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Anker Soundcore Boom 2 Speaker Review

Tested using Methodology v0.8
Reviewed May 08, 2024 at 09:37 am
Latest change: Retest May 09, 2024 at 04:35 pm
Anker Soundcore Boom 2 Picture
6.9
Music
6.0
Videos/Movies
7.3
Podcasts
2.6
Voice Assistant
7.6
Outdoors

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 is the latest portable speaker offering from Anker. Like the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom Plus, it comes in a neat and portable boombox-style package that you can easily bring around with you. It's IPX7 rated, so it can be fully submerged, and the manufacturer even advertises that it can float on water. Plus it features a long enough battery life to get you through multiple listening sessions without a recharge.

Our Verdict

6.9 Music

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 is okay for music. Like most smaller speakers, it struggles to produce low-bass frequencies, even with BassUp enabled. It also has a somewhat veiled treble response that can make sibilants, like cymbals, dull and lacking brilliance. It has a balanced mid-range response, so lead instruments and vocals sound clear and detailed. While it can get loud enough to fill an average-sized room with sound, there's some compression at max volume. Directivity isn't the best, so audio won't sound consistent from all angles around the speaker.

Pros
  • EQ and presets via the companion app.
  • Can connect up to two devices simultaneously.
Cons
  • Disappointing directivity.
  • Some compression present at max volume.
6.0 Videos/Movies

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 is mediocre for movies and videos. Like many smaller speakers, it lacks bass, so the blaring horns of Hans Zimmer's soundtracks will lack some oomph. However, its balanced mid-range will bring detail and clarity to vocals and dialogue. While loud enough to fill a living room with sound, you'll notice some compression at max volume. You'll want to be careful about positioning yourself around the speaker, though, as its disappointing directivity means audio won't sound consistent from every angle. On the upside, audiovisual synchronization error falls within good limits for both iOS and Android devices, so you're unlikely to experience any lip-synch issues. However, apps and devices compensate for this differently.

Pros
  • Lightweight, portable design with carrying handle.
  • EQ and presets via the companion app.
Cons
  • Disappointing directivity.
  • Some compression present at max volume.
7.3 Podcasts

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 is decent for podcasts. It's balanced mid-range is great for rendering speech and vocal content in a clear, detailed manner. It can also get reasonably loud, and while there's compression at max volume, it's mostly limited to bass frequencies that don't feature too much in podcast content. It's portable enough to bring around from room to room, too, but you'll want to be careful to position yourself in front of the speaker, as its directivity is disappointing.

Pros
  • Lightweight, portable design with carrying handle.
  • EQ and presets via the companion app.
Cons
  • Disappointing directivity.
  • Some compression present at max volume.
2.6 Voice Assistant

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 lacks voice assistant capabilities, so it's unsuitable for this use.

7.6 Outdoors

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 is good for outdoor use. Its lightweight design and built-in carrying handle make it a breeze to carry around for day trips or outdoor occasions, and its 16 hours of continuous battery life means it can make it through a weekend without needing a recharge. While it isn't loud enough to soundtrack a large outdoor bash, it can liven up a backyard BBQ, though there will be some compression as you approach max volume. Not everyone will experience the same audio delivery, though, as its disappointing directivity means that audio isn't consistent from every angle.

Pros
  • Lightweight, portable design with carrying handle.
  • 16 hours of continuous battery life.
  • Can connect up to two devices simultaneously.
Cons
  • Disappointing directivity.
  • Some compression present at max volume.
  • 6.9 Music
  • 6.0 Videos/Movies
  • 7.3 Podcasts
  • 2.6 Voice Assistant
  • 7.6 Outdoors
  1. Updated May 09, 2024: We've added a graph showcasing how the different EQ presets affect this speaker's sound profile in Frequency Response Accuracy.
  2. Updated May 08, 2024: We've updated this review to clarify that this speaker is both IPX7 rated and can float on water. Previously, the text implied these were the same thing.
  3. Updated May 08, 2024: Review published.
  4. Updated May 01, 2024: Early access published.
  5. Updated Apr 24, 2024: Our testers have started testing this product.
  6. Updated Apr 09, 2024: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  7. Updated Apr 08, 2024: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 comes in three color variants: 'Phantom Black,' 'Explorer Blue,' and 'Adventure Green.' We tested the 'Explorer Blue' version and expect all variants to perform similarly. You can see our unit's label here. If you encounter a different variant of this speaker, please let us know in the forums, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Speakers

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 is Anker's latest portable speaker offering, following on from the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom Plus. It has a similar boombox-style design to its predecessor, though it's a touch lighter. The two also have extremely similar sound profiles, with a lackluster bass response and a veiled treble range. The Motion Boom Plus can get louder and has rudimentary voice assistant capabilities, meaning it's a more versatile choice. Both speakers are also hampered by their disappointing directivity, so you might want to consider a portable speaker with a cylindrical design like the Ultimate Ears WONDERBOOM 3 if you care about getting consistent audio delivery from every angle.

You can also check out our recommendations for the best Bluetooth speakers, the best-sounding Bluetooth speakers, and the best Bluetooth speakers for bass.

Anker Soundcore Motion Boom Plus

The Anker Soundcore Motion Boom Plus and the Anker Soundcore Boom 2 are very similar speakers, but the older iteration has the edge in a few areas. They're both well-built portable speakers with built-in carrying handles, but the Motion Boom Plus has an IP67 certification against dust damage and is submersible in water. The two have very similar sound profiles that lack bass and treble output, but their balanced mid-ranges mean vocals and speech are reproduced cleanly. They both have disappointing directivity, too, so you must be careful about positioning yourself in front of the speaker. While the Boom 2 is lighter, it can't get as loud, and there's more compression present at max volume.

Anker Soundcore 3

The Anker Soundcore 3 and the Anker Soundcore Boom 2 are both budget portable speakers. While the Soundcore 3 is lighter, the Boom 2 features a built-in carrying handle, which can make it easier to carry around. The Soundcore 3 is cheaper, but the Boom 2 justifies its higher retail price with a better overall performance. It's better built, has a more balanced sound overall, and it can get louder with less compression at max volume. It also lets you pair with another Anker speaker for true wireless stereo via the app. The Soundcore 3 has a slightly longer continuous battery life, so it's a good choice for weekend trips.

Ultimate Ears WONDERBOOM 3

The Ultimate Ears WONDERBOOM 3 is a better portable speaker for most uses than the Anker Soundcore Boom 2. It's better built, lighter, and more portable than the Anker, although it lacks a built-in carrying handle. There's less bass on tap with the Ultimate Ears, but it has a more detailed treble reproduction, and its directivity is much better, thanks to its cylindrical design. While it can't get quite as loud as the Anker, there's significantly less compression at max volume, and it has a much longer battery life. That said, the Anker has better physical controls, and you can adjust the sound via a graphic EQ and presets in the companion app.

EarFun UBOOM L

The EarFun UBOOM L and the Anker Soundcore Boom 2 are both budget portable speakers. While the UBOOM has a lower retail price, the Anker offers a better price-to-performance ratio. They both have front-facing designs that limit their directivity, and they get equally loud, with similar degrees of compression at max volume. They're also similarly portable and well-built, though the Anker has a carrying handle to help you bring it around in one hand. The Anker has a more balanced sound profile and a much longer battery life, though, plus you can connect up to two devices simultaneously.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
RGB Lights Yes

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 utilizes the same boombox-style design as the other Motion Boom series speakers. This iteration is a little more rectangular than the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom Plus, but it retains the same carry handle, RGB lights, and backlit buttons. A metal grille with the Anker logo protects the front-facing drivers, and the sides are protected by rubber paneling that also houses the RGB lights. It comes in three color variants: 'Phantom Black,' 'Explorer Blue,' and 'Adventure Green.'

8.9
Design
Portability
Volume
331 inยณ (5,417 cmยณ)
Weight
3.5 lbs (1.6 kg)
Power Source
Battery & USB
One-Hand Carry
Yes

This speaker is lightweight and very portable. Its built-in carry handle makes it very easy to carry around in one hand. It's also battery-powered, so you don't have to worry about plugging it into an outlet.

7.8
Design
Build Quality
Material Quality
Good
Water Resistance
Submersible (IPx7)
Dust Resistance
Yes (IP rating unspecified)
Impact Resistance
Unspecified
Floats In Water
Yes

This speaker has a very good build quality. While it's almost entirely constructed from cheap-looking plastic, it's surprisingly sturdy and complemented by the tough metal grilles at the front. The physical buttons are tactile and clicky, and the RGB lights are bright and colorful. It's rated IPX7, so it can be fully submersed in water, and while there's no IP rating for protection against dust, Anker's marketing highlights the speaker's ability to be used in environments like the beach.

8.0
Design
Controls
Ease Of Use
Great
Feedback
Great
Music Play/Pause
Yes (Physical)
Call Answer/End
Yes (Physical)
Volume Up/Down
Yes (Physical)
Track Next/Previous
Yes (Physical)
Microphone On/Off
No
Additional Controls
Yes

The controls are simple yet well formatted. The buttons are easy to locate and press, even in the dark, as they're all backlit. There's audio feedback when a device is pairing and paired, when the BassUp feature is toggled, and when the PartyCast mode is toggled. However, no audio feedback indicates when the volume has been adjusted, or playback has been paused.

  • Power button: Press to power the device on/off.
  • BassUp button: Activates the BassUp preset to bring more punch to the mix.
  • Bluetooth button: Press once to enter pairing mode. Press and hold to enter TWS mode.
  • Play/pause button: Press to play/pause, press twice to skip forward, or three times to skip backward. Hold for two seconds to activate the paired device's voice assistant.
  • PartyCast button: Lets you pair the device to another compatible speaker for multi-speaker party mode.

Design
In The Box

  • Anker Soundcore Motion Boom 2
  • USB-C to USB-C charging cable (1.9ft / 60cm)
  • Quick start guide

Sound
6.9
Sound
Frequency Response Accuracy
Slope
-0.29
Std. Err.
3.65 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
54.2 Hz
High-Frequency Extension
18.2 kHz

With the BassUp feature on and the EQ set to the default 'Soundcore Signature' preset, this speaker has a sound profile that's remarkably similar to its predecessor, the Anker Soundcore Motion Boom Plus. As expected from a small speaker, it doesn't reproduce too much low bass, even with BassUp enabled. Fans of genres like EDM and hip-hop will be left wanting as basslines and kicks lack boom and substance. However, the mid-range is balanced and can reproduce vocals and lead instruments in some detail. A dip in the high-mid response carries over into the treble range, though, which can render sibilants, like cymbals, a little dull and lacking in bite. That said, there's a graphic EQ and presets accessible via the companion app that you can use to tweak the sound to your liking. You can see how these presets affect the sound profile here.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
Binaural Recording @ 1m
Binaural Recording @ 2m
6.8
Sound
Soundstage
Directivity Index
6.03 dB
Stereo
Yes

This speaker's soundstage performance is okay. Due to its front-facing design, directivity is disappointing, and audio won't sound the same across different angles. It can playback stereo content without downmixing to mono, allowing for a clear separation between the left and right channels.

6.7
Sound
Dynamics
SPL @ Max Volume
90.9 dB SPL
DRC @ Max Volume
3.30 dB

The dynamics performance is passable. This speaker can't get as loud as its predecessor, but it's still loud enough to fill an average-sized room with sound. There's quite a bit of compression at max volume, though, so you'll hear some pumping artifacts that detract from the clarity of your audio.

Active Features
8.2
Active Features
Battery
Battery Life
16.0 hrs
Charge Time
4.8 hrs
Power Saving
Yes
Charging Port
USB-C
Battery Powered
Yes

The Anker Soundcore Boom 2 has an impressive battery life. The manufacturer advertises up to 24 hours of battery life online and 18 hours in the owner's manual, but we achieved 16 hours of continuous battery life in testing. This is likely due to a difference in testing conditions, as using functions like BassUp or playing music at a high volume will result in a shorter battery life. There's even a handy auto on/off power-saving function that'll turn the speaker off after 20 minutes of inactivity.

0
Active Features
Voice Assistant
Alexa
No
Google Assistant
No
Speakerphone
No
Siri
No
Voice Assistant
No
Voice Activation
No
Microphone Mute
No
Far-Field Performance
No Assistant
Ambient Noise Performance
No Assistant
7.9
Active Features
App
App Name
Soundcore
iOS
Yes
Android
Yes
EQ
Graphic + Presets
Stereo Pair Mode
Yes
Party Mode
Yes
Multi-Room
No

The Soundcore app gives you access to a host of different parameters you can tweak. You can choose from four different EQ settings (Soundcore Signature, Voice, Treble Boost, and Balanced) and make custom EQ presets. You can adjust the PartyCast settings to pair up to 100 speakers, adjust the button brightness, and update the speaker firmware. You can see a video of the app in action here.

Connectivity
Connectivity
Wired
Aux Input
No
USB Audio
No
Other Ports
Yes

This speaker doesn't have an AUX input or an input for USB audio. There are USB-A and USB-C ports, though, with the former used to charge other USB devices and the latter used to charge the speaker.

8.3
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Yes
Bluetooth Version
5.3
Bluetooth iOS Latency
111 ms
Bluetooth Android Latency
159 ms
Bluetooth Range
334.6 ft (102.0 m)
Multi-Device Pairing
2 Devices

The Bluetooth performance is excellent. This speaker supports multi-device pairing, so you can pair up to two devices simultaneously. Audiovisual synchronization error is reasonably low with Android devices and lower with iOS devices, so you won't notice much in the way of lip-synch issues. Some apps and devices compensate for this differently, so your experience will vary.

0
Connectivity
Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi Version
No Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi Frequency Band
No Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
No
Apple AirPlay
No
AirPlay Latency
N/A
Google Chromecast
No
Chromecast Latency
N/A