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The 3 Best TVs Under $300 - Winter 2023 Reviews

Updated
Best TVs Under $300

Most big TV companies focus on making the best top-of-the-line TVs, and they're starting to stray away from making cheap entry-level TVs. Some companies still do, and you can find an okay 4k TV for under $300, but it won't have many features, the picture quality won't be anything special, and they'll usually be available in smaller sizes. These are good to have as secondary TVs in bedrooms or kitchens but aren't ideal as your main TV for watching 4k movies or playing games.

We've bought and tested more than 375 TVs and below you'll find our picks for the best TVs under $300 that are available for purchase. If your budget is a bit more flexible, see our recommendations for the best smart TVs, the best budget TVs, and the best TVs under $500.


  1. Best TV Under $300

    The TCL 4 Series/S455 2022 is the best TV under $300 you can get. At this price point, you can get it in either a 43-inch or 50-inch size, but if you're willing to stretch your budget a tiny bit more, you can get the 55-inch or 58-inch model instead. It's a decent 4k TV with deep blacks and nearly perfect black uniformity for a satisfying dark room experience. Even if you want to use it in a room with a few lights around, it has decent peak brightness but doesn't get bright enough to fight a ton of glare. It comes with Roku TV built-in and has a few extra features, like a built-in mic on the remote that you can use for voice control.

    This TV also supports HDR; however, it doesn't add much because it can't display a wide range of colors and doesn't get bright enough to make highlights stand out. However, there are no TVs under $300 that deliver a good HDR experience, so you aren't losing much here. For watching SDR content, it has okay accuracy without being calibrated, but colors are a bit off, and skin tones don't look natural.

    See our review

  2. Best Gaming TV For Under $300

    There aren't many good gaming TVs available for under $300, but the Hisense A6H is one of the best you can get for the price. At this price point, you can get either the 43-inch or 50-inch models, and like the TCL 4 Series/S455 2022, if you're willing to stretch your budget a tiny bit, the 55-inch is just a bit more expensive. It delivers worse picture quality than the TCL but has a good selection of gaming features, including variable refresh rate support to reduce screen tearing.

    It comes with the latest Google TV interface, with new accessibility features compared to other versions. It comes with the same app store, and the remote has a built-in mic for voice control. In terms of picture quality, it isn't the best as it has low peak brightness, so it isn't that good in well-lit rooms, but it's better for moderately-lit rooms. Luckily, it doesn't have any trouble upscaling lower-resolution content, and the out-of-the-box accuracy is excellent.

    See our review

  3. Best Kitchen TV Under $300

    If you want a small TV for a kitchen or guest bedroom, then a 32-inch TV like the TCL 32S327 is a good choice for your needs. It's a rather simple TV with a 1080p resolution on the S327 variant, but make sure you get that model and not the S325 model, which has a lower 720p resolution. It's a decent TV for streaming content as it comes with Roku TV built-in, which has a ton of apps available to download, and you won't have to connect external boxes to watch your favorite content.

    It doesn't have any trouble upscaling lower-resolution content, which is important if you watch cable TV. It also has excellent out-of-the-box accuracy, so you get accurate colors without any calibration, which is great because you can't calibrate the TV. As this is an entry-level 1080p TV, there are a few downfalls, like the fact that it doesn't support HDR and its overall picture quality isn't the best, but it's fine for watching your favorite cooking shows while making lunches or preparing supper.

    See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Jan 10, 2023: Completely restructured the article, moving the TCL 4 Series/S455 2022 to the top pick, and changing the structure from a by-size order to by-usage. Removed the Insignia F50 QLED as a Notable Mention, as it's difficult to find.

  2. Oct 21, 2022: Removed the Insignia F50 QLED, as the 50-inch model is hard to find at the moment. Replaced it with the TCL 4 Series/S446 2021 instead.

  3. Aug 17, 2022: Restructured article to focus on sizes and removed picks because they cost more than $300; removed the Amazon 4 Series, Vizio D3 Series, and the Hisense A6G and replaced them with the TCL 4 Series/S455 2022, Insignia F50, and Hisense A6H in their respective categories; updated Notable Mentions based on changes.

  4. Apr 04, 2022: Replaced the Hisense R6090G with the Amazon Fire TV Omni Series because it's easier to find; added the Vizio M6 Series Quantum 2021 to Notable Mentions.

  5. Feb 03, 2022: Replaced the Toshiba Fire TV 2020 with the Amazon Fire TV 4-Series because it's cheaper; added the Vizio D3 Series 2021 as the 'Best 32 Inch TV' and replaced the TCL 3 Series 2020 with the TCL 3 Series 2019 because it has a higher resolution; updated Notable Mentions based on changes.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best TVs under $300 to buy for most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper TV wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no TVs that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our reviews of TVs available under $300. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no TV is perfect, most TVs are great enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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