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The 7 Best Open-Back Headphones - Fall 2019
Reviews

Best Open-Back Headphones
393 Headphones Tested
  • Store-bought headphones; no cherry-picked units
  • Retest after major updates
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

Open-back headphones are designed to deliver an immersive listening experience by reducing the level of isolation between you and your environment. They produce a spacious soundstage and give you the impression of listening to a good speaker set up in an ideal room. However, they leak a lot, so they aren't the best choice if you want to use them outside, as they may distract the people around you (see our closed-back recommendations).

We've tested over 350 headphones and below are our recommendations for the best open-back headphones you can buy in 2019. See also our recommendations for the best audiophile headphones and the best headphones for music.


  1. Best Open-Back Headphones: Sennheiser HD 800 S

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2
    6.2
    Mixed Usage
    8.5
    Critical Listening
    4.8
    Commute/Travel
    5.5
    Sports/Fitness
    5.4
    Office
    6.2
    TV
    6.1
    Gaming
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Open-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Dynamic

    The best open-back headphones that we’ve tested so far are the Sennheiser HD 800 S. Like most open-back headphones, they’re wired critical listening headphones that are designed for use in a quiet room. They don’t have a microphone or any active features, but they deliver exceptional audio fidelity that doesn't disappoint.

    They sound amazing. They have a bright, spacious sound that lends itself particularly well to jazz and classical music. They’re extremely well-built and very comfortable, which makes them perfect for long listening sessions.

    While they are the best-sounding headphones we’ve tested so far, they’re also remarkably expensive. You’ll also need a powerful amplifier to drive these headphones and experience their full potential. That said, if sound quality is your top priority and you have the equipment and the budget for them, these headphones are hard to beat.

    See our review

  2. Less Expensive Alternative: HiFiMan Ananda

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Open-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Planar Magnetic

    If you’re looking for open-back headphones that sound as good as the Sennheiser HD 800 S but don’t cost quite as much, get the HiFiMan Ananda. They don’t quite sound as spacious as the Sennheiser, despite their planar magnetic drivers and very open ear cups, but they still sound excellent. They pack a bit more bass, which may feel more spacious due to their brighter overall sound, and deliver a balanced audio reproduction that sounds great with any track.

    While these headphones look and feel like high-end headphones, they're not as well-built as the Sennheiser. HiFiMan doesn’t quite have the quality control of a brand like Sennheiser, so some of their units are more prone to manufacturing defects. Thankfully, these headphones are better-built than their predecessor, the HiFiMan Edition X. Get the HD 800 S if you want the absolute best audiophile headphones we’ve tested so far, but if you want to save a couple of bucks for something that sounds nearly just as good, then go for the Ananda.

    See our review

  3. Best Open-Back Headphones For Gaming: Astro A40 TR Headset + MixAmp Pro 2019

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2
    6.4
    Mixed Usage
    7.8
    Critical Listening
    5.2
    Commute/Travel
    5.7
    Sports/Fitness
    5.9
    Office
    6.9
    TV
    8.3
    Gaming
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Open-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : Yes
    Transducer : Dynamic

    The best open-back headphones for gaming we’ve tested so far are the Astro A40 TR + MixAmp Pro 2019. They’re very comfortable headphones with large, well-padded ear cups, which makes them suitable for long gaming sessions. They have a wired design which ensures a latency-free gaming experience and come with an outstanding USB dock that provides lots of connectivity options.

    These headphones sound very good and their open-back design helps give them a more spacious soundstage than other gaming headsets we’ve tested. Their boom microphone is superb and works very well in noisy environments too. We even found the Xbox One variants also work on the PS4 as well while in PC mode. Note, however, that it's unlikely that the PS4 variants will work on the Xbox One.

    While these headphones have a fairly balanced frequency response overall, they show a noticeable lack of detail and presence in the treble range. On the upside, they’re compatible with the Astro Command Center, where you can EQ their sound profile and assign custom EQ presets to their MixAmp. They’re great gaming headphones all-around and are especially well-suited to those who prefer an open-back design.

    See our review

  4. Best Open-Back Headphones Under $200: Sennheiser HD 58X Jubilee

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2
    5.9
    Mixed Usage
    8.0
    Critical Listening
    4.6
    Commute/Travel
    5.7
    Sports/Fitness
    5.1
    Office
    5.9
    TV
    5.8
    Gaming
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Open-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Dynamic

    The best open-back headphones under $200 we’ve tested so far are the Sennheiser HD 58x Jubilee. They’re the result of a collaboration between Sennheiser and Massdrop and can only be purchased from Drop’s website directly. They’re great critical listening headphones with excellent audio reproduction and provide very good value for their price.

    These headphones sound very impressive, especially at this price point. They have a remarkably well-balanced sound that packs more bass than most open-back headphones we’ve tested, like the similarly designed Sennheiser HD 600, without sounding too sharp or sibilant, like the AKG K702. They have outstanding imaging and their soundstage isn't bad, either.

    On the downside, while they have replaceable cables, they’re a bit difficult to find online since they’re not widely available for purchase. These headphones may also not be comfortable for everyone. They clamp rather tightly, and they have large ear cups that may extend past your jaw if you have a smaller head, which can be uncomfortable over time. That said, their price-to-performance ratio is rather exceptional so if you don’t mind a tighter fit, they’re a great choice.

    See our review

  5. Better-Built Alternative: Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Open-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re looking for solid critical listening headphones that feel built to last, then get the Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO. They don’t have a detachable cable like the Sennheiser HD 58x Jubilee, but they still feel more durable. They have a removable headband that you can replace if ever it gets damaged or worn down with time, and there’s more metal in their build which makes them feel sturdier overall.

    While these headphones have excellent audio reproduction, they can sound a little sharp to some people, especially on brighter tracks. The Jubilee sound a bit more balanced in the treble range and also have less total harmonic distortion. That said, the Beyerdynamic are more comfortable and are more widely available for purchase. If you’re sensitive to sibilance or peaks in treble and don’t mind tighter-fitting headphones, get the Sennheiser, but if you prefer comfort and durability go for the Beyerdynamic.

    See our review

  6. Best Budget Open-Back Headphones: Philips SHP9500

    Usage Ratings - Version 1.2
    5.9
    Mixed Usage
    7.8
    Critical Listening
    4.6
    Commute/Travel
    5.4
    Sports/Fitness
    5.3
    Office
    6.0
    TV
    6.0
    Gaming
    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Open-Back
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you’re in the market for open-back headphones but don’t want to spend a fortune, the best budget open-back headphones are the Philips SHP9500. They have a remarkably comfortable design with very large, well-padded ear cups. The headband also redistributes weight across the top of the head very well, making these headphones great for long listening sessions.

    These headphones sound very good and have a well-balanced sound that, like the Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO, reproduces vocals and lead instruments clearly and accurately. They have a decent soundstage, and their overall sound quality is nearly on par with that of headphones that cost almost 10 times their price.

    On the downside, they use a fabric coating on the ear cups and headband padding that feels slightly rough to the touch. It’s not as noticeable once you’ve had the headphones on for a while, but it feels less pleasant than synthetic leather or velour padding would. That said, they still provide excellent value and are very hard to beat for their price.

    See our review

  7. Even Cheaper Semi-Open Alternative: Superlux HD 681

    Type : Over-ear
    Enclosure : Semi-Open
    Wireless : No
    Noise-Cancelling : No
    Mic : No
    Transducer : Dynamic

    If you like the more spacious sound of open-back headphones but don’t have room in your budget for some of our pricier recommendations, check out the Superlux HD 681. They’re not as comfortable as the Philips SHP9500, but they have very impressive sound for the price and are among the best semi-open headphones we’ve tested so far. They sound great for budget headphones. Their bass is flawless, they have a neutral and even mid-range, and their treble is decent, albeit a bit sharp at times. They also have an okay soundstage, especially for the price.

    Unfortunately, they are cheaply made and it's apparent in how they look and feel. They’re not likely to break if they fall once or twice, but they still don’t feel like durable headphones. Their padding is stiff and thin, but the headphones are lightweight enough to still be quite comfortable. Get the Philips if you don’t mind spending a little bit more, but if you’re trying to keep costs to a minimum and still want something that sounds great, then go for the Superlux.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Beyerdynamic DT 1990 PRO: Well-crafted and premium-looking open-back headphones with good sound. Can sound a bit too sharp and piercing for some. See our review
  • HiFiMan Sundara: A great sounding and cheaper alternative than the HiFiMan Ananda. However, they have a few issues with quality control, so some units may have failing drivers. See our review
  • Sennheiser HD 700: Good, open sound and a spacious soundstage. They're a viable and cheaper alternative to the HiFiMan Sundara. See our review
  • Sennheiser HD 599: Open sound and a spacious soundstage. Comfortable, lightweight design. Not as well-built as the Sennheiser HD 700, but cheaper than the HD 650 for a similar sound. See our review
  • AKG K702: Very comfortable headphones that sound great but don’t feel as well-built as the Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO for the price. See our review
  • AKG K712 PRO: Comfortable design and excellent sound quality. Come with more accessories than the AKG K702, but they're considerably more expensive. See our review
  • Bose SoundSport In-Ear: Comfortable and open in-ear fit. Lightweight and stable headphones for sports use, but they lack a lot of bass. See our review
  • Grado SR80e/SR80: Good-sounding on-ear headphones with a unique design. However, they're not very durable and may sound a little sharp. See our review
  • Sennheiser Game One Gaming Headset: A gaming headset with an open and well-balanced sound. A bit pricey for what they have to offer. See our review
  • Audeze LCD 2 Classic/LC2C: Great critical listening open-back headphones with an excellent build quality. They sound a bit dark overall and are slightly pricier than some equally good sounding options. See our review
  • Sennheiser HD 600: Good-sounding critical listening headphones with a similar design to the HD 58x, but with worse bass roll-off and more expensive. See our review

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best open-back headphones for most people to buy. We factor in the price (cheaper headphones win over pricier ones if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no headphones that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to choose for yourself, here is the list of all our reviews for open-back headphones. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There are no perfect headphones. Personal taste and preference will matter more in your selection.

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