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The 8 Loudest Bluetooth Speakers - Fall 2022 Reviews

Updated
Loudest Bluetooth Speakers

If you want your audio to fill a large crowded room at a party, or you want to listen to music outdoors, you're going to want a speaker that can get pretty loud, with little compression present at maximum volume. High compression levels at max volume degrade audio quality and affect how clean and clear audio is reproduced as you bump up the speaker's volume. Most speakers that can get quite loud tend to be larger and bulkier in size and aren't very portable. However, the best large Bluetooth speakers' sizes also help them produce more extended low-bass than their smaller counterparts.

We've tested over 95 speakers, and below you'll find our recommendations for the best loud Bluetooth speakers that we've tested. See our recommendations for the best speakers for parties, the best Bluetooth speakers, and the best Bluetooth speakers for bass.


  1. Loudest Bluetooth Speaker

    The SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3) is the loudest Bluetooth speaker we've tested. While the manufacturer advertises it to reach a maximum volume level of 126dB, it reached 110.0dB in our tests, which is still outstanding and lets the speaker fill large crowded parties with ease. It has a V-shaped default sound profile, meaning you can hear the deep thump and rumble in bass-heavy music like hip-hop, along with a bright and sparkling treble. Its SOUNDBOKS companion app also features a graphic EQ and presets you can use to customize its sound to your liking, and there are XLR ports you can use to connect it to an external microphone, guitar, or other instruments. However, there's a lot of compression at max volume in the low-bass and higher treble ranges, meaning you can hear some pumping artifacts in the bass and treble when the volume is maxed out, which degrades the quality of your audio.

    If you're looking for a speaker that still gets incredibly loud with less compression present at max volume, check out the JBL PartyBox 710. While it doesn't get as loud as the SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3), the JBL offers cleaner-sounding audio at louder volume levels, a wider and more immersive sounding soundstage, and can produce a slightly more extended low-bass at a more affordable price point. It also has a more balanced sound profile overall, making it better suited for listening to a wide variety of audio content. If you don't mind sacrificing a few decibels for better overall sound quality, the PartyBox 710 is the better choice and is among the best large Bluetooth speakers we've tested. That said, it lacks sound customization features like a graphic EQ and presets, and it isn't as portable due to its bulky and wired design.

    See our review

  2. Loudest Upper Mid-Range Bluetooth Speaker

    If you like the SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3) but aren't ready to splurge on it, check out the SOUNDBOKS Go. This portable Bluetooth speaker is designed to look like a smaller, more portable version than the SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3). While it doesn't get as loud as the (Gen. 3), the Go still gets incredibly loud, reaching a maximum volume level of up to 106.6dB. It has less compression present at max volume, so your audio quality sounds cleaner and clearer when you blast the speaker. It's also a bit less than half the size of the (Gen. 3) and comes with a removable carrying strap, so you can bring the party wherever you go with a lot more ease.

    With its default POWER EQ preset enabled, it has a V-shaped sound profile overall with a boomy bass and bright treble. There's a graphic EQ and presets in its companion app you can use to tweak its sound to your liking. However, it doesn't produce as much bass as larger party speakers, so you don't feel the deep thump and rumble in bass-heavy music like hip-hop or EDM. It also doesn't come with any inputs you can use to wire a microphone or external instruments to the speaker. That said, there's an AUX input you can use to wire your devices to it.

    See our review

  3. Loudest Mid-Range Bluetooth Speaker

    If the speakers above are way out of your budget, check out the JBL PartyBox 310. While you may have to sacrifice a few decibels and slightly more rumble in low-bass compared to the SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3) and the SOUNDBOKS Go, the JBL offers you more bang for your buck in terms of sound quality and portability. It can reach a maximum volume level of up to 104.4dB while operating on battery power and can reach a maximum volume of 106.6dB while connected to a power outlet, meaning its sound can easily fill large and crowded spaces for parties. It has less compression than the SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3), so audio quality doesn't degrade as much when you bump up the volume. It also sounds cleaner when the volume is maxed out. With its Bass Boost feature set to 'Deep', it has a boomy sound profile, so you can feel the thump and punch in your music. You can customize its sound profile to your liking, thanks to the graphic EQ featured in its JBL PartyBox app.

    This great all-around party speaker is smaller and more portable than the (Gen. 3) and the Go. There's a built-in telescopic handle and wheels to help transport it easily. Unlike the Go, it's also battery-powered, so you can take the party with you wherever your heart desires without needing to depend on a power outlet for it to work. There's even a 12V DC In port so you can charge it via your car's lighter port.

    See our review

  4. Loudest Lower Mid-Range Bluetooth Speaker

    The JBL PartyBox 100 is the loudest lower mid-range Bluetooth speaker we've tested. While this portable party speaker is smaller than the JBL PartyBox 310, it still gets just as loud, reaching a maximum volume level of 104.7dB when operating on battery power, and gets a touch louder while connected to a power source. With its Bass Boost feature set to its first level, it has a fairly neutral sound profile suitable for listening to a wide variety of music genres. There's a bit of warmth in the bass range that adds extra boom and punch to the mix. However, it doesn't produce a very extended low-bass, so you can't feel the deep thump and rumble typically present in bass-heavy music like you can with larger party speakers like the JBL PartyBox 310 and the SOUNDBOKS (Gen. 3).

    Unfortunately, it isn't compatible with the JBL PartyBox app, so you don't have access to a graphic EQ to tweak its sound to your liking, and you also can't customize its RGB lights. If having extra control over your speaker's sound profile and RGB lights is important, consider the similar, next-generation JBL PartyBox 110. While this speaker is pricier than the PartyBox 100, it's still more affordable than the PartyBox 310. It can produce a somewhat more extended low-bass than the PartyBox 100 and is compatible with the JBL PartyBox app, so you can tweak its sound to your liking using the featured graphic EQ. That said, the PartyBox 110 gets a touch less loud than the PartyBox 100, with slightly more compression at max volume.

    See our review

  5. Loudest Budget Bluetooth Speaker

    On a budget? Check out the ION Pathfinder 280. While it's smaller than the other party speakers on this list, this mighty speaker can still reach a maximum volume level of up to 100.5dB with little compression present at max volume, so your audio sounds mostly clean and pure when you crank up the volume. It's battery-powered, meaning it doesn't need to remain wired to an outlet to work, and it comes with a telescopic handle and wheels to help you wheel it around to your next gathering. Also, while it takes a while to charge the speaker fully, its battery can last up to 68 hours from a single charge, making it great for multiple long listening sessions.

    Vocals and lead instruments sound present in the mix, though there's some unevenness in the sound profile that causes them to sound alternately honky and dull at times. It doesn't produce a bass as deep as the JBL PartyBox 100, and you don't feel the deep thump and rumble in low-bass typically present in bass-heavy music like EDM or hip-hop. There's a graphic EQ and preset to adjust its sound to your liking, though it isn't enough to feel the deep rumble in low-bass. It's also rated IPX5 for water resistance, which certifies it to withstand direct contact with water for up to three minutes, meaning it can handle a bit of light rain at outdoor parties.

    See our review

  6. Loudest Cheap Bluetooth Speaker

    Looking for something cheaper? While the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom is smaller and more portable than most speakers on this list, it still gets mighty loud for its size, reaching a maximum volume level of 93.1dB, making it great to use outdoors or at smaller parties and gatherings. If you're looking for a speaker that can fill larger crowded outdoor parties with sound, it's worth looking into the larger, pricier picks on this list. That said, if you're looking for the loudest speaker that won't break the bank, it's a good choice. With BassUp enabled, it has a balanced mid-range that ensures vocals and lead instruments reproduce accurately and with detail in the mix. Its companion app also features a graphic EQ, meaning you can tweak its sound to your liking. That said, higher-pitched voices and instruments sound a bit dull at times, and it lacks the deep thump and rumble low-bass that's typically felt in bass-heavy music.

    Its long-lasting battery life of almost 40 hours means it doesn't frequently die on you in the middle of your jam. It even has an IPX7 rating for water resistance, so you don't need to worry about getting it wet at your next small pool party. If you're looking for an even cheaper option, check out the DOSS SoundBox Plus. You can blast your favorite songs without much compression at max volume, so your audio remains clean and clear-sounding when you max out the volume. However, it doesn't get quite as loud as the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom, and it doesn't produce a bass nearly as deep. It also isn't as well-built.

    See our review

  7. Best Portable Loud Bluetooth Speaker

    The loudest portable speaker we've tested is the Ultimate Ears HYPERBOOM. This portable speaker doesn't need to remain plugged into a power outlet since it's battery-powered and has a built-in carrying strap to help transport it. You can take it outside with you without worrying about it getting a few small splashes, thanks to its IPX4 rating for water resistance. It reaches a maximum volume level of 98.3dB, meaning it can easily fill a large crowded room with sound. It also has little compression present at max volume, so your audio remains clean and clear-sounding when the volume is maxed out. There's a room correction feature that adapts its sound to the environment it's in, whether it's your bedroom, patio, or rooftop. With it turned on, its sound profile is neutral and balanced, making it suitable for listening to lots of different types of audio content.

    Like most speakers its size, it struggles to reproduce the deep rumble in low-bass that's typically felt in bass-heavy music like EDM and hip-hop. Also, while it's portable, it's still quite large and bulky and isn't as travel-friendly as a smaller, more portable speaker like the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom. However, the Soundcore has significantly more compression present at max volume, so its audio quality degrades more at louder volumes. Its soundstage is also perceived as much more narrow.

    See our review

  8. Best Loud Home Bluetooth Speaker

    The best loud home speaker we've tested is the Denon Home 350. This home speaker can reach a maximum volume level of up to 97.0dB and easily fill a large room with sound. That said, there's some compression at max volume, mainly in the bass range, so you can hear some pumping artifacts in the bass when the volume is maxed out. It comes with Alexa built-in, which you can activate with your voice. It has no trouble registering your commands in noisy rooms and from far away, and you can even link the speaker to compatible Denon soundbars to create a home setup. Its default sound profile is boomy and can produce quite an extended thumpy and rumbling low-bass, which is great if you're a fan of bass-heavy music like EDM or hip-hop. Its balanced mid-range ensures lead instruments and voices sound clear and present in the mix, which is great for podcast and audiobook-lovers. You can tweak its sound to your liking, thanks to the bass and treble adjustments featured in its companion app.

    If you're looking for a speaker to use at home that gets even louder and don't care for voice assistants, you might want to look at the Klipsch The Three II, which can reach a maximum volume level of 105.0dB. However, its sound profile isn't as balanced as the Denon, and it can't reproduce the deep thump and rumble typically present in low-bass.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Bose S1 Pro System: The Bose S1 Pro System is a portable Bluetooth speaker that can get pretty loud with little compression at max volume, so your audio sounds clean during loud listening sessions. It doesn't get as loud as the JBL PartyBox 310. See our review
  • Sony SRS-XG500: The Sony SRS-XG500 is a portable speaker with party-related features like customizable RGB lights and a mic/guitar input. However, it doesn't get as loud as the Ultimate Ears HYPERBOOM and has some compression present at max volume, so your audio doesn't sound as clean and clear at louder volumes. See our review
  • JBL Boombox 2: The JBL Boombox 2 is a portable Bluetooth speaker similar to the Sony XG500. While it can get pretty loud, it doesn't get as loud as the Ultimate Ears HYPERBOOM. It also doesn't have a graphic EQ you can use to customize its sound to your liking. See our review
  • Yamaha MusicCast 50: The Yamaha MusicCast 50 is a wired home speaker that can get pretty loud, with little compression present at max volume. Unfortunately, it doesn't get as loud as the Denon Home 350 and can't produce as extended of a low-bass. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Sep 22, 2022: Minor updates to text for clarity and consistency. No changes made to product picks.

  2. Aug 05, 2022: Recategorized picks to better reflect a price-based approach. Added the SOUNDBOKS Go as the 'Loudest Upper Mid-Range Bluetooth Speaker', the JBL PartyBox 100 as the 'Loudest Lower Mid-Range Bluetooth Speaker', and the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom as the 'Loudest Cheap Bluetooth Speaker'.

  3. Jun 03, 2022: Restructured article to better reflect user needs. Added the ION Pathfinder 280 as the 'Loudest Budget Bluetooth Speaker', and recategorized the JBL PartyBox 310 as the 'Best Loud Speaker For Parties'.

  4. May 06, 2022: Updated text for clarity and accuracy. No changes were made to product picks.

  5. Apr 08, 2022: Updated text for clarity; no changes to product picks.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best loud Bluetooth speakers most people can buy, according to their needs. We factor in the price (cheaper speakers win over pricier ones if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no speakers that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to see more products, here's the list of all our reviews of Bluetooth speakers sorted by their max volume levels. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There are no perfect speakers. Personal taste, preference, and listening habits will matter more in your selection.

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