or 10-bit panel? Would it make more sense to wait for 10-bit 4k panel if this is indeed 8-bit?
We don't currently test for 8 vs 10-bit, so we can't say for sure. There really isn't any 10-bit content available at the moment, though, so there's no need to wait. Even when there is, the difference between the two shouldn't be significant.
5
Can you post the color charts for this TV? Everyone is curious to see if it clips Red early like the P-series is said to do. We are also curious to see if the JU7100 resolves more of the Rec.2020 spectrum than this M-series does.
We're in the process of testing all of our TVs for color. You can expect to see the results added to the review sometime in the next week or so.
5
Between the M-series and the JU6500 I know it has been stated on the site here that the superior TV for gaming is the JU6500. That said, the M-series allows for gaming with interpolation on and still has input lag that is average.
Does having the interpolation on solve the motion blur issues with the M-series for games? I want to have the 'soap opera effect' on for video games, provided the lag is still reasonable. Am I incorrect in relating interpolation to the 'soap opera effect'? Thank you for all the reviews, I just need help picking a TV mainly for games, and it is hard to find this info anywhere else.
The length of the motion blur trail doesn't change with interpolation, so no, it doesn't solve the issue. And "soap opera effect" is just another name for motion interpolation.
Motion interpolation can also introduce artifacts to the picture, which might make fast-moving objects disappear, so it's not really ideal for gaming. You're better off getting a TV with less blur and going without interpolation.
5
Hi! Trying to decide between this M-series, the E-series, and the Samsung J6200 or J6300 series (all 40-43" size). I primarily watch movies (SD and HD) via Apple TV, and tennis a few times a year. Also use an XBOX 360, but I am not the world's most demanding gamer. Living room situation, and TV is next to a window that often spills significant light. Thoughts on the best option?
The M-series is the best option of that bunch. It has good overall picture quality, and it gets brighter than those Samsung TVs, so it's better equipped to deal with the bright light.
5
Very close to purchasing this TV, however I keep reading conflicting issues when wanting to use headphones. Is it possible without much difficulty?
There's no headphone jack and no built-in Bluetooth, so it's not the most convenient thing in the world to connect headphones. All you really need to do, though, is get the right adapter to connect to the TV's optical audio out, so it's not especially difficult.
4
Looking to get a 65" TV, mainly for watching TV shows and sports, as well as some movies and occasional video games. I have the Vizio 2015 M series, Samsung JU6500, and JU7100 on my list. I know the JU7100 is the best, but it also is considerably more expensive than the Vizio. I'm coming from a 50" Panasonic ST60. I love it, and I'm only replacing because I want to go bigger.
The M has too much blur to be a great choice for gaming or sports, and the JU6500 doesn't have a movie playback option, which means 24p content (Blu-rays, DVDs) will have judder. The JU7100 would have all of your bases covered, but if it's too pricey and you don't mind judder when watching 24p, the JU6500 is a decent cheaper alternative.
4
I'm trying to decide between getting the Vizio M70-C3 and a Sony XBR-65X850C. The value seems to be with the Vizio, as I get a larger TV for less money, but what do you think I should go with for the overall better TV? (I watch lots of TV shows and sports).
If you're not a gamer, the Vizio M70-C3 should be fine. It has more blur than the X850C, but we haven't noticed significant blur while watching sports, so you should be fine to go with it.
4
Interested in getting the M60-C3. Do you guys happen to have any video of the motion blur? I've been trying to find a good example of it to see if I want to go forward and buy this tv or not. It's between this one and the Samsung JU7100.
The motion blur is hard to represent in a video. We used to capture videos for motion blur a few years ago, but we switched to a pursuit camera picture instead (a camera on a rail that follows the moving object with a long exposition). The resulting picture really represents what your eyes see when you follow a moving object. So compare our motion blur pictures, and look at the trail on the left of our logo. If you don't mind the longer trail, go for the Vizio.
4
Kindly clarify more for the below review comment on Vizio M65-C1 model sports mode quality.
"The screen has some smudginess to it, which could be a bit annoying when you're watching sports."
Is it related to refresh rate problem? 120Hz is not enough? Is that so noticeable? I watch lots of sports and want to make sure this is NOT an serious concern. Kindly clarify.
No, not related to blur. There are a few darker patches on the screen, which is typical of LED TVs, and is something that is pretty noticeable when watching sports. Blur on sports shouldn't be an issue.
We've updated the review to clarify this.
3
Hi, Can you talk a bit about how you tested 4:4:4 Chroma? IE what was the source, and did you test all HDMI ports? Thanks!
Tried HDMI 1 @ 30hz, HDMI 5 @ 30hz and HDMI 5 @ 60hz, with our GTX 960 and same setup and cable that worked on the Samsung JU7100 at 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4. None worked at 4:4:4.
3
I see you have 4:4:4 "no" can explain further on that? Does this mean they are not using the newer full bandwidth chips? Could this be a future firmware update?
It is not a bandwidth issue, because even 4k @ 24Hz didn't support 4:4:4, which is within the HDMI 1.4b spec. It is doubtful that it can be fixed in a firmware update.
3
You seem to give almost all recently reviewed TVs a 5.7 rating for viewing angle. Are they all really exactly the same? Do you think you could clarify this rating scale?
The viewing angle score is a formula based on our 50% contrast ratio angle measurement. It's a linear scale from 5 to 10, where 10 is the best value that we measured (currently 77°, on a plasma), and 5 the lowest (15°, on a cheap LED). The scores are always calculated from the measurement numbers, so if we were to review a TV with 5°, it will shift slightly the scores on the rest of the TVs automatically.
3
Hi there; love this site. I bought a 42" Vizio m2i-b to replace our beloved but dead Samsung UN40D6000 (bought in 2011). Calibrated it based on some info you provided. Watched a recorded Deadliest Catch and thought the visual quality as amazing as the old Samsung. Then watched a recorded American Idol and the visuals were kinda awful, with fuzzy backgrounds and blurring. Did not notice a difference in quality watching these taped shows on the old Samsung. Any insight? What TV would come closest to the old Samsung in quality? Thanks
It's likely because Fox is a 720p channel, whereas Discovery is 1080i. Your M just might not be as good at upscaling 720p. Try enabling the 'Reduce Signal Noise' and 'Reduce Block Noise' settings. That might help clear up compression artifacts and clarify the video.
In general, Samsung TVs are better than Vizio sets at upscaling low resolutions.
3
First of all, thank you so very much for all of the hard work that you do! Your reviews are thorough and very informative. This is one of my "go-to" websites for HDTV reviews. My question is in regards to sound quality. On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being outstanding, where does this TV fall? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also, if I recall correctly, I thought this year HDTVs were going to be reviewed for sound quality. Is that still in the works? Thanks again, and keep up the great work!
We're still developing our sound testing, so we can't comment on the M-series' capabilities just yet. We should have our results for sound out by the end of June.
3
I'm in the market to get a new 4k TV in the next two weeks and I am having trouble deciding which one is best for me. I have narrowed it down to three. It's between the Vizio M, the Samsung JU6500, and Samsung JU7100. I am an avid sports fan and will be watching football, baseball, and basketball the good majority of the time. Are the Samsungs really worth the extra cash for sports viewing?
The picture is a bit better, but the Vizio is very good for the price. You'll be fine with the M-series.
3
"The sub-par motion handling is more obvious when gaming, so the Vizio M isn't the best choice for gamers looking for great picture from their TV. The delay is very, very low, though"
So which is it? Is it bad or not? Is it genuinely noticeable while gaming? Any onscreen examples of the motion blur while gaming? Is this applicable even on HDMI 5 with game mode on?
The blur is genuinely noticeable with some colors, yes, and this is also true on HDMi 5 with GLL enabled. In particular, there was a very long trail on a dark red object moving against a light blue background (similar to our logo), and also a faint trail with black against a similar light blur.
We'll try to find another example or two and see about uploading a video that demonstrates the problem.
Overall, it's not horrid - you can still play games without going crazy - but since we've seen other TVs that don't have this issue, the M won't be a go-to recommendation for gamers.
3
What content did you use to test 4K? Was it streaming Netflix in 4K?
For our 4k test under 'Resolution' we use a 4k still image so to be able to compare the picture with other TVs. We don't use Netflix 4k or other streaming services for this test because we don't have perfect control over the feed quality. For similar reasons, most of our tests are done with a computer.
2
The 2015 Vizio equals or betters the Samsung in almost every single category. However, it received a shockingly low score in the extra features category with absolutely no explanation for that conclusion. So what are the extra features of the Samsung that make it so much better? Is the lack of Netflix one of those bonus features? Is the fact that it has to have an additional cable connector one of those bonus features? I think your reviews are normally spot on. However, in this case I sense a case of bias. It really appears that you simply didn't want the Vizio to score higher than the much more expensive Samsung JU7100.
The extra features are not part of the overall score. The overall score includes only picture quality (and input lag). Samsung TVs score better for extra features because of 3D, full web browser, mouse pointer remote and better codec support.
2
I'm torn between three TVs currently: the Vizio P652UI-B2 ($1,699), Vizio M65-C1 ($1,699) or Samsung UN65H7150 ($1,849).
I want to get the best overall TV for between $1,600 - $2K. I never game, so input lag is of no concern. I have the Samsung S5 and have used it to record 4K video, so 4K would be nice, but isn't a MUST-have.
I don't currently have Netflix, nor a Roku/Apple TV, etc. I do stream movies online and display it onto the TV with an HDMI cable. I plan on keeping the TV for a long time.
Which should I get?
All three have comparable contrast and uniformity. The H7150 has a glossy screen and less motion blur than the Vizio TVs, though, so it's best for overall picture quality. It also has a fancy smart remote.
The glossy screen is only important if you have ambient light in the room with your TV (it's not good if light is directly opposite the screen), and motion blur might not be that important to you if you don't watch sports.
If those features don't matter to you, you should get the Vizio M. It has better upscaling capabilities than the Vizio P, and is otherwise comparable to the H7150.
2
Will the 55" panel be IPS? I have the need for the wider viewing angle of IPS, despite the lower contrast ratio. Alternatively, is there a 2015 4K VA-based model with great PQ that doesn't lose color saturation as the angle decreases?
We haven't confirmed whether the 55" is IPS, but we'll be testing for that as soon as we seen that size in stores. Unfortunately, all VA TVs lose color saturation at wider angles.
2
I'm looking to purchase a newer 55 inch TV, It's between the 2015 Vizio M-series, P-series, or maybe Samsung H7150, if the price drops. I watch a lot of Blu-rays, sports, and gaming. I know the Samsung would fit the bill, but it's $1,400. I can find the M-series for $1,000 and the P-series for $1,200. First question is about gaming on a 4K TV. How is the scaling as far as PQ and lag? Last question: is there a major difference between the IPS panel on the P vs the VA panel on the M? I'd like to upgrade to 4k, but can't afford a $2,000 set. Would I regret buying the M series? Money is a concern.
The M upscales 1080p well, but lower resolutions poorly. The P upscales all of them poorly. The scaling won't introduce lag. It's also worth noting that both of these Vizio TVs have more motion blur than is ideal for sports and gaming.
There is a big difference in picture quality between IPS and VA. You would notice the lower contrast with IPS and the worse viewing angle with VA.
For your needs, and assuming you can afford it, the H7150 is the best bet for overall picture quality. You need to watch genuine 4k content for a 4k TV to be worth getting. For sub-4k gaming, sports, and TV watching, the H7150's better motion handling and native resolution of 1080p make it superior.
2
Which would you recommend between the 40" Sony W600B and the 43" Vizio M Series 2015? I'm not using it for gaming, only for normal everyday use, streaming Netflix and watching TV. I know all of the differences between the two, but I'm just wanting to know what your overall preference would be since they both have a rating of 8.0. Thank you!
It depends on your specific usage. If you plan on watching lots of 4k content on Netflix, you might want the M-series. If you expect most of your usage will be broadcast TV or sub-4k streaming, go with the Sony. We expect it has better upscaling, so anything 1080p and lower should look better. Apart from that, they have very similar overall picture quality.
2
I use my Xbox One for both movies and gaming. At this point, it's my only component hooked up to my new M. Input lag and movie quality are both important to me, but only if either are noticeable in "real world" settings (I lean towards picture quality for streaming video if I had to choose).. If you had to pick one, which input should I use? Would the changes in picture quality be noticeable to someone not using calibration software?
The visual differences aren't that apparent unless you go looking for them. Try HDMI 5 for the lower input lag, and if you find that you don't enjoy the look of things, switch over to one of the other inputs instead.
2
I am having a tough time deciding what my next TV should be. I am juggling the M-series 2015, the E-series, the Samsung H6350, or the Sony W600B, because they all have similar reviews and similar prices. I am a gamer and sports watcher as well. What would you recommend as the best option? Thanks!
Pick the Vizio E. The E-series has great motion handling and low input lag, as well as good contrast and black uniformity. It's the best gaming option on the list, and it will do well with sports, too.
2
Hello! I'm confused, is this M43-C1 120hz or 60hz refresh rate? I've seen a few dings on Amazon's reviews stating that it's false advertising and that the TV is only 60hz? Possible to clear this up? Thank you!
The M43-C1 is a 60 hz TV. Vizio lists what it calls the 'Effective Refresh Rate,' which is made up. It's technically not false advertising, although it is certainly misleading.
2
Will this TV support 1440p 60hz? I've heard of some TVs locking the refresh rate for 1440p at 30hz.
No. It only supports it at 30 hz.

Update: The Vizio M now support 1440p @ 60Hz and 1440p @ 120Hz.

2
I am torn between three TVs: the Vizio M43-C1, Samsung UN40JU6500, and Samsung UN40JU6700. I will use this for sports watching, movie watching (DirecTV, streaming on Hulu, Netflix, WWE Network, and UFC TV), I will also be gaming from a PS4. Thanks.
Get the M43-C1. The other two TVs can't play 24 fps without judder, so they're bad for movies. The M does have more blur than is ideal for gaming, but the judder-free 24p playback is more important.
2
The 65" M Series dropped to the equivalent price of Sony and Samsung's top 1080p tv for 2015. Samsung and Sony tend to be more reliable when it comes to reviews, so I was not considering Vizio, but is the the 4K capability worth it?
I will mostly be watching movies (Blu-ray/Netflix/Amazon), sports, and cable TV. Big concerns from the reviews are the SOE issue w/ lack of firmware fix options and upscaling sub-1080p content on ESPN and other networks.
The M-series is indeed a good choice for watching movies, but it's not ideal for sports or broadcast TV, and the firmware/SOE issue is indeed a problem. For your needs, you'll be better off sticking with a good 1080p TV, like the Samsung J6300.
Update: The SOE issue has been fixed by firmware version 1.2.23-UHD.
2
I just got the M80-C3 and I was unable to get the 1080p @ 120 FPS to work. It never would let me select higher than 1080p @ 60 FPS in the Nvidia control panel. However, my 2014 Vizio P-series with the updated firmware does 1080p @ 120 FPS with the same computer just fine.
Did you have any trouble getting 1080p @ 120 FPS to work with the 60" TV? I guess it is possible that the latest firmware disabled 1080p @ 120 FPS and that is why your TV with the original firmware worked and now it doesn't work with the new firmware. Has your 60" TV been updated with the latest firmware?
Our TV has the latest firmware, and we're still able to do 120 fps with no issues. You'll need to create a custom resolution setting and force it with your graphics card to make it work.
2
Hello. I bought the Vizio M60-C3 last week and have been very happy overall, but I just can't figure out the picture clarity/sharpness issues on regular programming. (The native 4K content from Netflix, Amazon, and YouTube has been awesome).
I've adjusted setting several times and some programs look stellar (like live sports such as Golf & Baseball thus far) but most regular shows seemed pixelated and lack sharpness. I think of how crisp shows look streaming on my iPhone and wonder why I can't replicate that quality on an expensive TV?
Also, the sight/distance recommendations are unusual to me. My sofa is 10ft away from the 60" 4k Vizio, which is not close enough according to most charts. However, the closer I get the worse/more pixelated it looks, the farther away the shaper it seems. Wondering if I am in the minority on this?
I figured the M60 at $1,248 (Walmart) was a bang up deal, considering the positive reviews and feature-laden product. However, would I get more clarity/sharpness on an expensive 1080p TV, considering that is the native feed for cable? Or would buying just about any Samsung do the trick? (Either a lower-priced 1080p Samsung, or more expensive Samsung 55" 4K TV?). Or is it unrealistic to expect that "only" spending $750-$1,500 on a TV will get you a product that looks as sharp/clear as my $100 iPhone 6?
Your site has been tremendously helpful. Thank you.
The distance issue with your TV is likely related to the quality of the content you're watching. It's not just the resolution of the TV that is important, but also the resolution of the content - whichever resolution is lower. For example, if you're watching 720p material on a 4k TV, it's the distance for 720p material that will apply, so 10 feet is actually a bit too close (11.5 feet is ideal).
The M-series is very good at upscaling 1080p, so if that's the resolution of most of the material you watch, there's no need to trade for a different TV.
Ultimately, for ideal picture, you should watch 4k and 1080p material, and also try using our recommended settings. That combination should get the best possible picture out of your TV.
2
With the current reduced pricing on the M70-C3 esspecially at Costco, would that be your choice for best budget 70" 4K, even with the minor issues with lag/motion?
Yes. It's our favorite budget 4k TV, so we do recommend it.
2
I purchased the M60-C3 recently and have noticed a strange effect while watching a TV show with captions. When the captions appear, which are in bright white letters at the bottom of the screen, the rest of the picture gets significantly dimmer. It is very distracting to me. Could this be an effect of local dimming?
Yes, that's what is causing the issue, so disabling the dimming will fix the problem.
2
In your review, it seems as though using this unit as a PC monitor is not ideal, but is that just for general use or utilizing video content through a PC? I use a Mac Mini and Plex for my media station (as well as various streaming sources). Does the 4:4:4 only matter in regards to utilizing it in browsing fashion?
Additionally, as I am looking to upgrade to a 70" (primarily for gaming and movies). At a $2,000 price point, would this be the suggestion? Are new models on the way? I know this review is a little dated, so should I buy now or wait?
Great site, thanks for all the information (even if I only understand about half of it!)
4:4:4 mostly for using the PC as a monitor for productivity purposes. The M is definitely fine for connecting a media center PC.
The M-series is definitely our recommendation for a 4k TV at size and price point, so you should go for it. It has a bit more blur than ideal, but games will still look okay.
And we only expect a refresh of the M-series sometime in Spring 2016, so you should go ahead and buy now.
2
Just picked up the M60-C3. The first thing I did was calibrate it using the recommended settings. After watching everything I could from HD DVD at 1080i to Netflix 4K and even Blu-ray upscaled to 4K using a Sony BPD-6500 Blu-Ray player, one thing remained consistent: There was a lot of noise in lighter areas of the picture and clouds looked blown-out and very unnatural.
After playing with all of the picture settings, I just couldn't make it look much better. As a last-ditch effort, I reset the color calibration/white balance settings to default and it looks so much better now. Not sure if the firmware makes a difference or not, but mine has version 1.2.23-UHD.
That is our firmware version as well. The white balance settings are only guaranteed to work for out unit, so it makes sense that once in a while (as in your case), there are negative outcomes.
Glad you were able to fix the problem. Thanks for writing in!
1
Would you buy this TV or the Samsung H6350?
If you just want something for general use, the Vizio M is a better buy, because it is 4k and has better uniformity. It has a bit too much motion blur to be a top choice for sports or gaming, though. The H6350 has less blur, and might be a better option for those uses (though it does have higher input lag, which is also an issue for gaming).
1
Hi. I'm thinking about buying this TV. Is it better to leave local dimming off?
We've found that the feature darkens everything in dark scenes, which reduces blooming, but also dims parts of the screen that should be brighter. With bright scenes, we didn't notice it do much of anything. If you do get this TV, try it out and see if you prefer it on or off.
1
Just a quick question. I know it's somewhat possible for Vizio to release a firmware update where it could fix the motion blur reduction feature in the future, but can it possibly fix or lower the input lag as well? Thanks.
Yes, it's possible, but very unlikely.
1
Did you really tested the 1080p@120fps?
The M43-C1, M49-C1, M50-C1 & M55-C have 120Hz Effective Refresh Rate. The M60-C3, M70-C3, M65-C1, M75-C1 & M80-C3 have 240Hz Effective Refresh Rate.
In all the manuals, the HDMI port 5 High Velocity Mode is described in a note as: "Available for compatible gaming systems or high-performance PCs for display of 1080p @ 60 fps."
The P-series have the same port described as 1080p @ 120fps, except it does not work without getting black screen or game lockups, as reported by many in the AVS Forum P-series owners' thread, and also reported to Vizio suport. Vizio is promising to fix the bug with firmware update, yet seven months later they can't even give an ETA on that.
We did, by forcing 1080p120 with our GTX 960 graphics card. This is the photo we took of the test result, which shows there was no frame skipping.
We were also able to get 120 fps with our Vizio P, and likewise did not have any frame skipping while conducting the test (Photo here). Unfortunately, if this is a known issue and Vizio has promised a fix, there is nothing to do but wait.
1
I'm a little confused on these price differences, the E50-C1 is $500. The M50-C1 is $800. Is there really a $300 dollar difference between the TVs? They are the same size.
Also, the E60-C3 is $780 (I think that is a 2014 model). The M602I-B3 is $878, only $78 more then the smaller M50-C1.
The TV I am looking for is a gift for my sister's family (6 & 3 year old, with twins on the way). Minimal video games, really just kid movies, cartoons, and sometimes NBA & NFL games. Regular lighting in room, there will be minimal dark room use, as my sister and her husband will watch regular TV sometimes at night after their kids are asleep.
Which do you recommend?
Yes. The M-series is 4k, has a 120 hz panel, and has better uniformity than the E-series.
This also accounts for the difference in price between this year's and last year's Vizio TVs. Also, the longer a TV is in stores, the more its price drops. The M50-C1 will cost much less by this time next year, when next year's model is presumably released. The E60-C3 is a 2015 model, though (with Vizio, 'C' indicates a 2015 TV).
It doesn't sound like your sister's family will need a 4k TV, though, so the Vizio E-series is your best bet. It has comparable picture quality to more expensive 1080p TVs, and it works well for gaming, too.
1
Lower-size models (55 and less) have a 120 hz effective refresh rate. Native is probably 60 hz. Does 24p support also apply to them?
We expect that it does. The manuals for those TVs list 'Film Mode' as a feature.
1
I am considering getting either a Vizio M43-C1 or a Samsung UN40JU6500 for a bedroom TV. I will only be using it for FiOS TV and streaming. The FiOS TV viewing will consist mostly of 1080i content and very little 720p content. The streaming will be from Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu. I am not going to be using it for watching sports or Blu-ray movies, but I do watch a lot of action movies with the sources I will be using. I was considering getting the Samsung UN40JU7100, but I don't really want to spend that much money for a bedroom TV. Thank you for your time and have a great day!
Get the M43-C1. Its blur shouldn't be noticeable with action movies, and the judder-free 24p playback option is essential for film content.
1
Thanks for the great info. Do the settings need to be changed for each input? Also, should an Xbox 360 be hooked up to input 5?
You do need to change the settings for each input, but you save your settings as a custom option and apply them to each input, so there's no need to do each setting manually each time.
HDMI 5 has lower input lag, so it's a good choice for your Xbox.
1
Looking for a replacement for our dying Samsung 40 inch LCD. Primary use is for viewing Dish HD and Dish SD as well as an occasional Blu-Ray movie. After researching your site and trying to digest all the review data I am leaning toward a Vizio M55-c2 as it is within the budget. Good choice for general TV viewing and Blu-Ray? Seating is approximately 8-10 feet. Thanks, and great informative site.
Yes, it's a pretty good choice for your needs. You could get better upscaling and motion handling by opting for the Samsung Un55J6300 (about $100 more), but the M55-C2 will work fine if you'd rather not spend the extra money.
1
Which size TV was used in this test? I ask because the 55" and under TVs seem to have a native refresh rate of 60Hz while the larger ones have 120Hz. So I imagine motion testing would be different depending on the TV size.
On a related note, I see 24p is listed as a feature. How is this possible on the 55" (and smaller) TVs if the native refresh rate is only 60Hz? Wouldn't pulldown still be required, since 60 is not divisible by 24, or does the TV's "fake" 120Hz refresh rate somehow take care of that?
We used the 60" size. We don't expect the motion blur to be vastly different. The smaller sizes won't have interpolation or support a 120 fps input.
Most TVs aren't locked into factors of their native refresh rate. Many 60 hz TVs are able to just match 24p, and the M is one of those. While there are 60 hz TVs with no 24p playback option, it's a fairly rare problem nowadays.
1
Do you why the M55-C2 consumes a noticeable amount of power more than other comparable sets? EnergyStar rates it at 244 kWH per year based on the 5-hrs per day metric. The Samsung HU6950 is 153 kWH by the same metric, the LG 55UF6700 is 154 kWH, and the LG 55UF7600 is 138 kWH.
You're right that it's a pretty demanding TV. It's likely that the components used in the M-series are just not as efficient as those in other sets.
1
The refresh rate for HDMI ports 1-4 are rated at 30hz for UHD content, but does 1080p content display at 60hz on those same ports?
Yes.
1
I mostly play games on my TV, but I want to get into 4K as well. With this and the Samsung JU6500 being so close, what would you recommend for gaming and general Netflix and sports watching?
The M-series isn't good for gaming because it has too much blur. The JU6500 isn't good for movies because it has judder when displaying 24 fps content. Both are about equally good for TV shows and sports (the JU6500 has less blur, but sports still look fine on the M).
If you want the best option for gaming and don't mind the judder, get the JU6500. If you want something that is better for movies and don't mind a bit of blur in games, get the M-series.
If you'd prefer something that can play movies without juddering and doesn't have much blur, get the Vizio E-series. It's not 4k, but that's the main downside. Its overall picture quality is still quite good.
1
I picked up the JU7100 and mirrored the gaming suggestion that you have on your website. I do like the TV overall, however I have to have 120hz @ 1080p.
I know the Vizio M series has the capability, and I'm still considering that as an option due to the low input lag. However, I do worry about the amount of motion blur there is, as I would be using the TV as a gaming monitor.
Is there another option out there that is 4k, 1080p @ 120hz and has good motion blur and input lag that I should be looking at? Thanks in advance.
Your best bet is the Sony X850C. It has little blur, as well as good contrast and black uniformity. Its input lag is only average, but still low enough that you shouldn't notice it while playing.
1
Any chance your P-series has gotten the 1.2.23 firmware update? Seems like a pretty significant update, and adds the individual judder/motion controls. I am crossing my fingers that we can get some de-judder without introducing SOE. It would be great if you could put your P-series through a few tests when you get the new firmware!
Both 'Reduce Judder' and 'Reduce Motion Blur' controls add the soap opera effect. The 'Reduce Judder' adds it for 24 and 30 fps inputs, while 'Reduce Motion Blur' is for 60 fps. They both interpolates up to 120 fps, producing the same SOE. I am not sure we will have time to retest it with the new firmware though.
1
How did you get 1080P @ 120hz to work? I had a P series that worked but flickered. I have the same setup now and am not getting the option.
We forced it with our graphics card (GTX 960). Try creating the custom resolution and refresh rate setting and see if that works.
1
With the new firmware update, would you change the calibration settings to anything different?
The same settings should still be valid with the new update.
1
I am hoping to hook up a M65-C1 to my HTPC. I know there is the lack of 4:4:4, but will this matter for watching movies/shows with closed captions from my HTPC on this TV?
No. You'll be fine without 4:4:4.
1
It's been rumored that the upcoming P-series will support HDR and WCG. At this stage can you honestly say that there's a significant difference with those two based on your viewing with the Samsung JS900 and 9500?
WCG will be important when UHD Blu-rays are released, as those will likely be able to take advantage of the wider range of colors. For now, it's not important.
For now, HDR is a bit like local dimming. It's cool for people who like what it does, but it's not essential. We'll only really be able to tell whether HDR is worth it once the spec is finalized and we see true HDR content released.
All in all, they're nice extras, but not must-haves.
1
I've seen it mentioned in your review Q&A that if you don't watch a ton of 4K material, the native 1080p sets are a better bet.
Obviously, I don't watch a ton of 4K since there isn't a ton available yet, so most of what I watch is 1080p, but I was under the impression that if the TV can output 4K, then 1080p shouldn't be a problem, and should look even better. Can you please clarify?
4k TVs can indeed play 1080p content, and it will look good most of the time. The TV needs to upscale 1080p to 4k to make it fit on the screen, though, and this process makes the image look a little bit less crisp (but it will still look great).
1080p TVs are also generally cheaper than 4k TVs, so there's no real point to spending more money on a 4k TV if you don't plan on watching 4k.
If you want to be able to watch 4k, get a 4k TV. If you don't, get a 1080p set.
1
Does upscaling occur automatically on HDMI ports 1-4? Is it recommended to use HDMI port 5 only when using a 4k source?
Upscaling occurs on every ports, but the HDMI 1-4 are better for low quality content. So it is indeed better to only use HDMI 5 when you either need the low input lag or have a 4k source.
1
Updating firmware... How?
Connect the TV to the internet (wifi or Ethernet) and it will auto update by itself.
1
I just purchased the M50 for a bright room (three windows to the right of the TV). I followed your picture settings, but prefer the "cool" look. Do you have color settings for that mode? Do I follow your other recommendations, or does going "cool" negate or change your hue/saturation/white balance and other settings?
The only thing that it would likely have an effect on is the white balance, but those are only guaranteed to work for our TV anyway, so we don't really recommend copying them. You'll be fine to use a cooler color temperature with our settings.
1
I feel like I've narrowed my choice of a 55" TV down to three options. There are a couple sales going on this Labor Day weekend, and I'm really considering picking up a new TV at this time. The options are the Samsung UN55J6200, Vizio M55-C2, and the Sharp LC-55UB30U.
I'm having a really hard time choosing, as when I go to Best Buy, the Samsung is the cheapest, but it doesn't have 4K. Vizio and Sharp are almost identical in price at the moment, and the BB guys are saying they would get the Sharp, as build quality is better, etc. However, multiple website reviews rate the Vizio higher. Please help! Thanks.
Get the Vizio M if you want to watch 4k video. The Sharp has judder when playing 24 fps video, and very high input lag. The M does have a bit more blur than ideal when displaying video games, but it's still the best option of the two.
If you don't plan on watching 4k video, get the Samsung J6200, since the main reason to get a 4k TV is to watch 4k, and the J6200 is great for 1080p and lower.
1
Hi there. I just picked up the M70-C3. I have a Yamaha receiver with 4K passthrough and ARC. My Blu-ray player and cable box are all plugged into my receiver, then with just onw HDMI cable plugged into input 1 on the Vizio. Whenever I am playing Blu-rays and hit info on the Vizio remote, it is saying 1080p. Shouldn't it be displaying 2160? Not sure what I am doing wrong. I am concerned as everything I play says 1080p. Would appreciate some feedback. Thank you
The info button tells you the signal resolution, not that of the TV. If you play genuine 4k material, you'll see 2160p.
1
I purchased this TV but had to return it because I couldn't get past the soap opera effect. I played with the settings but was never able to completely turn it off, though admittedly this was my first TV with advanced settings and refresh rates, so maybe I missed something. Also I never hooked it up to the internet as I have a Roku 3 I use for all my streaming. It is an absolute deal breaker for me as it makes everything from sit-coms to AAA blockbusters look like it was shot on an iPhone. Your site has a lot of great information but I was disappointed to see you don't talk about the SOE much. I was really hoping for a way to sort review that would exclude any TV that have the effect where it can't be turned off. I assume maybe reviewing as many TVs as you do you're more concerned about motion blur reduction and are less sensitive to it?
I also had a problem with what I've come to call "image fracturing," where fast-moving action of any sort would break up around the edges and look like you were viewing those fast-changing areas through a kaleidoscope. It cleaned up immediately as the image refreshed but I've never seen anyone else mention it, so I assume either I had a set with a buggy image processor or I'm usually sensitive and critical of such flaws.
I wound up replacing it with the 1080p E-Series set which obviously lacks the higher resolution but also seems to have much muddier colors, but lacks any trace of the SOE. I was thinking about venturing back into the 4K arena and exchanging it for a Samsung JU6500, but in your cons you say the set has judder of 24p content (which, to my knowledge, is all content, unless you're using it as a computer monitor), but I can't tell if that's good or bad.
Judder reduction on this Vizio seemed to exacerbate the SOE for me, so basically, is there a slam dunk budget 4k (like under $1,000 in a 40-45" range) that has no SOE or other issues like the image fracturing, or do I need to splurge and get something with a native 240Hz panel?
Thanks for the help!
There was a fix released for the Vizio M. Connecting it to the internet and letting it update would correct the SOE issue. We don't have a separate section for SOE because it's always optional, barring bugs like the one the M-series had initially.
We haven't seen an issue like that second one you describe, so we can't say for sure what is happening there. If ever you see it again, we'd greatly appreciate it if you could send us a photo/video so we can see what it looks like.
Generally, only movies are 24p, so you're most likely to see judder with Blu-rays, DVDs, and streaming/downloaded movies. Take a look at the video here and see if it bothers you. If it doesn't, there's no need to worry about judder.
Provided you're willing to connect it to the internet first and update its firmware, the Vizio M is really the best option for what you want, so we recommend going back to that. Barring that, and provided judder doesn't bug you, the JU6500 is the one to get.
1
Any guess on if / when Vizio will release an updated 4K model in late 2015? I believe they did a slight upgrade or refresh in Q4 2014, no? We're hoping they'll go back to the P-style stands. The M-style just requires too large a platform.
There is a Vizio event scheduled for next week, so it's possible that something will be announced about a new P-series TV then, with a release in time for the holidays. If not, we'll likely have to wait until next spring.
1
How would the 70" Vizo M compare to a seven year old Samsung 67" DLP sitting 9 feet away. Thanks!
Most probably in a favorable way but it depends on a few factors including the state of the old TV. Some TVs deteriorates or get dimmer over time so it would show compared to a new one. The Vizio M also boast a 4k resolution while the old Samsung is definitely not able to show that amount of picture details (at your viewing distance, that may not be an issue though). It is a case by case situation.
1
So I noticed you said input 5 is the best for gaming. I have a Xbox One and I have my cable box plugged into it. Then from there it goes to my Yamaha receiver. This way I don't need to switch inputs when switching from the TV vs my console. I currently have it plugged into input one on the back of my TV from my receiver. Should I have it input 5 on my TV? What would be the difference in the picture quality while watching TV?
1080i sources, like some HD channels appears to be shaking if using HDMI 5. That input is really only good if you connect a PC to your TV or if you want to get the lowest input lag possible for your game console. The input lag is still fine if you are using HDMI 1-4 so we suggest you leave it like this.
1
You state that 4:2:2 is available at 4k resolution, did you mean only 30hz though? I am unable to get anything better than 4:2:0 at 4k-60hz.
Yes. We can get 1080p @ 4:2:2 @ 60Hz and 4k @ 4:2:2 @ 30Hz but we weren't able to get 4k @ 4:2:2 @ 60Hz.
1
Hello, I am looking at the Vizio M60-C3 and the Sony X810C 55 inch. Both look like great 4Ks. I will be using the TV for UHD Netflix, Charter Cable, and movie streaming. I will be purchasing the TV at Best Buy soon. The Sony 55 inch X810C is on sale right now for $999. I also have a coupon (that can NOT be used for the Sony) that gives my 10% off the Vizio. Bringing the price down to $1,169. I have been between these two for a while now and am torn! is the 5 inches a big difference? Any suggestions? Thank you
5" does make a difference. If you sit farther than 10 feet, you will probably prefer the bigger M60-C3. Closer though, get the better Sony X810C instead.
1
Not sure i'm reading your reviews properly. I'm trying to sort them based on which TV has the best picture quality. I'd assumed "Picture" under your ratings means picture quality, but I could be wrong. What confuses me is you give this TV a Picture rating of 8.5 but the Samsung 50 inches J7100 you state is the best picture quality of any TV in the "50 inch" size (when I sort by size and 50 inch the J7100 is at the top under the heading "best picture quality 50"" Now when I go into the review/ratings for the J7100 you have the "Picture" rating for that set at 7.7. So if that "Picture" rating is for picture quality, then why isn't the Vizio at the top if it's almost a full point higher?
Our 'Overall' score is a better representation of the picture quality than the 'Picture' rating. This is indeed a bit confusing, and we should rename 'Picture' to something more else. Check out our formula for our scores for more info.
1
Just a quick question. How noticeable is the blurring on the M-series? I'm considering buying a Vizio 4k TV and I would watch movies and play PS4 games on it. So would the blur during the games bother me or it's a minor thing?
It really depends. It's very obvious on some movement, less obvious on different movement, and isn't there on other movement. In other words, it could be pretty bad on some games, and no problem at all on others.
1
I read CNET's review of this TV, and it said that the M doesn't have the VP9 decoding to watch YouTube videos in 4k, and this could not be fixed using future updates. Is this true? Because the review didn't mention it, so I wasn't sure who was right.
Yes, it's true. We mention it in our article on Vizio's smart features. You can get around this by connecting a PC and using that to play 4k YouTube videos.
1
Does this TV upscale 1080p, 1080i, and 720p sources coming in OTA on the ATSC tuner? I've "cut my cable" and I'm considering the M65-C1 for movies and streaming, but, I also watch some broadcast TV now and again (specifically football). I want to make sure it won't look awful/blurry. Thanks! Great review, BTW!
Everything is always upscaled to 4k. But upscaling doesn't improve the picture quality, so lower quality sources will still look blurrier than high quality ones. The same is true on all TVs, although Vizio TVs are slightly worse at this.
1
I would like to know your thoughts on Vizio brand reliability compared to that of Samsung? I really want to get this Vizio M65-C1 vs JS8500 because of lower cost and impressive reviews, but I am hesitate because its seems like lower cost = lower quality? I own a Samsung and it has been very reliable, but I am wrong about Vizio?
We don't expect Vizio TVs to be any less reliable than Samsung, so if you want the M, go for it.
1
I love all the info you guys provide! This is a GREAT site! I'm a bit confused though after reading the answers to questions. At times you indicate the Motion Blur of the M series makes viewing sports bad, but in one answer you said hockey looked really good. So which is it? Any input on how baseball & football look on the M series? I have narrowed my choices down to the M series 60", The E Series 70", and a Samsung J6300 65". The M series is being sold for $800 on Black Friday, the others I can get for $900. I understand 4K is not too big of a deal, but it seems the M has the better overall picture? I'm not overly concerned with my new TV being 4K, but the 4K option is $100 less than the others I have zeroed in on. I have Comcast's X1 Box (which I have set to 1080p). I watch that 85% of the time. I watch a lot of baseball & football as well as college wrestling. The other 15% of the time I watch movies I've downloaded or DVDs. I do NO gaming. As does everyone, I want to have the best of both worlds as far as picture quality and limited motion blur. It seems most of the more consumer friendly priced TVs all have some flaw (either great for sports, but not movies or vice versa). Lastly, the Samsung has more features which I'm intrigued by. How well does the web browser work on the Samsung? How's the speed and functionality? Is it a good feature or something that's not developed properly? Man, has buying a TV turned into a serious endeavor! I just wanted to get your opinion as to which of the 3 you would choose. Thanks in advance for your help.
The lighter trail we get on the Vizio M isn't that much noticeable. You have to really look for it to be able to spot it. It is more obvious on bright/retro video games but not for what you watch, including sports. If the 4k option interest you, don't hesitate to get the Vizio M. If you prefer the bigger sizes of the 1080p TVs, the extra size of the Vizio E would make it the best option. The browser of the Samsung TV works well for quick researches but wouldn't be great for long periods of time. Controlling the pointer with the remote is kind of clunky but nothing frustrating.
1
What is the quality difference between the 49" and 50" M-series TVs? I don't see 50" anymore in Vizio's store. Is that a newer model?
The 49" model is IPS, which means it has a wider viewing angle, and worse contrast. The 50" is VA, which means a narrower viewing angle and better contrast (like the 60" we reviewed).
Both have been available for most of this year, and the 50" model is still available from Vizio's online store.
1
I'm considering purchasing the M60-C3. Is the motion blurring that bad? I watch a lot of sports and movies, and do no gaming at all. Would you say I would even be able to tell?
You shouldn't have any issues with sports and movies. It's really only with some (not all) movement in video games that we have noticed significant blur.
1
You're site is the most helpful by far. Thank you! I have narrowed down my options to 2 (based on a balance of my price range and best features from what I could find that I would need). The Vizio m-series 55" and the Samsung J6300 55". I mostly watch TV, streaming (Roku), and on demand. Occasionally sports, never gaming. Seating is about 10 feet away. I'm terrified of the soap opera effect, but not too keen on motion blur either. Also, it seems like 4K shouldn't be too big of an issue but I have a 1080p now and would like a better picture even if it's slight. Which one should I go with or is there another that I'm missing?
The big lines are that the J6300 has less motion blur and upscale lower resolutions better (like for 720p HD cable channels). The Vizio M would give you that little edge on 4k content (like you said, maybe just slightly, because you sit far away). Since your main usage is watching cable and streaming, get the Vizio M only if your connected devices are able to upscale signals to 1080p, avoiding the bad upscaling performance of the Vizio M.
1
Very basic/noob question. When I receive the TV, and first take it out of the box, what list of steps should I take, before being able to sit back and enjoy the TV?
If you have to install the stand, just follow the instructions indicated in the user manual. Then connect the TV and make sure it powers on. Before installing the TV to it's definitive position with everything plugged in, you may want to connect only one of your device and inspect the picture you get with it. Look for any apparent uniformity problems or dead pixels. If everything looks good, move the TV to where it should belong and connect your other devices and sound system (if any). At this point, try to copy our calibrated settings for a start to good picture quality. You will be all set after that, just sit back and enjoy!
1
The stand/feet on this tv is awful. Most stands are in the center under the screen, but this places the feet at maximum width, greatly limiting where the tv can be placed. Are there any custom feet/stands that could support this screen from the middle, instead of the ends? If not, I cannot purchase this TV strictly for that reason.
We agree with you. If mounting to the wall isn't an option, there is also what is called a TV mount stand, VESA compatible, like this one.
1
Hello, I bought this TV and am not happy with the way cable/satelite (720p and 1080i) looks on it, very pixelated. I'm guessing due to the poor scaler built in to the TV. Are there any after market processors I can add to improve the picture quality? I am not using a receiver, the cable box is plugging directly in to the TV. The Direct TV box has various resolution options but gives me the same poor picture regardless of what is selected. I'm contemplating returning this TV for a 1080p. Thank you.
External standalone upscalers aren't that much popular and we haven't heard about great ones so you named the most common devices to do the job. You can always ask your cable provider technical support department for a box with better upscaling but you may be left without a better option. Generally speaking, chances are that scalers in receivers would be better but at the cost of a receiver. And if that cost represent the cost of a TV upgrade, then you would be better replacing the TV. If you are thinking about a 1080p TV, than we suggest the J6300. The best 1080p TV we have seen this year. It doesn't have the same upscaling issues the Vizio M has.
1
With CES just around the corner, I'm wondering (historically) how long it typically takes before the 2016 models hit the shelves. I'm looking to purchase a 70" model, but choices are limited and I'm about to head to Costco for an impulse buy. Thoughts? Should I wait a week or two? Where have all the 70" sets gone? 65" would work, but 70" is the perfect size for the space.
You'll only start seeing 2016 models in March, at the earliest, with the bulk of them showing up sometime between April and June.
70" isn't the most popular size, which is part of why selection isn't the best. For a little extra help choosing, we list some of our picks for the best 70" TV here.
1
We are buying our first flat screen tv (yes we still have a CRT), and we are overwhelmed by the choices. From reading your reviews, we are considering the vizio e48-c2, the vizio m43-c1, samsung un48J6200, or any other choice in that size and price range. We currently watch Charter cable tv, dvds and with the new tv we will also be streaming Netflix, Amazon prime, etc. We will still want to watch dvds also. We do watch some sports. We want great picture quality and good sports. There seem to be so many tradeoffs, like if the movies are good, the sports aren't as good. We went to look at tvs at the local BB store, but it didn't help much because they feed into the tvs what looks good. Please help!
Unless you sit less then 4-5" away from the TV, you won't be able to fully enjoy 4k on the 43" Vizio M. Get the J6200. It will be better than the Vizio E for watching DVDs and sports. It is also great for movies (it loses points for not supporting some extra features but the picture quality is great).
1
I had a PS4 plugged into HDMI 5 and had video issues (loss of video signal) contacted Vizio and they said that port should only be used with 4K content. Using HDMI 4 now with no problems.
Thank you for sharing your experience. We use the PS4 on HDMI 5 at the office and never ran into that problem. Have you tried using a different HDMI cable to see if that would make any difference? We will keep an eye on this and report if we get any other user feedbacks on the matter. Thanks again.
1
I bought this M65-C1 (for $947 , great deal) a few days ago. I checked and it is on firmware version 1.3.15. I called Vizio and was told that the current version is 1.3.21. They said they cannot do anything as all updates are automatic and my TV last updated on 2/12 (two days ago). Any advise? Thanks. Also, what color setting do you recommend? Thanks again.
Only thing to do is to wait for the TV to update itself. That is also what we do and unfortunately haven't found a better way. We have removed our color settings since they became obsolete after some firmware update. We haven't had time to re-calibrate the TV since then.
1
Just wanted to add an honest opinion about the 2015 Vizio M series. I currently own the 65" version, and absolutely love it. There may be some differences in panels from size to size, but the 65" is fantastic. I tried the 65" Samsung JS8500 and Sony 65" X930c. Between the Vizio M65-c1 and the other 2, I find the colors to be the same once calibrated, the motion handling to be the same, and the contrast/dark scene handling far better on the Vizio M. HDR on the Sony and Samsung shows the major flaws of edge-lit panels, with clouding and edge brightness being very obvious (mostly because the backlight gets cranked way up during HDR content viewing). On the Samsung the local dimming zones are horizontal zones going all the way across the screen, and the Sony uses vertical zones. This causes very obvious actuation affects. Vizio M is far less obvious, by a large margin. I very rarely, if ever, see the FALD in action, even during tricky shadowy scenes with bright lights showing up (007 Spectre has these sorts of scenes, and I never saw any zones in action). I tend to tone down the colors on any TV, because to me, colors that "pop" are inaccurate and cartoony. Quantum Dot technology doesn't help me any. I certainly don't miss it. HDR is also something I'll gladly live without for years to come. For now, I'm enjoying the superior contrast and dark scene capabilities of the Vizio, with awesome movie nights and PC gaming sessions.
Thank you for sharing your thoughts on the Vizio M! That might help others take some decisions.
0
I have the 50" P series, and unless I have the "game latency" setting changed there are some SERIOUS motion blur issues. Does the M series have this issue, and does the rest of the P series have the same issue I have?
The M series does have the same amount of motion blur, but the 'game low latency' feature shouldn't have an effect on blur for either TV. Try copying our settings for the Vizio P (find them here) and see if you still notice a difference in blur with/without GLL.
0
Although you've tested 1080p@120fps, have you tested for 1440p@120fps? If it's not capable, as I assume it's not a bandwidth issue with HDMI 2.0a, would be possible with an update in the future to use those settings through HDMI port 5?
We tested it, and the TV could not display 1440p@120fps. It's possible that this could be addressed in a firmware update, but it's unlikely.

Update: The Vizio M now support 1440p @ 60Hz and 1440p @ 120Hz.

0
Would you buy this TV or the Samsung H7150 (65" and up)?
Their picture quality is very similar, and the M has the bonus of 4k, but the H7150 has less motion blur, a smart remote, and 3D playback capability. Overall, the H7150 is the better pick.
0
What TV would be best for sports watching all the time, and in a well-lit room?
The JU7100 is our pick so far for a 2015 TV for sports. It has good contrast and uniformity, and little motion blur, which are all important for sports viewing. It's also very capable in well-lit rooms, as it's able to get bright and it has a glossy screen, so it reflects little ambient light (though light sources directly opposite the screen will be very defined).
0
When connected from PC to HDMI port 5, at 1080p 120Hz, is the motion blur reduced at all compared to 2160p 60Hz ?
Overall, the blur is reduced, but because the response time (how long it takes pixels to change colors) remains the same, the trail length won't change.
0
Your rating has been helpful. Right now I own a KDL40W600B. Would you say the M43-C1 is better for gaming? I currently game on a PS4 and PS3. Is the motion blur bad, or can it be fixed with motion interpolation? And how about input lag? Thanks in advance.
The W600B has less motion blur and decently low input lag, so it's still a better choice for gaming. Interpolation can improve overall blur, but the length of the blur trail (which is the main problem with the Vizio M) will be unchanged. The M does have very low input lag, though.
0
I am trying to decide between the Vizio M70-C3 or the LG 65UF8500. Which one would you recommend? Or should I wait for the new Vizio P-series if they are coming out?
If you want an IPS TV (poor contrast, wide viewing angle), the 65UF8500 is a better choice. If you want a VA TV (good contrast, poor viewing angle), the Vizio M is better. The new P is only likely to be out at the end of the year, and we don't know what to expect from it. There's no real point in waiting for the next thing, though, since there's always going to be a next thing on the horizon.
0
How does the M-series compare to Sharp's budget 4k Aquos line?
Unfortunately, we have not reviewed any Sharp TVs, so we don't know how they compare. We hope to start reviewing Sharp TVs in a few months.
0
Is the wireless only 2.4 ghz?
No, it's 802.11 AC.
0
What is the native refresh rate? 60 hz?
120 hz.
0
I am looking for a large 4k to use outside on the patio. The area is covered, but during the day there will be a considerable amount of ambient light. Is the M70 a good choice? Thanks.
It depends on what 'considerable' means. If it will be comparable to a room with a lot of windows, it should be okay (but not great). If it will be much more, you would probably be better off with a TV with a glossy screen, like the Samsung JU7100, since those reflect less ambient light than semi-gloss TVs like the M-series. That is a much pricier TV, though, so it will be quite costly to get a huge model.
0
I can't seem to find a physical button to turn my television off. Does it exist on the M-series?
Yes. There's a small black square on the back of the television. You can press it once to turn the TV on, and holding it down will turn the TV off.
0
I have the 2014 model of the M-series, and use it primary for PS4 gaming. This 2015 M-series looks really nice and has lower input lag. I see the motion blur isn't as great as the 2014 model though. Would you think it would be worth it to upgrade to the 2015 model?
There's not much point. Apart from the 4k resolution, there's no big difference in picture quality, and you do get worse motion blur. You should just stick with the one you have.
0
Since launch the 65" has been in short supply, with Best Buy having it in very limited quantities compared to other sizes and Amazon not stocking it at all, yet all other sizes are in stock and Prime eligible.
Are you aware of why this might be? Should I be concerned by the possibility of some manufacturing difficulties with the 65" that should make me wary of purchasing even if I can find one?
In all likelihood, it's just because the supply for that size is lower, so sales are being a bit restricted. There was a similar situation with Vizio last year. It's nothing to worry about.
0
If it was your decision, which TV would you have in your living room? The 60" version of this TV for $1,400, the 55" version for $1,000, or the 60" Sony W850B for $1,100? On one hand, I want to keep the 4k, because I feel like it makes me future proof, but at the same time, I don't know if 4K will even become a thing or a standard like 1080p is for a long, long time. I only care about picture quality, and I know the Sony is damn good. But the Sony doesn't have 4k. Is 4k still too far out?
4k isn't the most important element of picture quality, and there still isn't much content available in 4k, so don't prioritize 4k. If you only watch TV and movies, the Vizio M is a good choice (pick up the 60"), but if you play video games or watch sports, get the Sony W850B. It has better motion handling and lower input lag, which are important for those uses.
0
Hi. I ordered the 43' M-series and the main purposes for it is connecting a Wii U, streaming Netflix 4k, and connecting my Macbook Air. What are the optimal settings and/or inputs for each? I didn't realize this could be so complicated. Thanks in advance for your reply! I'm sure other novices will appreciate it as well.
Use the settings we list here for all of them. You should use HDMI 5 for your Wii U (you'll get less input lag), and then connect your laptop to any of the others.
0
I would like to verify whether the M70-C3 can do 4k at 60hz/60fps for computer gaming. I've heard mixed reports, and can't find a good answer for this. Even with Chroma 4:2:2, I think that should be fine for computer games. Some people say it can only do 30hz max. That's the deciding factor for me. Thanks!
It can do 4k @ 60 hz, but not with chroma 4:4:4.
0
I'm trying to decide between this and the Sharp lc-80uh30u, but I see you don't have a review for any Sharp models to compare. Are you going to have a review for the Sharp this year?
We will in about two months. We tested 2 Sharp TVs so far in the last week: the LC-55LE653U and the LC-50UB30U.
0
How long did it take to recognize a signal from your source? When I first turn the TV on in the morning, it takes almost four minutes to get any audio from the TV. Thinking about exchanging it.
It should work much quicker than that. We're typically up and running in under 30 seconds. Try unplugging everything from your TV, including the power cable, and then wait about 30 seconds. Plug everything back in and then try using your TV again. If that doesn't help, contact Vizio and see if they have any suggestions. If they can't help, make the exchange.
0
I have been trying to download some 4k videos on my USB flash drive and my TV doesn't support them. Which formats and codecs does this set accept, and is there a chance to convert codecs to be viewed on the TV set? Thank you.
It doesn't support VP9 at all, but it can play some H.265 files. It was able to play a 30 fps video, but not a 60 fps video. Those are the only two 4k codecs being used at the moment, so there's no chance of conversion making it possible to watch 4k video files any more easily.
0
Do you have any information from Vizio on whether the VP9 will be supported by firmware update? Is that even possible?
We haven't heard anything from Vizio about VP9 support. It's possible that support could be added, but we don't think it's likely that it will happen.
0
What did the TV do when you tried to select 3840x2160 @ 30 FPS 4:4:4? It displays just fine with UHD 4:4:4 on my Vizio M55 @ 30 FPS. UHD @ 60 FPS did not work properly though.
Our pattern just displayed 4:2:2 instead. You can see the result here.
0
I am attempting to set up my M43-C1 as a 4k computer monitor. I have plugged in an HDMI cable into HDMI 5 and the other end into my MSI 980 graphics card, but the best refresh rate I can get is 30hz.
I attempted 4k@60hz via the Nvidia graphics control panel and the screen snaps to pink and is completely wrong. I am unsure as to what to do next. I cannot get my games to adjust to 60hz either without the same issue happening.
I am running an updated graphics driver, and the TV (which was purchased today, and has no required updates). I only will be using this TV for computer gaming and if this TV will not do what I need then I would rather take it back and get one that will. If you have a solution that would be great! If not, then can you make a recommendation for a TV with good input lag ratings and that can do 4k@60hz? BTW, I would like to remain in the 40-43" ballpark. Thanks a ton!
We've encountered a similar problem with some of our other TVs. We've gotten different results with our different cables, so try using a different HDMI cable and see if that corrects the issue for you.
0
I've been looking into buying a Vizio M43 or Samsung F5500 which you also reviewed. I notice the Samsung had slightly better measured black levels (at 0.022), compared to the Vizio's 0.024. How is this possible, considering Vizio has local dimming? I understand the M uses only 28 dimming zones, but even so, it is surprising that Samsung has better blacks.
Also, between the two, which would you choose for playing Xbox One/360/PS4? The M43 is around $500, and I can find an F5500 on eBay for less than $300. Mostly used for casual gaming in a dark viewing environment. Thanks.
The black level of the M series with local dimming turned on is 0.022. It's a very minor difference from the .024 we measured without local dimming. The difference is small because we are using a checkboard pattern to measure it.
Between the two, the M43 is the better buy. It has less motion blur, and combined with its low input lag, that makes it a far better gaming screen. It also has great contrast and uniformity, and you get the benefit of being able to watch 4k material.
0
I've been reading your reviews for months and after a fairly freak (and first) TV buying experience, which now includes a potential warranty replacement, have to choose between a Samsung 48" H6400, and the Vizio M50-C1. I'm not a gamer, and will be almost-exclusively (at least for now) watching via smart features and a Roku stick. Any last minute advice before I pull a name out of a hat?
Get The M50-C1. Its smart features aren't as good as the Samsung H6400's, but between it and the Roku you will be covered. Its overall picture is very good (for your uses, about the same as the Samsung H6400), and it's also 4k, which is nice to have.
0
Are there any TV's that can do 4k but also have 1440p @ 120hz?
No. The max what we have seen is 1080p @ 120.

Update: The Vizio M now support 1440p @ 60Hz and 1440p @ 120Hz.

0
I'm looking at purchasing the Vizio M43-C1 for use as 4K Computer Monitor (will do all types of viewing genres) and will be used with the newer generation consoles (I don't mind the longer motion blur trail). I noticed that all TVs 55" and smaller will be unable to do 1080p @ 120hz, which is a major factor for me. So does this mean that this TV can't accept a 120hz input, or is this TV a 60hz panel? I have the Evga GTX 760, which I will upgrade in the future.
I was also looking at the Samsung 40-50" 7100 since that TV seems to be 120hz native and have overall better handling in what to use the TV for. Will either TV do 1440p@60hz, or can it be forced since this will be hooked up to a graphics card?
It means that those smaller sizes have a 60 hz refresh rate, and so their frame rate maxes out at 60 fps.
Neither the M-series or the JU7100 can do 1440p at 60 hz. They can do it at 30 hz, though.

Update: The Vizio M now support 1440p @ 60Hz and 1440p @ 120Hz.

0
Hi guys I was just wondering which of these two TVs you thought were better?
Vizio M50-C1 or the LG Electronics 49UB8200?
They are both pretty similar in price. Main usage would be Blu-rays and Netflix, as well as the occasional Xbox One and PS4 gaming.
We haven't tested the UB8200, so we can't say for sure how good it is. It does have an IPS panel, though, so while its viewing angle will be quite good, its contrast (and therefore overall picture quality) is weaker.
We expect the M50-C1 would be better overall, though it does have a bit too much blur to be ideal for gaming. Its good contrast and black uniformity make it great for Blu-rays and streaming, though.
0
What does "ARC only works with HDMI input 1. You cannot use port 5 with ARC" mean, and what kind of limitations should I expect from this? I plan on using an HDMI-Arc soundbar, and perhaps Apple TV.
It just means that the HDMI 1 port is the one you'll need to connect to your soundbar. You shouldn't have any limitations with it.
0
I purchased the M55-C2, but was between that one and the 55" Samsung JU7100. However it was $400 more expensive. I usually just watch Blu-rays, DVDs, and sports. Which TV is better for my case? Is the Samsung worth the extra money?
It's a little better, but not so much for your uses (it's mostly a better choice for gamers). You'll be fine to stick with the M-series.
0
I have a 2015 E-series. Color banding is very noticeable and distracting. Is this an issue with the M as well?
The E-series and M-series TVs we tested were nearly identical for gray uniformity, so it would appear so, yes.
0
Hello, I'm looking to replace my Vizio M650VSE with a 4K set. I mainly watch Blu-ray and play PS4 on it. I also watch a lot of OTA football during the season. The banding and inability to keep up with fast-moving things such as sports really bothers me.
Would the Vizio 65 inch M series be a big improvement from what I have? I notice it doesn't rate especially well on motion blur, but I'm hoping that since my TV is older that it would still be a big increase.
It's likely you will see a jump in overall picture quality, but since we didn't review your current TV, we cannot say just what the difference would be.
0
Vizio has resolved the issue where the TV would revert your motion interpolation settings back to very high values when you changed the channel or turned the TV off. Now the Motion Interpolation settings are very useful with this TV after the firmware update.
My question is why you won't retest and revise the rating for this TV specifically with respect to motion Blur. You specifically say that the Sony X930C has low input lag with motion interpolation turned on. That input lag is 65.9 ms by your measurements. The Vizio M-series would only have 43.9 ms of input lag even with motion interpolation enabled according to your tests.
With the updated firmware and Vizio's excellent 10 point control of the motion interpolation you can easily resolve any perceived motion blur issues and still have almost the same input lag than the Sony TVs have without using motion interpolation.
You recommend this approach with Sony X930c yet you seem to ignore it for the Vizio TVs. I don't understand why you would do that if you want to be unbiased.
Quote from the VERY Expensive Sony X930C review that has exceptionally poor motion blur performance (Worse than the Vizio M-series) yet receives a good motion blur score.
"With interpolation enabled, the input lag is surprisingly low, enough to be worth trying it out on slower games."
Why wouldn't you recommend the same thing with this Vizio and in turn not rate its Motion Blur so low? You gave the Sony a break because it can use the motion interpolation with mediocre input lag. The Vizio can do the same thing with very good input lag yet that fact has been largely ignored in your reviews.
The M-series has a great deal of overshoot, and that is not something that interpolation will fix. No matter which interpolation settings are used, the length of the trail on moving objects will not change. This overshoot is not an issue that the X930C has.
You can see our detailed motion blur test results for the X930C here, and our results for the Vizio M here.
We do mention that interpolation is a worthwhile feature for the X930C, and it is likewise a legitimate and good option for the Vizio M, for those who are interested in trying it out. Our not mentioning it in the review is not out of bias, but rather just a result of what came to mind while writing the individual reviews (which were written about three months apart).
Finally, we do not count interpolation capability in our motion blur review for any TV, and we did not give the Sony extra points for being able to use interpolation and yet maintain low input lag. It and the Vizio M are scored on the exact same tests, as are all the other TVs.
0
Your reviews are great! Does the M49-C1 come with an IPS display? Have you tested that out, and if I have to go with either the E50-C1 or the M49-C1, which would be better, considering that I would not use the TV for a lot of 4k video/gaming. (immaterial to cost).
Yes, the M49-C1 is IPS. The M-series has slightly better overall picture quality (in particular, it has better uniformity), but unless you want the wide viewing angle, go for the E-series.
0
Could you point me to the 4:4:4 test patterns you are using. The test pattern I have appears to be different than the one you are using.
0
Is calibrating this TV worth it? If yes, which option is the best? Geek Squad at Best Buy, or Blu-ray/DVD Calibration? Or is there a special calibration cheat sheet for this TV?
Yes, it's worth doing. If you want a full calibration, including color, then Best Buy is the way to go. If you want to do just a basic calibration (which will get you 95% of the way to perfect picture), use the settings we list here.
0
After living with a 40" Sony LCD for many years (KDL40V2500, if I remember correctly), my wife and I are moving into a much larger house, and that calls for a much larger TV. I'm looking at 65" TVs and much like a previous question, I'm looking at the Samsung J6300, Sony W850C, and the Vizio M series. I have a long history with Sony products and have been happy, but it didn't score as well as the other two.
I'll admit, with the recent scoring changes on your site and a few pricing changes, I'm now very confused about what to get. I was thinking about the J6300, but then the price jumped up $100! Now, with the Amazon $50 rebate on the Vizio M series, it's $150 less (though, to further confuse things, we do have a credit with Sears that could bring the J6300 down about $100). With quality picture and a great price, that seemed right, but the inconsistency with the HDMI ports has given me pause.
Let me explain the rest of my new setup: PS3, PS4, Apple TV, Intel NUC running Windows 10, all being fed into an Onkyo tx-nr636 receiver that will run through a single HDMI cable in the wall to the TV. It would make sense to get the Vizio M series and feed the signal into the HDMI 5 port, but that precludes the use of ARC and watching the 4K sources built into the television!
I realize I'm rambling a bit and this is a very specific situation, but I'd love to hear your thoughts.
If you're sitting close enough to get the full 4k experience (about 8/10 feet, for a 65" TV), then the M is the better bet. If you don't mind the slightly higher input lag, then use HDMI 1, since you'll get ARC that way. The input lag of HDMI 1 is about even with what you'd see with any input on the J6300.
If you're sitting much farther away than six feet, we'd recommend going for the Samsung J6300.
0
Just sold my Sony BRAVIA KDL46EX710, and am looking to upgrade. Looking to stay around $750. Should I get the M50-C1 or Samsung UN50JU6500 (via Craigslist)?
The M50-C1 is better for most people. Both have good picture, but the JU6500 has judder when playing movies, and the M doesn't have that issue.
0
What type of wall mount do you recommend for the M70-C3?
Any VESA mount that supports 70" TVs would work well.
0
Would you recommend the 2015 Vizio M 70" ($2,200) or 2014 Sony 70" X850B ($2,500) for quality of picture, especially when viewing sports and movies? I currently have the Vizio, but have been thinking of returning it, as a lot of the skin tones look washed-out. Last night Anderson Cooper looked albino. I like a picture that really POPS and the presets on the Vizio are pretty horrible, but haven't been satisfied with the tweaks I have seen on various sites. Thanks!
We didn't review the X850B, so we can't properly compare those two TVs.
For the Vizio M, have you tried using our recommended settings? Those should help get you better picture.
0
Does the Vizio M49-C1 have the ability to connect wirelessly to the internet, excluding the pre-loaded apps? If not, is there a Vizio or Samsung version that will?
Vizio TVs do not have an included browser, but Samsung TVs do.
0
Any compatibility or configuration issues using Apple TV or Google's Chromecast with this model?
No, you shouldn't have any issues with those.
0
I have Pppo 103 along with my PS4 and Xbox One. Can I run both my consoles through my Pioneer SC-85 to HDMI 5 and the OPPO straight to either of the other four HDMI ports?
Sure, that would work fine.
0
Dose the M43-C1 have motion interpolation? If so, at what hz?
It's a 60 hz TV, so if it does have interpolation, it will only be up to 60 hz. We haven't seen that size to verify if the 60 hz M-series TVs have the interpolation feature or not.
0
Two days ago I purchased the M55-C2. My main concern is I can hear a light hissing / buzzing coming from the back top vent of the TV. It's very soft and usually can only be heard if I place my ear close to the top of the TV, although a few times I did hear it just by standing close to the TV.
Is this common with all LEDs? I have read about this happening with TVs as they get older, but it seemed weird with a brand new one. Thoughts?
I was thinking about returning it for a different one. I also notice a lot of DSE, but that just might be the case with the Vizio M in general.
That's normal. Our Vizio M has a high-pitched whine that I can hear when my ear is near the top of the TV.
As long as you're not hearing the sound from wherever it is you're watching from, you're going to be fine, so we recommend not worrying about it. If the DSE is bad enough that it's ruining your viewing experience, though, it would be worth returning it for a different unit.
0
I am very interested and torn between the M43-C1 and the Samsung 40JU7100. I am a big gamer and stream most of what I watch through my PS4. Will I really notice a big difference between the two sets in terms of detail and blur?
Yes, the difference is noticeable in some cases, but only really with gaming (not streaming). The M-series doesn't look horrible, but the JU7100 is a much better buy for those who have the budget space.
0
If I connect my Apple TV to a sound bar, and then the sound bar to the TV, will the picture go through any type of processing when passing through the sound bar or is this not an issue? I would need to use HDMI 1 for this set up, correct? Also, how would I go about getting sound from the sound bar using this set up if my PS4 is in HDMI 5?
No, that shouldn't be an issue, and yes, you should use HDMI 1. Once you've set up the ARC connection, audio from any input can be sent from your TV and down the HDMI 1 connection to your soundbar.
0
I have the 32" 2014 model of this TV and I use it mainly for gaming. There are two picture settings under my custom Game Mode called reduce signal noise and reduce block noise. What do they do, and do they increase lag? Thanks.
They are used for clearing up compression artifacts from low-quality media (cable, DVDs, streaming video). You don't need those settings for gaming, and Game Low Latency disables them, anyway, so they don't affect lag.
0
Also, what are you current thoughts on Clear Motion? I've seen posted online that it is now working - but I'm new to the set so I have no baseline for comparison.
It is a backlight strobing feature. It darkens the picture, but helps clarifying the movement. It doesn't change the length of the motion blur trail though.
0
Between the Vizio M43-C1 and the Samsung JU7100 40", which TV is better, primarily for watching sports? Do both TVs have 120hz refresh rates? The TV will be used on an outdoor screened-in porch.
The 43" M-series doesn't have a 120 hz refresh rate, but the 40" JU7100 does. While both TVs are good for sports, the JU7100's glossy screen finish means it reflects less ambient light, so unless light will be shining directly on the TV (glossy screens aren't good for that), the JU7100 is the better option for you.
0
I've been put back into the TV market after my current four-year-old Vizio 55" was struck by lightning. Recently discovered your site and think it is one of the best, so thank you for the reviews and answers.
I was strongly considering the Vizio M65-C1, but cannot justify the current $600 price difference between this model and the E65-C3 just to be able to have the option for 4k viewing. I am 10-12' from the TV and mainly use it for standard viewing, sports (tennis, football, etc.) and Blu-Rays. Should I go with the E-series? It would be nice to have 4k, but is it worth $600 more?
It will be hard to see the extra detail of 4k at that distance, so save money and stick with the E-series. It's a good TV for your needs.
0
I'm currently on the market for a new TV and have narrowed it down to the M50-C1 and the Sony XBRX830C. Which would you recommend for movies, sports, and video games? Also, do the M43-C1 and the M50-C1 both have the same 60 hz native refresh rate?
The M-series is the better option. It has deeper, more uniform blacks, so the picture quality is a step up from the X830C. It has more blur than is ideal for gaming, but the overall look is still better than what you'll get from the X830C.
Yes, both those sizes have the same 60 hz refresh rate.
0
I will be using a PC with Windows Media Center on my next TV. We sit about 10 feet back and are looking at a 60" model, so I'm thinking 4k is not essential. I am primarily concerned about having very deep blacks and good picture quality. Do you recommend the Vizio M60-C3 or the older Samsung H7150 for deep blacks? Also, any thoughts on Plasma?
You're right that, for your setup, 4k won't be worth it as much as it would if you were sitting closer. The Samsung H7150 is a better TV all-around, so we recommend getting that if you can.
Plasma is even better (provided your room is dark), but they've become pretty tough to find.
0
Future Proof? What will happen with UDD Bluray or UHD streaming that has HDR, will non-HDR UHD sets be able to accept signals with HDR? Would it be better to wait untill 2016 or later? Thanks.
Most likely, non HDR TVs will be able to play HDR content, it just won't have the high dynamic range (super bright highlights), or wider color gamut. If you care about HDR, then yes it is worth waiting. But there is always be a next thing to wait for.
0
Concern:
I had a Samsung (4 years) which died, and had a nice swivel stand (I swivel it from left to right, depends where I'm watching from). You don't find TVs with that feature anymore, and I need a 43", because it's either that or 48"+, and I tried a 50", which was too big for watching standard content.
So, my choices are the 43" Vizio or Sony. I didn't look at LG at all.
Issue:
Vizios have wide stands, so it won't fit on the surface I have now, which means I have to buy a wall mount or one of these tabletop standalone mounts.
Sony's stand is in the middle, so it will fit, but since there's no swivel, I'll have to manually switch it from left to right everyday.
As you can see, a proper wall mount will give me swivel, but I hate doing extra work and I usually pay people to do wall mounting, which means waiting for someone and drilling, as I don't think that location has studs.
From the picture perspective:
My main usage is downloaded movies, HD satellite, Netflix, standard definition (satellite). The rest is either as a second PC Monitor, for gaming, or even for watching 4K (more if more content becomes available).
Money is not an issue but if I can save, then why not.
Would like: Bluetooth (I know Vizio doesn't have it). Smart Apps etc are not a big deal, as I have Roku.
Either way, will connect via LAN.
So from my usage POV - please, please recommend a good TV. My living room already has a 48" Sony TV - 1080p, with great, vivid colors. However, after reading some reviews, some have leaned towards Vizio, and some say Sony is great.
Please comment - Future proofing, PQ. The rest are just etc.
There aren't any Sony TVs we recommend at that size. The X830C has weak blacks, so the picture quality isn't as good overall, and the R510C has such a limited viewing angle that its picture suffers even from directly in front.
So the Vizio M43-C1 is what you should get (provided you don't mind waiting for a person to mount it). It has better picture quality than the Sony sets, and for less money. If you want Bluetooth for audio, purchasing a separate transmitter would let you add that feature on for relatively cheap.
0
I bought the 50" M series, and I have a Panasonic Blu-ray home theater system. I cannot get the sound from the cable box to work through ARC. Any ideas? Should the Panasonic be hooked in through HDMI 1?
Yes, you need to connect the home theater to HDMI 1. Be sure to go to the sound settings to disable the TV's internal speakers, and then go into the home theater's menu to see if there are additional steps you need to take to enable ARC.
0
I can only connect to the M70 at 1080p/120hz using a custom profile in NVCP. I am using a GTX 960 and have tried two cables. In other forums users are claiming the 980 has the 1080p/120hz option available natively in NVCP. Have you tried other cards at this resolution and frequency?
No, just our 960. We also use a custom profile, but what matters most is that it works.
0
Thank you for your response. I looked at the judder video and I couldn't tell which side of the screen was which, whether "on" meant judder was on or judder reduction was on so it obviously didn't bother me. I looked at the SOE video linked at the end and immediately saw the image fracturing I was talking about in the on column in the first 10 seconds. Again I'm not actually clear what "on" means. I assume since neither has a SOE feature, that "on" means there is aggressive motion smoothing being applied to the image, causing the SOE.
'On' means the feature is enabled. For the 24 fps video, it means the judder-free mode is on, and for the SOE video, it means the interpolation feature is on.
That image fracturing you're referring to is pretty common with motion interpolation. The extra frames are attempting to become midway points between the existing frames. When the TV can't quite keep up, it can make mistakes in what the extra frames should look like - hence the black leaking into the logo.
0
I can't decide between the M-series 55" or the E-series 65". I'll be watching Blu-rays and video files; I don't game or watch sports. Which one will be better for motion interpolation? I absolutely LOVE the soap opera effect.
They will both be equally good for motion interpolation. If you want 4k capability, get the M-series. Otherwise, save money and get the E.
0
i bought this tv (70 inch). Out of the box, the picture was eh. Sort of dull to me. Compared to a Samsung 45 inch 1080p I bought 7 years ago. The Samsung has colors that pop and is super clear. I cannot seem to get the setting right. I have FIOS going into to HDMI 1 port. I have it where the picture looks good, but on faces (especially foreheads) there is a orb or odd lighting going on. Anyone has some suggestions on ideal settings? I think I have it set to Standard with Cool. It is annoying bc I want to like the TV - but when I compare it, its hard to. Watched NFL games on it over the weekend and the green grass seemed dull and the uniforms just had no kick to it with color. I feel like I am missing something. BC most reviews are for the TV and its quality. Any help?
You can find the settings we used here. Try them and see if the colors are any better. Raise "Saturation" a little if you want even more pop. For the weird lightning you see, try turning off Active LED Zones.
0
Question ~ Sony mentioned that they will be providing a firmware update later this year for HDR in all their 2015 sets. This including the 850C which is not full aray backlight, thus probably resulting in not as good colors. Since the Vizio M series is full array backlight is it "technically possible" that it would be able to accept an HDR firmware update. If Sony can update their non Full aray LEDs with HDR, technically wouldn't Vizio be able to as well? Doesn't mean that they will, I just don't see any technical restraints if Sony can pull it off.
Technically, yes. But depending on how it's implemented, a TV could just take an HDR feed and show something on screen. And that doesn't mean the picture would be of any better quality. For the X850C, at least it has a wider color gamut but as you mentioned, because it is not FALD (full array local dimming), it won't make the highlights brighter. In the case of the M, it lacks a wider color gamut. So neither TV will look particularly good for HDR, even if they happen to support the input.
0
I recently purchased a Vizio M49-C1 for under $600. I was wondering what black level rating you would give it, seeing that it uses an IPS panel which does worse black level and contrast compared to VA panels. My only comparison is by looking at LG UF7600 , which also uses a IPS Panel
We can't say for sure since we didn't review that specific size but being an IPS panel, it should rate around the same as the other IPS panels. Around 0.135 cd/m2 for black and a score of 5.5 for contrast.
0
We are moving into a new house and need a new TV. It will be used for cable TV, Netflix, and sports viewing. Currently looking at the Vizio M70-C3, or Samsung JU7100 or JS8500. I'm worried about motion blur during sports/fast action scenes, and want good contrast. Should I consider another brand/model? Suggestions?
Those are three solid picks. For most, the JU7100 will be the best option, so we recommend getting that. It has great picture quality, little blur, and good upscaling, so your cable, sports, and Netflix will all look great. The M-series is also a good pick, but because its upscaling isn't the greatest, cable won't look quite as nice.
The JS8500 is also great, and is even better than the JU7100, but it's quite pricey, and given that you're mostly looking to watch low-quality video (as opposed to higher-quality stuff like Blu-rays), you wouldn't be getting the most out of it, so you should save money and get one of the other two.
0
When you have mixed sourcing (e.g. Amazon Instant Video with 1080p and 4k content), which HDMI port is best?
Stick with HDMI 1-4. HDMI 5 is really best only for PC and gaming. For mixed usage, the 1-4 are better.
0
I'm looking at purchasing the M Series, 70 inch from Best Buy. They list this TV, under specs as 240 Hz, but your review says it's only 120 Hz. Why has Best buy listed this whole series as 240 Hz? That's very misleading, and i'm glad i saw this review before i went out and purchased.
Bestbuy just use what terms the manufacturer advertises. In that case, Vizio call the 240Hz 'Effective refresh rate'. They also use the term 'Clear Action 720'. Anyhow, that doesn't reflect the real refresh rate of the TV that is 120Hz.
0
What devices if any should I plug into HDMI 5, on my Vizio M 43 inch? My Amazon Fire Tv, samsung bluray, or multi-region DVD player?
HDMI 5 is mostly for computers or video game consoles. Use HDMI 1-4 for all your devices.
0
I'm a little confused at your wording in the review regarding use as a PC Monitor:
1080p @ 120fps works (although only for the 60" model and up), which is great for gaming on a PC.
I'm planning to purchase the 70" and would like to know if 1080p @ 120fps is possible. Can you clarify?
Thanks for the wonderfully informative site and what looks like terrific support.
Yes, it will work fine.
0
Does the M55-C2 have a native 120hz panel? I know you said that it can't accept it as an input, but will it be 120 hz for sports and other sources?
No. It has a 60 hz panel, so it won't display anything in 120 hz.
0
I have had this TV for about 6 weeks now. Really like it, its only drawback I see is its viewing angle. I am torn about keeping this TV for that reason since I have seating on the far sides of this TV. Would I be better off with a different tv or can I expect most TV's of this size to exhibit the same issues. I'm coming from a 53" Sony Bravia that doesn't seem to have much of an viewing angle issue. Thanks!
Most LED TVs have poor viewing angles and although the Vizio M is about average in this category, you can't find much better in term of picture quality. You can compare the viewing angles of all 2015 TV we reviewed here but don't be fooled by the higher rated sets since they use IPS panels with poor contrast ratios and picture quality (click on a model name to view the overall score of the TV). Unfortunately, you can expect most LED TV's to have the same issues and unless you are ready to sacrifice picture quality, keep your TV.
0
I am now pretty much sold on the M65-C1. I know you recommend the J6300 but I do not see the reason to forego 4k and the other features (back lit array vs edge) this model offers for the same, or most often lower, price. Also the J6300 is becoming hard to find and the J6200 does not cut it, from what I have seen. I briefly considered the JU6500 but the 24p scared me away.
I may give more consideration to the E but it did not look great in store, I know it's hard to tell that way, but the image was not crisp. Also the review of non-working local dimming scares me as we are used to bright images.
I have three questions on it for you:
I watch a lot of hockey and some football. You rate this low for sports, but mention the blur affects gaming. Will this and the gray uniformity be an issue with hockey?
Does this handle cartoons / animation well?
And do you know why the 65 is rated at $45 operational cost while all other sizes (including 70+) seem to be around $21? Why is the 65" twice the cost, does it run hotter?
Because the TV performs worse in our measurements for motion blur, we have to score it low in that category. That said, we've watched hockey on the M-series and it doesn't look bad, so don't worry too much about the blur or the gray uniformity.
Cartoons and animation should also look good.
We aren't sure why the 65" is so different. It may just be that there are different components being used, which would indeed run the TV hotter.
0
I'm looking to get a new TV and have narrowed it down to three Vizios: the M55-C2, the M60-C3, and the E60-C3. The set will be primarily used for gaming and watching movies, but I can't seem to figure out which way to go.
Streaming Netflix at 4K would be a plus, but I don't know to what extent motion blur would bug me. At the same time, I'm not sure if I could justify paying the price difference between the M55 and M60 just for the refresh rate, since I don't know if 120 hz makes that much of a difference.
At the same time, the better motion blur of the E60 is very enticing, but I don't know if the lack of 4K will matter. Although, at 8 feet away, I'm not sure it will be that noticeable. Any recommendations?
The refresh rate isn't really important, so don't worry about that, and you're a bit far from the TV, so you wouldn't get the full benefit of 4k resolution.
For your needs, the E60 is the better choice, especially given that there's less blur with gaming.
0
How does this TV (or newer LCD TV's) compare to older plasmas? I have a Samsung PN64D7000 - once considered one of the best TVs - but that was four years ago. I imagine contrast is worse; or is it?
The M is a good TV, but it's not as good as most plasma TVs. The contrast won't be as strong, there's more blur on fast movement, and the viewing angle isn't as wide.
No LED TV is going to be able to match plasma's picture, so a bit of an adjustment will be necessary. Still, the M is very good for the price.
0
I have the M70-C3 and am trying to use the digital optical output in bitstream format to get 5.1 ch sound to my Denon AVR2801. I have the TV speakers turned off but I do not get any sound out. If I switch to PCM I get sound but only 2 channel stereo. Any ideas on how to get the bitstream to work?
Set the audio source device to 'Bitstream' as well. 'DTS 5.1' or 'Dolby Digital 5.1' would also work.
0
Am trying to decide between the M75-C1 and M80-C3 and have a couple of questions:
1) What is the difference between the -C1 and -C3 designations? What does it indicate?
2) I mostly watch movies, TV, Netflix, and some Football and/or basketball (but sports is less than 20% of the overall viewing). DirectTV has said that it will support 4k to the TV but if I read the specs right, it would have to be on HDMI-5. How would Blu-rays look if played thru HDMI-1-4 via PS3? What about Apple TV on 1-4?
We aren't entirely sure about the differences between C1 and C3. It may be related to the panel, but it doesn't appear that there is any significant difference between the different numbers.
Blu-rays will look great on HDMI 1-4, as will Apple TV. You'll also probably want to stick with 1-4 for DirecTV, though. The upscaling is better, and those inputs are also better at displaying interlaced video.
0
A good buddy just sent me a note that Costco Canada has the Vizio D58u-D3 as a new 4K 58" for $1,250, which ought to translate to ~$963 USD. Have you guys heard of it coming here?
No, we haven't seen anything about it coming to the US. But it wouldn't be surprising if it will, considering the D 1080p series is available in some retailers in the US.
0
I am looking at purchasing an M60. Can someone confirm if I hookup an HDMI2.0/HDCP2.2 device (as in future 4K blu ray player) to HDMI port 5, will audio streams be passed through to HDMI port 1 via ARC and onto my HDMI 1.4 AVR to decode? I have seen posts in other forums that claim only ports 1-4 will pass through audio via ARC, and port 5 is excluded. Thanks!
We just tried it. Dolby Digital 5.1 and DTS 5.1 were able to passthrough from HDMI 5 input to the HDMI 1 ARC without problem. Of course, we don't have a 4k bluray player to test yet but nothing lead us to think it wouldn't work.
0
I'm coming from a 2009 65" DLP TV (Mits WD-65737). I recently replaced the lamp with new OEM and cleaned the lenses and mirrors in the optical engine, restoring the picture quality to 'like new'. Overall I'm moderately happy with the set, however I'm not pleased with the black levels this can reproduce.
I'm wondering just how dramatic of an improvement the 65" Vizio M-series would be, specifically as far as black reproduction. I cannot find any real specs or measurements from the 2009 series Mits DLPs. I'm just not sure it'll be dramatic enough to justify spending $1,500. My other thought was that I might drop down in size, forego the 4K resolution, and get the 55" LG EC9300 OLED, which is in the same ballpark price as the 65" Vizio now that it's been replaced with an updated model.
Thanks for the wonderfully thorough reviews on this site, it's been invaluable to me, and I'd welcome any thoughts or advice you have as I look for a replacement for my trusty old Mits!
You should get better contrast from the Vizio M, and you would see an even bigger improvement with the LG EC9300.
Since you're coming from a 65" TV already, though, you probably wouldn't enjoy the significant drop in size you'd see by going to a 55" TV. Because of that, we recommend getting the Vizio M. You should see a difference in picture quality, and the size is a better choice.
0
Awesome reviews, very helpful for the not so tech savvy! I have been on this site constantly trying to decide between two TVs, the JS8500 55" and the M65-C1 65" (size difference due to pricing). Both of these TVs sit around the $1500 range right now. Sports, gaming, and movies as well. Seating is 10 feet from TV. Could you help with my decision? Again, thanks for all the great content!
The Vizio M would give you more with it's additional 10 inches than the JS8500 with it's better motion handling. Get the Vizio.
0
Trying to decide between this M3 and Samsung's JS8500. Would used primarily for normal TV (dish if that matters) and streaming. Sports are important they don't look like garbage but for a few weekends a year not basing a TV totally off of it. Light gaming via PS4 will also be done, but again not enough that I'd totally base my decision off of it. The 5" size difference does seem to matter to me that much, and the prices are close enough.
If prices are close and you don't care about the 5" size difference, go for the Samsung JS8500. It will display cable resolutions flawlessly and give you better motion for sports and video games.
0
Are you sure the 2015 55" model (M55-C2) only has a 60 Hz screen? It's being advertised everywhere I can find as having a 120 Hz effective refresh rate on the 55" size. I thought it was only 60 Hz with 4k and 120 Hz with everything else, which I was fine with. I was pretty much set on this TV for being the best for my price range (~$800) but if it's only 60hz for all sources I am going to hold off and wait some more.
Yes, it is a 60Hz. Notice that Vizio uses the term 'Effective refresh rate', not simply 'refresh rate'. The refresh rate is not an indication of the picture quality though, so don't look at that spec.
0
Great site. Been using it for recommendations for friends and family, and I guess now its my turn. I'm looking for 40-43inch TV as my main hub TV since that's all that will fit in my built-in entertainment center (trust me, not my idea). This one looks to fit everything I want/need, but I do have to ask about the HDMI 1-4 and 5 issue. Currently, everything I watch goes through my AV receiver to my TV (XOne, X360, PS3, Cable Box, Popcorn Hour A-110) through one HDMI. I think my receiver does some 4K upscaling, but I'm not sure if the HDMI cable I'm using supports 4K. I do game quite a bit, and recently, it has been an FPS (Destiny). If I do get the TV, what HDMI port should I use then? My entertainment consists of TV shows from the cable box (though this goes through the Xbox One), streaming apps from the Xbox One, games from all consoles, and videos though the Popcorn Hour. Plugging any of these into the TV directly is not an option for location purposes. Is HDMI 5 my best bet? How affected will the the non-gaming stuff be? Thanks!
You will probably be better off using HDMI 1. It has a higher input lag compared to HDMI 5, but it is still playable. You will most likely benefit more from the better upscaling of HDMI 1 for your other uses than the lower input lag for gaming on HDMI 5.
0
Love your reviews - good information. I just purchased a Vizio M50-C1 and love the picture while sitting in front of it in our family room - but with the VA panel - when we sit in our kitchen off to the side - the picture washes out somewhat. I see the M49-C1 has the IPS panel which should help the viewing angle - but what will I give up by going to an IPS panel, and is it significant enough stick with what I have instead.
IPS panels have worse contrast, so when you sit directly in front of the TV (particularly at night), blacks won't look as dark. So you'll need to decide which is more important - picture quality from directly in front, or picture from the side - and then choose accordingly.
0
The HDMI 5 + GLL is a godsend for gaming. Anyway, to connect a PS4 and a PC to it? I tend to game on both and it is quite annoying having to disconnect one to connect the other. I genuinely cannot play on either platform without that really low input lag.
You'll need to connect them to a receiver or HDMI switch, and then connect that device to HDMI 5, to use both on the same port. Keep in mind that some might add to the input lag, so you'll need to be careful in choosing one.
0
It seems like you recommend the Samsung 7100 over the M-Series. If I'm going to be watching mainly TV and movies over cable, with some streaming as well, and am looking for a 75" screen, which do you recommend? If the 7100, is it really worth $1800/72% more than the M75, which is now $2500 at Costco? It seems like you also are saying opposite things about the quality of local dimming in your review vs your calibration?
The JU7100 is better but may not be worth 1800$ more. The main difference is that the Vizio M has more motion blur and is not as good with lower resolutions. If your other devices can do the upscaling instead of the TV, than that is one less problem. The blur isn't that bad and wouldn't really be bothering watching regular cable or streaming contents. As for local dimming, we prefer it off.
0
Hey, I'm looking at either the m-50 from vizio or the 40 inch ju7100 from Samsung. I sit about 5-6 feet away from my tv and watch mainly cable, netflix, football and hockey. I don't want to lose a huge amount of picture quality so I was wondering if it makes more sense to get the bigger vizio or the smaller better picture with the Samsung? Any suggestions or ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
With 10" more, you will be better with the 50" Vizio M. It has a little more blur but nothing really bad.
0
How noticeable is the motion blur on the vizio M series? I'm looking for a cheaper tv with a combination of good input lag and motion blur, but also still good for movies I think this might be it but I want to know how noticeable the motion blur is. How is it in comparison to the LG 32LC7D?
We can't compare to the 32LC7D since we didn't reviewed that one but the motion blur on the Vizio M isn't really that bad. It isn't just among the best. Sometime, depending on the content played, it does have a very long light trail on contrasty colors. For example, it is more noticeable in blocky/pixalated retro games with highly saturated colors. The more details in the picture, the harder it is to notice that specific caveat. But the 'general' blur performance isn't really worst than average.
0
How would you compare the Sony XBR75X850C to the M75-C1? It looks like right now it's "only" $1,000 more. Is it $1,000 better?
It depends. With the X850C, you get 3D, the ability to display a wider range of colors, better upscaling of lower resolutions, and less blur on fast movement. The M should have slightly fewer dark patches on the screen, and can also get a bit brighter.
For most, the M-series is plenty good, and so the extra expense of the Sony won't be necessary. If you really want those other features we mentioned, though, the Sony is worth it.
0
I am in the market for a 55" TV. I am stuck like many between this 1080p or 4K dilemma. My research has indicated that the M55-C2 is a good value and has enough new technologies that make it a great 1080p tv regardless of the 4k. However, I am apprehensive now based on the fact that my viewing habits gravitate mostly towards sports (football, basketball, baseball, soccer) and cable TV (TWC) and the fact that this tv seems to score poorly with blur (like how bad is it? Will I even notice if I am not overly critical?). I will hook up a media computer to it for web browsing, slingbox viewing. We do have a prime account and will be able to access that 4K content, but mostly because it worked out that it was 4k. I could possibly upgrade my netflix account to access 4k content. We download and stream movies from ITunes, watch HBO and Showtime. Long story short, I can get this tv for $832 including tax. Is there a better TV out there, perhaps a 1080p, that I should go for based on my standard viewing needs. Thanks, Travers
For a 55" 4k TV, we usually say that is is worth it if you are not farther than 8 feet away from the TV. If it is the case, the Vizio M will be good for your needs and the blur shouldn't be a problem. If you are farther away to the TV, then it would be better to get a 1080p TV and maybe go bigger. Our favorite is the J6200 and it is perfect for what you watch.
0
I am about to buy the recently-released 75" M-series from Vizio. Would you suggest using your current M series calibration recommendations as my starting point? Thanks.
Yes, those will work well.
0
On the 2015 Vizio M Series Review under Software and Inputs, the link to the full review of Vizios smart features goes to a Samsung review. I am interested in the Vizio smart features. Any way to find that page?
We've corrected the link, and you can also find the page here. Thanks for pointing that out!
0
Thank you for your great reviews and help. I have a 43" vizio M43-C1. Besides plugging my ps4 to HDMI5, what would you say are the best settings to get the best game play out of the ps4? Also, do you have settings here for the M43-C1 for sports watching? Thank you!
Our settings are good for all contents so just copy them over for all your sources.
0
Is there a way to force the firmware update process? I bought an M43 about a week ago, and it's been on WiFi ever since. Still running firmware 1.06, and no matter what I do, I can't seem to get it to update.
No, there's no such option in the menu. Our only suggestions are to continue to wait and see if it downloads, or else contact Vizio for support.
0
Hello, I would like to thank you for the great review and all the great information assembled here. I have a question regarding hooking up the m70-c3 to my PC. My video card (nvidia gtx690) has 3 DVI and 1 mini-DisplayPort(1.2) while the TV only has HDMI. As such, I am going to have to use either an adapter/dongle or a DVI/mini-DP to HDMI cord to connect them. What is the best cable/adapter/dongle combo to get 4k@60Hz or 1080p@120Hz?
Unfortunately, you won't be able to get those resolutions and refresh rate with any adapter/dongle. While technically Mini-DP supports it, there is no adapters that exist yet.
0
Can you suggest or recommend a 55" budget to mid-range 4K with the best 4K codec compatibility, if there is such a set? I want to be able to stream or playback local 4K I have ripped/converted or created myself (in the future).
LOVE your site. Thanks for all of the hard work you put into it.
Get the Sony XBR-55X810C. It has great picture quality and good codec support, and it's priced very reasonably.
0
With the Black Friday drop in price of the Samsung 8500, would you get the JS8500 65 or the Vizio M70? All everything tv. Movies, PS4, lot of golf watching etc.
If you can afford the price difference, go with the best picture quality, the Samsung JS8500.
0
So i saw that the M43-C1 has a HDMI Input 5 for better whatever haha. My question is: Do I need a special HDMI cable to be able to utilize whatever HDMI 5 offers, or can i just use the one that came with my Xbox One (this is for gaming)?
You don't need a special cable. Even a cheap one will work.
0
This is a wonderful source of information. I see there have been several questions related to IPS vs VA displays, and I understand there is a trade-off between viewing angle and contrast ratio, so it comes down to personal choice.
What I would like is a quantification of how bad the contrast ratio is on an IPS vs a VA TV, and also whether it is worth paying $200 more (M49-c1 vs M50-c1).
The M-series TV we reviewed last year had an IPS panel, and its contrast ratio was 1138 : 1. This year's VA M-series has a contrast ratio of 4233:1.
If you sit right in front of your TV, and especially if you watch TV in a dark room, then yes, it is worth paying more for the 50" model. The blacks will be noticeably better.
0
Hey there. Firstly, you are fantastic. Secondly, I'm sitting here with a new M50 running a video game whilst turning clear action on and off. I've also been doing it whilst looking at testufo.com. It most definitely changes how motion blur looks. It keeps lines very nice and sharp, but it also creates doubles of the image (PWM artifacts). I was wondering if you knew the rate of flicker clear motion uses.
The backlight frequency is 120 hz (see a chart of the pattern here). Note that on our M60-C3, the clear action setting was just the equivalent of lowering the backlight. This is different from what it does on our E60-C3, where it does change the flickering.
0
Hello, I was looking into buying the vizio M-43 or the Samsung 40 ju6500. Which one would you recommend and which one has a better overall picture? I will use it mostly for watching blurays and video games.
The two are similar but although the Vizio M has a little more blur, it has better contrast and judder-free with 24p. Get this one. You will also enjoy its slightly bigger screen.
0
Will my Xbox One games (Call of Duty Black Ops 3, FIFA 16) only play at 30 frames-per-second on this 4K television instead of 60 frames-per-second on a 1080p television?
No. Since they are 1080p games (there isn't any 4k game for consoles) they will be displayed at 60fps. The TV will just upscale 1080p to 4k.
0
I'm thinking about getting one of the Vizio M-series TVs to use as a monitor for my PC, but don't know which size to get. I could easily be comfortable with the 43" TV, however, all the TVs below 60" are only 60 hz, while the 60" models and above are 120 hz.
My question is, what are the benefits for the M-series from going with a 120 hz TV over a 60 hz TV? Is there a big difference? The price right now between the 43" 60 hz and the 60" 120 hz is practically double. Is it worth paying more for the 120 hz upgrade?
For connecting a PC, the main benefit of the larger M-series TVs is that it can accept a 120 hz input. You also get the option to have a stronger soap opera effect. If you don't need or want either of those, then there's no need to get a 120 hz model. The M43 will work well.
0
Thanks for getting back. I've been looking through your site and you suggested the Sony X830C or Vizio M60 4k TVs to hook to a GPU like my GTX 980 TI. My only concern would be that with the Sony 49" X830C, I saw in a comment that you guys mention that the Sony X800 series gets artifacts while displaying 1080p 120 hz. Is that true for all, including the 49" X830C?
And also, are the HDMIs on the Sony and Vizio M60 fully HDMI 2.0-compliant, or only some HDMI 2.0 features, and does that really matter?
It's true for every Sony TV we have tested 120 hz playback on, so it will be true for both sizes of the X830C.
All ports of the Sony are HDMI 2.0, but for the M, only HDMI 5 is 2.0 (and even then not fully compliant). It's the only port that can accept a 4k @ 60 hz signal, but it can't accept a 4k @ 60 hz @ chroma 4:4:4 signal. Not really a big deal, given that only PCs can output 4k @ 60 hz (with or without chroma 4:4:4) right now - everything else will work fine with 30 hz.
0
Can I connect an external hard drive to the USB port and view my ripped movies?
Yes but it doesn't support a very wide range of codecs. Most popular file format should work.
0
Do you know anything about the D series? D50U-D1, D55U-D1, and D65U-D2. I think these just came out very recently.
We posted our impressions about the new D-series on our Deals page. Basically, we expect them to be 60 hz TVs with no interpolation ability, and somewhat worse picture than the M. We don't recommend picking one up unless you're not too concerned about those potential downsides.
0
Really interested in this TV. Cable cutter here, so will be watching 60% movies (Netflix and Blu Ray/DVD), 40% sports (through Chromecast apps - even though not 4K). Will be sitting 7 feet away. Compared to the other 55" 4K/1080p sets for sale at Costco (UN55JS700, UN55JU650, UN55J620) I think the M Series wins out. However, I'm concerned about how the sports might look upscaled from Chromecast. Any recommendations on which input/settings will work best? Your site has been a great resource, keep up the good work!
Just use our settings and HDMI 1-4. The TV hasn't the greatest upscaling so as long as you set your connected devices to output 1080p, it should be fine. That said, we haven't tested the chromecast with this TV.
0
It would be very helpful if the website had an option to compare models.
We have a compare tool under the 'Tools' menu on top of the page.
0
To achieve the lowest input lag possible on HDMI 5, does that mean using the game picture setting, turning on game latency mode, and turning off judder, clear action, and all other options? I'm a little confused by the interpolation term.
It just means you need to enable 'Game low latency.' Turning that on will disable the settings that increase input lag.
You can use 'Clear Action' (backlight flickering) within GLL, but 'Reduce Judder' and 'Reduce Motion Blur' (the two interpolation settings) are both going to be disabled.
If you're confused by what interpolation means, take a look at our explanation here.
0
My use case is mostly to watch the feed from my TV provider (1080i) and a bit of streaming (or movies on a USB stick). I would also use it from time to time as a PC monitor when I work from home (not for gaming and using a Surface Pro 2). I am considering a 4k TV so that the text is crisp and clear when I use it as PC monitor. I plan to not buy another TV in the next 10 years, so I'm considering a 4k so that it does not become obsolete in few years.
Do you think that I have a good use case for a 4K, or I should not spend the extra dollars and just stay with a Full HD?
When I look at the review of the Vizio M55-C2 it says that it doesn't support Chroma 4:4:4 at any resolution/refresh rate. Does that mean that the text will not be crisp, or it is not so bad?
What would you recommend for my use case (they are about all the same price) between the M55-C2 55", D58u-D3 58", a refurbished M60-C3 60", a LG 55UF6800 55" (a bit cheaper) or none of those.
Thank you very much for your answer.
4k could certainly be worthwhile for the streaming video. It won't matter much for the USB movies and the cable feed, though.
As for using the M as a PC monitor, the lack of chroma 4:4:4 could be a bit of a problem at the typical distance at which people sit from their screen. Text will be a bit less crisp than desirable, regardless of the fact that the screen is 4k. If this is a big concern for you, getting a TV capable of chroma 4:4:4 would be a better choice than the M.
Of the TVs you listed, the M55-C2 is the best choice in terms of general picture quality and reliability (since it's new). The larger M60-C3 could be a better bargain, but only if you are absolutely sure that it is in good working condition. If you have doubts, stick with the 55" model.
0
I recently purchased a Vizio M55-c2 and am less than impressed with the upscaling and motion blur, which I see are weaknesses in your review. Particularly, sports or action scenes look pretty blotchy at times. My cable provider gives only a 720p or 1080i signal that's probably compressed to some degree. I have a few days left to return this and upgrade, but I wanted to see what you all thought I needed to move up to in order to take care of what I'm noticing. I've been thinking about the Samsung JS8500, but I only want to upgrade if it would really solve my issues. 1. Motion problems – sports and quick moving scenes feel like the TV is struggling to keep up. I noticed the lower motion blur ranking, along with the higher MS response, and on top of that the 55 inch model I have is only 60hz. Would a 120hz JS8500 with a better response time solve the motion problems? I expect some blur with quick camera pans during sports, but not when players are jogging. 2. I know refresh rates don't have too much impact on picture quality, but how do the refresh rates versus response times factor in for motion handling? It looks like the TVs rated better for motion blur all have a lower MS. My older 720p TV had a 8.4ms response so I'm wondering if maybe that's the difference I'm noticing the most? The M series almost doubles that. 3. Upscaling – We watch a good bit of network cable, sports, and blu-ray movies. The vizio handles the Blu-Ray movies pretty well, although I do see motion problems on my 55in model there too. The biggest thing the bothers me about the Vizio is the poor upscaling for 720p and 1080i signals. There are moments when I can almost see the TV trying to upscale. Text/logo edges will be very jaggy and then suddenly go smooth. All your reviews note the improved upscaling on the Samsung 4k TVs. My question: is it a noticeable difference at 720 and 1080i? If it's hard to notice I'm worried it won't solve my frustrations. If it's notably better, and the motion handling would be better as well, I think it's time for me to move on and return the M55. 4. JS8500 – Any drawbacks vs the Vizio M series? If I upgrade to the JS8500, would I notice anything that the Samsung doesn't do quite as well? If so, hopefully it would be something minor that wouldn't outweigh the problems I see in the motion handling of the Vizio. Thanks for your help! This website has been extremely useful in helping me decipher the TV lingo of today.
Moving to the JS8500 will result in better motion and less blur. Not because it is 120Hz but because of faster pixel response time and practically no overshoot compare to the Vizio M. 120Hz will allow to interpolate a 60Hz signal (and bring the soap opera effect) but won't help much the actual blur caused by slow pixel response time. If your old TV had a faster response time, then the difference will be seen on the Vizio M. The better upscaling of the JS8500 will also be noticeable. All in all, the JS8500 would be a worthy upgrade for you. The only thing that the JS8500 doesn't do as good as the Vizio M is at constantly removing judder in movies while in 60Hz (cable and streaming). Fortunately, most people won't notice.
0
For the review of Samsung J6200 you said,"Surprisingly, a 720p input looks softer than normal. If you are watching cable TV, you should let your receiver do the upscaling to 1080p instead." Would you say the same is true for the Vizio M-series? I have the M50-C1 and the scaling from the cable box is pretty poor compared to my other three TVs. If so, is there a sub-$500 receiver you would recommend that would exceed the scaling capabilities of the Vizio M50? Thanks.
All the Vizio TVs we tested (including the M) have similar issues with 720p. Unfortunately, we don't review receivers, so we can't offer a recommendation for one.
0
First of all thank you for this website. Incredible work! I just bought the M70-c3 last week. Its getting delivered this week. My choices were narrowed between the M70-c3 and the Sharp LC-70UH30U. I chose the M70-c3 because bestbuy.com listed that the Vizio has a 240hz refresh rate. Now reading your site it seems that i got duped. Here are my questions: 1. Both the Vizio and Sharp are 120hz. Do you think the Vizio is a better set than the Sharp? Would it be horrible to run ps4 or xbox one at hdmi 2-4? 2. If i have a PS4 and a Nvidia Shield (which runs 4k at 60fps) which should I hook up to hdmi 5? 3. Does the Sharp have more HDMI inputs that run 4k at 60fps?) Vizio only has 1. 4. What do you think is the BEST 70" 4k TV right now? I already have a Fire TV 4k which is why i thought i didnt need the google interface in Sharp, however is the Smart Tv functions really that good? Can the Sharp run 4k youtube? I know vizio cannot. Thank you so much!
1. Both TVs are similar. The Vizio M has a better input lag for video games, the Sharp has slightly better motion blur. HDMI 2-4 will work fine for video game consoles but with a higher input lag (45.2 ms).

2. For HDMI 5, use the device you want to have the least input lag on or if you want 4k @ 60Hz.

3. All HDMI inputs can do 4k @ 60Hz on the Sharp UH30U.

4. The best 70" will depend on usage. For movies and sports, the Sharp UH30U will be best. For video games, it depends if you prefer faster input lag (Vizio) or better motion (Sharp).

The Sharp smart features aren't as advanced as the competition but offer the more popular apps including Youtube that can stream 4k videos.

0
Any plans to review the new Vizio D-Series 4K televisions that were recently released? They appear to be a compromise of sorts between the E and M-series. Thanks!
It's likely that will be one of the first TVs we review in 2016, sometime around April.
0
I have an M60 2015 and am able to get 1440p@60hz and 1440p@120hz by making a custom resolution in the Nvidia Control Panel. I am using a GTX970.
Thank you for sharing the information. We just tested it ourselves and we got the same results. And on a side note, we are planing to add both tests in our future reviews under the 'PC Monitor' section. Thanks again!
0
After what I felt at the time to be adequate research, I purchased a M60-C3. My frustration point has been the inability to stream 4K content from Amazon/YouTube for lack of VP9 support. Wish I would have caught that before my purchase. UltraFlix is an option if I care to rent a movie, but this just isn't how I watch TV. 90% of my viewing is from my cable box on HDMI-1 (sports, movies, kids shows), but I also want to figure out how to view 4K content on my 4K TV. I've read many of the questions/comments on this and other sites, but a lot of it is above my head. Could someone please recommend in layman's terms my best options for 1) viewing from my cable box using this set, and 2) how to get 4K other than UltraFlix, please? I know I can shell out more dough for a good Blu-Ray, but again I just don't do a lot of movies that way. Would a 'smart' Blu-Ray having Amazon/YouTube let me stream from that device in 4K? Looking for a way to 'upconvert' my cable feed or find other ways to put 4K content on this set using apps or my laptop.
The cable signal is available at a maximum resolution of 720p/1080i. It is not possible to watch tv shows (or movies on cable) that are 4k. Some cable box will offer the possibility to stream 4k movies (on demand) from different streaming services. Verify with your cable provider if they offer such an option. You can as well stream 4k content through your laptop to your TV with YouTube/Amazon but your laptop need to be powerful enough. The new 4k bluray players are coming soon so that would be the easiest way to watch 4k content on your TV. Some will probably offer streaming apps that do 4k too. For up-conversion, your TV does that already (it always displays in 4k) but that doesn't necessarily mean better/sharper picture.
0
I have had an M75-C1 for a couple of months now. Has anyone else noticed the FALD struggle to keep up with a change in scene from light to dark? I can see the zones dim immediately after certain changes in the image. Vizio claims this is normal behavior, which I tend to disagree with. I have always had Auto-Brightness off, btw. Simply disabling active dimming solves the problem, but the image looks very washed-out to me. The TV is great otherwise, although I think I made the wrong choice and may exchange for the J6300. Thanks.
It's normal behavior, but we agree that it's sub-optimal. Our experience was that the M-series has slightly darker blacks than the J6300 even without local dimming, so if blacks are the lone basis of your wanting a change, you might want to reconsider.
0
Which HDMI port do you suggest for Roku 4? I don't want to lose 60fps support, but also want the best upscaling. Is downgrade in upscaling really only noticeable with 1080i and below?
For HDMI port number 5, the downgrade in picture quality is mostly apparent with 1080i and lower resolutions. For 1080p and above, HDMI 5 should be fine and will allow 60fps signals.
0
I have an M50-C1 and my cable provider is FIOS. The cable box is an Arris VMS 1100. It allows me to output 1080p/60 with a 1080p/24 bypass. Which would give me a cleaner picture: 1080i or 1080p? And could I use HDMI 5 with the 1080p HDMI input?
The M-series isn't the best at receiving a 1080i signal, so use 1080p instead. And yes, you could use HDMI 5 with a 1080p signal and it would look fine.
0
I noticed that you removed the color and white balance settings because they became obsolete after a firmware update.
Does that mean that the color issues have been resolved due to this update? Or does your test TV just need re calibration? Just curious?
It means our test TV would need a new calibration, but we unfortunately don't have time to revisit the M-series, as we're working on developing our new tests in time for the 2016 lineup.
0
My D series 4k 58" had the Reduce Motion Blur feature (actually worked), then completely lost the function during the last firmware update (1.3.15-UHD). Vizio rep. told me there aware of this and are working to have new firmware reinstall the feature.
Thanks for letting us know! We still haven't lost that feature, but we'll continue watching to see if a new firmware release changes anything.
0
I was 99.9% sure that I was going to get the XBR55x810c after waiting to see if it went on sale in March, but ended up finding a deal I couldn't pass up on the M60-C3 for $699. Coming from a 42" 1080p set, it's obviously better all around!
However, cable is where we watch the most content by far, and even with all of the settings, I can only manage to get subpar results (I have Fios and it broadcasts in 1080i). I love watching sports as well.
The Blu-ray and 1080p upscaling look amazing, but I was hoping to achieve similar results with cable. Are there any adapters that would further upscale the cable broadcast, should I drop to 720p resolution, or should I return and wait it out for the X810C?
With the Vizio M's upscaling, 720p will look better than 1080i, but still not great. For the M, your best bet would be to get a receiver that can upscale video to 4k UHD. Allow that to do the upscaling and output to the TV, and the picture quality should improve.
Or, if you'd rather just stick with a TV and don't mind dropping in size, the X810C's upscaling works well on its own.
0
Looking at the 55 inch version, does anyone know for certain if it's a VA panel or not? I called Vizio customer support and they didn't know if it was VA or IPS on the M55-C2. Google hasn't been much help either.
Yes, the Vizio M Series 2015 does have a VA panel, it's the 49 inch model that does not.
Questions Have a question?

Before asking a question, make sure you use the search function of our website. The majority of the answers are already here.

Current estimated response time, based on # of pending questions: 9.4 business days.

:
:
A valid email is required. We answer most questions directly by email to prevent cluttering the site.