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The 8 Best Cameras For Landscape Photography - Black Friday 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Cameras For Landscape Photography
71 Cameras Tested
  • Store-bought cameras; no cherry-picked units
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There are a ton of very capable cameras on the market today, but landscape photography requires a particular set of features. Unlike wildlife photography, autofocus and speed are less important. Instead, image quality is a top priority. While a higher megapixel count can help, most modern cameras can turn out great images with plenty of dynamic range regardless of sensor size and resolution. Portability, battery life, and weather-sealing are also considerations, depending on your needs and preferences, whether you're hiking up mountains or capturing scenic views while traveling. Above all, the lens you use will have a big impact on how your landscape photos turn out.

A camera's overall performance varies drastically depending on what kind of lens you use. Your lens influences the amount of light entering the camera, an image's depth of field, autofocus behavior, and stabilization performance. As a general rule, it's better to invest in a less expensive camera body and higher-quality lenses than it is to invest in an expensive camera body and cheap lenses. That said, for the sake of consistency and user-friendliness, we currently test cameras with their standard kit lenses.

We've tested over 70 cameras, and below you'll find our recommendations for the best cameras for landscape photography for most people to buy. These picks were selected not only based on their overall performance but also their feature set and price. For more options, see our recommendations for the best cameras for photography, the best travel cameras, and the best cameras.


  1. Best Mirrorless Camera For Landscape Photography: Sony α7 III

    8.4
    Landscape Photography
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    Full Frame
    Tested Lens
    Sony FE 28-70mm F3.5-5.6 OSS

    The best mirrorless camera that we've tested for landscape photography is the Sony α7 III. This popular full-frame mirrorless camera feels incredibly well-built and comfortable to shoot with. It has a tilting screen, a large viewfinder, and a few customizable buttons that you can tailor to your shooting preferences. It also has a fantastic battery life that's advertised to last for approximately 600 photos, meaning you can take it on long shooting days to remote locations.

    It delivers superb image quality thanks to its 24-megapixel full-frame sensor, and photos have exceptional dynamic range at the camera's base ISO, which is ideal for pulling out more detail in landscape shots. It's also well-suited to low-light photography, with fantastic noise handling at higher ISO levels if you prefer to take landscapes at night or as the sun sets. You'll also have several E-mount lenses to choose from for landscape photography, including many third-party options.

    That said, it isn't weather-sealed, which shouldn't be a deal-breaker but means you have to be more careful when shooting in poor weather conditions. It isn't the most portable camera, but it's still relatively compact for a full-frame interchangeable lens model. All in all, this is one of the best cameras for landscape photography that we've tested, thanks to its high dynamic range, fantastic image quality, and superb battery life.

    See our review

  2. Crop Sensor Alternative: Fujifilm X-T4

    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    APS-C
    Tested Lens
    FUJINON XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R OIS

    If you want to save some money with a crop-sensor camera, check out the Fujifilm X-T4. Despite having inferior low-light performance than the Sony a7 III, it's still a good option for landscape photography thanks to its 26-megapixel X-Trans 4 sensor, which delivers very good overall image quality with excellent noise handling at higher ISOs. It has a decent amount of dynamic range, and you can take advantage of Fujifilm's 'Film Simulation' profiles to emulate the colors and tones of various classic film stocks and make your landscape photos pop. It comes with a fully articulated touchscreen, which is helpful when composing shots from a tripod, and it also has a fantastic in-body image stabilization feature for handheld shots. While its battery life is shorter than the Sony's, it's advertised to last for approximately 500 photos, which is still great.

    Get the Sony if you want a camera with a full-frame sensor for better overall image quality and low-light performance. If you're looking to save some money and want a slightly more portable camera, the Fujifilm is a great APS-C alternative.

    See our review

  3. Best DSLR Camera For Landscape Photography: Nikon D780

    8.0
    Landscape Photography
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    No
    Sensor Size
    Full Frame
    Tested Lens
    Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR

    Of the DSLRs that we've tested, the best camera for landscape photography is the Nikon D780. This camera has a robust magnesium alloy and carbon fiber body that's advertised to be weather-sealed against elements like dust and rain. It feels incredibly comfortable to shoot with and offers several customization options with both settings and physical controls. Its screen can also tilt out from its body for easier framing.

    It uses a 24.5-megapixel full-frame sensor, which yields amazing overall image quality with a good amount of dynamic range at its base ISO. It's well-suited to taking landscape photos in dimly-lit conditions, thanks to its superb noise handling capability. It supports extended minimum shutter speeds up to 900s (or 15 minutes) for long-exposure shots. It also has an exceptional battery life that's advertised to last for over 2,250 photos. If you like to use a backup SD card, it has two high-speed UHS-II card slots.

    Unfortunately, this is a heavy, bulky camera, so it's not the most convenient to carry to remote shooting locations. Still, going with a DSLR also gives you a wider range of lens options, and Nikon has a long line of compatible DSLR lenses to choose from. Overall, if you're in the market for a DSLR camera for landscape photography, its excellent image quality and robust physical design make it a great choice.

    See our review

  4. Crop Sensor Alternative: Canon EOS 90D

    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    No
    Sensor Size
    APS-C
    Tested Lens
    Canon EF-S 18–55mm f/3.5–5.6 IS STM

    If, however, you'd prefer a crop-sensor DSLR for landscape photography, the Canon EOS 90D is a good alternative. Unlike the Nikon D780, it isn't as well-suited to low-light conditions due to its smaller APS-C sensor, but it's considerably cheaper, lighter, and more portable. Its sensor has a 32.5-megapixel resolution, so it delivers good image quality and can yield sharp, detailed prints if you want to physically display your landscape photos. It has a fully articulated screen that makes it easy to compose and frame your shots, and it's weather-sealed to protect against elements like rain and humidity. It also has a very good battery life that's advertised to last for over 500 photos. That said, it doesn't feel as well-constructed, and it only has a single SD card slot.

    Get the Nikon if you want a high-end, well-built DSLR with a full-frame sensor. If you prefer the portability and cheaper price of a crop sensor DSLR, consider the Canon.

    See our review

  5. Best Compact Camera For Landscape Photography: SIGMA fp L

    7.4
    Landscape Photography
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    Full Frame
    Tested Lens
    Panasonic LUMIX S 20-60mm F3.5-5.6

    If you want something more compact, the best camera for landscape photography with a compact body is the SIGMA fp L. It sports a remarkable 61-megapixel full-frame sensor, the highest resolution full-frame sensor on the market along with the Sony α7R IV. It's also one of the most compact full-frame interchangeable lens cameras, making it easy to take on hikes or remote shooting locations.

    This camera's higher resolution means you can crop photos to different aspect ratios without noticeably compromising on image quality. It yields photos with good image quality and excellent dynamic range, giving you more latitude in editing. It also has decent RAW noise handling capability, meaning it performs well at higher ISO levels in low light. On top of that, it has a very wide expanded ISO range, going as low as ISO 6, which helps to take long exposure shots without using an ND filter.

    That said, its compact, modular design means it doesn't have a built-in viewfinder or handgrip, making it less comfortable to shoot with, although you can buy EVF and grip attachments from SIGMA at an additional cost if you'd like. It also has a fixed screen and lacks in-body image stabilization, so it does a poor job stabilizing handheld shots, though this is less of an issue if you mainly shoot with a tripod. Overall, this is a solid and unique option for landscape photography thanks to its high-resolution sensor and compact design.

    See our review

  6. Alternative With IBIS: Sony α7C

    Body Type
    Rangefinder-Styled Mirrorless
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    Full Frame
    Tested Lens
    Sony FE 28–60 mm F4–5.6

    If you'd prefer a compact camera that has in-body image stabilization, consider the Sony α7C. It's not quite as portable as the SIGMA fp L, though it's still very compact for an interchangeable lens camera, and it has a lower-resolution sensor. However, it's more comfortable to shoot with thanks to its handgrip, EVF, and fully articulated screen. On top of that, it has in-body image stabilization, which does a great job of reducing camera shake when shooting handheld. This camera also has superb noise handling at higher ISOs, so it's better-suited to shooting in low light, and its overall image quality is fantastic. That said, its extended minimum ISO only goes to ISO 50, meaning you may need to use a filter for long exposure shots.

    Get the SIGMA if you prioritize portability and want a higher-resolution sensor, but if you'd prefer a more ergonomic camera that's still compact, the Sony is an excellent alternative.

    See our review

  7. Best Beginner Camera For Landscape Photography: Canon EOS Rebel T8i

    7.6
    Landscape Photography
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    No
    Sensor Size
    APS-C
    Tested Lens
    Canon EF-S 18–55mm f/4–5.6 IS STM

    Of those we've tested, the best camera for landscape photography if you're starting out or on a budget is the Canon EOS Rebel T8i. It's an entry-level DSLR camera with an APS-C sensor that's easy to use and feels comfortable to shoot with, thanks to its intuitive menu system and simple control layout. Going with a DSLR also gives you access to a long line of compatible lenses, including wide-angle lenses ideal for landscape photography.

    This camera has a fully articulated touchscreen that makes it easier to compose shots, and its 24-megapixel APS-C sensor delivers good overall image quality. Photos have amazing dynamic range at the camera's base ISO 100 setting, and it has decent noise handling at higher ISO levels too, so it fares relatively well in low light. It also has fairly good battery performance with an advertised battery life of about 360 photos, so it should last for quite a while, depending on your usage habits and settings.

    Unfortunately, the camera is heavier and bulkier than most mirrorless alternatives, so it may not be the best option to take on long hikes to remote shooting locations. Despite that, this is still a good beginner camera that you can grow with, thanks to its easy-to-use design, good image quality, and extensive lens options.

    See our review

  8. Best Bridge Camera For Landscape Photography: Sony RX10 IV

    7.9
    Landscape Photography
    Body Type
    Bridge
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    1-inch
    Tested Lens
    Built-In Lens

    The best bridge camera for landscape photography of those we've tested is the Sony RX10 IV. It features a long 24-600mm equivalent zoom lens that's built-in for more convenience, allowing you to zoom in and adjust the framing of your landscapes or maintain a wider field of view. While the camera is on the bulky, heavy side, it feels incredibly comfortable to shoot with.

    Its screen can tilt out for easier composition, but it also has a large, high-resolution viewfinder, along with several customizable buttons. It delivers excellent overall image quality with amazing dynamic range to bring out more details in landscapes, though it's not as well-suited to shooting in low light due to its smaller 1-inch sensor. Still, it has a wide ISO range, which is extendable down to ISO 64. Though it lacks in-body image stabilization, it has an electronic stabilization feature that does a great job of reducing camera shake.

    Unfortunately, like other Sony cameras, its menu system is a bit complicated to navigate. It's also not the best option for traveling light because of its size and weight, but on the upside, it has a good battery life that's advertised to last for approximately 400 photos, and it supports USB charging. Overall, if you want the convenience of a point-and-shoot camera with the versatility of a long zoom lens, this is a great option.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV: The Canon EOS 5D Mark IV is a staple full-frame DSLR that's well-suited to a range of photography, including landscapes. It has lots of lens options and delivers impressive image quality, but it's older than the Nikon D780 and has a fixed screen and poor battery life. See our review
  • Canon EOS R6: The Canon EOS R6 is a premium full-frame mirrorless camera that offers fantastic image quality, and unlike the Sony a7 III, it has a weather-sealed body. However, it's a bit bulkier and has worse battery life. See our review
  • Fujifilm X100V: The Fujifilm X100V is a premium APS-C point-and-shoot that delivers excellent image quality, making it a great option for landscapes if you want something very portable. Its fixed prime lens is less versatile than an interchangeable lens compact like the Sony a7C. See our review
  • Nikon D5600: The Nikon D5600 is a solid entry-level DSLR that performs similarly to the Canon EOS Rebel T8i. However, it's not quite as comfortable to use and is less versatile since it can't record 4k video. See our review
  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III: The Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III is a great option for landscape photography. It's more portable than the Fujifilm X-T4 since it uses a smaller Micro Four Thirds sensor. However, it still delivers excellent image quality, and the MFT system has plenty of affordable lenses. However, it's less suited to shooting in low light and has mediocre battery life. See our review
  • Panasonic LUMIX FZ1000 II: The Panasonic LUMIX FZ1000 II is a great bridge camera option that's considerably cheaper than the Sony RX10 IV. It's a bit more portable, but it's not weather-sealed and has a shorter zoom range. See our review

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best cameras for landscape photography for most people to buy, according to their needs. We factor in the price, feedback from our visitors, and availability (no cameras that are difficult to find or almost out of stock in the US).

If you'd like to choose for yourself, here's the list of all of our camera reviews, arranged by their landscape photography score. Be careful not to get caught up in the details. There is no single perfect camera. Personal taste, preference, and shooting habits will matter more in your selection.

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