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    Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Back
    3. Borders
    4. Thickness
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. HDR Peak Brightness
    5. Gray Uniformity
    6. Viewing Angle
    7. Black Uniformity
    8. Gradient
    9. Pre Calibration
    10. Post Calibration
    11. 480p Input
    12. 720p Input
    13. 1080p Input
    14. 4k Input
    15. Color Gamut
    16. Color Volume
    17. Image Retention
    18. Reflections
    19. 3D
    20. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Apps
    2. Ads
    3. TV Controls
    4. Remote
    5. In The Box
    6. Misc
  8. Sizes and Variants
  9. Compared
  10. Conclusion
  11. Q&A
Reviewed on Apr 09, 2016

Vizio P Series 2016
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
8.2Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.7Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
7.3TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.6Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
8.9Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
8.5HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
8.4HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
7.9PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Type : LED
Resolution : 4k
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz (except 50")

The Vizio P Series 2016 has one of the best picture quality we have seen. It really shines in a dark room. It isn't OLED and it won't please everyone - especially because of its poor upscaling of low-quality content - but those looking for a TV for watching 4k movies will be more than satisfied.

Pros
  • Great picture quality, especially for movies
  • Great gaming TV, with low input lag and little motion blur
  • Bright, even on full screens
Cons
  • Sub-par upscaling of lower resolutions
  • Loss of picture quality at an angle

Test Results
Design 8.0
Picture Quality 8.0
Motion 9.2
Inputs 8.7
Sound Quality 5.1
Smart Features 7.0

Check Price

50" P50-C1
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55" P55-C1
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65" P65-C1
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75" P75-C1
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8.0

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 Design Picture
Curved : No

The design of the Vizio P Series 2016 feels higher-end than the previous P Series. It is still bulky, though, and doesn't look as premium as the high-end models from other brands, like the Sony X930D or the Samsung KS9500.

Stand
Vizio P Series 2016 Stand Picture

The stand is very wide. We even had to extend our test table to be able to put the 65" model on top of it.
Footprint of the 65" TV stand: 50" x 11"

Back
Vizio P Series 2016 Back Picture
Wall Mount : Vesa 400x400

In most cases, you shouldn't have a problem accessing the connections at the back of the TV when it is mounted to the wall.

Borders
Vizio P Series 2016 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.63" (1.6 cm)

The borders have a metallic finish.

Thickness
Vizio P Series 2016 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 2.60" (6.6 cm)

The Vizio P Series is thicker than most TVs.

8.0

Picture Quality

The Vizio P Series has excellent picture quality, and is especially good in a dark room. Dark scenes will look great, with deep and very uniform blacks. It also supports HDR content, offering up a wider range of colors and a high peak brightness. It is average at dealing with reflections, but the whole screen can get quite bright to combat glare. The only downside is low resolution content, like DVDs and SD channels, looks a bit too soft and the picture quality deteriorates when viewed from the side.

9.0 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Checkerboard Picture
Native Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
5694 : 1

Excellent native contrast ratio. The blacks are very deep, even when local dimming is off.
The 55" size doesn't have great blacks, though, because it uses an IPS panel, and not the VA panel used by other sizes.

8.5 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
Yes
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
Full-Array

The local dimming feature on the Vizio P Series 2016, called 'Active LED Zones,' works really well, thanks to the full-array backlight. In our video, the white dot is a bit dimmed, which is unfortunate, but at least there isn't any major blooming. You will see more blooming at an angle than you will from directly in front of the TV. When watching movies, a downside of this feature is that stars in the sky won't be bright, but at least the blacks will be great.

8.1 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
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What it is: The maximum luminosity the TV can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more regular movie condition. All measurement are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over SDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV show in SDR.
:
543 cd/m2
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
326 cd/m2
SDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
460 cd/m2
SDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
518 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
554 cd/m2
SDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
571 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
326 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
460 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
518 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 50% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
554 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
571 cd/m2

The peak brightness in SDR is almost the same as in HDR, which is a good thing since most of the content available right now is still mostly in SDR.

8.1 HDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; HDR content.
HDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
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What it is: The maximum luminosity the TV can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more realistic movie condition. All measurement are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over HDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV show in HDR.
:
492 cd/m2
HDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
360 cd/m2
HDR Peak 10% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
487 cd/m2
HDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
519 cd/m2
HDR Peak 50% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
550 cd/m2
HDR Peak 100% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
568 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 2% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
360 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 10% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
487 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 25% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
519 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 50% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
550 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 100% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
568 cd/m2

This TV cannot get a small highlight as bright as other high end TVs like the Samsung KS9500 or the Sony X930D; but it can get very bright across the entire screen. Bright scenes should perform well compared to most other HDR TVs.

Update 08/05/2016: Retested with newest firmware update, sending a HDR10 signal over HDMI.

Update 10/14/2016: Retested with the newest 2.2.7.4 firmware update.

Update 01/24/2017: Retested with the newest 3.0.12.2 firmware update.

6.8 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
4.527 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.188 %
Vizio P Series 2016 5% Uniformity Picture
5% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 5% gray.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 1.15%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
1.911 %
5% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 0.116%
:
0.124 %

The gray uniformity is average. You can see a few vertical bands of colors across the screen, as well as darker corners. It is a bit worse at an angle.

4.3 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
VA (except 55")
Vizio P Series 2016 Color Shift Picture
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
18 °
Vizio P Series 2016 Brightness Picture
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
32 °
Vizio P Series 2016 Black Level Picture
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
22 °

The colors shift when viewed from the side, as is expected from a VA panel. This isn't ideal if you watch TV from wide angles. The 55" model's (Vizio P55-C1) IPS panel will maintain better colors at an angle.

9.8 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
0.505 %

The uniformity of the blacks is almost perfect, especially when you use the local dimming feature. More issues can be seen at an angle, but the P-series is still better than the majority of LED TVs.

9.0 Gradient
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What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 Gradient Picture
Color Depth
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What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
10 Bit

Gradients are relatively smooth. It is a 10 bit panel, but there are imperfections and banding along the gradients. Nothing major enough to ruin the experience, though.

8.9 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Pre Calibration Picture Vizio P Series 2016 Pre Gamma Curve Picture Vizio P Series 2016 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.34
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.5044
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.23

The white balance is quite good by default under the 'Calibrated Dark' preset. Colors are too saturated, though, especially the blue and the red.

9.4 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Post Calibration Picture Vizio P Series 2016 Post Gamma Curve Picture Vizio P Series 2016 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.26
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.0181
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.2

The 11 pt settings were easy to use and allowed us to fix the white balance. For the colors though, calibration was a bit of a mess. Fixing the oversaturated primaries resulted in an undersaturation of less-saturated colors.

7.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 480p Picture

Upscaled DVDs looks a bit soft and some small details on our test pattern, like the sail boat ropes looks choppy.

7.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 720p Picture

Not too much small details are lost in the upscaling compare to other Vizio TVs, but the image is still softer than other brand like Sony or Samsung.

9.0 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 1080p Picture

Good quality 1080p content look good on the P series 2016.

10 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 4k Picture

4k content look very good and sharp.

7.6 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
Yes
Vizio P Series 2016 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
83.86 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
90.44 %
Vizio P Series 2016 Color Gamut Rec.2020 Picture
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
61.10 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
68.93 %

It isn't as wide as the coverage of some competitors, but the colors do pop more than they do on a TV lacking the wide color gamut feature.
Update 08/05/2016: Retested with the newest firmware update, sending a HDR10 signal over HDMI.

6.5 Color Volume
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What it is: How many colors a TV can display at different luminosity levels.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Vizio P Series 2016 P3 Color Volume Picture
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
:
74.319 %
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels when compared to an ideal 10,000 nit TV
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
:
44.59 %
Vizio P Series 2016 2020 Color Volume Picture
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the Rec. 2020 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
:
55.801 %
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage
Show Help
What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels when compared to an ideal 10,000 nit TV
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
:
33.585 %

10 Image Retention
Show Help
What it is: How much a static image is retained on a TV screen after a certain amount of time.
When it matters: When watching TV show, playing video games or when using your TV as a PC monitor.
IR after 0 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured right after the static image exposure, without recovery time.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 2 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 2 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 4 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 4 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 6 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 6 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 8 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 8 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 10 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 10 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %

8.0 Reflections
Show Help
What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 Reflections Picture Vizio P Series 2016 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
Show Help
What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
2 %
Screen Finish
Show Help
What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Semi-gloss

The reflections are average. The P-series' semi-gloss screen means the amount of ambient light reflected is greater than you see with other high-end TVs, but there are no major rainbows around direct reflections.

0 3D
Show Help
What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
3D
Show Help
What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
No
3D Type
Show Help
What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
No
2D to 3D
Show Help
What it is: Feature that converts 2D content to 3D.
When it matters: If you want to watch 2D content in 3D. Note that the quality is not as good as that of native 3D.
:
No

Pixels
9.2

Motion

Motion handling is great on the Vizio P Series 2016. Fast moving objects appear with very little motion blur. Movies played from any source display smoothly. It is able to interpolate content up to the native refresh rate of 120Hz.

9.2 Motion Blur
Show Help
What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Motion Blur Picture Vizio P Series 2016 Response Time Chart
Response Time
Show Help
What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
10.2 ms
Overshoot
Show Help
What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0.7 ms

The average response time of the pixel transitions is really good. The only problem area is dark transitions, and particularly the 0% to 20%, which comes in at a pretty long 42.9ms. This TV uses PWM flickering to adjust the luminosity of the backlight.

6.8 Image Flicker
Show Help
What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
Show Help
What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
120 Hz
BFI
Show Help
What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes
Vizio P Series 2016 BFI Picture Vizio P Series 2016 BFI Frequency Picture
BFI Frequency
Show Help
What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
60 Hz
BFI In Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes

The Vizio P Series 2016 has the option of enabling 'Clear Action' to reduce the backlight frequency to 60Hz. This helps to clear up motion due to eye tracking blur.

10 24p Playback
Show Help
What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60i
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
Yes

It is able to play a 24p signal without judder. It can also detect and perform 3:2 reverse pulldown without issue, even with a 60p signal. This is great for watching movies sent by an HTPC.

10 Motion Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Show Help
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
Vizio P Series 2016 Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Show Help
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
Vizio P Series 2016 Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

'Reduce Judder' is the setting that turns on motion interpolation for 30 fps (and lower) content. For 60 fps to be interpolated to 120, you will need to use the 'Reduce Motion Blur' slider (but there is currently a bug; in order for RMB to work, you also need to set 'Reduce Judder' to at least 1 as well).

8.7

Inputs

Show Help
Score components:

The Vizio P Series 2016 supports a wide range of inputs, which is great. The input lag is low, which is perfect for fast games. With the latest firmware update available, the TV is able to display the chroma subsampling correctly at different resolutions, which should please PC enthusiasts and gamers out there.

8.5 Input Lag
Show Help
What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
16.3 ms
1080p With Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
86.8 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
91.3 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
16.3 ms
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
16.3 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.
When it matters: PC Monitor
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
43.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz with HDR.
When it matters: HDR Video games.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
43.8 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + 8 bit HDR
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 with HDR enabled at 8 bit
When it matters: PC Monitor with an HDR capable graphic card
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
43.8 ms

Input lag is great. For best results, use HDMI5 with 'Game Low Latency' on for both 1080p and 4k resolutions. Note that HDR is only possible for HDMI 1-4, and so the input lag is higher. It is still playable for casual gamers. Shown below are the results for combinations of HDMI ports, HDR vs SDR, with different signal formats.

FormatHDRHDMIInput lag
1080p@60HzSDR516.3ms
1080p With InterpolationSDR586.8ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game ModeSDR591.3ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR516.3ms
4k @ 60HzSDR516.3ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR5n/a
4k @ 60Hz + HDRHDR5n/a
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + HDRHDR5n/a
1080p@60HzSDR150.8ms
1080p With InterpolationSDR1114.7ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game ModeSDR1118.2ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR150.8ms
4k @ 60HzSDR143.8ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4SDR143.8ms
4k @ 60Hz + HDRHDR143.8ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + HDRSDR143.8ms

Update 01/23/2017: Retested with the newest firmware (3.0.12.2) and now the Vizio P Series 2016 can now display the chroma subsampling correctly when set in 'Computer' picture mode. The input lag has also been reduced.

10 Supported Resolutions
Show Help
What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Show Help
What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
Yes (except 50")
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
Yes

Update 01/23/2017: Retested with the newest firmware (3.0.12.2) and now the Vizio P Series 2016 can now display the chroma subsampling correctly when set in the 'Computer' picture mode for HDMI port 1 to 4. On HDMI port 5, chroma subsampling is supported on any picture mode.

Note that the Vizio P can also correctly display chroma subsampling at 1080p @ 120Hz

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 5
USB : 2
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 1
Component In : 1
Composite In : 0
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 0
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Show Help
What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
Yes
Dolby Vision
Show Help
What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : Yes
ARC : Yes (HDMI 1)
USB 3 : Yes (1)
HDCP 2.2 : Yes
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : Yes

5.1

Sound Quality

The sound quality is sub-par, and the TV doesn't get very loud. You will definitely benefit from having a separate sound system. Even a cheap sound bar would be an improvement.

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

6.5 Frequency Response
Show Help
What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.38 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.31 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
6.02 dB SPL
Max
Show Help
What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
89.2 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
Show Help
What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
127 Hz

Average frequency response. Low-end cutoff of 127 hz and maximum loudness of 89.2dB SPL are not great, even for a TV. There may also be a slight compression and pumping present at higher volumes.

2.4 Total Harmonic Distortion
Show Help
What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
Vizio P Series 2016 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.393
Distortion @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
1.964
Distortion @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
2.510

Poor distortion results. The overall distortion is high, and it rises even more as the volume is increased. The peak in distortion at around 1.5KHz is quite noticeable.

7.0

Smart Features

Show Help
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Vizio P Series 2016 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : SmartCast

The Vizio P Series 2016 uses SmartCast, which is based on Google Cast. This is a completely different approach than the one taken by other smart TVs. Instead of the smart features being directly on the TV, the TV only acts as a screen to which you cast videos from your apps on your tablet, smartphone, or PC.

This is a great idea in theory. Having smart features on the TV is arguably redundant, given all the different devices many people already own. However, the current implementation isn't flawless. The tablet often either loses connection with the TV or lags behind. It is a bit frustrating to not have the TV respond when you are trying to change the volume or a setting. Even turning on the TV is sometimes an issue.

Hopefully Vizio will be able to improve on the implementation and make this smart platform a more seamless experience. For now, LG's WebOS is still tops for usability.

This is one of the only TVs that doesn't have a tuner included. This means you cannot plug in your cable or over-the-air antenna directly. You will need to buy a separate tuner like this one.

See our full review of Smartcast here.

Apps
10 Ads
Show Help
What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
Show Help
What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
Yes
Opt-out
Show Help
What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
N/A

TV Controls
Vizio P Series 2016 Controls Picture

The controls directly on the TV are a bit hard to access if the unit is mounted to the wall.

Remote
Vizio P Series 2016 Remote Picture
Remote : Tablet

It comes both with a tablet and a basic remote. You will pretty much have to use the tablet, though, because the remote is very basic and you cannot access a lot of features with it.

In The Box
Vizio P Series 2016 In The Box Picture

- HDMI cable
- XR6P Tablet
- Manuals
- Power cable
- USB cable
- Basic remote
- Batteries

Misc
Power Consumption : 101 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 307 W
Firmware : 1.1.6.12

Differences between Sizes and Variants

We tested the 65" (P65-C1). For the most part, we expect our review to be valid for other sizes of the Vizio P Series 2016, with a few key differences:

  • 50" (Vizio P50-C1): This is a 60 hz TV, not a 120 hz model like the rest. This means the motion interpolation/soap opera effect won't be as strong, and the TV won't support 1080p @ 120Hz. Motion blur should be similar, though.
  • 55" (Vizio P55-C1): This size has an IPS panel instead of VA. It will have better color accuracy at an angle, but worse contrast and blacks from in front (in the 1000:1 ballpark).
Size Model LCD Type Effective Refresh Rate Real Refresh Rate Local Dimming Zones
50" P50-C1 VA 120 Hz 60 Hz 126
55" P55-C1 IPS 240 Hz 120 Hz 126
65" P65-C1 VA 240 Hz 120 Hz 128
75" P75-C1 VA 240 Hz 120 Hz 128

Compared to other TVs

Vizio P Series 2016 Group Shot Picture
Top row, from left: Samsung KS8000 (UN55KS8000), Vizio P Series 2016 (P65-C1), Sony X850C (XBR55X850C). Bottom: LG EF9500 (55EF9500), Vizio M Series 2015 (M60-C3), LG UH8500 (55UH8500). Unlike our other photographs, this picture wasn't taken under a controlled environment, so do not draw conclusions from it.

The Vizio P has a lot of bang for the buck so even when compared to high end models of other brands, it is a good buy because it is often way cheaper for a similar picture quality.

Vizio M Series 2015
43" 49" 50" 55" 60" 65" 70" 75" 80"

The Vizio M 2015, although cheaper, is inferior to the 2016 Vizio P in about every aspects except simplicity where its standard remote might be preferable to some. Be it sports, movies or video games though, the Vizio P outdoes the picture quality of the Vizio M.

Samsung KS8000
49" 55" 60" 65"

The Samsung KS8000 is better for a mixed usage. It has the edge for sports with long camera pans, for HDR, and is a better fit for bright living room. If usage is limited to watching movies in a dark room, the Vizio P will be the better option.

Sony X850D
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Sony X850D is worse if watched in a dark room but it has a better viewing angle (same as Vizio P 55”). For most content, the Vizio P is the better choice.

Conclusion
SEE PRICE
B&H

8.2Mixed Usage
Show Help
What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
Great TV for a range of usages. Picture quality is excellent, and excels in a dark room. Great motion handling for sports or video games. Unfortunately the image deteriorates quickly when viewed from the side.
8.7Movies
Show Help
What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
Excellent for watching movies in a dark room. Blacks are very deep, and dark scenes appear detailed.
7.3TV Shows
Show Help
What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
Above average for watching TV shows in a bright room. Picture quality is great when viewed from in front. Not the best TV at dealing with reflections on the screen, and doesn't get as bright as some others to combat glare. Upscaling of low quality content is average. No tuner.
7.6Sports
Show Help
What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
Good for watching sports. Handles motion very well with a minimum of blur. Great picture quality. Uniformity is average which results in some dirty screen effect over playing fields.
8.9Video Games
Show Help
What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
Excellent video game performance. Feels very responsive due to low input lag. Handles fast camera motion very well. Picture quality is great.
8.5HDR Movies
Show Help
What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
Very good TV for HDR. Supports a wider color gamut and has above average peak brightness. Picture quality is great. Supports Dolby Vision and HDR10.
8.4HDR Gaming
Show Help
What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
Great for HDR gaming. Feels responsive due to fast response time. Input lag is fine for casual gamers but may be an issue for those more serious. Local dimming works well and helps to provide great picture quality.
7.9PC Monitor
Show Help
What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Very good PC monitor. Displays a wide range of resolutions well. Feels very responsive and has a minimum of motion blur. Displays text clearly at a wide range of resolutions and refresh rates.
Questions Found an error?

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Questions & Answers

103 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
87
How does the Vizio P series compares to the new Samsung KS?
We will soon know. We bought the KS9500 and the KS8000 last week. The review of the KS9500 will be posted next week.
Update: Review of the KS9500 posted. Check the additional review notes in that review for the full comparison with the Vizio P.
37
You mentioned that the motion blur should be similar on the 50" model. I purchased that model and playing games on my PS4 was bad. The input lag felt very responsive; however when I would rotate the field of view in the game there would be ghost images on everything rendered about 1/4 inch opposite of the motion direction. This produced a very blurry image when the screen was rotating. Everything rendered would produce a ghost image of itself. This was on HDMI port 5 and with game low latency on. I am hesitant to try a larger 120hz panel due to you guys saying the motion blur would be similar.

It sounds like you are referring to the image duplication caused by the PWM backlight. This is more apparent on 30 fps games. If you check our motion blur picture, you can see the duplication of the logo too. Enabling 'Clear Action' will worsen that problem, because it adds even more flickering. Compare it to the Sony X810C, which is flicker free:

32
Been on the fence deciding between the new P-series or the Sony X930D. Which would you recommend?
Get the Vizio. It has deeper blacks, better uniformity, lower input lag, and better color out of the box. The main downside is that its upscaling of 480p and 720p isn't the best, but since those resolutions don't look great even with really good upscaling, that's not the biggest issue.
27
I am really interested in this display, but I worry that the 55" model will not be as good as the 50" or 65". What are your feelings on the contrast differences of the two different panels on this model?
IPS panels have usually a contrast ratio between 700:1 and 1,300:1, where as VA panels are usually between 3,000:1 and 5,000:1. This is quite noticeable in a dark room. But if you have a few lights on, you won't really see the difference in terms of blacks.
20
Rumors of a software upgrade to support HDR10. Can anyone either confirm or deny? Thanks.

Yes. Vizio has announced a firmware update that will bring HDR10 to the Vizio P this summer.

Update: The update has arrived, and the review has been updated to reflect this.

16
Great job! I just found your site and I am definitely impressed. CNET used to be my resource for TV reviews but now you're my favorite. Keep up the good work.
We're glad to help! Thank you for your feedback.
14
Thank you for all the great reviews you do! You educate us in every level and we are grateful. Have you tried this TV on content from Hulu? Hulu is running its content in 720p. Will the quality be good or it is really low? I really like this TV, and this is the only concern I have because I will use this TV for Netlix, Hulu and Gaming, and based on your great review Netflix and Gaming will be great. Thank you in advance! Keep up the good Work!
Hulu will look decent since 720p is a little soft on the Vizio P. 1080p, for console gaming and Netflix, look better and sharper. On our resolution tests, we don't add sharpness not to get artifacts but we found that 480p and 720p looked better with 'Sharpness' around 20-25. Also, if you have an Xbox One, you could watch Hulu using it. Hulu would then be upscaled to 1080p assuming your Xbox One is set to output 1080p. It would look best like this.
12
Maybe I'm blind but I don't see an option in the TV's menu to enable WCG/HDR?
Indeed there is no option in the menu. The TV switch into a "hidden" mode when it detects HDR. If you go under 'System Information' in the menu, you will see whether it has detected HDR or not.
12
Can you tell me more about the IPS panel in the 55". I am kind of limited to that size only. Will the degradation in contrast and blacks when viewing head on be an issue? What scores that you tally would be affected?
In general IPS panels provide better viewing angles, but blacks are affected in a negative way. Overall, you will get a better score in terms of viewing angles, but the dark scene score would definitely go down.
12
Do you know when the Vizio 2016 M-Series are being released and when you will be testing them?

We don't have an exact date but it should be released soon. Since this will no doubt be a popular model, we will prioritize its review which should be available shortly after we buy the TV.

Update 07/15/2016: We have now published our review of the Vizio M Series 2016.

11
Good job guys. Great review as usual. I'm still undecided between the 2016 Vizio's and the 2016 LG Oled's lineup. As you probably know the LG OLED55C6P is available at select retailers. When will you be reviewing that particular model? I'm pretty much waiting on your review to help me decide which one to get. I'll be anxiously waiting your reply. Thanks guys!

We haven't bought that one yet, so it isn't on our current schedule. Maybe in 1-2 months.

Update 10/14/2016: We have now published our review of the LG C6.

11
I have been refreshing you guys website everyday like a madman waiting for this specific review, haha. Glad to see it is finally done. Thanks for all the great job and effort you guys put into giving out information to the masses. I do have one question about the wide color gamut. The numbers you guys have for the P series seems huge but then you said it doesn't have the widest coverage you have seen. So what TV does have the widest you have seen so far?
You can see all our measurements results for color gamut coverage here.
11
It's unfortunate you can't easily test HDMI 5. Can you guys do a Blur Reduction test, in the way you did the Clearness test on the X850C's Q&A? I'd like to know how this TV handles motion blur in and out of game mode with the Blur Reduction tool. Can Blur Reduction be used with GLL outside of game mode on HDMI 5? Also, how is Clear Action on this set? I know you guys hate it, but as a gamer who perceives motion blur very easily (I come from plasma TVs), backlight scanning and high blur reduction on other TV sets are the only ways I can accept LCD TVs for gaming. I am accustomed to the flicker. I'd just like to know if there is any combination with the Blur Reduction setting that won't be horrendous in input lag.

We just took pictures of the motion blur for all values of 'Reduce Judder', 'Reduce Motion Blur' and 'Clear Action'. Note that only 'Clear Action' can be used while 'Game Low Latency' (GLL) is activated (it adds about 5 ms of input lag) and that GLL is required for 'Clear Action' to work. It works the same for all HDMI inputs.

Clear Action

'Clear Action' does work well under 30p and 60p. There is no slider for it so it is either on or off. 'Game Low Latency' must be on for 'Clear Action' to work.

Keep in mind that this setting adds flickering, which some people find uncomfortable. It also reduces the maximum brightness.

Clear Action (30 fps)

Clear Action

Clear Action (60 fps)

Clear Action

Blur reduction features

Both 'Reduce Judder' and 'Reduce Motion Blur' create the soap opera effect.

'Reduce Judder' affects 24Hz and 30Hz inputs. Here are pictures of all different values, when fed 30 fps.

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'Reduce Motion Blur' affects a 60Hz input. Here are pictures of all the different values, when fed 60 fps.

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11
Is there any way to stream HDR content from Amazon Prime to the VIZIO P50 C1?
Unfortunately Amazon Prime does not support casting, so this application will not work directly through this Vizio. It is necessary to use an external device such as a home theatre PC or blu-ray player connected via HDMI.
11
Hello, thank you for your great reviews. I'm between this and the Samsung ks8000 which I can get for the exact same price. I watch a lot of movies, stream, sports and it will be in a dark basement. Which do you recommend at the same price?
For the same price, get the Samsung KS8000. It is a more versatile TV that will be better for cable TV including sports. Low quality streams will also appear better on the KS8000. Both perform good in a dark room but whenever the lights are on, the Samsung KS8000 will have the edge with its better screen and low amount of reflections.
11
Can you please do separate rating of tv's without their sound rating? Many TV users like me will have a separate surround sound system or separate speakers and do not rely on the sound produced by a TV at all. I am only interested in picture quality and the like, so when a TV's rating is weighed down by poor sound quality the rating does not make sense for me at all. Thank you.

We are planning to do an overhaul of the score system that will solve your issue. For now, at least, the sound is only 4% of the overall score, so it doesn't have a big impact.

Update: We have updated our scoring system, to fix this issue. It is also possible to create custom ratings depending on your personal preferences.

10
I would like to see this television compared to the Sony X940D which is also full array. Will you be testing the Sony X940D?
It is not on our current schedule, given its high price. Maybe in the summer.
10
Is the upscaling on par with previous Vizios like the 2015 M? Asking because I think that TV has "passable" upscaling, but it's right at the edge of acceptable to me, so hoping it's not worse.
It is not worse than other Vizio TVs. It is about the same.
10
I have been waiting for this review. I don't recall reading anything about which HDMI ports it has. Does it have any HDMI 2.0? Also, does it support HDR10 in addition to Dolby Vision?

Yes it does support HDMI 2.0, and Dobly Vision, but it does not support HDR10 yet.

Update: The HDR10 update has been released and the review has been updated.

9
Does this TV support playback of .MKV files (either H.264 and/or HEVC/H.265) through its USB ports. I know it is Chromecast but does it have an internal media player for external sources.
It will automatically play the files on a USB thumb drive that you insert in the TV but there is no interface on the screen. The h264 and h265 .MKV files that we tried didn't played but some other formats, like .MP4, worked fine.
8
For sports and gaming, 60hz VA or 120hz IPS? I bought the P50-C1. I believed the box when it said 120 hz, but found out it's 60 hz. They are bringing the 55" out to me Tuesday, and I'm now worried about it being IPS.
So my second question is this: Is 120 hz still 120 hz whether a TV is VA or IPS? I guess I've read some stuff saying the refresh rate of IPS is lacking, but I'm not sure how if 120 hz is 120 hz. Ahhhhhhggggg! So confused. Hope this 55" is the one!
Vizio lists a fake 'effective refresh rate,' which equals double the real refresh rate. It's not that the refresh rate changes based on the panel type, but rather that their marketing is misleading; they claim the 55" and up are 240 hz TVs, when those are actually 120 hz.
In this case, the refresh rate really isn't going to matter. Sports will look very similar on both. The main difference here is that VA panels have much deeper blacks, but a narrower viewing angle, and IPS TVs have lighter blacks and wider viewing angles.
Since you'll have both, just choose the one you think looks the best with the stuff you watch. That's what matters most.
8
Do you have any info on when the P-series will be available at retailers aside from Best Buy? Specifically, any info on availability at Amazon?
Unfortunately, nothing specific. Hopefully sometime in the next 2-3 months.
8
would you recommend this TV over the UN65JS8500?
It depends on your usage and preference. The Vizio P is better for movies in a dark room, and also for playing video games. The JS8500 is better for sports and general TV watching.
8
Does the Vizio P series 2016 have HDMI 2.0a inputs for 4k blu ray players?

Yes, but it currently doesn't work with HDR10. There is a firmware update planned to add that support in a few months.

Update: The HDR10 update has been released, and the review has been updated.

8
I'm pretty obsessed with your site and am anxiously awaiting a review of the new Vizio M Series in comparison to the P Series. Any idea when/if that'll happen? Thanks for everything!

We will be reviewing the new Vizio M Series in about a month or so.

Update 07/15/2016: We have now published our review of the Vizio M Series 2016.

8
Hello, I'm purchasing an Xbox One S soon and I was thinking of purchasing the P50-C1 for playing the HDR enabled games coming out later this year. However, I noticed the input lag with HDR and GLL on is >60ms which is pretty high, would you say this is the normal for HDR gaming? Should I expect to find the similar input lag on HDR with other TV's, like the Samsung KS800 for example, which is another TV I was interested in. Thanks for your help.
It is normal that the input lag is higher with HDR on, since HDR need some image processing to be displayed. Each time you add some image processing, it adds some delay before the image is displayed. That why normally, when you put a TV in 'Game Mode', almost all the image processing is turned off. But as far to say if >60ms is normal for HDR gaming, we will need to do more tests before answering this question.

We will retest the Samsung KS8000 this week and the review will be updated with the new results.

Update: We have now retested our 2016 TVs with HDR input lag measurements.

7
When will this be on Amazon?
We do not know when it will be available on Amazon at this time.
7
Great work, this is my favorite site to go to for the newest TVs. Comparing last year's Samsungs (JS8500 or better), how does the Vizio P-series handle video processing? I've noticed at times that Samsung TVs can produce fine details like hair and skin pores during a movie or a show (1080p Blu-ray) while Vizio's video images are not as precise. Any thoughts?
We consider the P-series' upscaling of 1080p to be at the same level as Samsung TVs, so if you only watch 1080p and 4k, the 2016 P-series is a great choice. 720p and 480p won't be quite as crisp on the P-series as it is on most Samsung TVs, though. If you watch lots of content with lower resolutions, you might want to consider a Samsung (or a Sony or LG model).
7
Would you consider updating this review to compare and contrast (pun intended) the performance of the VA panels vs. the lone IPS panel in this series? Based on the current review it seems like the recommendation is to steer clear of the 55 inch IPS panel, but would it be really beneficial to see a quantitative, side by side analysis of VA vs IPS performance.
It would be interesting but even if the 55" has one of the best IPS panel with say, a contrast of around 1300:1, it would still fall in the current IPS vs VA comparison where IPS screens have grayish blacks but better viewing angle and VA better blacks but narrow viewing angle. Unfortunately, because we have a lot of TVs to review right now, we don't think we will have the time to test a 55" Vizio P Series 2016.
6
The review says "HDMI 1-4 have higher input lag (34.7 with GLL), but it's still manageable." I'm not sure what GLL is, or whether or not it's something you can disable, but does this mean that the only way to achieve a 17.7 ms input lag is by using HDMI 5? If so, can you recommend a good HDMI hub that would allow me to share HDMI 5 between my PC and two consoles without degrading picture quality?
GLL is 'Game Low Latency.' It's Vizio's setting for disabling some extra processing and getting low input lag, and can be enabled or disabled. And yes, only HDMI 5 is capable of 17.7 ms of lag.
We don't currently review HDMI switchers, so we can't recommend one in particular. However, any of them should do what you're looking to do without degrading picture or raising input lag.
6
Can you guys further clarify when referring to the 2016 P-series Vizio's motion blur? "The only problem area is dark transitions, and particularly the 0% to 20%, which comes in at a pretty long 42.9ms. This TV uses PWM flickering to adjust the luminosity of the backlight."
Is this something I should be worried about? What is PWM? Does it make the blacks look bad with dark scenes in video games? This is the only thing holding me back from purchasing this TV. I want my gaming experience to at least have decent picture.
It's not something to be too worried about. Darker scenes will have a bit more blur, but it's unlikely to be a huge problem for most people.
PWM means the TV's backlight has a pattern of brightening and darkening, and doesn't remain at a static level. It doesn't make dark scenes look worse, but it does add a slight 'duplication' to movement. PWM isn't necessarily worse than static, though some people do find it fatigues the eyes, or even causes headaches. Compare the P's motion blur to that of the Sony X810C (no PWM) to see the difference.
6
According to the product page for the P65-C1, the HDMI5 input is only HDMI1.4 (not 2.0) and does not support 4k@60Hz @ 4:4:4. Is this true? To use it as a 4k computer monitor, I'd have to put it to the 1-4 ports (and endure the higher input lag) to get the best picture, right?
We can confirm that the Vizio P Series 2016 does support HDMI 2.0 as well as 4K@60hz 4:4:4. What HDMI 5 doesn't support is 480p as well as 720p.
6
Will this now be the highest rated 75" tv you have tested?
Yes, it will most likely be our recommendation for that size.
6
What is the reliability of the Vizio brand? I've read stellar reviews about the 2016 P-Series and I am seriously considering buying the P75-C1 because of all the excellent reviews and the great price on the sets compared to other brands. But it seems that no one ever mentions the reliability of Vizio in the reviews. I've been to Bestbuy a couple times to compare the Vizio, Samsung and Sony TVs and each time the sales associate steers me away from the Vizio and tells me the Sony is much better because the Vizio has horrible reliability issues and the Sony is a much "safer" brand to buy because of this, weirdly they never suggest the Samsung sets, just the Sony. Does Bestbuy get a bigger "profit" selling the Sony's than the other brands? I've read several other comments about Bestbuy pushing Sony products over other brands. I love what I've read about the Vizio P75-C1 but I'm also concerned about the reliability of Vizio products. Can you please shed a little light on this subject?
Unfortunately, we don't have nor do we compile reliability data but from our experience, we haven't had more problems on Vizio TVs then with other brands. As for Besbuy representatives pushing more on the Sony TVs, we also had similar reports.
5
"Thanks to its good motion handling, sports look great on the Vizio P Series 2016. The only issue is some bands of colors can be seen on panning shots, which is noticeable when watching soccer or hockey." I love my P65-C1 so far and glad to see this positive review. While watching hockey I notice vertical black bars on panning shots, which I assume is what you are referring to above in your comment? I see on forums others are also seeing this. I assume this is "normal" and not worth playing the panel lottery to find one that won't have this. I don't have to go very far off angle to notice it.
Yes, this is what we are referring to. We can notice both colored bands and darker bars on panning shots. There is a variance for this, so maybe you could get lucky and have one without this issue, but based on the feedback that we received, it is pretty common for that TV.
5
Did you notice any delayed dimming like when there's a conversation between two people, one against a dark background and one against a light background. I also heard it can be distracting with subtitles. Thanks!
Yes. Local dimming on all TVs does this. The Vizio P is slightly better than average on that, but if you don't like a varying luminosity in reaction to the scene, you will be better off with that feature turned off.
5
For the Vizio P-Series 50" you note the screen is 60hz vs the other sizes 120hz. Is there a major disadvantage to having 60hz for movie watching and gaming? Can any 4k content take advantage of the higher refresh rates? Will motion blur take a hit in any way?
There is no real advantage or disadvantage between 60hz vs 120hz for movies and gaming. It will only matter for motion interpolation and on a computer if it can handle 1080p@120hz.
5
How does the P Series handle the up scaling of 1080i content?
A little bit like the 480p and 720p resolutions where it is somewhat softer than higher resolutions. For these type of content we suggest to increase sharpness between 20-25.
5
You say sports will be better on the Samsung but the Vizio rate much higher for sports. Also, I plan on having the TV calibrated, mid level, which TV calibrates better?
It depends which sports. Those that have long camera panning shots will be better on the Samsung KS series (better screen uniformity). Sports that have more fixed camera shots, like tennis, will be better on the Vizio P. As for calibration, the Samsung TVs calibrate better. Vizio TVs aren't easy to do without introducing some other issues, as for in colors.
5
Will the sub-20ms input lag still be applicable when outputting from a PC with "HDMI color subsampling" turned on for 4:4:4 chroma? For both 1080p@120hz and 4k@60hz? And what does it mean that the 4:4:4 chroma mode is blurrier than on other TVs? With my limited understanding of 4:4:4 chroma mode that doesn't make sense to me - I thought it meant the PC output essentially mapped perfectly to all of the color subpixels it expects rather than being slightly degraded over a group of subpixels.
'HDMI color subsampling' won't change the input lag at 1080p @ 60 Hz. Unfortunately, we haven't tested the input lag at 1080p @ 120 Hz and 4k @ 60Hz but we are planning to do so at some point in the future. When we open this file on the Vizio P with 'HDMI color subsampling' turned on, the last 2 lines of text at the bottom doesn't appear as sharp as on some other TVs that support chroma 4:4:4. It is sharper than when the TV is fed 4:2:2 so the additional color information is there. It just comes to how the Vizio P process the additional color information.
5
For the love of all that is holy, please do a comparison of the P65 with the new M65 so I know which one to pull the trigger on buying!!

Your request has been noted, and it is expected that we will review the M series in July.

Update 07/15/2016: We have now reviewed the 70" Vizio M Series 2016.

4
I was really looking forward to the new P-Series, but no built in tuner, no Amazon video support, the distracting silver bezel, and a 60Hz refresh rate on the size I wanted kills it for me. It's bizarre to me that they're using a 60Hz panel on their high end line. So, even to watch cable I have to buy an external tuner? Does my cable box count as a tuner? What about satellite?
Yes, your cable or satellite box count as a tuner and this is all you need to watch 'regular' TV.
4
I recently bought a 55x850c. I do not like it because of the edge bleed. It does, however, provide a 120 hz native panel, and is in the same price range as the new P50-C1, which I'm interested in.
My only concern is losing the 120hz native panel, and the P55 is IPS, so that's a no-go, as it will be far off from the contrast a VA screen can provide. The 65" is too large for the area it is going in, so I'm really stuck at the P50. I have been keeping up with the forums, but one person just returned their P50 due to motion blur.
Does this have to do with the set being 60 hz? Or is game mode in the new P-series the same across the board (same at each screen size)? I'm hoping the P50 is good for everything I need, but motion blur will drive me insane.
I am returning the X850C no matter what and will NEVER purchase another edge-lit set or buy from a brand that thinks "thinness" of a panel is better than the PQ and quality control. I wish Vizio had made the 50" IPS and not the 55" :(
The amount of blur is mostly related to response time, not the refresh rate, and the game setting only lowers the amount of input lag - not the amount of blur.
The level of motion blur should be similar between the two sizes, but since they each use different panels, it's possible that the 50" model will have a bit more blur than the 65" model. Unfortunately, we have not yet had a chance to check how the two sizes match up for blur.
For you, the best move would be to pick up the 50" P-series and see how it does for what you want to do. If you find the level of blur is too high, return it to the store and choose a different model instead.
4
Is it possible to get 4:4:4 60 hz 8-bit on HDMI 5?
Yes, but it's a bit blurrier than what 4:4:4 normally looks like.
4
For an average-lit living room, and all other things being equal (including price), would you prefer the 2016 P-series over your last's year LCD champ, the Samsung JS8500?
Yes. It's very close, but the Vizio's deeper blacks, lower input lag, and slightly reduced amount of motion blur make it the better option for most. The only real downside is that the Vizio has worse upscaling of 720p and 480p video. Those aren't high quality anyway, so it shouldn't be a big issue for most, but the Samsung does do better for those resolutions.
4
Hi there. So I've been studying your website as if I'm writing a college essay lol. So I'm looking to buy a 65" tv for a dark man cave loft. I had decided on the Samsung JS9000 since gaming and movies are my main two priorities. And then I read the Vizio P Series review. So if it were up to you, and both are similar price, which would you choose out of the two if gaming and movies in a dark room are your priorities?
For your usage (gaming and movies in the dark), the Vizio P is the clear winner.
4
First, thank you for offering such amazing and thorough reviews; I feel very confident buying a TV based on your recommendations! I am interested in buying a 65 inch TV for watching movies in a dark room and for video games, so this TV seems to be perfect. However, I still enjoy playing older systems such as the Wii, original XBOX, and PS3, in addition to PS4, which are not 1080P. So, would you still recommend this TV or the Samsung KS9000, which appears to do a better job of upscaling? Is one more "future proof" than the other? Also, would you be able to speak a bit about game mode? I have read many reports that people feel that the drop in picture quality while in game mode does not justify the decrease in lag time, or they recommend using PC mode instead of game mode while playing games, which once again appears to be an area that the KS9000 does better than the Vizio. Thank you so much for your help and time!

The KS9000 is better at upscaling lower quality content, but unfortunately, with the KS9000 (or even the KS8000) there is no way to connect the older video games console without having the need to have a component-to-HDMI converters, which may add some input lag. In that aspect, the Vizio P does offer more flexibility, since it has a wider choice of video inputs. Also, we didn't found that the picture quality drop while in game mode ('Game Low Latency' option) is that much significant so not to benefit from the very low input lag.

If you want more options, the Sony X930D or the X850D would provide similar or even better upscaling than the KS9000, but with the video inputs needed for your older video game consoles

4
Just wanted to say thank you. We used your site to purchase out Vizio P-50. We love what your team is doing! Chris & Stacey
Thanks for the kind words and we are glad that our site could help you find the perfect TV for your need.
4
Great work guys! I love the site and recommend it to everyone I know who are shopping for TVs. With the recent news of the next couple of Xbox consoles having HDR gaming capabilities, I have been looking to upgrade my TV to one that can display HDR while in game mode. Is the P series capable of doing this? I saw that the KS8000 was unable to do HDR while in game mode because it turns off HDR processing when set to this mode? I also have been seeing people complain that the P Series has a ghosting issue when game mode and clear action is activated at the same time. Has this been resolved in a firmware update? Thanks again! I love reading each review!
The update for HDR10 is expected for August, and we will be able to provide more information on HDR10 gaming once it is released. At the moment the only way to play Dolby Vision content is via streaming services on the inbuilt apps, and so it is not possible to take definitive measurements of the performance. When streaming Dolby Vision content, it is possible to enable 'Game Low Latency' but at the moment we aren't able to test if this is an improvement over SDR 'Game Low Latency'. We have heard of this ghosting issue as well, however have just tested on the 65" P series and it appears that the current firmware update has fixed it.
4
Would the review score change at all now that Vizio has released a firmware update that added HDR 10 capability?

We will be updating the review this week after we test what has changed. We do it expect the score to change slightly.

Update: We have now tested the Vizio P Series 2016 with the HDR10 update.

3
Great review, guys. I was just curious about whether you could test the refresh rate for the 50" model. Being on a budget, this TV really hits all the boxes for me, and as a 4K enthusiast I just want to know if I'm going to really be missing a lot. Because I don't really have the money to go up to a 65, but I don't want to get the 55" either due to it being an IPS panel with worse blacks.
Unfortunately, we won't have time to test other sizes of the models we review. We don't expect the 50" will have significantly different picture quality; the main difference should be that you will not be able to interpolate 60 fps video up to 120 fps. Motion blur should be about the same.
3
You guys should try reviewing the new Insignia 4k Roku TV's from Best Buy. They are quite affordable and it would be interesting to see how it stacks to the higher end models.
We will get to Insignia and Roku TVs when we will be done with the main brands. Maybe sometime in the summer.
3
I was curious how you thought this set compared to Samsungs 2015 HDR compatible offerings.
For HDR, the 2016 Vizio P is better. It doesn't offer as wide color gamut as the Samsung JS series but it produce brighter highlights and have better local dimming feature.
3
Hi guys! Great review, I'm curious about your HDR section though. Are you suggesting that local dimming should be off to achieve maximum brightness in all windows? Or did your tests show that only the 2% window was brighter with local dimming off?
No, we are not suggesting to turn off local dimming. You should leave it on. For this test (and for consistency between TVs), we always use the local dimming setting that give the brightest 2% window. For the Vizio P, we got a brighter 2% window without local dimming so we left it off for the rest of the measurements too (bigger % windows wouldn't benefit from local dimming anyway). What this means for the Vizio P is that it have a hard time getting small highlights very bright when local dimming is on. It is then a trade off between getting brighter small highlights (local dimming off) and deeper overall blacks (local dimming on). Most of the time, the deeper blacks that local dimming provide will be more enjoyable than the small boost of brightness in the rare scenes where there is no more than a 2% bright highlight.
3
What is the HDMI Color Subsampling? And should I have it on?
This will allow chroma 4:4:4 on a 60Hz 4k resolution. It is to get sharper text when using the TV as a PC monitor. Unless you plan to use the TV that way, there is no point of turning it on.
3
I'm trying to decide between the P50 and KS8000. Mainly purchasing it for sports, (baseball, basketball, hockey, football, soccer), and normal TV viewing. The P50 is quite a bit cheaper, but a bit worried about using the tablet as a remote and the less intuitive smart features. Is it silly to purchase the KS8000 for these reason at the more expensive price?
If you use a cable box for sports and TV watching, then you may not have to use the tablet remote. In the box is another remote which is extremely basic, but allows you to turn on and off the TV, swap between input sources, and adjust the volume and picture mode. In this case, go with the P50. The tablet remote is necessary for the smart features and may take some time to get used to, so if this is more of a focus then go with the more traditional KS8000 to get the most out of your TV.
3
Okay, so my friend currently owns the Vizio P55 and it looks outstanding in pitch black rooms. You must see for yourself, there is minor blooming, I think 126 zones really helps its contrast ratio.
Good to hear that you like it. Dimming zone always help to get a better deeper black on an LED TV even with an IPS panel. Note that you would really notice more a difference of black if you had side by side, an IPS panel (55") and a VA panel (50", 65" or 75") P series TV, with the same content playing on both of them.
2
Based on your PC test, would you recommend the 50" model as 4K PC monitor for prolonged use, or should I look at getting a Samsung 49KS8500 instead?
Right now I use a 40" Philips PC monitor (actual monitor) and want something bigger and to unite my TV and PC monitor into one device.
The P's 4:4:4 implementation is a bit blurrier than we would like, and we don't expect that will be the case for the KS8500. For that reason, the KS8500 will probably be better for prolonged PC use.
2
Given that the 2015 Samsung JU7100 is similar in price to the new P-series (with the P-series being slightly cheaper), which would you recommend?
Get the P-series. It has deeper blacks, better uniformity, less blur, lower input lag, and better local dimming. Its upscaling of 480p and 720p video isn't great, but those aren't high-quality resolutions anyway, so that won't be a huge problem for most.
2
I'm looking for a 65" 4K tv for my theater room I'm about to complete. It will be used for a variety of things, including movies, sports and gaming on my ps4 and Xbox one. I have the ability to grab a Samsung JS8500 as an open box for the same price as this or the Samsung JU7500. I was pretty set of the 8500, but then I just read your review on the 2016 P Series. Which in your opinion provides better all around performance?
They are all great TVs but the new 2016 Vizio P TV have better contrast, local dimming, brightness and HDR. It is also great for gaming and sports although its screen uniformity issues will show up more under the later. This wouldn't be as much of a problem on the JS8500 but for all the other aforementioned reasons, the Vizio P would get the edge over the two others.
2
Could you test the 2016 P-series input lag with FALD turned on? I've heard that adds a bit of lag.
The input lag does not suffer whether FALD is on or off.
2
What type of wired Ethernet card does this TV have? 10/100 Mbps? 1000 Mbps? I looked in the manual and it does not specify.
Vizio doesn't specify the speed of its ethernet component but we ran some tests this morning. On our speedy 250Mb/s office connection, the Vizio P achieved 89.69Mb/s when connected through ethernet. This is more than enough for 4k streaming and the most demanding smart apps.
2
I wanted to buy one of these or the Samsung KS8000. I was leaning towards the Samsung KS8000 since you guys say this one does not upscale dvds that well, but I was wondering if it would make a difference if you are watching dvds using a Sony Blu-ray player with 4k upscale?
If your player does the upscaling job, you have nothing to worry about with the Vizio.
2
I am looking for a relatively affordable TV to use for a powerful gaming PC so the combination of 4k @ 60hz @ 4:4:4 chroma and very low (<20ms) input lag is all important to me. If I were to just read your review, I would have thought I'd found the perfect display. However, upon some more research, particularly looking at Vizio's own tech specs for the TV at www.vizio.com/p65c1.html (65"), I feel like the PC monitor section of your review is slightly misleading, since it does not mention that 4k @ 4:4:4 chroma is only possible on HDMI 1-4 and not on HDMI 5, which is the only input that supports the lower input lag of 17.7ms vs. the less impressive 34.7ms.
Thank you for pointing that out. We have now updated the 'PC Monitor' section of the review to reflect these informations.
2
I already bought a X900C but now am I wondering if maybe I should have gotten the P50? Watch a lot of TV, cable, movies, etc and also game with my PC. I really like the X900C but overall the P series got a better score? And seems like it may be a bit better? The P-50 is a 60hz set opposed to my 120Hz X900C but I am fine with 60fps max in games. I would also lose true 4:4:4 chroma as the P50 does not appear to have that. I don't mind losing the 5" of screen size for the benefit of the VA panel (the p55 is IPS so it would not be any different from my X900C for movies) Should I take the X900C back and get the P50?
If you watch TV in a dark room and you sit straight in front of your TV most of the time, go with the Vizio P50-C1. If not, keep the Sony X900C
2
Hi, I recently purchased this TV and I'm now looking for something to share HDMI 5 so I can use GLL on my PC, and gaming consoles. I'm was looking for a switch that won't degrade the quality of the picture, HDR, increase the lag input or limit the frame rate (both very important) etc. I'm willing to purchase something high-end if necessary. I posted this in a forum, and two other owners of this set suggested an AVR over an HDMI switch to achieve what I want. In particular, they recommended the Denon AVR-S920W which is currently retailing for $500. Is this correct information? Also, another owner claimed that HDMI 5 doesn't do HDR, which I found strange. Is that correct information? If you think there's something better for my purposes than the Denon, feel free to tell me. Thanks.
It is true that the HDMI 5 don't do HDR. HDR need some software image processing and the HDMI port number 5 bypass a lot of image processing to achieve the lowest input lag possible. If you go with an AVR, just be sure that it as a 'Direct passthrough' or 'Game mode' that won't do any image processing, so that it won't add input lag. But you could also use a powered HDMI switch like this one, it would certainly do the job and for a lot cheaper than a AVR.
2
Hi, great review as always. Question: I see for gaming you reviewed the input lag for HDR on HDMI 1. Would it not be more beneficial to test HDR on HDMI 5? Thanks
HDMI 5 does not support HDR10.
2
Which audio formats besides the one's listed get passed through the ARC from other HDMI inputs. For instance will it passthrough 7.1 DTS-HD MA, ATMOS if a UHD player or Game console is hooked up to a separate HDMI port on the TV instead of going through an AVR?
For the moment in time, we are not testing for formats other than what we currently listed on our review pages. In the future, if there is a lot of demand for it, we could implement new test to cover all the newer sound formats that the TVs can re transmit.
2
Hi! Thanks for all your work. I am stuck between the 55" Vizio P Series (2016) on sale for $1100 and the 55" Samsung KS8000 for $1300. This TV will be for Video Games and Movies/TV at night in a dark room. Thanks again you guys rock.
Go with the Samsung KS8000. The 55" variant of the Vizio P Series 2016 has an IPS panel, with worse dark scene performance despite the local dimming features. It retains the contrast ratio and colors better when viewed from an angle, but this isn't usually beneficial for watching movies at night. The KS8000 has a better native contrast ratio because of this.
2
You guys haven't reviewed the P55 C1, yes it's a IPS panel but it's also a FALD display. Not many of them with FALD, and you failed to include the off angle advantage and color advantage.
While that is true, all TVs we have tested with local dimming have some blooming and with IPS TVs this becomes more of an issue. Local dimming also takes some time to adjust to scene changes, which is quite noticeable. Local dimming is not a replacement for a high native contrast ratio, especially when watching at night in a dark room. The question has been updated to include the off-angle advantage.
1
Hi, could you please tell me what the footprint of the 55" model is? I want to make sure it will fit on my TV stand.
Unfortunately, because we haven't seen that size in person, we can't say what the stand's footprint is. We'll post an update once we find out.
1
"For all resolutions and refresh rate, 4:4:4 is more blurry than on other TVs that support it." Could you clarify what this means exactly or what is causing it?
To test chroma 4:4:4, we use this file and open it on a PC in paint so it isn't scaled by any viewer software. We then look at the bottom two lines of text. When chroma 4:4:4 is enabled and displayed correctly, the text is sharp. When chroma 4:4:4 isn't supported, the text is either unreadable (sometime missing part of the letters) or very blurry. On the Vizio P, the letters stays clear but not as much as other TVs that support 4:4:4 where you can nearly count every pixels. It is still 4:4:4 since there is a difference from 4:2:2, where it is even worse.
1
I was wondering if I could play a PC game at 1080p 120fps (like certain PC monitors) on the 55" or 65"?
Yes you can as it supports 1080@120hz.
1
Hi, I wanted to know the full range of audio and video containers it supports playback for especially for the file type mkv?

Video containers supported that we've tested:

  • MP4

Video containers not supported that we've tested:

  • WMV
  • FLV
  • MKV
  • 3GP
  • AVI
  • M4V
  • MOV
  • MPG
  • MTS

You are better off converting any video container to MP4 as that's what it seems to only support. Unfortunately there no way we can test the different audio containers as the Vizio P Series 2016 doesn't seem capable of reading audio files from a USB stick. It may be something we look into in the future.

1
So if this TV does not support HDR 10, does this mean that a UHD BluRay will not work/function properly? Or will that just mean I'll get the benefit of the 4K resolution without the HDR?
You get the 4k but not the HDR.
1
Can you have the audio come through the remote's headphone jack like some game consoles and set top boxes can do these days?
No you can't, but that seems like an interesting feature that they should think of doing.
1
Regarding 120hz 1080p, is lag still 17.7 or is there a scaling penalty? Does persistence blur improve? Thanks!
We haven't measured lag at 1080p @ 120Hz but plan to add that test in our future test bench. Given the source is off 120Hz, persistence blur will indeed be reduced, but the trail length (response time), will stay the same.
1
Will this TV ever be compatible with directv 4k content?
We are not sure when it will be a certified Direct TV ready, but this can be fixed by getting a device called '4K Genie Mini' which will make the TV compatible.
1
I connect my Direct TV via HDMI to my receiver that does 1080p up conversion. My receiver does a very good job up scaling 1080i and 720p. Would this give me better picture quality than if I connected my DTV box directly to my P65 and let the TV do the up conversation for 1080i and 720p?
Yes, this would probably give you a better result as there are issues with the 720P upscaling on the 2016 P series.
1
Just bought the P50-C1 to replace my M50-c1(2015) that I have been using as a monitor. I was thinking it would be better on my eyes with the 4:4:4 however I notice that I get eye fatigue really fast on the P50-C1 that I didn't experience on the M50-C1(2015). I have messed with all the settings and done many calibrations and it still messing with my eyes. What is so different between the lighting on the M50-c1(2015) and on the P50-C1(2016) that would be causing this. Also I seem to only able to get 4:4:4 in 8-bit.
Looking at the backlight response of the 2016 P series compared to the 2015 M series, the 2015 M series has a smoother backlight transition when at lower backlight values. The smoother transition may be less fatiguing for your eyes. 4:4:4 at 4k requires a lot of bandwidth and it supports only up to 8bit. At 1080p 4:4:4 at 12bit color works.
1
How is the upscale quality of the 2016 Vizio P models for 1080p content compared to Sony's 4K models? Specifically, How does the Vizio P compare to the Sony X930D? Does one brand seem better quality than the other?
Generally for lower quality content (480p and 720p) the Vizio TVs are a bit worse than Sony TVs. For 1080p content, the upscale results are very similar and you normally wouldn't notice any difference in quality. This is the case for the 2016 Vizio P series and the Sony X930D.
1
Hi, thanks for the review. Is it possible for you guys to post the 444 chroma test picture as you saw on this TV, via a camera snap or something. I want to see how blurry are the last two lines compared to my current TV (Sharp Elite PRO-70X5FD). I am looking to get a 4K TV as a PC monitor (incl Movie watching / Gaming all via PC, up to 8hrs/day usage) and was trying to decide if the Vizio will be a good choice. Thanks!

Here are photos of the chroma 4:4:4 test at a range of resolutions and refresh rates.

4k and 60Hz

4k and 60Hz

4k and 30Hz

4k and 30Hz

1080p and 120Hz

1080p and 120Hz

1080p and 60Hz

1080p and 60Hz

1080p and 30Hz

1080p and 30Hz
1
I am wondering what would be best for reading text & reducing eye strain 55" 120hz IPS or the 50" 60hz VA? Also, would you go with the Vizio P series or a Samsung in this case? Samsung UN48JS9000 Curved; JU7500 Curved 43"-48"; UN40KU7000; UN48JS8500 Lastly, I am running a radeon 6850. This does not support 4k resolutions. If I am sending a 1080p signal will this be upscaled and have an effect on the picture quality?

We do not know of any consensus on which type of panel is best for reducing eye strain, however generally the most important factors are adjusting the backlight to an appropriate level and choosing a TV and settings for less intensity flicker, at a higher frequency. This backlight frequency is different to the panel frequency (or refresh rate). When using a TV to read text, it is also best to choose one with chroma 4:4:4 support as it allows certain colored text to be better defined. We haven't reviewed the KU7000, but will within the next few weeks.

The Vizio P series has a different type of backlight flicker (here) than the Samsungs (here), and may cause more eye strain. Curved vs flat is a personal preference, and it is important to choose the appropriate size depending on the distance you are from the TV, a guide can be found here. You will have a similar experience with each of the Samsung TVs mentioned, so go with the one that is the most comfortable size and lowest price.

That's correct, the 1080p image will be scaled by a factor of 4, however 1080p to 4k scaling is very good and should not be an issue.

1
I recently just purchased the 50" version. Previously I had a 50" D series which had a noticeably large darker band that crossed the whole screen horizontally in the upper portion. It could only be seen on dullish colors and panning shots but I returned it for the P series thinking it would be better. Surprisingly, this TV has the same band. Is this normal, is it just the way they make the uniformity on these TVs?
We also have a similar banding issue on our Vizio D TV. We don't have the same issue on our Vizio P but that is not to say the uniformity is really better. On our set, we have a few vertical color banding issues. Vizio TVs seem to be slightly worse than other brands when it comes to uniformity.
1
I was planning on picking this TV up until I just heard about Xbox Scorpio which should be able to play games at 4k/60hz. I am wondering if the 50 inch can handle that.
We don't have the 50" in hands to confirm but we would expect it to support 4k at 60Hz.
1
Does the TV support HDR over HDMI?
The Vizio P Series 2016 does not support HDR10 over HDMI yet.
1
Can you confirm that you developed your scores (for video games and sports) with Reduce Motion Blur & Judder (interpolation) set to 0 (off.) I have been letting the lower refresh rate prevent me from purchasing the 50". (I tried the 55" and it appears all 55's have corner flashlighting/blooming and the 65" is way too big.) If you give the TV high scores across the board without even considering interpolation, I do not see any reason to not get the 50". I mostly watch movies/TV series in dimly lit or dark rooms but sometimes watch sports/play video games.
That's correct, we turn all interpolation features off for all of our tests except for those specifically testing the feature (the motion interpolation of 30Hz and 60Hz content test). Despite this, the P series does perform very well with motion. It also has very low input lag for video games. We tested the 65" but the motion handling should be similar, despite the lower refresh rate of the 50".
1
I see that HDMI5 and Game Low Latency (GLL) are needed for achieving the ~20 ms of input lag, but is the 'Game' picture mode also required? Would I get ~20 ms using a different picture mode, like 'Calibrated'? In other words, is HDMI5 and GLL all that's needed, or is any mode other than Game going to significantly increase the input lag?
We get identical results for the input lag on HDMI 5 with 'Game low latency' enabled for the 'Game', 'Calibrated' and 'Calibrated dark' picture modes.
1
Evidently the Panasonic DMP-UB900 only outputs either 8 bit or 12 bit color. Since the Vizio P75 is a 10 bit panel, can it accept 12 bit color input, or would it cause the Panasonic player to drop back to 8 bit color? I would NOT want to sacrifice the 10 bit color due to the Panasonic's push to full 12 bits. Please advise.
Yes it can accept 12 bit.
1
In previous questions you have recommended the Samsung KS8000 over the Vizio P65-C1. I will mostly use the TV for general viewing, with some Blu-Ray movies in a darkened room. Because the Vizio supports both HDR-10 and Dolby HDR, I have been giving it and LG a bit of extra weight over Samsung. Is this reasonable or is it better to follow your recommendation and go with the Samsung?
The benefits of the KS8000 or P Series 2016 depend upon your usage. For watching movies in a dark room, the P Series 2016 is slightly better due to the better local dimming. Although it is better to support both HDR formats instead of one, at the moment there is more content available in HDR10.
0
Does frame interpolation work in game mode while Game Low Latency (GLL) is disabled? If so, on which HDMI ports?
It works on all HDMI ports but it bring the same input lag we have recorded with interpolation, 107.1 ms. We wouldn't recommend gaming with that high of an input lag.
0
I'm very interested in the P75, but I'm concerned about the upscaling. I watch mostly TV so I have a 720 input. It seems this TV is the worst TV out there for upscaling. I assume the is no firmware fix since all Vizio's seen to be weak at this. I have seen that many surround sound receivers offer upscaling. Since I plan to upgrade my audio equipment at the same time. Could the receiver handle the upscaling? If so is there a receiver out that that you would recommend?
For 720p and 480p content, the Vizios generally do not perform as well as the more premium brands, however as you have noted it is possible to use your receiver to upscale. A receiver with good quality upscaling will definitely be an improvement, however we are not able to recommend a receiver because we don't test them. If you are able to see the receiver upscale in person (for example in store) that would be the best way to decide if you like the picture.
0
Good review. I had a few questions. One, if my ps4 is the primary blu-ray player, but I also game A LOT, do I still have my ps4 connected to HDMI 5? Should i just switch from game mode to my movie watching calibration when I switch from watching blu-rays to gaming? Also when the Playstation Neo releases, with a 4k blu-ray player inside, will I need to calibrate differently for HDR? Are there different calibration settings for HDR than SDR? Or does the HDR calibration work for SDR as well. It says this TV has Dolby Vision and not HDR10. Will this mean I wont be seeing an optimal picture when I watch 4k blu-ray discs? Thanks for your help
That's correct, connect your PS4 through HDMI 5 for the lowest input lag. You can enable game mode for your PS4, and disable it for extra image processing when you are watching blu-rays. The TV will have to be calibrated differently for HDR, however the rest of the settings should remain the same. At the moment there is no confirmation whether the new PS4 will support Dolby Vision or HDR10, but Vizio is planning to update for HDR10 in August.
0
Have you heard when the HDR10 update will be made available? It is now summer and I haven't heard if the update has arrived or is coming soon. I have been holding off purchasing the TV until the update arrives because I will primarily be watching UHD Blu-rays which feature of course HDR10.
We heard the HDR10 update is due for the month of August.
0
How do these new P series TV's (2016) connect to a Charter Cable digital box? Is it possible to use Charter's remote or is everything controlled thru Vizio's Smartcast tablet? I went to their web site and read the manual, but I do not see any explanation.
You can connect the Charter Cable digital box via HDMI to the Vizio P. The Vizio remote allows you to do basic operations, such as turning on/off the TV, changing picture mode, input source and volume however for the full range of settings or for casting it is necessary to use the tablet or phone app. You should be able to program the Charter Cable universal remote for the Vizio TV to do these same operations, as described here.
0
I just got this TV, what can you suggest if I only use it for gaming for the calibration settings? Also how do I adjust it to play 4k content? I have the 50 inch version. Thank you!
We suggest to use all our settings, except for the white balance and color space settings, for gaming with 'Game Low Latency on. We also recommend using the HDMI 5 input for gaming as you will experience a lower input lag. The same goes for 4K content, you must use HDMI 5.
0
Fantastic reviews! I've owned a Panasonic V series purchased in 2010. It is getting a little dull in the color department. I'm really looking at the Vizio P 65 for video games and sports. However I'm not sold on the quality of Vizio's in the past. How is the build quality of the P series, do you think it will last a few years? Thank you!
Coming from a plasma TV to an LED, you will notice differences in the picture quality. The Vizio P can produce very bright vivid colors, however the viewing angle is more narrow. For video games and sports, this should not be an issue and is a good TV. As for build quality, we do not know of any difference in failure rate between the different brands.
0
How many nits does the 2016 Vizio P50-C1 have? It would be great if you could include this in the reviews. Thanks
Unfortunately we can't review every size in each series, so we only have the 65" of the 2016 P series. We measured a peak brightness of 520 cd/m^2 (nits) on a 100% white window.
0
Is an internet connection required to be able to change the picture settings on the 2016 Vizio p series?
No, the Vizio tablet can be pair via Bluetooth to the TV when no WiFi is available.
0
I've been trying to decide between the Vizio P50 or the 55" Sony x810c. My main uses are Netflix/Hulu/other streaming, PS4 gaming, PC gaming, and occasional cable TV via Comcast. Now, I noticed in another answer, you mentioned that the Vizio may create image duplication while gaming while the x810c does not. Will this be an annoyance with the P series, or does it only occur with certain settings turned on? Overall, do you think the quality of the P series warrants losing 5 inches on the x810c?
Image duplication happens on TVs that have a flickering backlight and is more obvious in 30 frames per second video games. It isn't an issue for everyone though and some even like the look of the motion it creates better. To an extent, it makes motion clearer but not as smooth compared to a non-flickering backlight. Luckily, flickering can be controlled on both the Vizio P and the Sony x810c. By default, the Sony x810c is flicker-free. To make it flicker, activate the 'Clearness' setting. The Vizio P flickers unless its 'Backlight' setting is set to 100%, where it stops flickering. Between the two TVs, pick the Vizio P if you think you will watch a lot of HDR content. Pick the Sony x810c if you want to game at 120Hz and maximize your viewing area.
0
On the local-dimming test video, when the round dot starts moving quickly, there is a visible trail left behind on the screen - it looks darker than the surrounding black, until it is "erased" by the next pass of the dot. Is this actually a flaw in the Vizio screen, a flaw in your camera, or a flaw in the YouTube compression? None of your other videos show this effect, and it seems a strange artifact for the set to produce. Also, on the "Resolution" test photo (the boats in the marina), this image looks noticeably bluer and brighter than most of the other sets (like the Samsung KS8000), to the exclusion of almost all warmth in the image, and the blacks look blue-grey and washed out. Are these test photos taken before or after color-calibration? Is this an actual difference in the image rendering of the Vizio set? It seems rather extreme, and I thought such inconsistencies would be removed by your color-calibration. (I also notice in the side-by-side "Compared to other TVs" photo, while not taken "under a controlled environment" the Vizio always looks more blue and washed-out than the other sets, which would seem to indicate the same issue.)
Thank you for pointing this out. This is an artifact from the camera or the compression, and not an issue with the screen. It is visible to a lesser extent on the Vizio M Series 2016 as well. The tests are done after calibration, however for the Vizio P Series 2016 the color calibration did not work as effectively. Reducing the saturation of the primary colors led to undersaturation of other colors. As such, the color calibration settings were left untouched and these issues can be seen in the post-calibration color space here. For the 'Compared to other TVs photo', the settings are adjusted to match the content (eg. Game picture settings for video games). This normally results in a slight loss of picture quality. The Vizio P Series 2016 doesn't deal with reflections as well as many of the TVs it is compared to (high end Samsung, Sony, and LG TVs) which leads to it looking more washed-out.
0
I first want to say that I am big fan of the site and have been using you for my research extensively. I wanted to offer my experience with the Vizio P55-C1. I just picked it up yesterday and have done a calibration as per the specs a poster put for the IPS panel variant on avs forum. However, I am noticing (no matter which picture setting I choose, AVS or standard built in ones) that blacks aren't as deep as compared to the VA screen (as expected). What's not expected is that I'm seeing some odd "flashlighting" effect in each of the corners when conducting a YouTube based 4k black screen test. Would you expect this to happen with the IPS panel or is my unit defective? Separately, do you think it's worth spending 1K more on the P65 variant to get the VA screen? Any guidance would be appreciated
Flashlighting is more apparent on IPS panels since the blacks are not as good. Also, keep in mind that IPS panels have 'IPS Glow', which exaggerates this issue even more. Send us a picture via email if you want us to comment on your set. If you want to upgrade to the 65", do it for the size, not really for the VA panel. If you want a VA panel, you will probably be better off with another model instead so you don't have to spend 1k more.
0
Thanks for all of your reviews. You make it a lot easier to make informed decisions about TV purchases and it is greatly appreciated. I was wondering if you are able to say in reviews how many zones TV's with FALD have in the future. It is my understanding that what sets features like Sony's Backlight Master Drive apart is the amount of zones it has. Having a point of reference for the few TV's that have it would be useful in making future purchase decisions.
Thank you for this feedback. Unfortunately most brands don't want to publish information about the number of zones. It is possible to make an educated guess at the number (to try to count), but what is really important is the performance. More zones does not always mean better performance. We try to rate this in our 'Local Dimming' score.
Q&A for this section is now closed.