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    Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Back
    3. Borders
    4. Thickness
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. HDR Peak Brightness
    5. Gray Uniformity
    6. Viewing Angle
    7. Black Uniformity
    8. Gradient
    9. Pre Calibration
    10. Post Calibration
    11. 480p Input
    12. 720p Input
    13. 1080p Input
    14. 4k Input
    15. Color Gamut
    16. Color Volume
    17. Image Retention
    18. Reflections
    19. 3D
    20. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Apps
    2. Ads
    3. TV Controls
    4. Remote
    5. In The Box
    6. Misc
  8. Sizes and Variants
  9. Compared
  10. Conclusion
  11. Q&A
Reviewed on Apr 01, 2016

Sony X930D
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
Version 1.0
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Test Benches:

  • 1.1: Summer 2017
  • 1.0: Winter 2015
  • 0.9: Winter 2014
  • 0.8: Winter 2013
Recommended if under (USD)
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What it is: Maximum price to be a better value than its competitors.
How to use it: This product is the best choice in its range if you can find it below this price.
Automatically calculated every hour based on the scores and prices of all other products we've tested.
Value for price
beaten by
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What it is: Product with the best value in this price range
Other best choice in a cheaper price range
Other best choice in a pricier price range
Automatically updated every hour based on the scores and prices of all other products we've tested.
Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.0 Not at latest test bench
Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
8.3
TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.8
Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
7.9
Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
8.1
HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
8.4
HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
7.7
PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
7.8
This tv has been discontinued.
It was replaced by the Sony X930E

Type : LED
Resolution : 4k
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz

The Sony X930D is a great 4k UHD TV that offers good all-around picture quality, especially for movies. Its HDR mode is impressive, with very high peak brightness. It doesn't have any major flaws apart from the limited viewing angle and the high input lag.

Pros
  • Great picture quality for movies
  • Great motion handling
  • Very bright
Cons
  • Average-high input lag
  • Loss of saturation at an angle

Test Results
Design 8.5
Picture Quality 8.0
Motion 9.2
Inputs 6.4
Sound Quality 5.5
Smart Features 7.5

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8.5

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D Design Picture
Curved : No

The Sony X930D has a decent look. Its frame and stand are made of plastic, but look metallic. Borders are relatively thin, and once it is in its stand, the TV feels sturdy. Its back and side inputs can be hidden behind removable plastic panels on the back of the TV. Cable routing is also possible behind those panels.

Stand
Sony X930D Stand Picture

The stand is very sturdy and doesn't have a very big footprint for the size of the TV. It's plastic, but looks like metal.

Footprint of the 55" TV stand: 16.2" x 9.8"

Back
Sony X930D Back Picture
Wall Mount : Vesa 300x200

A standard VESA wall mount can be used with the supplied VESA spacers. Most of the connections will still be usable when the TV is mounted flush on a wall. Plastic covers are provided to hide cables away.

Borders
Sony X930D Borders Picture
Borders : 0.59" (1.5 cm)

Borders are made of plastic.

Thickness
Sony X930D Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 1.38" (3.5 cm)

The upper third of the TV is thinner, while the bottom of the TV is thicker.

8.0

Picture Quality

When it comes to watching TV or movies, the Sony X930D delivers the goods. Its contrast is good and will do justice to dark scenes. Color is great right out of the box, and the TV is able to remove judder from all content, which will ensure a smooth movie experience. Be it standard resolution or 4k UHD, all content looks good on the X930D. HDR, though it doesn't look perfect, is nice and bright.

7.8 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Sony X930D Checkerboard Picture
Native Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
2843 : 1

Contrast is good, although not as good as that of many other TVs. The Sony X930D's blacks are not the deepest, but most people shouldn't notice this. We did expect better results from a high-end TV like this one, though.

6.0 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
Yes
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
Edge

For an edge-lit TV, the local dimming is impressive, though still not quite as good as what you can get from a full-array backlight. The blooming is even more obvious if you turn on 'X-tended Dynamic Range'.

8.2 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
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What it is: The maximum luminosity the TV can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more regular movie condition. All measurement are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over SDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV show in SDR.
:
499 cd/m2
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
923 cd/m2
SDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
786 cd/m2
SDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
581 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
560 cd/m2
SDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
485 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 50% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
400 cd/m2

The SDR peak brightness is above average for the Sony X930D. While it can get very bright (with 'Auto local dimming' and 'X-tended Dynamic Range' set to 'High'), the brightness is not stable and vary over time, from very bright to about 400 cd/m², which is our sustained value in our test results.

8.9 HDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; HDR content.
HDR Real Scene Peak Brightness
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What it is: The maximum luminosity the TV can obtain while playing a movie or while watching a TV show. This scene was selected to represent a more realistic movie condition. All measurement are made with the TV set to be as bright as possible, but with a 6500k white. Measured with local dimming, max backlight and over HDR signal. Scene: here.
When it matters: When watching movies or watching TV show in HDR.
:
888 cd/m2
HDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
1054 cd/m2
HDR Peak 10% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
1038 cd/m2
HDR Peak 25% Window
Show Help
What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
659 cd/m2
HDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
602 cd/m2
HDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
554 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
465 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 10% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
515 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in HDR video.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
549 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 50% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
600 cd/m2
HDR Sustained 100% Window
Show Help
What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over HDR signal (if supported).
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 1000 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
554 cd/m2

The Sony X930D can get very bright. For really bright highlights, both 'Auto local dimming' and 'X-tended Dynamic Range' have to be set to 'High'. Unfortunately, the TV brightness is also very unstable, and varies a lot when there is only a small highlight on the screen (as in our 2% or 10% window tests). For those two tests, the TV slowly cycles between 465 cd/m² and its peak value of around 1054 cd/m². See the additional review notes at the bottom of this review for more details.
Update: Updated with sustained brightness.

6.5 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
Sony X930D 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
6.366 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.198 %
Sony X930D 5% Uniformity Picture
5% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 5% gray.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 1.15%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
1.302 %
5% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Dark scenes.
Good value: < 0.116%
:
0.119 %

There isn't much dirty screen effect. However, the edges and the corners are noticeably darker than the center of the screen.

4.9 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
VA
Sony X930D Color Shift Picture
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
20 °
Sony X930D Brightness Picture
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
44 °
Sony X930D Black Level Picture
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
19 °

Very narrow viewing angle. As with most LED TVs, the X930D's color becomes desaturated at wide angles.

8.6 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Sony X930D Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
1.209 %

There are a few clouding spots, but nothing that ruins the experience.

10 Gradient
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What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D Gradient Picture
Color Depth
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What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
10 Bit

Our gradient test is free of any obvious problems and shows smooth color transitions across the board. The Sony X930D displayed one of the best gradients we have seen so far on a 10-bit panel.

8.5 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
Sony X930D Pre Calibration Picture Sony X930D Pre Gamma Curve Picture Sony X930D Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.90
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.387
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.25

Good results for color out of the box. Blue was lacking a little, which resulted in a slightly warmer picture. This was subtle, though, and most would be very satisfied with the default settings.

9.6 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
Sony X930D Post Calibration Picture Sony X930D Post Gamma Curve Picture Sony X930D Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.27
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.1749
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.19

After calibration, white balance results are great. Although there are no specific color settings for the Sony TVs, adjusting white balance did improve color accuracy. You can see our recommended settings here.

8.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D 480p Picture

The X930D does an amazing job at upscaling lower resolution content like DVDs. The final image looks very good.

8.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D 720p Picture

Like the majority of Sony TVs, 720p content when upscaled looks very good.

9.0 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D 1080p Picture

1080p content like Blu-rays look sharp and no detail are lost. Picture is crisp and fine details are well preserved.

10 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D 4k Picture

Native 4k content looks amazing on this TV.

7.9 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
Yes
Sony X930D Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
88.08 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
93.16 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
64.21 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
70.40 %

The Sony X930D has a wide color gamut option, although its range of coverage isn't among the best we've seen. The wider color gamut makes a good visible difference for HDR content.

6.4 Color Volume
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What it is: How many colors a TV can display at different luminosity levels.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Sony X930D P3 Color Volume Picture
Normalized DCI P3 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
:
71.711 %
10,000 cd/m² DCI P3 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels when compared to an ideal 10,000 nit TV
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
:
54.386 %
Sony X930D 2020 Color Volume Picture
Normalized Rec 2020 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the Rec. 2020 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
Good value: 80 %
Noticeable difference: 5 %
:
55.909 %
10,000 cd/m² Rec 2020 Coverage
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What it is: How much of the DCI-P3 colorspace a TV can display at different luminosity levels when compared to an ideal 10,000 nit TV
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos, UHD Blu-rays and HDR games.
:
42.067 %

10 Image Retention
Show Help
What it is: How much a static image is retained on a TV screen after a certain amount of time.
When it matters: When watching TV show, playing video games or when using your TV as a PC monitor.
IR after 0 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured right after the static image exposure, without recovery time.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 2 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 2 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 4 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 4 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 6 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 6 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 8 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 8 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %
IR after 10 min recovery
Show Help
What it is: Image retention measured after a recovery time of 10 minutes.
When it matters: When changing channels while watching TV, right after changing the type of content (i.e. stopping playing video game to watch a movie) or changing input.
Good value: 0 is perfect.
Noticeable difference: 0.015%
:
0.000 %

9.0 Reflections
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What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D Reflections Picture Sony X930D Bright Room Picture
Reflection
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What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
0.7 %
Screen Finish
Show Help
What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Glossy

Reflections aren't a big nuisance on the Sony X930D's glossy screen. Some rainbows might appear around bright objects, though. For anyone that has a bright room, this TV will work well.

9.0 3D
Show Help
What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D 3D Picture
3D
Show Help
What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
Yes
3D Type
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What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
Active
2D to 3D
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What it is: Feature that converts 2D content to 3D.
When it matters: If you want to watch 2D content in 3D. Note that the quality is not as good as that of native 3D.
:
No

As with most 3D TVs, the screen got darker once 3D was engaged. You might want to increase 'Brightness' when watching 3D content. There was no apparent cross-talk, which is good. The active 3D technology also ensures full-resolution 3D, although it is not as comfortable to watch as is passive 3D. No 3D glasses were included in the box.

Update 11/21/2016: The 65" size has been reported to have more crosstalk than the 55" we tested.

Pixels
9.2

Motion

Because the Sony X930D has very low amount of motion blur, sports will look good on it, even when there is fast action on screen. Players, balls, or pucks will stay defined when moving at full speed. The only downside is the screen uniformity, which might reveal some dark spots on camera pans over playing fields.

9.1 Motion Blur
Show Help
What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
Sony X930D Motion Blur Picture Sony X930D Response Time Chart
Response Time
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What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
10.6 ms
Overshoot
Show Help
What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0.4 ms

The response time of the pixels is pretty quick, which means motion blur is not a problem. This TV isn't flicker-free, unfortunately (all other Sony TVs we reviewed in the last few years were), and this is more noticeable at a lower backlight level. The frequency of the flickering is high, though, so it isn't as noticeable as PWM on Samsung TVs.

7.5 Image Flicker
Show Help
What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components:
Sony X930D Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
Show Help
What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
720 Hz
BFI
Show Help
What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes
Sony X930D BFI Picture Sony X930D BFI Frequency Picture
BFI Frequency
Show Help
What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
120 Hz
BFI In Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes

10 24p Playback
Show Help
What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60i
Show Help
What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
Yes

With 'Motionflow' set to 'True Cinema' and 'CineMotion' set to 'High', you won't need to worry about 24p judder from any source, whether it's cable TV, streaming, DVDs, or Blu-rays.

10 Motion Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
Show Help
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
Sony X930D Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
Show Help
What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
Sony X930D Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

With the Sony X930D's Motionflow settings, you can make video smoother by increasing the frame rate up to 120 fps. This applies even to cable TV and streaming. Note that this adds what some people call the 'soap opera effect' (SOE). For those who don't like the look of SOE, low 'Motionflow' custom values can be used to smooth out motion with only minimal SOE.

6.4

Inputs

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Score components:

Although the time it takes for the TV to react to controller inputs is average-high, the low motion blur this TV produces, combined with its ability to accept the most commonly used PC inputs, makes it a great gaming TV. That said, any gamers playing competitively should look for a TV with much lower input lag.

5.8 Input Lag
Show Help
What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
52.5 ms
1080p With Interpolation
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
80.0 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
Show Help
What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
88.3 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
52.5 ms
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
76.0 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.
When it matters: PC Monitor
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
76.0 ms
4k @ 60Hz + HDR
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz with HDR.
When it matters: HDR Video games.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
75.4 ms
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 + 8 bit HDR
Show Help
What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4 with HDR enabled at 8 bit
When it matters: PC Monitor with an HDR capable graphic card
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
75.4 ms

Update 04/20/2017: Under the latest firmware update that brought Android 6.0.1 (PKG3.865.0136NAB), the input lag is now higher than what it was under the previous firmware. In fact, we measured almost the same numbers that we had measured 2 firmware ago.

Update 11/02/2016: After the last firmware update (PKG3.531.0108NAB), the input lag is reduced for both 1080p and 4k resolution, which is a big improvement over the last results. The table above has been updated with these new values. Input lag under game mode with a resolution of 1080p is now good enough for casual gamers (it was over 50ms before the last firmware update).

Under a 4k resolution, it is better than what we had before (SDR was 75ms and HDR was 110ms), but it is still a bit too high even for casual games.

10 Supported Resolutions
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What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
Show Help
What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
Show Help
What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
Yes

Most common PC inputs are accepted. As with other Sony TVs, little artifacts (flashing lines) are seen when a 1080p @ 120Hz signal is being displayed. 'Game' or 'Graphics' picture mode as to be selected at that refresh rate to get a sharp picture. To get chroma 4:4:4 (for sharper text) at 1080p @ 60Hz, use the 'Graphics' picture mode. For 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4, turn on 'Enhanced HDMI' for the input in use.

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 4
USB : 3
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 1
Analog Audio Out RCA : 0
Component In : 1
Composite In : 1
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 1
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Show Help
What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
Yes
Dolby Vision
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What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
Show Help
What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : Yes
ARC : Yes (HDMI 4)
USB 3 : Yes (1)
HDCP 2.2 : Yes
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : Yes

5.5

Sound Quality

Unlike 2015's Sony X930C, the X930D doesn't have great speakers, and its overall sound quality is bad. It won't get that loud, and slight distortion is present.

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

5.6 Frequency Response
Show Help
What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
Sony X930D Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
5.48 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
5.73 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
6.28 dB SPL
Max
Show Help
What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
87.9 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
Show Help
What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
160 Hz

Poor overall performance. Low-end cutoff and maximum loudness are below average, even for a TV. There may also be some compression and pumping at higher volumes.

5.4 Total Harmonic Distortion
Show Help
What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
Sony X930D Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.060
Distortion @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.055
Distortion @ Max
Show Help
What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.247

Poor overall performance. Although there is not a dramatic rise in harmonic distortion at max volume (unlike other Sony TVs we have tested), the general level of distortion at all levels is rather high.

7.5

Smart Features

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Sony X930D Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : Android

Sony's Android smart platform provides plenty of apps spread out across many different interfaces. Overall, it's a little confusing to navigate. If you look deep enough, though, you should find what you are looking for. As for inputs, there are plenty available, and all needs should be met. Something to note is that the TV come with a huge power brick that may be a problem to hide.

Apps
Sony X930D Apps Picture

Lots of apps available on the Android smart platform. A web browser is available, as are the typical popular apps, like YouTube, Netflix, Amazon Video, and HBO Go.

10 Ads
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What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
Show Help
What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
Yes
Opt-out
Show Help
What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
N/A

TV Controls
Sony X930D Controls Picture

Some basic TV controls are located on the back-left of the TV and can be accessed even if the TV is mounted on a wall.

Remote
Sony X930D Remote Picture
Remote : Basic

Sony uses a basic remote. Navigation of the different TV menus is straightforward, but could be made better. The inclusion of a pointer would be nice.

In The Box
Sony X930D In The Box Picture

- Remote
- Batteries
- VESA spacers
- Huge power brick with cable
- IR blaster
- Manuals

Misc
Power Consumption : 70 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 158 W
Firmware : PKG3.531.0108NAB

Differences between Sizes and Variants

We reviewed the 55" (XBR-55X930D).

Update: We have received reports indicating a higher contrast ratio for the 65" (XBR-65X930D) at around 4000:1. It would also have worse 3D with more crosstalk. There are also reports of smearing present in dark scenes for the 65" model. If someone comes across a different type of panel used or differences between sizes, let us know and we will update our review.

Size Model UK
55" XBR-55X930D KD-55XD9305
65" XBR-65X930D KD-65XD9305

Compared to other TVs

Sony X930D Group Shot Picture
Top row, from left: Sony X930C (XBR65X930C), Sony X930D (XBR55X930D), Vizio P Series 2016 (P65-C1). Bottom: Sony X850D (XBR55X850D), Samsung KS8000 (UN55KS8000), LG UH8500 (55UH8500). Unlike our other photographs, this picture wasn't taken under a controlled environment, so do not draw conclusions from it.

The Sony X930D is hard to justify with that many TVs that offer near as good picture quality for a much less money. Its competition is fierce.

Sony X850D
55" 65" 75" 85"

The Sony x850d has the edge for sports and gaming while the X930D is a better pick for watching movies including HDR content. The X930D is the only one offering 3D.

Sony X930C
65"

The Sony X930C is slightly better for watching movies in a dark room while the X930D is the better TV for HDR. Sports will look better on the X930D too but gaming is a mixed bag. For games that asks fast reflexes like first person shooters, racing or combat games, buy the X930C. For slower pace games, the X930D has the edge.

Vizio P Series 2016
50" 55" 65" 75"

The Vizio P is better for sports that don’t have much camera movements, like tennis. It also has the edge for watching movies in the dark and playing video games. The Sony X930D is better for sports with long traveling camera shots like football and hockey.

Samsung KS8000
49" 55" 60" 65"

The Samsung KS8000 is better for watching movies in a dark room, playing fast reflexes video games and HDR. For slower paced type of video games, the X930D offer a better picture quality. The X930D also offer 3D and the Samsung KS8000 does not.

LG EF9500
55" 65"

The LG OLED EF9500 clearly has better picture quality. Be it for movies, sports or video games. The X930D only gets the edge for HDR content.

Conclusion
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Sony X930D is an excellent TV that will please almost everyone, especially those looking for good HDR picture. It has a very good picture quality for movies and it can get very bright. It also handles motion very well. Gamers might be turned off by the rather high input lag, though, and the picture quality isn't great when viewed at an angle.

Usage Ratings - Version 1.0
Show Help

Test Benches:

  • 1.1: Summer 2017
  • 1.0: Winter 2015
  • 0.9: Winter 2014
  • 0.8: Winter 2013
8.0Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.3Movies
Show Help
What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
7.8TV Shows
Show Help
What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.9Sports
Show Help
What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
8.1Video Games
Show Help
What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
8.4HDR Movies
Show Help
What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
7.7HDR Gaming
Show Help
What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
7.8PC Monitor
Show Help
What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Questions Found an error?

Let us know what is wrong in this question or in the answer.

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Questions & Answers

35 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
103
Do you have any plans on reviewing the full array Sony X940D, because on paper it looks like it will be one of the best tvs released this year?
Not in the near future, but maybe during summer.
53
Additional Review Notes

Peak brightness

The Sony X930D peak brightness isn't constant. It varies in time, even when the picture doesn't change. It alternates between two values slowly. See these results for the 2% window:

Auto Local DimmingX-tended Dynamic RangeMaxMin
HighHigh987 cd/m2350 cd/m2
MedHigh617 cd/m2376 cd/m2
LowHigh618 cd/m2377 cd/m2
HighMed660 cd/m2360 cd/m2
MedMed615 cd/m2442 cd/m2
HighLow520 cd/m2360 cd/m2
LowLow541 cd/m2374 cd/m2

It also happens with the 10%, but not the 25% and above.

Note: This table was done without sending an HDR signal, which is why it is different than the measurements in our review.

22
Other reviewers have tested the 65 inch set and have recorded 4000:1 contrast ratio. I myself have recorded 3885:1 on my 65x930d. The 55 and 65 are both VA panels but have a rather large difference in native contrast ratio. Also the 3D on the 65 inch model is currently experience large amounts of crosstalk and is consider broken by owners on AVS forums.
Interesting! This is a rather big contrast difference between the two sizes. On our 55", we didn't experienced any obvious problems with crosstalk when watching 3D content with our Samsung glasses and PS3.
20
Just wanted to put a request in for the Sony Z9D. Exited to see how Sony's new flagship LED stacks up against the OLED.
We take note of your request. If we have time, we will review a Sony Z9D this fall.
19
Sony won't say if the X930D TV meets the requirements of the UHD Alliance to receive Ultra HD Premium certification. Does it? It looks like it doesn't meet the peak brightness standard. Does it meet the other standards?
The Ultra HD Premium certification doesn't really tell how they are measured, so manufacturers can cheat them. For example, we actually measured a max of 1183 nits on it. But that's uncalibrated and with cool color temperatures, not accurate colors. Or for the blacks, you can get the TV to produce a pure 0 nits black: if you display a complete black screen, the backlight will turn off... So the certification is a bit meaningless.
18
WARNING ! Unacceptable AWFUL 3D Crosstalk on 65X930D I am owner of this TV and potential buyers have to be aware they should for now not invested so much money if they're interested in watching 3D content. Keep in mind Sony has been the main company to push 3D since 2010, there are still plenty of great quality 3D Blu-ray released every month. The crosstalk (or ghosting) here is extreme on EVERY unit of 65X930D worldwide (I actually have the Chinese model), nothing can be set properly using the depth parameter, you can hardly fix only one element at a time (for example only menu or subtitle, or only closest objects on screen, middle range, deep, deeper etc...). I have exchanged mine 3 times already and the result if the same. I can assure everybody it is not a problem of player, cable, glasses, or source whatsoever. I am a huge 3D fan and have 60 original 3D Blu-rays, which look marvelous on my 1st generation Sony 3D TV. I know what I'm talking about. This problem has received a lot of complains for last years X850C model and after 6 months of users struggling with Sony Support, they finally admitted and fixed it via firmware update for the 65" but did not for the 55" and 75" sizes. It seems Sony doesn't want to admit this set also has a disgusting 3D rendering like they kept the firmware in Alpha version.
Thanks for sharing your experience with it. Our 55" doesn't have that issue, so it looks like the poor 3D performance is only present on the 65".
13
Hi, fantastic work of rating TVs by the way mate. I'm always using this website when talking to customers. What's the better buy in your opinion between X930C and X930D. Apart from the sound and design, for someone looking to watch sports and movies (action movies) is there really a big difference between the last model and this? If so how noticeable is it. Many thanks.
Both are great TVs, especially for movies. The differences aren't big. Mainly, the X930C has better native contrast, but slightly worse motion blur. This makes the X930C better for movies, and the X930D better for sports. But don't get too hung up in the details. Most people won't see the difference once calibrated, unless they are side by side. And both are great.
12
When do you guys plan on reviewing the Vizio P Series?
We have started the calibration on it. It will be the next review to be published either at the end of this week or early next week. Stay tune!
9
Hi, is there anyway to reduce the haloing/blooming on this TV. I noticed in store when a logo would appear on a black background the surrounding would light up too. Any setting to reduce this? The X850D doesn't suffer from this, any idea why? I'm guessing local dimming? When playing normal tv (not just a logo on a blackscreen) the tv picture quality is fantastic, dare I say I don't notice the difference when looking at the OLED (not a black screen but normal tv) however this one issue of haloing is really effecting my opinion of this tv. Any advice?
Yes you can play with the local dimming settings on the television to try to reduce that bloom. Unfortunately, since that television is edge lit, you may not get much of a difference. The reason why that happens is due to the back light trying to light up that logo, which leaves that blooming effect.
8
I am considering buying a Samsung JS9500 or a Sony 930D. I am looking for the best picture quality, the best overall TV and technology and something that will bring out the best of HDR content via my Samsung 4K Blu Ray player. Of the two TVs, which one would you recommend?
They are close in picture quality and both great TVs. They have similar black levels and native contrast ratios. The x930d can get brighter which is good for HDR but it doesn't have as good local dimming. For that reason, most of the time, the JS9500 makes for a better TV for watching late night movies. For sports, the x930d has less blur and get the edge. For gaming, the lower input lag of the Samsung JS9500 makes it for a better choice.
7
"For 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4," Looks like you didn't finish your sentence. Great Review.
Thanks for pointing that out. Fixed.
7
Is the power cable from the brick to the TV in-wall rated for wall mounting the TV? Also, regarding the input lag, it seems strange that it's so much higher than the X850D. Why would that be? Is it related to the slim backlight drive? Does turning off local dimming improve it at all? I'm a bit of a TV novice so don't know much about this stuff. Could a future firmware update improve that?

Yes, the cable is rated for in-wall installation (the cable have a tag on it saying so). We were surprised at the input lag too but couldn't get it any lower than this. Local dimming was off when we took the measurements as well as all other video processing that could be turned off from the TV menu. This is just how it is. Rarely did a firmware update lowered an input lag so we wouldn't count on that too.

Update: Sony has now reported that "a tag on the DC power cord (the cord that connects the AC adapter to the TV) of some units is mislabeled as In-Wall Rated. The DC power cord should have a tag on it that states, Not For In-Wall Use.". The cable we received with the x930d has that mislabeled tag and is not in-wall rated. Thanks to one of our visitor for pointing that out.

6
The cord says not in wall rated. Sony mistakenly send the first batch out with an incorrect tag. Please correct this as your are misinforming people and potential putting them at risk.
You are right. Thank you for pointing that out. We updated the previous answer Here is the full Sony post on the matter.
6
I'm a TV salesman at an national chain and I want to, first of all, challenge the notion that this TV has bad viewing angles. What originally drew me to this TV was my ability to see it much more clearly from even extreme angles than, say, the KS9000. And second, I believe the way these TVs are rated don't put nearly enough importance on the upscaling functions. In a highly transitional period of resolutions, the ability to upscale is far and away the most important aspect of a 4K TV, and not one client has disagreed with that sentiment. Even with the rather pleasing influx of 4K content this year, 1080p content still outpaces 4K content by factors as high as 1000:1. Another recommendation (from experts who come through the store) is to put more emphasis on noise algorithms. LG TVs look nice while not moving, for example, but generate awful amounts of artifacts in comparison to Sony and Samsung TVs.

Thank you for your constructive feedback.

Our viewing angle score isn't subjective, but a measurement of the angle at which the TV loses half its contrast (measured with spectro-photometer pointing directly to TV on a rotating table). Although colors doesn't shift the same way, from our tests measurements, side-by-side, in a bright room or a pitch black room, the Samsung KS9000 maintained a better picture quality when viewed from the side than the Sony x930d.

We agree that 1080p upscaling has a big importance nowadays. That particular resolution weights more than any other at 36% of our resolution score. It is followed by 720p, which is also common for cable TV.

We don't currently have a specific test for noise artifacts although we make some settings recommendations to attenuate the issue when present. It might be a good idea to add more information about this in our future review.

Once again, thank you for taking the time to send us your feedback.

6
Hey, I'm interested in gaming on a 4K TV, 65 inch. I'm liking the Sony X930D. I don't know if I should get this model or the Sony X930C. The X930C has better input lag but lower motion blur. Between the two, which should I get for fast paced games? I'm a competitive gamer, but I'm not a professional gamer. I have a surround sound system, so I don't necessarily need the speakers.
For fast paced games, the lower input lag of the X930C is worth it. Although 15ms is not a huge difference, it may be noticeable. Consider the 2016 Vizio P series as well, which also has good motion blur and very low input lag.
6
Hey there. Cnet just posted their review and they say input lag is 37ms? How could theirs be lower for the same TV? I was going to get the 930c for that reason alone, but it's harder to get at the moment and I get can get the 930d cheaper. Which one should I get? Regards
We have checked all the HDMI inputs again for the X930D and get the same result at 52ms. This could be due to the different size TVs reviewed, we have the 55" here and CNet reviewed the 65". For gaming, the two TVs have similar performance. Go with the cheaper one.
5
Seeing the Sony x930c, it looks like the 930D is a step backwards in terms of contrast and local dimming. That's a shame. I'm glad I went with the Vizio M65-c1 instead of waiting for the 930d.
In terms of contrast, yes. But it depends on how you see local dimming. The x930d has bigger blooming effect but can get highlights much brighter than the x930c can which is definitely great for HDR content. It also is better for motion with less blur. The input lag hurts it though. If you are after great blacks then you should be satisfied with the Vizio M.
5
I understand the X950B is two years old, but how does it compare to the X930D?
We didn't review the X950B, so we can't say for sure. The X950B has a direct backlight, so it probably has better black uniformity, but we expect the two should be pretty similar apart from that.
5
I've read the review from you guys from the first day it was released on your website for the 930D, some the scores have changed multiple times ie contrast, black uniformity and even the movie and TV score all have gotten lower. Why cant you make up your minds? Even things writen about the HDR being very impressive have been removed. I work at Best Buy in TV department and 9 out of 9 agree the the Sony 930D picture is better than the new Samsungs, including the KS9500. Also the Sony 850D picture and color have noticable improvements over the 850C we all see it as plain as day. The score you gave it does not reflect what 9 out of 9 of us see. I also find it curious that the Samsung demo TVs are already having issues and they are not even 3 months on display and the motion on the 8000, 9000 and 9500 KS models have motion issues that are glaring. When will you admit what we know that Sony TVs upscale better and move better than Samsung. However I still look forward to your reviews guys, you can do better.

When we review TVs, we take measurements so that they can be reproduced, and are consistent across different TVs using the same method. All these results (eg. the black and white brightness levels when displaying the checkboard pattern) are inserted into the system, and a score is calculated based on how these results compare. All of these tests are described on the website.

Since the review of the X930D was published, the weightings applied to each score for all reviews have been changed . Updates to any weighting changes can be found here. These weightings are changed to reflect the importance of various features (such as motion interpolation or peak brightness) to the average user.

We cannot comment on the reliability of TVs as we do not have enough information, however we have not heard of any significant differences between the brands.

4
Just quickly will you be reviewing Sony's XBR65X750D? Thank You.
The review of the Sony XBR65X750D is now live.
3
Could you provide a bit more detail on the the varying peak brightness effect you describe on the X930D? For instance, how long does it usually take to transition between maximum brightness to minimum brightness for, say, the 2% window (i.e., is it a relatively quick shift, or does it take several minutes)? Is the transition period shorter or longer for larger windows (e.g., 10%)? When you say the brightness "yo-yos" between the two levels, does that mean it goes all the way from maximum to minimum, then all the way back to maximum before repeating the cycle, or does it just oscillate at varying levels between the maximum and minimum? Finally, does it always start at the same level of luminance (e.g., max or min) when a highlight is initially displayed, then shift from there, or does the initial luminance value of a highlight window vary as well?
The transitions between maximum and minimum brightness (or vice-versa) goes at a rate of about 8 nits per second. There is a pause when the lowest or highest brightness value is reached and it then goes back the other way to complete full cycles. The higher the maximum brightness, the shorter the pause is at peak brightness. Going from a totally black screen to a sudden 2% white screen won't necessarily mean brightness will be at its peak if the cycle isn't at that point in time. This also mean that an highlight on one scene might not be as bright on a second viewing. The transitions speed are the same for the 2% and 10% windows.
3
I just noticed that the Sony model this replaces the X930c has a contrast level of 5000 compared to just 2840 for the new X930D How can a new model be so inferior to what it replaced? This makes it far inferior to the 2015 model.
The contrast ratio of LCD panels have plateaued for a few years, in the 3,000:1 to 7,000:1 for VA. Sony most likely went with another manufacturer this year, and they didn't mind the loss of contrast.
2
I am really curious about the "Slim Backlight Drive" as Sony is calling it on this TV. I do not see you mention it at all in the review and this is not a slam at you. I was just more curious. Did it play no factor into anything so much it was not worth mentioning?
Good question. We didn't mention the technology name used by Sony ('Slim backlight Drive') in the review but did comment on the local dimming improvements compared to other edge-lit TVs. In the end, that new technology is great for edge-lit TVs but still not as good as full array backlight.
2
I was wondering, if you don't go with a TV that support both HDR format, will you be narrowing your choices on what you stream or buy down the road. My preference is the X930D 55 INCH. The LG UH9500 support both HDR10 and Dolby Vision, but I just don't think the picture is as good as the sony.

You will find HDR10 on all UHD Blu-rays and on most of the streaming service for the moment. If you go with a TV set that do only HDR10, you should not have any problem finding any content with this HDR format for now and in the future. As for the Dolby Vision offering, it is very limited for now compare to HDR10.

For your choice of TV between the Sony X930D and the LG UH9500, you are right, the Sony will give you a much better image quality, since it use a VA panel. It will give you much more better black and contrast ratio. The only draw back is that it will lose some color saturation if not seen directly in front on the set vs the LG IPS panel.

2
Can I stretch the screen to get rid of the black bars on the top and bottom of some movies on this set.
The button labeled 'Wide' on the remote will allow you to zoom in the picture and remove most of the black bars in movies playing from HDMI sources. Unfortunately, this function doesn't always work for apps, like it is the case for Netflix.
2
Ok here is the dilemma; I'm looking at the new Vizio P Series, the Samsung KS8000 series and this Sony X930D. Help! What do I do on my TV? EVERYTHING! I watch sports (mostly tennis and football [US football]), I play games (Xbox One and PS4, I will probably get the 4K versions of the consoles when they release), I stream every source possible, right now from a Roku but I wouldn't mind being able to do it through apps, and soon I will watch 4K HDR movies. The only thing I do on rare occasion is use my computer on my TV (I have some very nice Acer Predator monitors so this part isn't important). With that said, why am I leaning towards the Sony? If I buy a Sony TV I can get 200 off of their $800 dollar sound bar, this is important to me as I have gone from surround to a sound bar in other rooms of my house. This will be a living room TV and I will be getting the 65" model of whichever one I buy. The ambient light when I do most of my TV watching will probably be super minimal (when it is light out I am generally at work). Any help is much appreciated. Thank you for the great site and reviews!
The Sony X930D is a great choice. It doesn't get as dark as the Vizio P Series 2016 or the KS8000, but if there is some ambient light this is not an issue. It also has a slightly higher input lag for gaming, but for most people this is not noticeable. The picture quality is excellent, and the smart interface works well for streaming to replace your Roku.
1
As firmware is provided, do you retest the TV and update your findings?
If we find out that a firmware update has improved the scores in one of our tests, then we do retroactively update the relevant section of the review. We are very unlikely to do a complete retest of the whole TV unless there are multiple significant changes.
1
This TV has been plagued with bents on the sides and in the center bezel. Was your TV straight? Any bending you noticed?
Our set does curve very slightly, along the top right of the set. This is very difficult to notice however, and you have to be looking along the edge of the TV.
1
The XBR55X930D released an update on October 25, 2016. Can you retest the input lag of the television with the update to determine whether it has improved? The input lag is the only thing holding me back from purchasing.
We have now updated the input lag above with the newest update. It has improved, but is still a bit high even for casual gaming at a 4k resolution.
1
Hello! Thanks for your time and dedication to this review. I was wondering if the 940D was still being considered to be reviewed, or is it too old and you're moving on to the 2017 sets going forward? Thank you.

We are moving to the 2017 line-up and as soon as the new set are available in store, we will start the review process on those new TVs.

But if you are still interested in the Sony X940D, we expect it to be slightly better than the X930D. The full array backlight of the X940D should give you better local dimming, better dark scene performance, less blooming and also a slightly better HDR.

1
Just wanted to share my experience with the XBR-65X930D - it has been horrible. This is now my 4th Sony TV - and being a big fan of their products I did not hesitate purchasing this TV but now I have regrets.

I am having a lot of issues with the HDMI Inputs. The first problem that I started noticing was with my Comcast X1 cable box. What was happening is that if I turned off the TV and came back the next day to watch cable the TV would display the message that there was no signal. The only thing that would make it work was to unplug the cable box and plug it back in. I thought the issue was the cable box so it was changed 3 times. I switched out cables, switched out HDMI inputs, even removed the TV from a power strip (as suggested by Sony Support) and I am still experiencing this issue.

I also noticed an issue with my Apple TV. Same type of scenario - where I would come back to watch the device on my TV (Apple TV gen 4) and the best way to describe without posting pictures is that areas of the screen/menu that should have been grey showed up black. You could not properly navigate through the menus of the Apple TV to make it work. I tried doing the same thing, switching out Apple TV and cables inputs etc. and still had the same issue.

It's almost like the tv is not understanding what's coming through the HDMI. All these devices work perfectly well on other Sony TVs in my home. Support has not been really helpful. At this point I just want my money back - I don't want them to fix a tv I just paid $2,000 for.
We're sorry to hear about your bad experience. We haven't noticed any behavior like that with our 55X930D. You may have a defective unit. Getting a replacement may fix the problem. Another thing you could try is to restore the TV to factory settings, rollback the firmware or update the firmware.
1
Hi. I have a Sony XBR65X900C and I love the low input lag and passive 3D. I don't use game mode at all and play PS4 Pro games in 4k and HDR and there is absolutely no lag I can feel. I do have some issues with light bleed and dirty screen effect. Also the HDR is not that great. Sony has offered to upgrade me to the X930D, but I'm so worried about the plethora of reported issues. What do you recommend I do?
The 65" X930D often has issues with crosstalk in its active 3D. If 3D is important to you then the upgrade isn't worth it. The 55" does not have the same 3D issues but it is significantly smaller and it's still active 3D and not passive, so it may not be a good option either. See if Sony can offer you any other form of compensation like a refund. Also check if you're under warranty from another source such as the retailer you bought it from or your credit card.

You may be able to correct some of the black uniformity issues, see the "How to get the best results" section of this article. These don't work for gray uniformity though. The X900C is worse than many TVs for uniformity issues. If you decide to get a new TV many LG TVs have good passive 3D.

0
Great review as always! I have a little dilemma, I am planning on buying the X930D and wall mount it. I saw the huge power brick and would like to have some suggestions on how to hide it.
There is no good way. You could hide it behind the upper third of the TV (where it is thinner), and add an extension cord.
0
I'm trying to decide between a 55 inch x930d and a 65 inch ks8000 cause there roughly the same price. My viewing distance is about 9 and a half feet and the lighting in the room is always changing never overly bright in there but I do sometimes watch in the pitch black at night
For the extra 10", get the KS8000. That alone will improve your viewing experience much more than any difference between these two TVs, since they are not far from each other.
0
I tried the LG OLED B6 55". I actually thought the picture with regular cable/satellite programs wasn't that great. Very DULL picture. I returned it and got the X930D 55". Do you think reviewers are looking at 4K and HDR and still pictures when judging TVs, and not really concentrating on what people are actually watching? I much prefer the Sony over the OLED. The black levels were better on the OLED, but the Sony had better cold and upscaling.
I'm sorry to hear you didn't like the LG B6. Even among the best TVs there are differences that can cause people to prefer one over another. Sony TVs are known for having better upscaling than most other brands. The X930D is also a very bright TV, and is much brighter than the B6 when showing bright scenes. This is especially helpful in a bright room with lots of glare. These factors may have made you prefer the X930D over the B6.

About our testing, we try to measure how the TV will perform in as many use cases as possible. We do this by making each test measure one specific aspect of the TV independently of the rest. So some tests are only important to HDR content, or to lower resolution content, or to bright rooms, or to video games. This way no matter what you use the TV for, we can show you what's important for you.
We are not taking any more questions for this product because we no longer have it in our lab.