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The 7 Best Wireless Bluetooth Headphones - Summer 2019
Reviews

Best Wireless Headphones
371 Headphones Tested
  • Store-bought headphones; no cherry-picked units
  • Retest after major updates
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

Tired of tangled cords while listening to music? Some wireless headphones connect to your devices via Bluetooth to provide a cable-free listening experience. They’re not usually the best choice for gaming or watching TV since they tend to have high latency, but having the freedom of being untethered to your audio source is great when listening to music at the office, in the bus, or on the treadmill.

So far, we've reviewed 347 headphones and below are our recommendations for the best Bluetooth headphones to buy in 2019. See also our recommendations for the best wireless earbuds, the best on-ear wireless headphones, and the best true wireless earbuds.

  1. Best Wireless Headphones: Bose QuietComfort 35 II/QC35 II Wireless 2018

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    7.4
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.9
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.7
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.1
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    7.8
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    6.0
    TV
    Score components:
    5.6
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    The best Bluetooth headphones we’ve tested so far are the Bose QuietComfort 35 II. They’re lightweight noise cancelling headphones that are outstandingly comfortable and easy-to-use. They’re versatile, well-rounded headphones that are a good choice for commuters, office workers, or anyone on the hunt for great-sounding wireless headphones.

    These headphones have one of the best active noise cancelling systems we’ve tested. They do a great job at blocking out a variety of noises, from the deep rumbles of bus and plane engines to office chatter. They have a well-balanced sound, suitable for a not only a wide range of music genres, but for podcasts and audiobooks too. They provide 20 hours of continuous playback on a single charge, support NFC for easier device pairing, and can connect to 2 devices simultaneously.

    Unfortunately, they leak a bit of sound at higher volumes and their companion app doesn’t offer many customization options. If isolation is important to you and you also like to be able to customize your headphones from your smartphone, then the Sony WH-1000XM3 are worth considering. They’re not as comfortable as the Bose, though, and they have a more bass-heavy sound that not everyone will prefer. Overall, the more neutral sound profile and higher comfort level of the Bose QuietComfort 35 II make them a slightly better choice.

    See our review

  2. More Portable, Customizable Alternative: Jaybird Tarah Pro Wireless

    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you want wireless headphones that are more portable but still sound decent, get the Jaybird Tarah Pro. They’re not as comfortable as the Bose QuietComfort 35 II, but they have an earbud-like fit that’s still reasonably comfortable for in-ear headphones. They’re well-built, have great audio reproduction, and are highly customizable thanks to their compatibility with the Jaybird MySound app, which features a great parametric EQ. They have a good 13-hour battery life and have magnetic earbuds that trigger an auto-off timer when they’re snapped together.

    These headphones use a proprietary charging cradle that can be a bit inconvenient at times, especially if you forget it somewhere. They are also not noise cancelling earbuds. Though their passive isolation performance is decent, the noise cancelling Bose QuietControl 30 have superior noise isolation. Their neckband design is less portable, though, and they don’t have any customization options. Overall, the Tarah Pro are versatile wireless earbuds that deliver a satisfactory listening experience, not only for athletes but for more casual users as well.

    See our review

  3. Versatile Gaming Alternative: SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re a gamer but don’t want to have to buy a second pair of Bluetooth headphones for casual use, get the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless. They aren't noise cancelling like the Bose QuietComfort 35 II, but they’re still among the most versatile headphones we’ve reviewed so far. They have a low-latency wireless transmitter for gaming that doubles as a battery charging station, and they also support Bluetooth. They sound impressive and their retractable microphone is great.

    Unfortunately, these headphones don’t have adjustable microphone control like the wireless Astro A50 or the wired Arctis Pro GameDAC. These headsets don’t support Bluetooth, though, and are less versatile overall. The Arctis Pro Wireless may be a bit bulky, but they’re very good headphones overall and are particularly great for gaming, watching TV or movies, and even critical listening.

    See our review

  4. Best Mid-Range Wireless Headphones: Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 Wireless 2016

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    7.3
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.7
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.4
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.1
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    7.5
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    6.2
    TV
    Score components:
    5.9
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re looking for versatile noise cancelling over-ear headphones but find the more premium options too expensive, the best Bluetooth headphones in the mid-range category are the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2. They’re well-made, comfortable over-ear headphones with an ergonomic design that’s easy-to-use. They provide fantastic value for their price and are good headphones to use in the office thanks to their decent isolation and low leakage.

    These headphones have an exciting sound that will please bass fans. Their battery lasts an outstanding 30 hours and benefits from numerous power-saving features, like smart pause and an auto-off timer. They can be used while charging as well as completely passively without ANC when the battery is drained. These headphones can connect to 2 devices at a time, support NFC for easier Bluetooth pairing, and can even be used to watch movies or game with if you have an aptX-LL Bluetooth dongle.

    Unfortunately, they have a pretty bulky design, especially compared to the sleeker Plantronics Backbeat Go 810. Also, since they have no EQ, you cannot really adjust their bass if it's too much for you. The Go 810 have a more neutral sound profile, which some may prefer, but are less comfortable and don’t feel as well-built. If you're looking for well-rounded, versatile wireless over-ears, then you can't do much better than the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2, especially at this price.

    See our review

  5. Truly Wireless Alternative: Jabra Elite Active 65t Truly Wireless

    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Truly Wireless
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you prefer the compact format of truly wireless headphones, consider the Jabra Elite Active 65t. Their battery doesn’t last as long as that of the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2, but they have a much more portable design. Even though they don’t have ANC like the Plantronics, they block even more noise passively and hardly leak at all, which makes them a good choice for commuters. They sound decent and are even customizable via the Jabra Sound+ app.

    On the downside, the Jabra Elite Active 65t aren’t the most comfortable in-ears we’ve tested. They have a bulky earbud design that can cause some discomfort over time, especially for those with smaller ears. Consider the Samsung Galaxy Buds for a more comfortable truly wireless alternative with longer battery life, but they are a bit harder to use due to their touch-sensitive controls that can only be customized on Android.

    See our review

  6. Best Budget Wireless Headphones: Anker SoundBuds Curve Wireless

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    6.8
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    6.9
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.0
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.9
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    6.9
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    5.5
    TV
    Score components:
    5.3
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you like deep thumping bass and saving money, get the Anker SoundBuds Curve; they're the best Bluetooth headphones in the budget category. These well-designed wireless in-ears have a great performance-to-price ratio and are among our best cheap earbuds. They’re more comfortable than many other in-ear headphones we’ve tested and have a great, stable fit.

    These headphones sound decent, especially for budget in-ears. They have powerful bass that’s well-suited for bass-heavy EDM, dubstep, or hip-hop tracks. Their deep bass may feel slightly overpowering to some, but their sound is still balanced enough to be suitable for more vocal-centric music too. The SoundBuds Curve charge in an hour and a half and provide nearly 13 hours of continuous playback, which is pretty good for budget headphones.

    Like most budget headphones, the Anker SoundBuds Curve don’t have many active features. If you use a Samsung device and want more customization options, like an EQ or an auto-off timer, consider the Samsung U Flex. They’re a bit more expensive, but also provide a more premium experience with the Samsung Level app. That said, the Anker SoundBuds Curve are more comfortable, sound better out-of-the-box, and provide unbeatable value for their price.

    See our review

  7. On-Ear Alternative: Skullcandy Grind Wireless

    Type : On-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you're not a big fan of in-ears but want an affordable pair of wireless headphones, then consider the Skullcandy Grind. They’re not as portable as the Anker SoundBuds Curve, but they're surprisingly comfortable for on-ear headphones. They’re well-built, sound decent, have good battery life, and are easy-to-use.

    Though these headphones are comfortable, they don't have a very stable fit and they don’t block a lot of ambient noise. They also don’t fold up in a more compact format, so they aren’t as portable as other on-ear headphones. However, they still perform reasonably well for budget wireless headphones and are hard to beat for their price.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Sony WH-1000XM3 Wireless: Wireless headphones with outstanding noise cancellation and premium build quality. Bass-heavy sound and touch-sensitive control scheme. See our review
  • Bowers & Wilkins PX Wireless: Decently versatile wireless headphones with great noise cancelling and excellent build quality. They would be a great alternative to the QC 35 II but they do not sound quite as good. See our review
  • Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless: Good overall performance and great customizable features. Mediocre at best isolation. See our review
  • Sennheiser HD 4.50 BTNC: Versatile wireless headset with a lot of features. Not as good as the Plantronics for around the same price. See our review
  • Beats Studio 3 Wireless: A good upgrade to the Beats Studio Wireless with better overall performance. They do not perform as well as the Bose or Sony wireless over-ears for around the same price. See our review
  • Plantronics BackBeat Go 810 Wireless: Stylish over-ears with a great, neutral sound, but sub-par noise-isolation and less comfortable than BackBeat Pro 2. See our review
  • Marshall MID ANC Wireless: Versatile and good sounding on-ears with a great design, but mediocre noise isolation performance. See our review
  • Bose QuietControl 30/QC30 Wireless: Good noise cancelling earbuds for traveling. A worthwhile consideration for those who like the QC 35 II but prefer an earbud-style fit. See our review
  • Jabra Elite 65e Wireless: A good and cheaper alternative to the Bose QC 30, but don't perform as well overall. See our review
  • Samsung U Flex Wireless: Decent wireless in-ears with lots of customization options, but limited functionality for non-Samsung users. See our review
  • Astro A50 Wireless:  A well-designed and comfortable wireless gaming headset. Good for movies and videos but can't be used outdoors without their dock like the SteelSeries Arctis Pro Wireless. See our review
  • Anker SoundCore Liberty Air Truly Wireless: Truly wireless in-ears with great audio reproduction. Not customizable and less sweatproof than Jabra Elite Active 65t but a good alternative for casual use. See our review
  • Turtle Beach Stealth 700 Wireless: A good gaming headset that is Bluetooth-compatible but doesn't perform as well as similarly-priced gaming headphones. See our review

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best Bluetooth headphones to buy for most people in each price range. We factor in the price (cheaper headphones win over pricier ones if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no headphones that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to choose for yourself, here is the list of all our reviews for wireless headphones. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There are no perfect headphones. Personal taste, preference, and listening habits will matter more in your selection.

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