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The 8 Best Closed Back Headphones - Spring 2019
Reviews

Best Closed-Back Headphones
347 Headphones Tested
  • Store-bought headphones; no cherry-picked units
  • Retest after major updates
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

Closed-back headphones suit most listeners due to their versatility. They are comfortable and offer a well-isolated listening experience in both noisy and quiet environments. Closed headphones have sufficient noise isolation to not let too much ambient noise seep into your audio. They also don’t leak as much as open headphones, so they’re not distracting to the people around you. Finally, closed headphones cater a bit more to fans of bass.

So far, we've tested 287 headphones and below are our recommendations for the best closed-back headphones to buy in 2019. See also our recommendations for the best wireless over-ear headphones and the best noise cancelling headphones

  1. Best Closed-Back Headphones: Bose QuietComfort 35 II/QC35 II Wireless 2018

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    7.4
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.9
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.7
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.1
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    7.8
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    6.0
    TV
    Score components:
    5.6
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    The best closed-back headphones we've tested so far are the Bose QuietComfort 35 II. They're super comfortable and easy-to-use Bluetooth headphones with one of the best noise cancellation on the market.

    They're a slight upgrade to Bose QuietComfort 35 with more control over their noise cancellation feature and a dedicated button to trigger Google Assistant. They have a good battery life with power saving features, a balanced sound that caters well to most genres, and they're easy to use with simple controls and few customization options.

    Unfortunately, this also means that they won't be as customizable as the Sony WH-1000XM3 or the Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless since you can't EQ their sound profile. Also, they're not as well-built or as premium-looking as Bowers & Wilkins PX, but deliver a slightly more reliable performance overall, which makes them the better choice for most listeners.

    See our review

  2. Alternative With More Customization: Sony WH-1000XM3 Wireless

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you want a headset that isolates as well as the Bose QuietComfort 35 II but delivers a more customizable sound that you can adjust to your liking, then go with the Sony WH-1000XM3 instead. They may not be quite as comfortable as the QC 35 II, but thanks to their highly customizable app, they are a bit more flexible for users with different tastes and use cases. They also have a slightly better noise cancelling feature. Their sound, although slightly darker than the Bose, can be easily EQed via the app and you can even add some room effect for further customization. They also have excellent battery life and last longer than the WH-1000XM2, thanks to the added auto-off timer that you can adjust via the app.

    In short, the WH-1000XM3 are a great alternative to the Bose and may even be a better option if you're the type to dive deep into customization options. However, their touch-sensitive control scheme is not as precise and also does not work as well in colder climates. So if you live in colder regions, this may be a deal breaker for you. For most, they're a great headset with great build quality, a comfortable design, excellent noise isolation, and a good, customizable sound. You can also get the Sennheiser PXC 550 Wireless for the same level of customization, but their noise canceling is not as good.

    See our review

  3. More Portable Alternative: Jaybird Tarah Pro Wireless

    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you like the isolation that closed-back headphones provide but prefer the more portable format of in-ears, get the Jaybird Tarah Pro. They don’t isolate noise as well as the Bose QuietComfort 35 II do with ANC, but they still do a decent job. They also have outstanding leakage performance, so you can raise your listening volume to mask out more noise without disturbing those around you. The Tarah Pro have a stable fit that’s great for sports and are even rated IPX7 for superior sweat and water resistance. They sound decent and are compatible with the great Jaybird MySound app for added customizability.

    On the downside, you may not find the Jaybird Tarah Pro as comfortable as over-ear headphones, especially after long periods of time. They also have a proprietary charging cradle that’s a bit restrictive. If you don’t mind the fit of in-ears, though, these headphones are well-designed wireless that are super portable and easy to carry around.

    See our review

  4. Best Mid-Range Closed Back Headphones: Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 Wireless 2016

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    7.3
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.7
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    7.4
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    7.1
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    7.5
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    6.2
    TV
    Score components:
    5.9
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : Yes
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you like noise cancelling over-ears like the Bose QuietComfort 35 II and the Sony WH-1000XM3 but find them a bit too expensive, then get the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 instead. They offer the best value for their mid-range price, although they will not be the most isolating headphones since their noise canceling is not as good as the Bose or the Sonys. They also do not come with a very customizable app.

    On the upside, what they lack in isolation they more than make up for with their exciting bass-rich sound, excellent wireless range and battery life, and an ergonomic and easy-to-use design that's well-built and durable. They even support aptX-LL (a low latency codec) which makes them more suitable than most of the headphones on this list for watching movies as long as you have the right transmitter dongle.

    If you're looking for a mid-range option that delivers great value for your money, then you can't go wrong with Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2.

    See our review

  5. Truly Wireless Alternative: Samsung Gear IconX Truly Wireless

    Type : In-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Truly Wireless
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you need a more portable design than the over-ears on this list, the Samsung Gear IconX will be the best option for your money. They only isolate passively so they won't be as good as the Bose QuietComfort 35 II in loud environments. They also won't have the battery life or range of the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2 and won't be as easy to use. On the upside, they're a decently affordable truly wireless in-ear with a lot of features. 

    They have a decent sound quality, a customizable app that offers great health tracking features, and a compact and stable design that you can use for running and will easily fit into most pockets. They also have up to 4GB of onboard storage so you do not have to carry your phone around to listen to your tunes if you don't want to. This makes them a great option for sports, but they're also a versatile option for most uses if you want to go truly wireless.

    See our review

  6. Critical Listening Alternative: Audio-Technica ATH-M50x

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If sound quality is what matters most for you and you also want a pair of audiophile-level headphones that you can also use outdoors, get the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x. They won't have the convenient range of the Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2. They also do worse in loud environments since they are not noise cancelling headphones.

    On the upside, they have a well-balanced sound that packs a good and exciting bass, a well-balanced mid-range, and a good reproduction of the higher frequencies that's not too sharp or recessed. They also have a durable build quality that will last you years of regular use, and they're comfortable enough to wear for long listening sessions. They're one of the better options if you're looking for a headphone for just listening to music, but they also have the benefit of a closed-back design so you can use them outside with your phone.

    See our review

  7. Best Budget Closed Back Headphones: Skullcandy Grind Wireless

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2

    Test Benches:

    • 1.2: Winter 2018
    • 1.1: Summer 2017
    • 1.0: Winter 2017
    • 0.9: Winter 2016
    6.5
    Mixed Usage
    What it is: This is the combination of the different use cases to evaluate how versatile the headphones are. Therefore an everyday headphone should be well-rounded enough to adapt to most situations and environments without significant losses in sound quality, design ergonomics or isolation.
    Score components:
    7.2
    Critical Listening
    What it is: The level of audio fidelity a headphone can reproduce. Therefore a balanced and true representation of bass, mids, treble, soundstage and imaging, as well as a comfortable listening experience, is essential for critical listening.
    Score components:
    6.2
    Commute/Travel
    What it is: How well the headphones handle the loud environments involved in commuting or traveling. Therefore your listening experience should be comfortable, hassle-free and as isolated from noise as possible.
    Score components:
    6.8
    Sports/Fitness
    What it is: How well-adapted the headphones are, to use while doing sports or strenuous exercise. Therefore the headphones should not be too cumbersome and deliver a stable and comfortable listening experience.
    Score components:
    6.6
    Office
    What it is: How well the headphones can deliver a comfortable and isolated listening experience in an office-like environment. They should not leak much and should block the noise of a busy office.
    Score components:
    5.8
    TV
    Score components:
    5.5
    Gaming
    Score components:
    Type : On-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : Yes
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you want a budget wireless headset, the Skullcandy Grind are one of the best budget closed-back headphones we've tested. They do not have active noise cancelling, so they won't be the best option for very noisy environments and commutes. They also have an on-ear design that doesn't fold.

    On the upside, they are a lot more comfortable than most of the on-ear headsets we've reviewed. They also have a well-balanced sound that caters well to most genres and a good build quality that feels sturdy and durable especially at their price range. They have an easy-to-use control scheme and design.

    The Skullcandy Grind are a good choice if you're looking for a budget wireless headset and like on-ears. The Bluedio T4 and Cowin E7 are noise cancelling headphones that will provide a bit more isolation for your noisy commutes but will not be as comfortable or as portable.

    See our review

  8. Gaming Alternative: Logitech G433 Gaming Headset

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Closed-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re a gamer who doesn’t want to battle with latency issues, get the Logitech G433. They’re less portable than the Skullcandy Grind and a bit less versatile since they can’t be used wirelessly, but they deliver great sound in a comfortable design. They have an awesome detachable boom microphone with excellent recording quality and noise handling and are compatible with the great Logitech Gaming Software for a more customizable experience. They’re also more breathable than most gaming headsets, which is nice for long gaming sessions.

    Unfortunately, the G433 have poor frequency response consistency, which means that they may not sound the same to people with different head shapes, or among those who wear glasses. They’re also covered in a somewhat rough-feeling fabric that may wear and tear over time. They’re still a good choice for gamers looking a budget gaming headset, though.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • SteelSeries Arctis 7 Wireless 2017: A great gaming and home theater alternative to the Bose QuietComfort 35 II and Sony WH-1000XM2. Durable and comfortable design with a low latency wireless connection. See our review
  • Sony WH-1000XM2 Wireless: Sleek and feature packed wireless headphones. Good alternative to the Bose QC35 II.  See our review
  • Bowers & Wilkins PX Wireless: Decently versatile wireless headphones with great noise cancelling and excellent build quality. They would be a great alternative to the QC 35 II but they do not sound quite as good.  See our review
  • Sennheiser HD 4.50 BTNC: Versatile wireless headset with a lot of features. Not as good as the Plantronics for around the same price.  See our review
  • JBL Everest Elite 700 Wireless: Great sounding closed headphones with good noise isolation. Bulky design and slightly uncomfortable.  See our review
  • Sony MDR-1A:  A comfortable and well-built headphone with a good sound for critical listening. A bit pricey for what they have to offer.  See our review
  • 1More Triple Driver: One of the best sounding in-ear headphones. Wired and not as versatile as the Jaybird X3 or the Samsung Level U Pro.  See our review
  • Beats BeatsX Wireless: Closed-back in-ears with a sleek design and easy to use. Limited for Android users.  See our review
  • Beats Studio 3 Wireless: Above-average overall performance and a decently well-balanced sound. A more stylish alternative to the QC35 II and WH-1000XM2 but do not isolate as well.  See our review
  • Astro A50 Wireless: A premium gaming headset with a lot of features and an excellent sound quality. Not as versatile as the SteelSeries Arctis 7.  See our review
  • B&O PLAY Beoplay E8 Truly Wireless 2018: Decent truly wireless earbuds with a great isolation performance but the Samsung Gear IconX offer a similar if not better performance for much cheaper.  See our review
  • Marshall MID ANC Wireless: A versatile and good sounding on-ear with a great design. Mediocre noise isolation performance.  See our review

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best closed-back headphones to buy for most people in each price range. We factor in the price (a cheaper headphone wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no headphones that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to choose for yourself, here is the list of all our reviews for closed-back headphones. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There are no perfect headphones. Personal taste, preference, and listening habits will matter more in your selection.

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