Get insider access
Preferred headphones store

Philips Fidelio X2HR Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.5
Reviewed May 12, 2020 at 08:56 am
Philips Fidelio X2HR Picture
8.4
Neutral Sound
3.8
Commute/Travel
5.0
Sports/Fitness
4.6
Office
4.6
Wireless Gaming
6.7
Wired Gaming
1.6
Phone Calls
Type Over-ear
Enclosure Open-Back
Wireless No
Noise Cancelling No
Mic No
Transducer Dynamic

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are a great pair of wired open-back headphones for neutral sound listening. Their sound profile is very well-balanced, making them suitable for a wide range of genres and content, though some people may find they sound a bit piercing or dull on certain tracks. Thanks to their large, well-padded ear cups and automatically-adjusting headband, they're comfortable to wear, even for extended periods. As is to be expected with open-back headphones, they aren't the most versatile as they don't block out any background noise, and don't have a microphone. Overall, they're a fairly sleek and premium-looking pair of open-back headphones.

Our Verdict

8.4 Neutral Sound

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are great headphones for neutral sound listening. Their sound profile is very well-balanced, though some may find they sound a bit dull with some frequencies and piercing with others. They also lack a bit of low-bass, though this is common with open-back headphones. Their weighted harmonic distortion is very good, and even critical listeners shouldn't notice much distortion. Thanks to their open-back design, their soundstage is quite open and natural, and they're very consistent between various users or reseats.

Pros
  • Well-balanced sound profile.
  • Comfortable.
  • Premium, durable look and feel.
Cons
  • Bulky design.
  • Open-back design results in poor noise isolation and leakage performance.
3.8 Commute/Travel

The Philips X2HR are bad for commuting or travel. These wired headphones have an open-back design that leaks a lot of audio and blocks out almost no background noise. They're designed for listening to music alone in a dedicated room.

Pros
  • Well-balanced sound profile.
  • Comfortable.
  • Premium, durable look and feel.
Cons
  • Bulky design.
  • Open-back design results in poor noise isolation and leakage performance.
5.0 Sports/Fitness

The Philips X2HR aren't recommended for sports or fitness. These wired over-ear headphones have bulky ear cups, and their headband isn't the most stable. Even during light jogs, they'll likely move around a fair amount on the head. They also block almost no background noise and leak a lot of audio.

Pros
  • Well-balanced sound profile.
  • Comfortable.
  • Premium, durable look and feel.
Cons
  • Bulky design.
  • Open-back design results in poor noise isolation and leakage performance.
4.6 Office

The Philips Fidelio X2HR aren't recommended for office use. Since they have an open-back design, they leak a lot of audio, and even in a loud office, your coworkers will likely hear your music. They also block almost no background noise, so it may be difficult to concentrate.

Pros
  • Well-balanced sound profile.
  • Comfortable.
  • Premium, durable look and feel.
Cons
  • Bulky design.
  • Open-back design results in poor noise isolation and leakage performance.
4.6 Wireless Gaming

The Philips X2HR are wired-only headphones without a microphone.

6.7 Wired Gaming

The Philips Fidelio X2HR don't have a built-in microphone. That being said, if you have a dedicated mic, they may be a decent option for gaming thanks to their well-balanced sound profile and wide soundstage. Their open-back design is also comfortable to wear during long gaming sessions, though they aren't the best choice if you game with others in the same room.

Pros
  • Well-balanced sound profile.
  • Comfortable.
  • Premium, durable look and feel.
Cons
  • Bulky design.
  • Open-back design results in poor noise isolation and leakage performance.
1.6 Phone Calls

The Philips X2HR don't have an integrated microphone.

  • 8.4 Neutral Sound
  • 3.8 Commute/Travel
  • 5.0 Sports/Fitness
  • 4.6 Office
  • 4.6 Wireless Gaming
  • 6.7 Wired Gaming
  • 1.6 Phone Calls
  1. Updated Jun 29, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.5.
  2. Updated May 12, 2020: Review published.
  3. Updated May 07, 2020: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style

These headphones have a premium and stylish design. Like most open-back headphones, they're quite bulky, but their mix of metal and good quality plastic gives them a sleek and high-end look.

8.0
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.86 lbs
Clamping Force
1.2 lbs

These headphones are very comfortable. Their large ear cups are very well-padded, and they have an automatically-adjusting headband which is very comfortable. While they clamp a bit more than other Philips headphones, like the Philips SHP9500, they shouldn't cause discomfort.

0
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
No Controls
Ease Of Use No Controls
Feedback No Controls
Call/Music Control No
Volume Control No
Microphone Control No
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls No

These headphones don't have any buttons or controls on them.

5.0
Design
Portability
L 9.0" (22.9 cm)
W 8.0" (20.3 cm)
H 4.1" (10.4 cm)
Volume 295.20 inยณ (4,837.44 cmยณ)
Transmitter Required No

These headphones aren't very portable. They're very large and don't fold up into a more compact size. They also don't come with any sort of carrying case.

0
Design
Case
Type No case
L N/A
W N/A
H N/A
Volume N/A

These headphones don't come with a carrying case.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

The build quality is good. While they're mostly made of plastic, they feel dense and solid and have some added touches of metal for reinforcement. They look and feel slightly more durable than the Philips SHP9500 and should be able to withstand a fair amount of accidental drops and bumps without sustaining damage. Their audio cable is detachable, so you can easily replace it should it get damaged. On the downside, the adjustable headband is held in place with two thin pieces of plastic that could get damaged.

6.0
Design
Stability

Not very stable. While they should stay in place while sitting at home and listening to music, they aren't designed to wear while running or working out. Even a small tilt or shake of the head causes them to move, and any larger movements will likely result in them falling off your head.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Philips Fidelio X2HR headphones
  • 1/8" to 1/4" adapter
  • TRS audio cable
  • Manual

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
-2.39 dB
Treble Amount
-1.48 dB

The sound profile of these headphones is very well-balanced and accurate, making them suitable for a wide range of genres and content. While they lack a bit of low-bass, this is common of open-back headphones. Unfortunately, their treble range is fairly uneven, which may cause some higher-frequency sounds to come across as sharp, while others may be dull and lacking in brightness.

7.9
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.42 dB

The frequency response consistency of these headphones is very good. While you may need to adjust them slightly to achieve the same treble response, their bass is quite consistent, even if you wear glasses or have long hair.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
8.3
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.28 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
37.21 Hz
Low-Bass
-3.99 dB
Mid-Bass
0.92 dB
High-Bass
1.47 dB

Great bass accuracy. Like most open-back headphones such as the Grado The Hemp Headphone, they're lacking a fair amount of low-bass, reducing the amount of thump and rumble they create. Other than that, the rest of the range follows our target curve almost perfectly.

9.3
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
0.9 dB
Low-Mid
0.86 dB
Mid-Mid
0.18 dB
High-Mid
0.39 dB

Excellent mid accuracy. They follow our target curve almost perfectly for the entire range, ensuring present and accurate mids and vocals.

8.3
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.61 dB
Mid-Treble
0.79 dB
Low-Treble
-0.87 dB
High-Treble
-6.82 dB

The treble accuracy of these headphones is great. While they follow the target curve quite well through the low-treble range, they're a bit uneven in mid-treble which may cause some frequencies to sound dull, while others may sound slightly piercing and painful. Most of the high-treble range is recessed, causing some music to sound dull and lifeless. This may not be too noticeable to everyone, however, and the treble range is quite accurate overall.

7.7
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
1.66 dB
Dips
0.65 dB

The peaks and dips performance of the Philips X2HR is good. Most of the bass and mid ranges are even and flat, and the biggest peaks and dips are throughout the treble range. The large peak in mid-treble followed by the big dip in high-treble causes sounds to be both piercing and sharp as well as dull and lifeless.

8.6
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.26
Weighted Phase Mismatch
4.67
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
0.85
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.6

The imaging of these headphones is excellent. The GD graph shows that nearly the entire group delay response is below the audibility threshold, resulting in a tight bass and a transparent treble reproduction. Additionally, the L/R drivers of our test unit were exceptionally matched, which is important for the accurate placement and localization of objects and instruments (like voices and footsteps) in the stereo image. However, these results are only valid for our unit and yours may perform differently.

7.8
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
1.46 dB
PRTF Size (Avg.)
3.6 dB
PRTF Distance
7.38 dB
Openness
9.4
Acoustic Space Excitation
8.7

The Philips X2HR have a very good passive soundstage. Thanks to their open-back design, their soundstage is very spacious and open and music is perceived as being in front of you as opposed to inside your head.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No App

The Philips Fidelio X2HR don't have any virtual soundstage features.

7.8
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.211
WHD @ 100
0.132

The weighted harmonic distortion of the Philips X2HR is very good. Even at higher volumes, most people shouldn't notice any distortion or artifacts.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
No Firmware
Power
Passive
Connection
Wired
Codec
PCM, 24-bit, 48kHz
EQ
No EQ
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
No Microphone

These are the settings used to test these headphones; therefore, our results are only valid when used at these settings.

Isolation
1.5
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-4.2 dB
Bass
-0.05 dB
Mid
0.98 dB
Treble
-13.19 dB

As to be expected with open-back headphones, the Philips Fidelio X2HR have very poor noise isolation. Since the back of each ear cup is open, they don't block any background noise and you'll hear almost everything that's going on around you.

1.5
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
63.95 dB

The leakage of these headphones is poor, but this is expected of open-back headphones. Even at moderate listening volumes, people nearby will hear what you're listening to. If you're looking for headphones that leak less audio, try headphones with a closed-back design like the Wyze Noise-Cancelling Headphones Wireless.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
No
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No

The Philips Fidelio X2HR don't have a microphone.

0
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
N/A
LFE
N/A
FR Std. Dev.
N/A
HFE
N/A
Weighted THD
N/A
Gain
N/A

The Philips Fidelio X2HR don't have a microphone.

0
Microphone
Noise Handling
SpNR
N/A
Noise Gate
No
Speech + Pink Noise Handling
N/A
Speech + Pink Noise Audio Sample N/A
Speech + Subway Noise Handling
N/A
Speech + Subway Noise Audio Sample N/A

The Philips Fidelio X2HR don't have a microphone.

Active Features
0
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
No Battery
Continuous Battery Life
N/A
Additional Charges
N/A
Total Battery Life
N/A
Charge Time
N/A
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
No
Passive Playback
Passive Headphone
Charging Port None

These are wired-only headphones that don't require a battery.

0
Active Features
App Support
App Name No App
iOS No
Android No
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
No
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
No

No dedicated companion app.

Connectivity
0
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth Version
No Bluetooth
Multi-Device Pairing
No
NFC Pairing
No
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
PC Latency (SBC)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX HD)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX-LL)
N/A
iOS Latency
N/A
Android Latency
N/A

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are wired-only headphones that don't support Bluetooth.

0
Connectivity
Non-Bluetooth Wireless
Non-BT Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Non-BT Latency
N/A

These are wired-only headphones.

9.5
Connectivity
Wired
Analog Audio
Yes
USB Audio
No
Detachable Yes
Length 10.30 ft (3.14 m)
Connection
1/8" TRS
Analog/USB Audio Latency
0 ms

These headphones have a detachable TRS cable to connect to any device with a 1/8" jack. The included cable is over 10 feet long, which is convenient, but unfortunately, Philips doesn't include a shorter option for use on-the-go. There's also an included 1/8" to 1/4" adapter.

Connectivity
PC Compatibility
Analog
Audio Only
Wired USB
No
Non-BT Wireless
No
Connectivity
PlayStation Compatibility
PS4 Analog
Audio Only
PS4 Wired USB
No
PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
PS5 Analog
Audio Only
PS5 Wired USB
No
PS5 Non-BT Wireless
No
Connectivity
Xbox Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
Audio Only
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
Xbox Series X|S Analog
Audio Only
Xbox Series X|S Wired USB
No
Xbox Series X|S Non-BT Wireless
No

These headphones don't have a microphone, so they can only be used with an Xbox One to receive audio by plugging them into the controller.

0
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
No Base/Dock
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
No Base/Dock

These headphones don't have a base or dock.

Compared To Other Headphones

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are great open-back headphones for neutral listening. They look and feel more premium and sleek than the similarly-performing Philips SHP9500, and are more comfortable as well. Like all open-back headphones, they don't block any background noise and are best suited for a dedicated music listening room at home. See our recommendations for the best audiophile headphones, the best open-back headphones, and the best wired headphones.

Philips SHP9500

The Philips SHP9500 and the Philips Fidelio X2HR are both great open-back headphones for neutral sound listening. The Fidelio X2HR have a sleeker and more premium design, and look and feel a bit more durable. Their bass range is also more accurate, and they come with a 1/4" to 1/8" adapter, as well as a slightly longer audio cable. While the X2HR have an auto-adjusting headband, the SHP9500 are a little bit more comfortable overall as they don't clamp the head as tightly. Both perform very similarly, but the SHP9500 likely represent better value overall.

Philips Fidelio X3

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are better headphones for neutral sound than the Philips Fidelio X3. Both are open-back headphones with a similar design and performance, but the X2HR have a more neutral, balanced sound profile. Their treble accuracy is better-balanced than the X3.

Sennheiser HD 560S

The Philips Fidelio X2HR and Sennheiser HD 560S have different strengths in regards to neutral listening but share similar overall sound profiles. The Sennheiser have a more stable fit, better peaks and dips performance, and exhibit less audio distortion. Conversely, the Philips are more sturdily built and have better stereo imaging performance as well as a more expansive soundstage.

Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are slightly better open-back headphones for neutral sound listening than the Beyerdynamic DT 990 PRO. The Philips are more comfortable, have a less over-emphasized bass range, and a much wider and more open soundstage. Their treble range is also a bit more consistent between various users or reseats. On the other hand, the Beyerdynamic feel more durable and stable and have less distortion at lower listening volumes.

Sennheiser HD 599

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are slightly better open-back headphones for neutral sound than the Sennheiser HD 599. The X2HR look and feel slightly better-built, and have a slightly better-balanced sound profile. On the other hand, the Sennheiser are more comfortable and feel slightly more stable on the head.

Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO

The Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO and the Philips Fidelio X2HR are audiophile headphones with different strengths. The Beyerdynamic are better-built headphones with a closed-back design. They do a better job of reproducing the thump and rumble of low bass. They also leak less audio and passively isolate you from more sound, although they still aren't ideal for noisy environments. On the other hand, the Philips are open-back headphones with a much better passive soundstage performance. They're also much more comfortable.

HiFiMan Sundara 2020

The HiFiMan Sundara 2020 are better for neutral sound than the Philips Fidelio X2HR. The HiFiMan have a more immersive passive soundstage and deliver sound more consistently across users. However, while both headphones lack thump and rumble because of their open-back design, the Philips do a better job of reproducing low-bass, which some listeners may prefer. They also come with a long, 10-foot audio cable.

Audio-Technica ATH-M50x

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are better headphones for neutral sound than the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x. The Philips are open-back headphones with a more comfortable fit, a more neutral and accurate sound profile, and a significantly better passive soundstage performance. However, the Audio-Technica are still a suitable choice if you prefer a closed-back design that's better-built. 

AKG K702

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are better for neutral sound than the AKG K702. The Philips have a more neutral sound profile, which some may prefer, deliver bass more consistently, and have a much more stable fit. On the other hand, the Philips have a significantly better passive soundstage performance. 

Philips SHP9600

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are better headphones for neutral sound than the Philips SHP9600. While both pairs of open-back headphones have balanced sound profiles, the Fidelio X2HR have a more neutral sound. They're also better-built. That said, some listeners may prefer the extra boom and punch in the SHP9600's bass range. The SHP9600 also have a more comfortable fit.

Sennheiser HD 58X Jubilee

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are slightly better open-back headphones for neutral sound listening than the Sennheiser HD 58X Jubilee, though they both perform very similarly. The Philips are more comfortable and have a marginally better-balanced sound profile, especially in the treble range. The soundstage of the Philips is also perceived as being slightly more open and spacious. On the other hand, the Sennheiser feel quite a bit more stable on the head and are less likely to move around or slip off.

Beats Solo Pro Wireless

The Beats Solo Pro Wireless are more versatile headphones than the Philips Fidelio X2HR. The Beats are wireless on-ears that feel better-built, come with a carrying case to help protect them when you're on the go and have an ANC system that helps block out a great amount of noise. They also have an integrated mic so you're able to take calls, and an H1 chip, which allows you to seamlessly pair them with other Apple products. However, the Philips are over-ears with an open-back design, making them better suited for neutral sound. They're more comfortable, have a more neutral default sound profile, which some users may prefer, and their passive soundstage is larger, more natural-sounding, and spacious.

Sennheiser HD 800 S

The Sennheiser HD 800 S are better open-back headphones for neutral sound listening than the Philips Fidelio X2HR. The Sennheiser feel quite a bit more durable, are more stable on the head, and are much more consistent among various users or reseats. They also have a slightly better-balanced treble range, though this could vary by adjusting them on your head. On the other hand, the Sennheiser are fairly lacking in bass, and the Philips have a more accurate and natural low-to-mid bass range. The Sennheiser also require a powerful amplifier to run them and are considerably more expensive than the Philips.

Drop + Sennheiser PC38X

The Philips Fidelio X2HR are better for neutral sound while the Drop + Sennheiser PC38X are better for wired gaming. The Philips have a more neutral default sound profile and a better passive soundstage performance. However, the Drop have a boom mic that's able to capture your voice clearly, even in moderately noisy environments. 

Wyze Noise-Cancelling Headphones Wireless

 The Philips Fidelio X2HR are better for neutral sound than the Wyze Noise-Cancelling Headphones Wireless. The Philips are more comfortable and sound more neutral out-of-the-box, which is good for fans of neutral sound. However, the Wyze are more versatile as they have an ANC that can help isolate some ambient noise around you, an integrated microphone so that you can take calls on-the-go, and a graphic EQ as well as presets so that you can customize their sound profile. 

+ Show more

Recommended Articles

Discussions