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    Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Back
    3. Borders
    4. Thickness
    5. Temperature
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. HDR Peak Brightness
    5. Gray Uniformity
    6. Viewing Angle
    7. Black Uniformity
    8. Gradient
    9. Pre Calibration
    10. Post Calibration
    11. 480p Input
    12. 720p Input
    13. 1080p Input
    14. 4k Input
    15. Color Gamut
    16. Color Volume
    17. Image Retention
    18. Reflections
    19. 3D
    20. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Apps
    2. Ads
    3. TV Controls
    4. Remote
    5. In The Box
    6. Misc
  8. Sizes and Variants
  9. Compared
  10. Conclusion
  11. Q&A
Reviewed on Jul 15, 2016 , Eric Bousquet, Justin St-Laurent

Vizio M Series 2016
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
Version 1.0
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Test Benches:

  • 1.1: Summer 2017
  • 1.0: Winter 2015
  • 0.9: Winter 2014
  • 0.8: Winter 2013
Recommended if under (USD)
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What it is: Maximum price to be a better value than its competitors.
How to use it: This product is the best choice in its range if you can find it below this price.
Automatically calculated every hour based on the scores and prices of all other products we've tested.
Value for price
beaten by
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What it is: Product with the best value in this price range
Other best choice in a cheaper price range
Other best choice in a pricier price range
Automatically updated every hour based on the scores and prices of all other products we've tested.
Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
7.9 Not at latest test bench
Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
8.2
TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.1
Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
7.4
Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
8.8
HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
7.8
HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
8.1
PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
7.9
This tv has been discontinued.
It was replaced by the Vizio M Series 2017

Type : LED
Resolution : 4k
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz (except 55" and smaller)

The Vizio M Series 2016 LED TV provides great picture quality and overall performance, excelling in motion performance for watching sports or playing video games. Unfortunately it can't get very bright and doesn't have good 4k HDR support. Overall it is an improvement on the Vizio M Series 2015, and the performance is close to the higher end Vizio P Series 2016.

Test Results
Design 7.5
Picture Quality 7.6
Motion 8.8
Inputs 8.7
Sound Quality 4.1
Smart Features 7.0
Pros
  • Great picture quality, especially for watching movies in a dark room
  • Great motion handling and low input lag for sports and video games
Cons
  • Picture quality degrades from the side
  • Can't get very bright
  • Lacks TV tuner
  • Sub-par upscaling of lower resolutions

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7.5

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 Design Picture
Curved : No

The design is quite similar to the Vizio M Series 2015. The front is plastic and appears more solid and higher end than that found on the Vizio E Series 2016, but doesn't look as good as the Vizio P Series 2016's metal finish. The most significant change from the 2015 model is the legs, which have a stylish new look.    

Stand
Vizio M Series 2016 Stand Picture

Like other Vizio TVs, the stand is very wide so that we had to extend our test table to fit the 70". The TV is not as stable as some of the other models with sturdier stands.

Footprint of the 70" TV stand: 55" x 11"

Back
Vizio M Series 2016 Back Picture
Wall Mount : Vesa 400x400

The back of the TV is similar to the P Series 2016. All inputs and outputs are directed to the side of the back, providing easy access if wall mounted.

Borders
Vizio M Series 2016 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.63" (1.6 cm)

The borders feature metal sides with a nice textured finish and a plastic front.

Thickness
Vizio M Series 2016 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 2.56" (6.5 cm)

Like other Vizio TVs, it is quite thick when viewed from the side. If wall mounted it will stick out quite obviously.

Temperature
Vizio M Series 2016 Temperature picture
Maximum Temperature
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What it is: The peak temperature found on the TV.
Good value: <35°C
Noticeable difference: <5°C
:
38 °C
Average Temperature
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What it is: The Average temperature measured on the TV
When it matters: If the TV is placed in an enclosed space.
Good value: 30
Noticeable difference: 5
:
33 °C

The full-array local dimming heats up the TV evenly. You do however see some hot spots where internal electronics are located.

7.6

Picture Quality

The M Series 2016 provides great picture quality, especially in a dark room, since it has a very good contrast ratio and a pretty good black uniformity. It also features Dolby Vision HDR with a fairly good local dimming option which results in an even greater movie watching experience. Like the rest of Vizio line of TVs, low-resolution content like DVD and standard television channels look a bit soft and 3D is not offered. It only has average brightness, and the picture quality diminishes when viewed from the side. It deals well with reflections.

8.7 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Checkerboard Picture
Native Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
4781 : 1

The native contrast ratio is pretty good. It is not as good as this year's P series, but it is not far behind. This should provide dark scenes with rich details.

8.0 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
Yes
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
Full-Array

Like this year P Series 2016, the local dimming called 'Active LED Zones' works very well. In combination with the full-array backlight, it can provide very deep blacks when watching a movie and especially when watching HDR content. There is also no major blooming around the highlight in our video test when viewed straight in front. Unfortunately, like this years P Series, the local dimming did dim a bit of the white dot. Because there are fewer (and bigger) dimming zones than the P Series, it is more noticeable when they turn on and off.

7.1 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
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What it is: The maximum luminosity the TV can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more regular movie condition. All measurement are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over SDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV show in SDR.
:
324 cd/m2
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
109 cd/m2
SDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
205 cd/m2
SDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
254 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
298 cd/m2
SDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
321 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
109 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
205 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
254 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 50% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
298 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
321 cd/m2

The SDR peak brightness of the Vizio M Series 2016 is bad. The maximum the TV can reach is around 320 on a 100% windows. The local dimming dim too much the small highlights, making the 2% windows only 1/3 of the brightness it can get. Since this TV can't get very bright, it will not be the best option for people that have a bright room.

7.2 HDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; HDR content.
HDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
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What it is: The maximum luminosity the TV can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more realistic movie condition. All measurement are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over HDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV show in HDR.
:
310 cd/m2
HDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
195 cd/m2
HDR Peak 10% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
317 cd/m2
HDR Peak 25% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
413 cd/m2
HDR Peak 50% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
345 cd/m2
HDR Peak 100% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
241 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 2% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
195 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 10% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
317 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 25% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
413 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 50% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
345 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 100% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
241 cd/m2

The Vizio M is not a very bright TV. The 2% window is only at 183 cd/m², which is less bright than the 2015 M series. The 100% peak windows is also not very bright at 232 cd/m² making the 2016 M series well under the 535 cd/m² of the P series 2016. We tested the peak brightness with a HDR10 signal.

Update 08/09/2016: Retested with newest firmware update, sending a HDR10 signal over HDMI. No improvement to peak brightness.

Update 10/14/2016: Retested with the newest 2.2.7.4 firmware update.

6.9 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
3.093 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.211 %
Vizio M Series 2016 5% Uniformity Picture
5% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 5% gray.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 1.15%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
1.615 %
5% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 0.116%
:
0.124 %

The gray uniformity of the Vizio M Series 2016 is average and when viewed from an angle, it looks worse. The LED of the full array backlight are visible and the corner are also more dark. Dirty screen effect will certainly displease sport fans, since it is in sport like football or hockey that you have more panning shots over uniform background.

4.3 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
VA (except 60")
Vizio M Series 2016 Color Shift Picture
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
21 °
Vizio M Series 2016 Brightness Picture
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
29 °
Vizio M Series 2016 Black Level Picture
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
26 °

The viewing angle is good for a TV using a VA panel. In fact, when view side by side, the M Series 2016 actually give a better viewing experience than the more expensive P Series 2016.

8.8 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
1.048 %

The black uniformity is good, but there is definitely some clouding issues on our unit, and it is more visible at an angle. With local dimming enabled this is not an issue.

8.5 Gradient
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What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 Gradient Picture
Color Depth
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What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
8 Bit

When sending a 10 bit signal, 8 bit gradations can be seen even though the panel is 10 bit. Despite this, the gradient performs pretty well, without any major color or banding issues.

8.2 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Pre Calibration Picture Vizio M Series 2016 Pre Gamma Curve Picture Vizio M Series 2016 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
3.26
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
3.3492
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.18

Out of the box, the pre-calibration of this TV was pretty great. There were some issues with the reds being too high and the blues being too low in the white balance. As for the colors, it too had it's share of issues, with some colors being too saturated.

9.5 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Post Calibration Picture Vizio M Series 2016 Post Gamma Curve Picture Vizio M Series 2016 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.38
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.5297
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.21

Most of the issues that were present in the pre-calibration were fixed using a handheld device. By downloading the 'Vizio SmartCast' application that is available for both Android and Apple we were able to adjust the 2 point and 11 point.

7.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 480p Picture

DVDs or standard TV channels upscaling is not as good as other TV. You can see on the picture that the sail boat ropes looks choppy.

7.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 720p Picture

Small details are a bit lost and the general rendering is a bit soft.

9.0 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 1080p Picture

Blu-rays upscaling looks very good and details are very sharps.

10 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 4k Picture

4k content looks very good without any image problems.

6.7 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
No
Vizio M Series 2016 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
74.50 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
81.03 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
53.45 %
Rec 2020 uv
Show Help
What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
59.07 %

We measured the color gamut coverage in the Dolby Vision mode (via the metadata tunneling of Spectracal's Calman software). It doesn't have a wide color gamut for HDR, but it is enough for Rec 709 content.
Update 08/09/2016: Retested with newest firmware update, sending a HDR10 signal over HDMI. No improvement to color gamut.

6.0 Color Volume
Show Help
What it is: How many colors a TV can display at different luminosity levels.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Vizio M Series 2016 P3 Color Volume Picture
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage
Show Help
What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
:
68.697 %
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage
Show Help
What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels when compared to an ideal 10,000 nit TV
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
:
36.663 %
Vizio M Series 2016 2020 Color Volume Picture
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage
Show Help
What it is: How much of the Rec. 2020 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
:
48.788 %
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage
Show Help
What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels when compared to an ideal 10,000 nit TV
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
:
23.200 %

10 Image Retention
Show Help
What it is: How much a static image is retained on a TV screen after a certain amount of time.
When it matters: When watching TV show, playing video games or when using your TV as a PC monitor.
IR after 0 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured right after the static image exposure, without recovery time.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 2 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 2 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 4 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 4 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 6 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 6 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 8 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 8 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 10 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 10 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %

8.0 Reflections
Show Help
What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 Reflections Picture Vizio M Series 2016 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
Show Help
What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
2.0 %
Screen Finish
Show Help
What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Semi-gloss

Reflections on the Vizio M Series 2016 appear large and diffused. This helps to combat bright glare. It is similar to the Vizio M Series 2015.

0 3D
Show Help
What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
3D
Show Help
What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
No
3D Type
Show Help
What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
No
2D to 3D
Show Help
What it is: Feature that converts 2D content to 3D.
When it matters: If you want to watch 2D content in 3D. Note that the quality is not as good as that of native 3D.
:
No

There is no 3D functionality on the Vizio M Series 2016.

Pixels
8.8

Motion

The Vizio M Series 2016 is very good at handling motion. Fast moving objects such as a a puck in a hockey game will look quite clear. Movies played via blu-ray or casting apps play smoothly. Good support of motion interpolation up to the native refresh rate of 120Hz.

9.2 Motion Blur
Show Help
What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Motion Blur Picture Vizio M Series 2016 Response Time Chart
Response Time
Show Help
What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
10.4 ms
Overshoot
Show Help
What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0.0 ms

The response time of this TV is excellent. No trail can be seen following the Rtings logo. This means that fast moving objects on this TV will be quite clear. This TV uses PWM flickering to adjust the luminosity of the backlight.

6.8 Image Flicker
Show Help
What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
Show Help
What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
120 Hz
BFI
Show Help
What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes
Vizio M Series 2016 BFI Picture Vizio M Series 2016 BFI Frequency Picture
BFI Frequency
Show Help
What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
60 Hz
BFI In Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes

The Vizio M Series 2016 is able to reduce the backlight frequency to 60Hz, which helps to clear up motion.

7.1 24p Playback
Show Help
What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
No
Judder-free 24p via 60i
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
No

The Vizio M Series 2016 is judder free only for 24p sources like movies on Blu-ray, DVD and from streaming apps. On other movie sources which play at 60Hz such as from a cable/satellite box, judder does occur, but not consistently. We were able to eliminate this completely when setting 'Reduce Judder' function to 1, however this does add a little of the Soap Opera Effect.

10 Motion Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Show Help
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
Vizio M Series 2016 Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Show Help
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
Vizio M Series 2016 Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

'Reduce Judder' is the setting that turns on motion interpolation for 30 fps (and lower) content. For 60 fps to be interpolated to 120, you will need to use the 'Reduce Motion Blur' slider (but there is currently a bug; in order for RMB to work, you also need to set 'Reduce Judder' to at least 1 as well).

Update 05/30/2017: The M50-D1 and M55-D0 cannot perform motion interpolation.

8.7

Inputs

Show Help
Score components:

The Vizio M Series 2016 supports a wide range of inputs, which should be enough for most people. The input lag is very low when game mode is activated on HDMI 5. With the latest firmware update, it can also display correctly the chroma subsampling at different resolution, which is good for people using their TV as a PC monitor or gamers who want to have a high level of detail while playing.

8.5 Input Lag
Show Help
What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
17.1 ms
1080p With Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
79.2 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
83.8 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
16.9 ms
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
16.7 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.
When it matters: PC Monitor
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
43.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz with HDR.
When it matters: HDR Video games.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
43.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + 8 bit HDR
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 with HDR enabled at 8 bit
When it matters: PC Monitor with an HDR capable graphic card
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
43.8 ms

Input lag is great. For best results, use HDMI5 with 'Game Low Latency' on for both 1080p and 4k resolutions. Note that HDR is only possible for HDMI 1, and so the input lag is higher. It is still playable for casual gamers. Shown below are the results for combinations of HDMI ports, HDR vs SDR, with different signal formats.

FormatHDRHDMIInput lag
1080p@60HzSDR517.1ms
1080p With InterpolationSDR579.2ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game ModeSDR583.8ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR516.9ms
4k @ 60HzSDR516.7ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR5n/a
4k @ 60Hz + HDRHDR5n/a
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + HDRHDR5n/a
1080p@60HzSDR151.5ms
1080p With InterpolationSDR1122.7ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game ModeSDR1126.8ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR151.5ms
4k @ 60HzSDR143.8ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR143.8ms
4k @ 60Hz + HDRHDR143.8ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + HDRSDR143.8ms

Update 01/24/2017: Retested with the newest firmware (3.0.12.2) and now the Vizio M Series 2016 can now display the chroma subsampling correctly when set in 'Computer' picture mode. The input lag has also been reduced.

10 Supported Resolutions
Show Help
What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Show Help
What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
Yes (except 50", 55")
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
Yes

Update 01/24/2017: Retested with the newest firmware (3.0.12.2) and now the Vizio M Series 2016 can now display the chroma subsampling correctly when set in the 'Computer' picture mode. Note that it can also correctly display chroma subsampling at 1080p @ 120Hz.

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 5
USB : 2
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 1
Component In : 1
Composite In : 0
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 0
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Show Help
What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
Yes
Dolby Vision
Show Help
What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : Yes
ARC : Yes (HDMI 1)
USB 3 : Yes (1)
HDCP 2.2 : Yes
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : Yes

HDR10 is supported only on HDMI1. Despite what is mentioned on Vizio website, HDCP 2.2 protected content can play on all HDMI ports.

4.1

Sound Quality

The sound of the Vizio M Series 2016 is terrible, with no bass and lots of distortion regardless of the volume. Even a cheap soundbar is an improvement over the built-in speakers. 

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

4.5 Frequency Response
Show Help
What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.95 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.85 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
5.23 dB SPL
Max
Show Help
What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
91.2 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
Show Help
What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
302 Hz

Poor overall response. The frequency response is poor. The low-end cutoff, at 302Hz, is the worst we have measured so far. This TV doesn't produce any bass. On the other hand, we didn't notice many compression/pumping artifacts and the maximum loudness is good too. But it's not difficult to make a TV loud when it's not producing much bass.

3.3 Total Harmonic Distortion
Show Help
What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
Vizio M Series 2016 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.201
Distortion @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.496
Distortion @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
1.802

Poor distortion results. The overall amount of harmonic distortion is elevated, even at low volumes. As the volume increases, the harmonic distortion increases with it. At 85dB and especially Max dB, the rise in harmonic distortion is significant and could be audible.

7.0

Smart Features

Show Help
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio M Series 2016 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : SmartCast

The Vizio M Series 2016 shares the same smart operating system as the Vizio P Series 2016 and the Vizio E Series 4k 2016 from past reviews we have done. While some may enjoy the simplicity of the SmartCast smart interface, which is similar to a chrome cast experience, depending on the quality of your wireless network there may be disconnections with the tablet. While having a tablet that comes with a TV is great included gift, some people may find it less intuitive than a traditional smart remote. For basic functions, you can use the included traditional remote control but for adjusting picture settings or to control the smart features a tablet or smartphone is required. In terms of inputs, there are 5 HDMI ports which is great for anyone who wants to connect all their devices. You can learn more about Smartcast and its app here.

Keep in mind that it is lacking a TV tuner, which means you cannot connect an antenna or cable directly to the TV. You will need to buy a separate tuner like this one.

Apps
Vizio M Series 2016 Apps Picture

This TV uses SmartCast, and as such, there is no applications on the actual TV itself. However, using the tablet provided with this TV, or any other handheld device, you will have many applications to choose from that supports casting services. There are already many major applications that do so such as Youtube, Netflix, and Spotify. Amazon Prime isn't supported at the moment.

10 Ads
Show Help
What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
Show Help
What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
Yes
Opt-out
Show Help
What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
N/A

TV Controls
Vizio M Series 2016 Controls Picture

The TV controls are located behind the TV on the left side.

Remote
Vizio M Series 2016 Remote Picture
Remote : Tablet

The Vizio TV comes with both a 8-inch tablet and a basic remote. You will most likely be using the tablet more often than the remote itself though as that's how you can adjust all the settings of the TV. You can also download the 'Vizio SmartCast' application on any handheld device. It's available for Android and Apple.

In The Box
Vizio M Series 2016 In The Box Picture

  • 8-Inch Tablet (XR6M)
  • Tablet Manual
  • Wireless charging Dock
  • Charging block
  • Charging cable
  • Remote
  • Batteries
  • HDMI cable
  • Quick start guide

Misc
Power Consumption : 154 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 248 W
Firmware : 1.1.14.4

Differences between Sizes and Variants

The Vizio M Series TV that we bought is the 70" with SKU M70-D3. Note that the M60-D1 has an IPS panel. This means we expect it to have a worse contrast ratio, and wider viewing angle. 

The 50" and 55" models  have 60Hz panels so some of the motion interpolation options are not available (i.e. 'Reduce Judder' and 'Reduce Motion Blur'). For those who like the soap opera effect, it is maybe better to get an 120Hz version of the M series 2016.

Update 05/30/2017: The M50-D1 and M55-D0 cannot perform motion interpolation at all.

Different sizes have different panel provenances, so it is possible our review doesn't represent exactly all sizes. If someone's Vizio M Series doesn't correspond to our review, let us know and we will update the review.

Size Model Effective Refresh Rate Real Refresh Rate HDMI # Speakers Panel Local Dimming Zones
50" M50-D1 120 Hz 60 Hz 4 10W x 2 VA 32
55" M55-D0 120 Hz 60 Hz 4 15W x 2 VA 64
60" M60-D1 240 Hz 120 Hz 5 10W x 2 IPS 64
65" M65-D0 240 Hz 120 Hz 5 15W x 2 VA 64
70" M70-D3 240 Hz 120 Hz 5 10W x 2 VA 64
80" M80-D3 240 Hz 120 Hz 5 10W x 2 VA 64

Compared to other TVs

Vizio M Series 2016 Group Shot Picture
Top left: Vizio M Series 2015 (M60-C3). Bottom left: Sony X850D (XBR55X850D). Middle: Vizio M Series 2016 (M70-D3). Top right: Vizio P Series 2016 (P65-C1). Bottom right: Samsung KU6300 (UN55KU6300).  Unlike our other photographs, this picture wasn't taken under a controlled environment, so do not draw conclusions from it.

The Vizio M Series 2016 provides great movie and TV watching performance, especially for the price.  

Samsung KU6300
40" 43" 50" 55" 60" 65" 70"

The Samsung KU6300 is a better pick for a bright room, such as a living room due to the higher brightness which helps to overcome glare, despite the slightly brighter reflections. The Vizio M Series 2016 does have better picture quality when viewed from in front and in a dark room, at a similar price.

Sony X850D
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Sony X850D offers a much better viewing angle, and its higher peak brightness helps it deal with glare in a very bright room. However for watching movies and TV from straight on in most rooms, the Vizio M Series 2016 is a better pick due to the deeper blacks and better picture quality.

Vizio M Series 2015
43" 49" 50" 55" 60" 65" 70" 75" 80"

The Vizio M Series 2016 is an overall improvement on the previous year's Vizio M Series 2015. It offers the same good picture quality, with increased dark room performance and motion handling. Go with the Vizio M 2016.

Vizio P Series 2016
50" 55" 65" 75"

The Vizio P Series 2016 is the next step up in price from the Vizio M Series 2016.The biggest advantage of the P Series 2016 is the higher brightness and better HDR support, however for those that aren't interested in HDR content the M Series 2016 will provide almost the same performance.

Samsung KS8000
49" 55" 60" 65"

The Samsung KS8000 is a higher end TV, with more premium features such as HDR and does perform better overall. If you plan to watch a lot of HDR content or have a bright living room then the Samsung KS8000 is a better choice, but for those on a smaller budget go with the Vizio M Series 2016.

LG UH8500
55" 60" 65" 75"

The LG UH8500 is better suited for a living room due to the higher brightness and wider viewing angle. It offers a more intuitive smart platform and 3D but the blacks aren't as deep as the Vizio M Series 2016. It also features a more sleek design, but most people are better off saving the money and going with the Vizio M Series 2016.

 

Conclusion
SEE PRICE
B&H

7.9Mixed Usage
Show Help
What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
Good all-round TV. Excels in dark scene performance thanks to great picture quality. Great motion for sports and low input lag for video games.
8.2Movies
Show Help
What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
Very good for watching movies in a dark room. Local dimming works well, and native contrast ratio is high. Blu-rays play smoothly.
7.1TV Shows
Show Help
What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
Average performance for TV shows in a bright living room. Can't get very bright to combat glare but deals with reflections well. Picture quality is great from in front, but deteriorates when viewed from the side. Lacks TV tuner.
7.4Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
Good TV for watching sports. Fast movement is handled very well with a minimum of motion blur. Average field uniformity.
8.8Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
Excels in video game performance. Low input lag on HDMI 5 with game mode which is good. Great handling of fast camera movement with minimum motion blur.
7.8HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
Good for HDR. Supports Dolby Vision and HDR10 but average peak brightness. Slightly above average colors but not enough to take full advantage of HDR.
8.1HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
Good for HDR gaming. Support HDR10 and Dolby Vision but doesn't really benefit from HDR signal. Picture quality is great, but can't get bright highlights or display a wide range of colors. Input lag for HDR is good for casual gaming.
7.9PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Good when use as a PC monitor. Supports a wide range of resolutions. Very good motion handling and feels responsive. Chroma subsampling is displayed correctly at many resolutions.
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Questions & Answers

48 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
23
Hey RTINGS team, I just want to say I really dig the site you guys have created, it makes it so us TV shoppers don't have to wade through any nonsense and fluff that is necessarily added when all we want to know is what we're getting before we buy it. Anyway, onto my question. As this TV includes Bluetooth, is it possible to use a PS4 controller or other Bluetooth controller to play android games on it using the cast feature?
Thank you for the kind words. We are happy to help. We have some PS4 controllers in the office but we haven't found a way to pair them with the Vizio P 2016 unfortunately.
12
With the new firmware update for HDR10 are you planning to retest and update your review? I noticed rating went down from 7.9 to 7.8, is there any particular reason?
We are retesting at the moment the M Series. Update will be online soon. Also, we are always looking for ways to make our testing more accurate and more representing of real life situations. When some test methods are modified, we retest all TVs and some TV scores better or worse.
10
I just purchased the Vizio M50-D1 and in the picture editing mode they do not have the reduce judder or reduce motion blur option that you talked about and that exist in the user manual online for the M series. Do they not exist for this model? Thanks.

Very interesting. It is totally possible that the M50-D1 do not have those setting. Since the M50-D1 is an 60Hz TV, it is normal that it should not have the 'Reduce Motion Blur', since it is related to the motion interpolation 60Hz signal to 120Hz. It is a little surprising that it don't have the 'Reduce Judder'. Thanks you for the information and we will update our review to reflect this.

Update 01/02/2017: The 55" model (M55-D0) also has a 60Hz native refresh rate, and so is also limited with motion interpolation options.

Update 05/30/2017: The M50-D1 and M55-D0 cannot perform motion interpolation at all.

10
Hello, and thanks for a great review. I ended up buying this TV. I want to use my Xbox One S as a game console and an HDR 10 compatible video streamer. I understand that low latency is only available on HDMI5 and that HDR10 is only available on HDMI1. Am I just out of luck? Is the only solution to purchase an HDMI switch? Thanks
Yes, the best solution would be a switch, but we are not aware of a cheap one at the moment that support the full HDMI 2.0 bandwidth.
8
I bought the M55-D0, and I was wondering since there are only 4 hdmi ports instead of 5, does that mean this model does not have a 21ms gll port? Also I can not find a reduce judder option in the smartcast app even after selecting clear motion, is that a feature missing because this is only 60hz? Thanks!
Unfortunately we can't find any information about a game low latency HDMI on the M55-D0. That's correct, reduce judder is missing because it is a 60Hz TV, so there are less motion interpolation features. We have updated the review to show this.

Update 05/30/2017: The M50-D1 and M55-D0 cannot perform motion interpolation at all.

6
Thanks for the review, was waiting for it :-) I have purchased the M55-D0 and it has 15W speakers. Looks like the one you reviewed has 10W speakers. Will that make a difference in the sound output quality? For worse or for better? Also which value/cheap sound bar would you recommend?
More powerful speakers usually generates better sound but given the bad sound measurements we got on the Vizio M, we don't expect much improvements with the 15W speakers. We don't test sound bars unfortunately so we can't recommend one.
5
I noticed the Color Gamut is rated at a 6.8. Will this improve to a higher rating once the HDR10 firmware update is ready?
It will be interesting to see but we don't expect a notable difference.
5
I sit about 14 feet from my TV, I am looking for a 70 inch at the smallest. Is the M70-d3 going to give me the best bang for my buck in the 70+ screen size? I mainly watch cable or stream netflix and keep the living room relatively dark with blinds when I'm watching the TV. Thank you and love your site!
If you watch a lot of cable TV, you would be better with the Samsung KU6300. The KU6300 as a TV tuner and does a better job at upscaling low resolution content like cable TV and it also has a pretty decent picture quality. Also, the smart TV interface is more stable than the Vizio one.
5
Vizio sent out the promised HDR10 firmware update last week (July 29, '16). Do you think there would be any change in the review for the M or P series? Secondly, with respect to the lower scoring of TV shows in Vizio due to upscaling (480p/720p), do you'll directly connect a 480p/720p source using an HDMI cable? I'm wondering because these are tuner free displays, so what if I use a PC with a tuner card which outputs 1080p or a provider like Comcast has it's 'X1 set top box' which outputs in 1080p (480p/720p/1080i channels), would I still have lower quality upscaling or would it be the better 1080p upscaling to 4k? Finally, how would you compare Vizio M with LG UH7700?
The Vizio M and P review will be updated this week with the new firmware update and there is not much change, beside that now HDR10 is supported via HDMI input.

For the upscaling, we connect directly to the TV and we send a lower resolution content via HDMI input, to test the TV upscaling. If you upscale the content via another device before it is feed into the TV, you may have better upscaling, depending of the quality of the upscaling the device can perform. In general, Vizio TVs do a good job upscaling 1080p or higher resolution content, only with 480p and 720p that they are not as good as other brand. So if you feed 1080p content or higher into the TV, you should be good.

As for the comparison between the Vizio M and the LG UH7700, they are both not very far from each other in term of rating, but the Vizio M will be a better choice for a dark room where you sit in front of the TV. If you have a bright room where people a not sitting directly in front of the TV the LG will be a better pick.

5
What size TV formed the basis of this M-series 2016 review? I only ask because of the fact that the 60" model has an IPS panel. I assume the trade-off between a 55" and 60" model - other than the 60Hz refresh on the 55 - is that the 60 gives a wider viewing angle at the cost of the deep blacks provided by the VA panel on the 55. My viewing environment for this TV: a less-bright room, curtained during the day but still moderately bright, dark at night; viewing angle may get to 25 degrees or so. Viewing habits: 30% - my son's video gaming; 25% DirecTV watching - but including football and hockey games (fast motion); and 45% blu-ray or DVD viewing, mostly at night in the dark. In your opinion - would I be better served by a VA panel at 60Hz, or an IPS panel at 120Hz? Or for this TV, do I need to go 65" to get VA + 120Hz, thus increasing the cost quite notably?
The review is of the M70-D3, which has a VA panel. You're correct about the trade off. As you spend a significant proportion of the time watching movies in the dark, go with the 55" VA. The picture quality does degrade when viewed from the side, but not as much as other VA panel TVs. Unless you really like motion interpolation, go with the 60Hz panel. A lot of people find that especially for sports like hockey, the motion interpolation adds artifacts (such as the puck disappearing sometimes). This is unavoidable with interpolation, so we recommend to leave it off and watch the DirecTV at the native 60Hz.
4
So are you saying that the 2016 M series will get HDR10 as well as the P series? And does it really have an 8-bit or 10-bit panel? For gradient, you say it's 8-bit in caption but then say it performs like 8-bit even though it's actually 10-bit in the description. If it's really 10-bit, then a firmware update that includes HDR10 support also possibly fix the gradient and brightness issues? Thanks! I've been waiting for this review forever to see how this model really performs.
A firmware update can only fix software related problems or add software related features like the HDR10 metadata decoding. For the brightness, the firmware update should not make it more brighter since this is hardware related.

As for the 10-bit gradation, even if a panel is 10-bit, but the graphic processing unit driving it has a max output of 8-bit you will see the 8-bit gradation when looking at our test picture. Since the theoretical maximum output of the graphic hardware use to drive the panel is unknown, we cannot extrapolate about the effect of future firmware update would have on this specific issues.

4
Based on your reviews, are you planning to update your 'Best By' listings? Does this Vizio M series 2016 come in 'Best' in any size? If I go by your overall rating then it beats almost all sizes 'Best' categories in certain price ranges.
The Vizio M 2016 should find a place on some of our 'Best By' lists for sure. We will update those lists soon.
4
Right now at Best Buy the 55 inch P series is the same cost as the 65 inch M Series. This is a hard decision because the P series at 55 inches uses an IPS panel. It could very well be that the 65 inch M series what have better picture quality and give me a larger screen for the same price, couldn't it? By the time you get back to me I'll have already made my decision, but it is a difficult one to make. I'd be willing to spend the $30 a month to get access to all the great HDR content. But what's the point of having HDR content if I'm using an IPS panel? In the reverse I don't have an HDR certified screen in the M series but it would likely have almost four times the contrast ratio and also 10 more inches to play with. Pretty much everything else is worse about the M series, Black transitions, input lag, motion, wide color gamut. This is a very difficult decision.
If you're planning to watch movies in a dark room, go with the M Series 2016. The extra 10 inches does make a big difference, and the VA panel is certainly an improvement when viewed from in front. If you are in a brighter living room, or have a wide seating arrangement then go with the Vizio P Series 2016.
3
For angled viewing, do your ratings apply vertically? That is, if a TV sits higher than the viewer's header (wall-hung, for example) does the same degradation occur?
Yes there is both vertical and horizontal picture degradation at an angle, but for the moment, we only test the horizontal viewing angle. If you hang the TV high on the wall, usually most of the wall mount bracket have an adjustment to be able to position vertically the TV so that you don't have any lost in picture quality.
3
I need some help with my settings. I purchased the M65 last week, and I believe it downloaded the latest firmware when going through the setup. My problem is the HDR settings. I have it paired with a Philips BDP7501 player, and when I put in the Man of Steel UHD I get a message that it is not hooked up to an HDR capable television. I'm not sure how to change this, or even verify what's going on. Can you run me through the settings to determine what settings I need to adjust?
First, don't use HDMI port 5, since it is not compatible with HDR. Secondly, you'll need to activate the 'HDMI Color Subsampling' for the HDMI port that your Blu-ray player is connected to, by going in the system setting --> inputs --> HDMI Color Subsampling. After this, if you have the latest firmware update, it should work out.
2
I'll be moving soon and not sure what size room I'll be in but I know I'm looking at a 65 or 70. I have been waiting for the 2016 M series review for a long time. Unfortunately it only muddied the waters for me. Basically is the performance of the P series, in your opinion, worth the $500 price bump. I'm fine with spending the 2k, bump for performance, but if it's not worth it the extra 5 inches should get the money. Guidance and thoughts?
If you plan to watch any HDR content (streaming, games or blu-rays) then go with the 65" P series. It has a wider color gamut and higher peak brightness which will be an improvement. Other than this they are very similar TVs.
2
How is the HDR different from the P-series and the M-series? Vizio's site says that the P-series has a wider color spectrum than the M-series, but how noticeable would that be? For $2000 what is the better buy - the P65-C1 or the M70-D3?
The bigger difference that you are going to notice is more the brightness difference than the wider color gamut. You are going to have a better HDR experience with a TV that can get small highlight brighter. Thing like the sun shining in the sky or a candle burning in a dark room are going to pop more on the P series. Also, the P series scores better in the almost every tests. If you want to buy the best TV, get the Vizio P series 2016.
2
Since the firmware update, has your team tested the HDR10 on the M Series? Also, I've noticed a bit more green or cyan in the picture when I play HDR content. For instance, in The Revenant, sometimes the snow and sky appear greenish. I'm not sure if it's suppose to look like that or if the color space is causing it.
The reviews already have been updated and beside the new HDR10 support, we did not notice any improvements. We did not notice any change in the color space after the update. You could try to reset the calibration (just note your values if you want to come back to them after) to see if it is still the same after.
2
I want a good 70 inch TV that will get me through a few years while these standards get sorted out. Should I just get a 1080P TV and wait, or is HDR here and ready to go? Does this M Series underperform so much that HDR isn't worth it for this TV? And if so, what is the best TV for HDR in your opinion?
At the moment there is no TV which can display HDR content as intended, and there probably won't be for at least a few years. Having said that, HDR performance is still a dramatic improvement over SDR content, with TVs like the Vizio P Series 2016 producing a wide range of colors with highlights that stand out and excellent picture quality. It is our pick for the best HDR TV. HDR content on the Vizio M Series 2016 still looks good, but only because the TV has excellent picture quality. It does not benefit from the HDR signal. Depending on your budget, you are probably better off buying a cheaper TV with excellent picture quality (such as the Vizio M Series).
2
Hello. Have you tried the XBOX one S HDR on the TV or any 4k movies on it, and if so how does it compare to the P series?
We did not try the Xbox One S on in our lab yet. As for the P Series, since it has the wide color gamut, better local dimming and higher peak brightness, HDR movies do look better on it than on the M Series.
2
I have a direct TV receiver. Is there a “better” or “best” HDMI input (of the 5 inputs available) to use to ensure the best quality picture, particularly for upscaling and HDR? Are your settings such that they are best for these? Are there any settings that might need to be tweaked to improve upscaling from Direct TV input?
All port should give you the same quality of upscaling. Note that if you want to use HDR, you'll have to use the HDMI port 1, since the other HDMI ports cannot transmit the HDR metadata. You can use our setting, since those are best for movies and TV shows. Upscaling is not affected by the settings, since this is an automatic feature of the TV itself.
2
First off - you guys provide GREAT information! Absolutely invaluable. I recently purchased a Vizio M70-D3 and I love the TV including the picture quality. I'm mostly using your recommended calibration settings with some small tweaks. The only thing that bothers me is that I've noticed that when a TV show or movie is panning quickly and there is a solid, "pastel"-like color (light blue sky, white/beige walls, etc), I see "bands" or "columns" that are brigher that the area next to them - these "bands" don't move, while the image itself is moving and it really bothers me. I've never noticed this on any other TV (previous Vizio 55" and other 40" - all 1080p sets. Is this a "defect" with my TV or just the way it is with this model? Thank you VERY much for all of the great info!
This sounds like a uniformity issue which is causing the dirty screen effect. This exists to some extent with all LCD TVs, however is more pronounced at larger sizes. If you take a photo of this image on the TV we can see if it is very different to what can be expected. Either way, if it bothers you then you should exchange the TV for another one as it does vary on a set-by-set basis.
2
Here is a cautionary tale to the would be VIZIO buyer, not just the M series or the P series or any particular year model for that matter. Let me begin buy saying that I was the proud owner of a 2016 Vizio M70-D3. I still own it but I can’t say that I am any longer proud of my purchase. Not so much so because it filled my 1500 sq ft apartment with this pungent smell which now has completely saturated the leather of my $4000 Restoration Hardware sofa but may have very well cost me everything else since it wasn’t even on when it filled my home with smoke. 1 month ago I purchased the M70 and loved and was fully engulfed with the brilliance of its picture, at least until I connected my first 4k device to it. The M70 produced beautiful 4k streamed images from YouTube and such but as soon as I connected it to the UHD DVD player or my Xbox One S it would play then cut off, play then cut off, and on and on and on until I got frustrated enough to just go to bed. I called Vizio the following day and it was suggested that even though I could reproduce the problem by streaming video or by playing blu-ray UHD through the Xbox One S that I needed get a third device to test as an exclusionary step to prove that the Xbox was not possibly the issue. The TV sat on the wall , being passed over for my 60 inch 4 year old LG. Until that faithful day I got home from work, pressed the on button and proceeded into the bedroom to change into my bedroom slippers and comfortable pants. When I got back to the living room fully expecting to sit down to the news or whatever, I was greeted buy that familiar smell of a burning piece of electronics and a steady stream of casual smoke coming up out of the top of my $2000 display. I Immediately unplugged it and called Vizio. I was promptly transferred to something called the safety group where I was then asked a barrage of what seemed to be legal liability related questions, was anyone injured, so on and so forth. Eventually we got to the issue of the television and I was offered an immediate replacement. Fast forward 3 weeks later. I now have the replacement Vizio M70 on my wall, since then I have upgraded the Samsung 8500 UHD player with a Panasonic, yet the new Vizio is still cutting off just like the last one. I am thinking that I don’t want to go through the last sequence of events with possibly a worse outcome this time so all I want this round is a refund. I call Vizio and they submit a request for refund and I am told that someone will call me with the approval or denial in 48 hrs. The call comes and I am denied, bases m9st likely on the fact that the noted the rep read out to me on my account about my problem with the set had absolutely nothing to do with my issues so I demand to escalate since the notes in the system for my initial complaint were nothing to do with the initial issue of cutting off or fire but with something to do with pixelation. I then get put on hold and when the representative returns I am all of a sudden approved for the refund. I am advised that someone will contact me within 48hrs to arrange the pickup of the TV and once they have in in their possession the refund will be issued within another 10 business days. The next day I receive a call from supposedly a Vizio executive manager who informed me once again that my request for refund is again denied, I demand to escalate and once again and I am told that he will submit yet another request for refund apparently there is no escalation process. Just resubmit and deny resubmission and denial then apparently rinse and repeat, my ordeal is now 6 weeks old. So people be warned: EVEN THOUGH A VIZIO M70 SAYS IT IS HDR COMPATIBLE, IT MAY NOT BE. ESPECIALLY SINCE VIZIO SAYS THAT THE IT ISN’T COMPATIBLE FOR HDR GAMING AND IS VERY HAPPY TO SUGGEST TURNING OFF Color Upsampling (HDR) The old adage of getting nothing for free holds true, especially when it appears you’re getting features that other name brands sell for hundreds or even thousands more. I don’t know about you but I think my M70, now that vizio has stuck me with it, may last me another month or so before it completely dies or burns my home down. I only hope vizio understands that at that point, if I survive the possible fire, they will be facing a whole lot more than just a warranty claim.
Thank you for sharing your experience.
2
Have you tested the M70 D3 series with firmware 2.2.7.4 (latest). Has it improved on the picture quality and especially the low brightness/nit that you mention in the review?
Yes. There was a very slight (~30 nits) increase in brightness across all window sizes, but this is not noticeable. Otherwise we found no difference in picture quality with the new firmware.
1
Is HDR10 & DV only available on 4K sets?
Yes. 1080p TVs doesn't come with HDR support.
1
Does less local dimming zones mean worse picture quality? Ie. the 50"(32) vs 55"(64)?
It will make a difference only if local dimming is turned On. It means the dimming won't be as precise than if more zones were available.
1
Running off of input HDMI 5 but I'm unable to get 120hz using the GAME picture setting, with what settings are you achieving 120hz?
PC connected to HDMI 5, outputting 1080p @ 120Hz. Color output chroma 4:4:4, 8 bit. TV is set to 'Game' picture mode and 'Game Low Latency' enabled. Otherwise set to calibration settings available here. Ensure your HDMI cables are high speed, and aren't too long.
1
Hi, I'm interesting to Vizio in the 55 inch size. Which model do you recommend? The Vizio 2016 P Series in the 55 inch or the 2016 M Series in the same size, considering that the P Series have an IPS panel for that size and the M Series have lower Spec and for that specific size a lower refresh rate (60Hz). Second question, is the 60 inch 2015 M Series model a better choice considering it has VA panel and 120Hz. But it is the old model? But preference is in the 55 inch size. Thank you very much. You have very good and detailed review. :)
You will notice less the difference between the 60Hz and 120Hz than between the IPS an VA panel difference. If you will be watching TV in a bright room most of the time, go with the P Series with the IPS panel. But if you'll be watching TV in a dark room most of the time, go with the M Series with the VA panel.
1
When it comes to HDR performance do you recommend the M55-D0 over the Sony XBR55X900C? On the XBR55X900C you have it rated as a 10 bit and the M55 as an 8 bit, currently both are around the same price range when I checked your links to amazon and best buy, I will be using your links to buy so you can get a cut. Just advise which TV is the better buy and I will pull the trigger, I need to be ready for the PS4 Neo.
Go with the Sony X900C. Since the Sony has a 10 bit panel and the wide color gamut, you will get a bit more vibrant color than on the Vizio M series. But be aware that both the Sony X900C and the Vizio M series are not the best choice for HDR gaming, since under HDR, both have around 65-70 ms of input lag, which is a bit too much even for casual gaming.
1
Stupid question, if the TV can only display 8 bit color and no wide color gamut, then how can Vizio claim that it's a HDR TV? The ability to decode the signal isn't the same thing as the ability to display it. How does the output differ to SDR given its color depth and brightness specs are essentially SDR rather than HDR compliant?
Unfortunately, this is a marketing trick to sell more TV. Since real good HDR performance is mostly a high end TVs feature, at least at the moment in time. Tying the HDR label to some mid-range level TVs, even if they do not display all of HDR benefit, will make less spec-conscious people buy those TVs over the normal SDR TVs.
1
Thanks for all the information; this site is great!

I plan to buy a 55 inch TV to use as my sole PC display for web browsing, data entry, and media consumption (youtube/netflix, etc.). I have no plans to use cable television service, blu-rays, or game consoles, and HDR is a nice bonus, but is not a priority. I want to use 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + HDR and/or 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 as my full time display mode for the PC.

I think the Vizio M55-D0 is a solid choice for my use case, but I have a doubt due to the following quote from this review: "The Sony X850D offers a much better viewing angle, and is better suited as a PC monitor due to the clearer text and resolution support." This comment is making me concerned that the Vizio M55-D0 has issues with displaying text even with 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4. The X850D currently costs $300 USD more than the M55-D0 (currently $700 USD). Can you further comment on the text quality observed from the M55-D0 during web browsing?

Would you recommend another TV over the M55-D0 for my use case? Thanks again for all the info; it really helped!
The Vizio M55-D0 is better if the TV will be 5 feet or further from where you are sitting, and if the room isn't too bright. Otherwise the X850D is better. The M55-D0 has better picture quality when watching content in a dark room due to its better contrast ratio and local dimming. However in a very bright room the X850D is better due to its higher peak brightness. The X850D also has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, which is important if you are sitting closer than 5 feet from a 55" TV; it's also important if other people watching the TV will be often sitting to the side of the TV and viewing it on an angle.

The comment about clearer text is an error on the website, that has now been corrected. When we first tested the Vizio M 2016 it could not display 4:4:4 correctly, however a future software update enabled the Vizio to display proper 4:4:4 when it is in the Computer picture mode. The Vizio M55-D0 can now display text just as clearly as the Sony X850D.
1
The new M55-D0 only has 4 HDMI ports. There is no HDMI 5 port for gaming. Which port should I use for gaming and which port for 4K HDR10 Blu-ray?
The other inputs are identical in terms of input lag. HDMI 1 is the only port that supports HDR and is also the only port that supports ARC (audio return channel). If you're not interested in gaming in HDR use HDMI 1 for the Blu-ray. If you do want to game in HDR, you need to use an HDMI splitter so that two inputs can go into HDMI 1 (or manually unplug the HDMI cable from the console and into the Blu-ray player every time).
1
I'm considering the M70-D3 but the reason I'm back in the market is because my VIZIO E600i-B3 has started showing dark bands at roughly the year and a half mark. So I'm a little hesitant to go back with Vizio since it hasn't held up, but wonder if that was just a bad model. So I guess my question revolves around the durability/quality of the Vizio lineup (specifically the M70-D3) or if there are any other similar models I should be considering. Note: the real draw is the decent picture quality for the price (for the size). I've got a nice home theater setup (and remote) so its shortcomings are really a non-factor. Basically I just want the best picture for the $$$ and there aren't really any other "features" that I need (apps, sound, remote, etc).
Reliability is only a concern for ultra budget TVs from no name brands. All the major brands have equally good reliability.

The Achilles' heel of the M70-D3 is its low peak brightness which is a problem in very bright rooms; but it is really great in a dim room due to its great local dimming. It also has a poor viewing angle which can be a problem if people will be often sitting to the side of the TV and viewing it on an angle. But at the size and price of the M70-D3 there aren't many others that offer as good dark room picture quality when viewed straight on.

0
Any suggestions to make streaming live content "pop" a little more? This is for all shows shot on video instead of film, actually.
Try our settings first. If you find the picture too dull or yellowish, you can either change the 'Color Temperature' to something cooler or change the picture mode to something else. If the video signals isn't of the best quality, try to engage 'Reduce Signal Noise' and 'Reduce Block Noise' which will make the picture slightly clearer. Turning up the 'Backlight' also help to make things pop a little more.
0
I am looking at the M65-D0 and the Sony 810c. Used almost entirely for movies and tv viewing with Direct tv. which one one you choose? Any others in the price range better?
If you are watching TV in a bright room majority of the time, go with the Sony X810C. The 65" version of the Sony X810C is a bit different from the one in the review, because it uses a IPS panel, which is more suited for bright room. If the majority of your viewing is in a dark room, go with the Vizio M65-D0. The Vizio M use a VA panel, which is better suited for dark room, because of the deeper black it can produce.
0
Does the M series have a long black transition/pixel response/blur as the 2016 P series?
Yes it does. This is visible here. On the M Series 2016 it is 49.8ms for the 0%-20% black transition and for the P Series 2016 it is 42.9ms.
0
What's the latest on a supposed halt in production to fix some problems? Also, is part of the low HDR rating due to it not currently having HDR10?
We are not aware of any halt in production for this specific TV. The HDR low rating is mostly due to the low peak brightness and the average color gamut coverage, which both important to have a great HDR experience.
0
I was just wondering what kind of picture quality and in what area's would i receive by keeping game mode on all the time on the vizo m 2016 model? All my devices that i am concerned about picture quality (media player, htpc, cable box) output at 2160p so scaling and deinterlacing do not apply, but i dont know if you observed degradation in other areas?
Game mode turn off most of the TV image processing to diminish the input lag (image processing take time). We did not perceive degradation in image quality or other area, because when we test TV, we already turn off most of the TV image processing.
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It's a shame that the 55 and 50 inch models lack a judder reduction setting. Since motion interpolation is a hardware thing and not a software issue, it looks like there's no way of adding the SOE. Have you guys noticed judder in the 60hz models?
Unfortunately, we currently only have the 70" M70-D3 in our lab, so we cannot test them directly. But, the Vizio D 4k and Vizio E 4k, that are 60Hz TV do not have judder on 24p content but they both do have judder on 60p and 60i source. Without being 100% sure here, we could extrapolate that the 60Hz M series might be the same. But without actual testing in our lab, this answer is to take with a grain of salt.
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I am deciding between the Samsung KS9000 75" Samsung and the 80" M Series (I'm open to a recommendation other than these two TV's). Our usage will be 50% movies (HD and UHD), 30% sports, and 20% general TV watching (both in HD). The TV will be in a generally dark room and our seating is mostly in front of the TV and we sit 15ft from the screen. We can afford either TV and our priorities are as follows: size (leaning toward at least 80"), image quality, brightness/contrast/color, ease of use, and future proofing. Thank you for any recommendations and guidance you can provide.
The Samsung KS9000 is a better pick. The increase in picture quality of the KS9000 is worth more than the extra 5" of the Vizio M, but at that size you're limited in the number of options. The KS9000 also provides more future proofing with better HDR support.
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I am not sure I follow your input resolution results. You write "No" to the 4k @ 60Hz 4:4:4, but then you acknowledge that it accepts it in the next statement? And Vizio's website state that HDMI 1 accepts "2160p@60fps, 4:4:4, 8-bit". Can you clarify? I want to ensure that this TV has at least one HDMI port that supports the most up-to-date standards before I consider buying it. Thanks.
It is true that it does accept 4k @ 60Hz 4:4:4, but when displaying our test picture, it does not display it clearly. To pass our test, the test image need to be clear and it is for this reason that we say that it does not. But here, there is something important to point out, it is that color subsampling (or chroma 4:4:4) is really only important if you will be using your TV as a computer monitor, since Chroma 4:4:4 is use mainly to make text look more sharp and define on screen. So, if you won't use the TV as a computer monitor, even if the TV does not display perfectly 4k @ 60Hz 4:4:4, it still displays normal 4k @ 60Hz perfectly and it should be good for normal TV use.
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I am stuck between the M series, the P series, and the Sony X800D. I know the P series is probably the best overall, but I don't want to pay extra unless the HDR is really a lot better. Is HDR better on the M Series or on the X800D? Thanks!
The P Series is definitely the best of the 3 for watching HDR content from directly in front.The Sony X800D is slightly better than the Vizio M Series 2016 for watching HDR content. It supports a wide color gamut which produces much more vivid colors. The Vizio M Series 2016 has the advantage of local dimming, but without the wide color gamut the picture quality isn't any better for HDR content than SDR content. Go with the Sony X800D.
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I previously asked about HDR10 pushing green and cyan on my TV set. I've reset the calibration settings as you suggested and still no luck. I decided to experiment with the color temperature and found while watching The Revenant and Deadpool, that switching the color temperature from normal to computer gave a more accurate and natural appearance to images like the white snow that Leo crawls on looking for food, the rich blue sky in the background while Deadpool sits on the highway giving his speech about getting his own movie, and the white scrub that Wade Wilson wears while being experimented on in the lab as apposed to a greenish hue that you would see with the color temperature set to normal. However, while those images appear accurate, other elements of the picture do not. I'm starting to wonder if I either have a defective TV or if this is a consequence of a less than wide color gamut.
It is a bit hard for us to recreate exactly your condition since we don't have those 2 movies with us in our lab at the moment. But we never seen a TV that had a defect of this kind, so it is maybe just the calibration that is a bit off or that you were used to seeing, on another TV, an image set to another color temperature.
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I purchased the M70-D3 for our bedroom and love it. Now I need another TV for our theater room. I was thinking of the M80-D3 but wonder if the P75-C1 would be a better TV all around. The theater room can be blacked out so we may watch in the dark but it also can be bright. I am also considering the Sony 75X940D. Would greatly appreciate your advice.
Go with the P75. It has a bit better picture quality, and better motion handling. At 80" the fewer dimming zones of the Vizio M Series 2016 might result in more obvious blooming. Also if you plan to watch HDR movies in the future, the P Series 2016 benefits with a wide color gamut and brighter highlights. On paper the X940D looks good, but we haven't reviewed it so can't comment on how suitable it would be.
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What are the differences between the 5 HDMI inputs on the Vizio M65-D0? HDMI1 is labeled ARC; HDMI2, 4 are labeled BEST; HDMI5 is labelled BEST, 1080P&HIGHER; HDMI3 is not labeled. I'm just not sure what these labels mean relative to plugging something into them such as my cable STB.
The labelling on the inputs is not completely clear, but 'BEST' refers to the group of HDMI ports and not an individual port. HDMI 1 supports HDR, so use it for highest quality content such as a HDR bluray player. HDMI 2 - 4 are all identical, and will work well for your cable STB. HDMI 5 is for low input lag, so should be used for game consoles or PC.
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I'm trying to decide between the Vizio M Series 60" TV vs. Samsung KS8000 55" TV. I would use it mostly for watching basketball/football games and blu-rays and 4K blu-rays. My friend has the Samsung 4K 55 inch and loves it but I notice when watching basketball games at his place there is some motion blur at times, also the colors are great on his TV but not in darker rooms. Which TV is better for what I'm looking for? Cost isn't an issue although the Vizo is $300 cheaper, I like the Vizio but I'm worried the Android tablet is too clunky and not user friendly. Please advise? Thanks!
The 55" KS8000 is the better choice. The 60" Vizio M uses an IPS panel, unlike the other sizes in the series. This means it has better viewing angles but a poorer contrast ratio and black levels, which are important for viewing in a dark room. This makes the 55" KS8000 better overall, despite its smaller size. The Vizio only becomes the better choice if the TV will often be used in a bright room and if people will often be sitting to the side of the TV and viewing it on an angle.

The 6" Vizio Android tablet is quite big for a remote, but the interface is user friendly. If you don't like the tablet you can install the app on your Android or iOS phone and use it instead.
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I'm trying to decide between the 55H8C ($500) and the M55-D0 ($700). Both are 55" 60Hz VA panels. Your reviews obviously favor the M series, however your test panel was 120HZ. Would the M55 be more on par with the H8c? Which would you give the nod to?
Thanks for the great reviews and info!
Even with a 60 Hz panel the M55-D0 is better than the 55H8C in nearly every way. Its local dimming performance is especially great. The M55-D0 will provide noticeably better picture quality in a dim room, but in a bright room its advantages aren't as noticeable. It's up to you if the added cost is worth it, but the M55-D0 will be more worth it in a dim room and less worth it in a bright room.

120 Hz only directly matters for motion interpolation, which will look smoother than on a 60 Hz TV. It's also more common for 120 Hz TVs to play 24p content judder free, but many 60 Hz TVs such as the X800D also play 24p judder free.

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I'm a little confused and was curious if you could help clear some stuff up. I have the Vizio M65-D0 and am currently looking into purchasing a UHD 4K Blu-Ray player to maximize my TV's potential, however I believe I have read somewhere that only one HDMI port (HDMI 1) on the M65-D0 supports 4K and HDR, is this true? My only dilemma with that if true is that HDMI 1 is the only ARC port and I currently have my LGSH7B soundbar hooked up to HDMI 1 port. I'm just trying to find the best way to maximize both sound and picture on my TV. Thanks in advance and this site is great, really helped me to make my Vizio M65-D0 purchase. Looking forward to your advice!
4k is possible for all ports, but HDR is only possible for HDMI 1, which unfortunately is also the only ARC port. Your LGSH7B sound bar supports HDMI passthrough, but it might not suppot HDR passthrough. If it does you can connect the Blu-ray player to the sound bar and the sound bar will send the video to the TV over the cable it uses for ARC. It'll be obvious if the sound bar doesn't support HDR passthrough because either the TV won't say it's playing HDR or there will be nothing on the screen. If that's the case you can connect to the sound bar using optical audio rather than ARC, or use a non HDR port to play your Blu-rays in standard 4k, or buy an HDMI 2.0a splitter so that both the sound bar and the Blu-ray player can use HDMI 1. Our HDfury Integral can do this but it costs over 200$.
We are not taking any more questions for this product because we no longer have it in our lab.