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The 6 Best Bass Headphones - Spring 2019
Reviews

Best Bass Headphones
363 Headphones Tested
  • Store-bought headphones; no cherry-picked units
  • Retest after major updates
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

If you like bass-heavy genres like hip-hop, dubstep, or EDM, picking headphones with great bass performance can make a big difference in your listening experience. Having the right amount of thump and punch can really get you going and make you feel pumped up. However, it’s important that the bass isn’t too much and that you don’t lose detail in the rest of the mix.

We’ve tested 327 headphones and below are our recommendations for the best bass headphones to buy in 2019 that won’t sacrifice too much detail for a bass-heavy sound. It should be noted that these picks are not the ones with the highest scores in the bass category box, but rather the ones with the most enjoyable bass performance, even if their bass is over our target curve. See our recommendations for the best headphones for music, the best earbuds for bass, and the best audiophile headphones.

  1. Best Bass Headphones: Sony WH-1000XM3 Wireless

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    7.3
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.2
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.8
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.2
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    7.7
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    5.8
    TV
    Score components:
    5.4
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    The best wireless bass headphones we’ve tested so far are the Sony WH-1000MX3. They are bass-heavy headphones that are great for daily commuting thanks to their amazing isolation. They are one of the best noise cancelling headphones on the market and they reduce a great amount of ambient noise. They have a more premium look and feel than the previous models. They also have a touch-sensitive control scheme on the right ear cup for on-the-fly controls.

    The Sony WH-1000XM3 place more emphasis on bass than earlier generations of the series. They have deep, thumpy bass, but don’t overdo it. The XM3 are also compatible with the Sony Connect app that offers a good amount of customization. You can use the graphic EQ to get more or less bass depending on what you’re listening to and find a sound profile that suits you. They have a great 27-hour battery life with a quick 2 hours of charge time and also have a 15-minute quick charge feature that gives you 5 hours of playback, which can be very useful.

    The Sony WH-1000XM3 do tend to sound a bit boomy to critical listeners, but you can use the EQ from the app to customize the sound to your liking. They’re also quite expensive, but they’re very comfortable, well-built headphones. They’re well-rounded headphones that are sure to please bass lovers with an eye for quality.

    See our review

  2. Customizable In-Ear Alternative: Jaybird Tarah Pro Wireless

    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you like being able to adjust your bass with an EQ and are looking for even finer control, get the Jaybird Tarah Pro. They don’t have active noise cancelling like the Sony WH-1000XM3 and they aren’t as comfortable, but they’re compatible with the Jaybird MySound app that has a great parametric equalizer for you to fine-tune your bass in great detail. Being in-ear headphones, the Tarah Pro are also more portable and are a more stable, breathable option for sports.

    These headphones have a good battery that lasts for over 13 hours, but it doesn’t compare to the 27-hour battery life of the Sony WH-1000XM3. They also use a proprietary charging clip that some may find a bit restrictive. If you like the fit of in-ear headphones and want the best in sound customizability, these headphones are worth considering.

    See our review

  3. Best Mid-Range Bass Headphones: Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 Wireless 2016

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    7.3
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.7
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.4
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.1
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    7.5
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    6.2
    TV
    Score components:
    5.9
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If the Sony WH-1000XM3 are too expensive but you still want great wireless bass-heavy headphones, the best bass earphones in the mid-range category are the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2. They also have an active noise cancelling feature like the XM3, although not as powerful, and have great sound quality with exciting bass. They also have physical buttons and an easy-to-use control scheme that’s a bit more efficient than that of the Sony WH-1000XM3.

    The Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 have powerful and deep bass, but it doesn’t drown the lead instruments and vocals and overpower the rest of the mix. These headphones are geared towards bass fans and are great for genres like EDM, dubstep, or hip-hop. They have a great battery life with 30 hours of playback and have plenty of power-saving features.

    Unfortunately, they aren’t the best-looking headphones and their style is bulky with hinges, making the ear cups stick out. They also don’t isolate as much noise as higher-end ANC headphones. However, they perform well for their price and are versatile, well-rounded headphones.

    See our review

  4. Alternative With A Unique Bass Feature: Skullcandy Crusher Wireless 2016

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re looking for even more powerful, headbanging bass, then the Skullcandy Crusher Wireless can be a good choice. They’re less comfortable than the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 and might not have the best sound signature, but they have a unique bass slider on the left ear cup. The slider lets you adjust the amount of bass and it can get to a pretty intense level.

    These headphones don’t have an app with an EQ to customize the sound to your liking and they don’t isolate noise well, but they have a great 36-hour battery life and a great build quality that feels solid. If you enjoy the tactile feedback of deep bass but want something with lower latency for gaming, check out the Razer Nari Ultimate. They’re significantly more expensive but have a haptic feedback system that lets you feel the bass while you’re gaming.

    See our review

  5. Best Budget Bass Headphones: Anker SoundBuds Curve Wireless

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    6.8
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    6.9
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.0
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.9
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    6.9
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    5.5
    TV
    Score components:
    5.3
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re a fan of bass-heavy music but don’t want to spend a lot of money on headphones, get the Anker SoundBuds Curve. They’re surprisingly comfortable for wireless in-ear headphones and have very good, deep bass that’s sure to please fans of electronic music.

    The Anker SoundBuds Curve sound decent for budget headphones and deliver the deep thump and rumble that bass-lovers crave. Their battery also lasts for nearly 13 hours, which is pretty good.

    Though the Anker SoundBuds Curve have a durable, sporty look, they don’t have the best build quality. If you do a lot of sports or want budget headphones to wear at the gym, in particular, check out the slightly more expensive Anker Soundcore Spirit X. They’re very similar to the SoundBuds Curve but are better-built and are more sweat-resistant.

    See our review

  6. Truly Wireless Alternative: SoundPeats TrueFree/True Wireless

    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Truly Wireless
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you prefer the unbeatable portability of truly wireless headphones, get the SoundPeats TrueFree. They don’t sound as good as the Anker SoundBuds Curve overall, but they still pack deep, thumpy bass

    The SoundPeats TrueFree have very powerful bass, but some may find it slightly overpowering. Their battery also only lasts about 3 hours, which is disappointing even for truly wireless headphones. Thankfully, their charging case holds a couple of extra charges, so you can get up to 15 hours of playback if you take breaks to charge them throughout the day. Overall, the SoundPeats TrueFree are decent truly wireless earbuds with a bass-heavy sound.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO: Great wired headphones for critical listening that provide more bass than most open-back models. See our review
  • Bose QuietComfort 35 II/QC35 II Wireless 2018: A versatile and great-sounding headset for most uses. A more balanced bass sound than the Sonys, but no customization options or EQ for fans of even more bass. See our review
  • Microsoft Surface Wireless Headphones: A versatile noise cancelling headset that packs a good amount of bass. The mediocre Cortana implementation on mobile may not be ideal for all listeners. See our review
  • Audio-Technica ATH-M50x: A great sounding headset with an exciting bass. A good closed-back alternative to the Beyerdynamic DT 990. See our review
  • Sony MDR-1A:  A more comfortable design than the Audio Technica ATH-M50x with good audio reproduction. Slightly too pricey for what they offer. See our review
  • Skullcandy Hesh 3 Wireless: A bass-heavy wireless headset with incredible battery life. Good for most use cases, but not as well built as the Crusher Wireless. See our review
  • Bose QuietControl 30/QC30 Wireless: A comfortable and practical noise cancelling earbud with a good amount of bass. Build quality not the most durable, and neckband design isn't for everyone. See our review
  • Jabra Elite Active 65t Truly Wireless: A truly wireless design with a customizable EQ so you can turn up the bass. Not the most bass-oriented default sound and slightly bulky earbuds. See our review
  • KZ ZS10: A budget wired in-ear with a cool design, a replaceable cable, and decently balanced sound. They're slightly bulky and won't be as comfortable for all listeners. See our review
  • Anker SoundCore Spirit X Wireless: Good wireless sports in-ears with deep bass. May not provide as much value as the SoundBuds Curve but solid option for running and working out. See our review
  • Bluedio T4 Turbine Wireless: Budget wireless over-ears with a bass-rich sound and good build quality but uncomfortable fit. See our review

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best bass headphones to buy for most people in each price range. We factor in the price (a cheaper headphone wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors and availability (no headphones that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to choose for yourself, here is the list of all our reviews for headphones. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There are no perfect headphones. Personal taste, preference, and where you use the headphones will matter more in your selection.

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