The Best Lightweight Mouse - Spring 2021 Mice Reviews

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Lightest Mouse
109 Mice Tested
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Demand for lighter mice first came from the esports world, where making movements as quickly as possible is crucial, and having a lighter mouse helps. That said, you may also want a lightweight option that's easy for traveling. Many lightweight mice have hexagonal cutouts in the body to save weight; these are called honeycomb mice. For a time, the best lightweight gaming mouse was unquestionably the best honeycomb mouse, but recently, some solid body designs are getting light enough to be considered. For this article, we define anything under 85g as lightweight, but it's important to know what you're looking for. For competitive gaming, click latency, build quality, and connection types are key concerns. For long gaming sessions, you'll want good ergonomics.

We've tested over 105 mice, and over 30 that we'd consider lightweight; below are our top picks for the lightest mouse for several uses. For more options, check out our recommendations for the best mouse, the best gaming mouse, and the best ergonomic mouse.


  1. Lightest Mouse: Finalmouse Ultralight 2 - Cape Town

    6.2
    Office/Multimedia
    8.1
    Video Games (FPS)
    6.1
    Video Games (MMO)
    8.9
    Ultra-Light Gaming
    5.2
    Travel
    Connectivity Wired
    Type
    Standard

    The Finalmouse Ultralight 2 - Cape Town is the lightest mouse we've tested. It has a honeycomb body that feels solid and only flexes slightly. It has an ambidextrous shape with two side buttons on the left. It has a streamlined look with a cream-colored body, orange accents on the scroll wheel and cable, no visible logo, and no RGB lighting.

    While most lightweight mice we've tested tend to fall between 60 and 75 grams, this one is only 49g, making it only slightly heavier than two AA batteries. On top of being incredibly lightweight, it performs very well thanks to its low click latency, consistent CPI, and smooth-gliding feet that work well on both mousepads and directly on tables. It also has an exceptional paracord-like cable that's very flexible and feels durable. The mouse is well-suited to small and medium hand sizes, but it isn't recommended for larger hands. That said, it comes with latex skin grips, which may help make it suitable for people with larger hands.

    Unfortunately, it lacks companion software, only has a maximum polling rate of 500Hz, and has only four default CPI settings onboard. Finalmouse also releases its products in single drops, so at this point, you can only purchase it through third-party sellers, which tends to be very expensive. If you care about weight above all else, this is the lightest gaming mouse we've tested.

    See our review

  2. Best Lightweight Gaming Mouse: Glorious Model O

    7.0
    Office/Multimedia
    8.5
    Video Games (FPS)
    7.3
    Video Games (MMO)
    8.7
    Ultra-Light Gaming
    5.0
    Travel
    Connectivity Wired
    Type
    Standard

    The Glorious Model O is the best lightweight mouse for gaming that we've tested. It has a honeycomb body that feels very solid and an ambidextrous shape suitable for all grip types, depending on your hand size. It has two side buttons on the left and customizable RGB along both sides, on the scroll wheel, and within the body.

    It has an outstanding cable that's very lightweight and flexible, and remarkable virgin grade PTFE feet that offer very smooth gliding despite their sharp edges. It also has a low lift-off distance, a wide CPI range, a very consistent CPI, and great click latency that's adjustable along with other sensor and lighting settings using the companion software.

    Unfortunately, its CPI is only customizable by increments of 100, and while it's compatible with Windows and macOS, you can't install the software on macOS. While it also has a large body unsuitable for small hands in every grip type, there's a smaller version with nearly identical performance, the Glorious Model O- that's ideal for small hands with any grip type. Overall, this is one of the best gaming mice we've tested and is a great choice for gamers who prefer lightweight mice.

    See our review

  3. Wireless Alternative: Logitech G PRO X SUPERLIGHT

    Connectivity Wireless
    Type
    Standard

    If you'd prefer a wireless alternative, check out the Logitech G PRO X SUPERLIGHT. It's a lot more expensive than the Glorious Model O, and it doesn't have RGB lighting, but it has a wider and more adjustable CPI. It has lower click latency and is even lighter, despite being wireless and having a solid, non-honeycomb body. It has an excellent, sturdy-feeling build quality with only slight flex around the sensor and some wobble in the left-click and right-click buttons. Its shape is well-suited to all grip types and hand sizes. That said, if you have small hands, you may have difficulty reaching both side buttons using a fingertip grip. It's compatible with the outstanding Logitech G HUB software, which is available for both Windows and macOS, and you can save profiles to the onboard memory. Unfortunately, it doesn't support Bluetooth, and there are only side buttons on the left side. It also charges via micro USB, as opposed to the newer USB-C standard.

    If you're looking for a more affordable lightweight gaming mouse with RGB lighting, go with the Glorious. However, if you prefer a wireless option that's even lighter and has better overall performance, get the Logitech.

    See our review

  4. Best Ergonomic Lightweight Mouse: Cooler Master MM720

    6.8
    Office/Multimedia
    8.7
    Video Games (FPS)
    7.8
    Video Games (MMO)
    9.1
    Ultra-Light Gaming
    5.0
    Travel
    Connectivity Wired
    Type
    Standard

    The best ergonomic lightweight mouse we've tested is the Cooler Master MM720. It has an extremely light honeycomb body that feels fairly well-built and has an ergonomic right-handed shape that features a groove on the right to rest your ring finger. There are two buttons on the left side and independent RGB zones inside the body and the scroll wheel.

    It's best-suited for both palm and claw grips, but if you have larger hands, you may have a hard time reaching the side buttons. It also includes adhesive strips that you can apply to the sides for added grip. It has an extremely low click latency, a wide CPI range, and a low lift-off distance that's customizable using the companion software, along with a host of sensor, lighting, and button programmability options.

    Unfortunately, you can only adjust the CPI by steps of 100, and the sensor undershoots quite a bit, especially when moving your cursor quickly. Also, the build quality is only decent, and the body squeaks and feels as if it may crack if you press hard enough, though we don't expect this to be too much of an issue for everyday use. That said, it's a very comfortable lightweight gaming mouse and is one of the best ergonomic mice we've tested.

    See our review

  5. Best Lightweight Travel Mouse: Microsoft Arc Mouse

    6.5
    Office/Multimedia
    5.4
    Video Games (FPS)
    4.3
    Video Games (MMO)
    6.0
    Ultra-Light Gaming
    7.5
    Travel
    Connectivity Wireless
    Type
    Standard

    The Microsoft Arc Mouse is the best lightweight mouse for travel that we've tested. It has an unusual ambidextrous shape and a compact design that offers great portability, as you can easily collapse it to a flat form. It has a good build quality, and the mechanism that locks it into its flat or arched shape feels well-built. Visually, the design is sleek and minimal, and it won't look out of place in business settings.

    While it isn't designed for a fingertip grip, it's well-suited for palm or claw grips for almost all hand sizes, though you may find it too small if you have extra-large hands. It has left and right-click buttons that you can swap depending on your dominant hand, and it supports certain gestures, including a three-finger click function and a single finger dragged up or down within the button area for scrolling. It connects with Bluetooth, so there's no need to worry about losing USB receivers, and it's powered by a pair of AAA batteries.

    Unfortunately, it has plastic feet that don't glide very well on desks, and its click latency is high, though this likely won't be noticeable while performing everyday tasks. It has companion software, but there are limited customization options, and it isn't compatible with macOS. While the mouse works in macOS, some functions like the three-finger click gesture don't. Overall, this is an extremely portable option that'll easily slide into even the smallest of laptop cases.

    See our review

  6. Cheaper Alternative: Logitech Pebble M350

    Connectivity Wireless
    Type
    Standard

    If you're looking for a cheaper alternative, check out the Logitech Pebble M350. It doesn't have the collapsible design and gesture support of the Microsoft Arc Mouse, but has a physical scroll wheel, lower click latency, and is significantly less expensive. It has a straightforward wedge shape and a low-profile design that makes it very portable, though it's not the most comfortable design to use for long periods. It has a decent build quality, and the frame feels very solid, but the top cover is made of very thin plastic. It isn't suitable for either a palm or claw grip, but everyone should be able to use it comfortably with a fingertip grip, regardless of hand size. It's wireless-only, and you can connect it with the included USB receiver or via Bluetooth. Unfortunately, the plastic feet don't glide very smoothly across mousepads or desks, and there's no companion software for making sensor adjustments. However, this is unlikely to affect most people using it for everyday tasks.

    If you're looking for a lightweight travel option with a collapsible design and support for gesture controls, go with the Microsoft mouse, but if you'd prefer a cheaper option with lower click latency and a traditional scroll wheel, check out the Logitech.

    See our review

  7. Best Budget Lightweight Mouse: Razer Viper Mini

    7.2
    Office/Multimedia
    8.7
    Video Games (FPS)
    7.7
    Video Games (MMO)
    9.0
    Ultra-Light Gaming
    5.1
    Travel
    Connectivity Wired
    Type
    Standard

    The best budget lightweight mouse we've tested is the Razer Viper Mini. It's very similar to the original Razer Viper, sharing the same solid plastic body and ambidextrous shape in a smaller and lighter form factor. Despite being extremely lightweight, it still manages to retain the same impressive build quality as the full-sized version. It has a sleek, gamer-centric look, including an RGB logo behind the crest and an additional RGB strip at the back around the bottom.

    Due to its small size, it's well-suited for a fingertip grip, regardless of hand size. Only those with small hands can use a palm grip comfortably, while a claw grip should be comfortable for both small and medium hands. The feet are rounded, virgin grade PTFE plastic, and glide very smoothly across mousepads and desks. The excellent paracord-like cable is lightweight and flexible. The mouse has a very wide CPI range, extremely low click latency, and user-friendly software that allows for plenty of customization. It's compatible with both Windows and macOS, but you can't install the software on macOS. However, you can carry over saved profiles using the onboard memory.

    Unfortunately, unlike other mice in the Viper lineup, it only has two side buttons on the left. It also has a fairly high CPI variation, so the sensor tends to overshoot, especially when you're moving your mouse slowly. That said, this is one of the best gaming mice we've tested and an amazing budget pick, with performance and features that rival more premium gaming mice.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Cooler Master MM710: The Cooler Master MM710 is a slightly lighter alternative to the Glorious Model O, although the Glorious feels better-built. See our review
  • Endgame Gear XM1: The Endgame Gear XM1 is a superb ultralight gaming mouse that feels more solidly-made and has a solid plastic body. However, it has a higher lift-off distance, and you can't reprogram its buttons. See our review
  • G-Wolves Hati: The G-Wolves Hati is an excellent alternative to the Glorious Model O, but it suffers from a less sturdy-feeling build quality, a cable that's not quite as flexible, and mouse feet that don't glide quite as easily. See our review
  • Glorious Model D: The Glorious Model D is an excellent alternative to the Glorious Model O if you'd prefer a right-slanted design, though it has a higher-lift off distance and doesn't quite feel as sturdy. See our review
  • Glorious Model O Wireless: The Glorious Model O Wireless is an excellent wireless alternative to the Glorious Model O, though it's marginally heavier and has a less consistent sensor when switching between slow and quick cursor movements. See our review
  • Glorious Model O-: The Glorious Model O- is a lighter, scaled-down version of the Glorious Model O that's a great alternative if you have small or medium-sized hands. See our review
  • HyperX Pulsefire Haste: The HyperX Pulsefire Haste is an excellent alternative to the Glorious Model O. However, the Glorious has a slightly more flexible cable and storage for more than one profile in the onboard memory. See our review
  • Razer DeathAdder V2 Mini: The Razer DeathAdder V2 Mini is a significantly shorter, slightly lighter alternative to the Glorious Model O, but it has a smaller CPI range and isn't as well-suited to large or extra-large hands. See our review
  • Razer Viper 8KHz: The Razer Viper 8KHz is larger than the Razer Viper Mini, but it's only slightly heavier. It also features an outstanding maximum polling rate of 8000Hz that should make mouse movements smoother, but this isn't something we test. See our review
  • ROCCAT Burst Pro: The ROCCAT Burst Pro is an amazing, solid plastic body alternative to the Glorious Model O, but it's slightly heavier and has a lower click latency. See our review
  • XTRFY M42: The XTRFY M42 is an excellent alternative to the Cooler Master MM720. It has a pair of modular back panels to suit different grip types, but its ambidextrous design isn't quite as ergonomic. See our review

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the lightest mice that are the best picks for the most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper mouse wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no mice that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here's the list of our lightest mice. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no mouse is perfect for every use, most mice are great enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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