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Fujifilm X-H2 Camera Review

Tested using Methodology v0.12
Reviewed May 04, 2023 at 11:56 am
Latest change: Retest May 29, 2023 at 04:53 pm
Fujifilm X-H2 Picture
8.0
Travel Photography
8.3
Landscape Photography
8.3
Sport & Wildlife Photography
7.1
Vlogging
8.4
Studio Video
6.4
Action Video

The Fujifilm X-H2 is the flagship model in Fuji's mirrorless APS-C lineup. In contrast to the high-speed Fujifilm X-H2S, it has a 40MP backside-illuminated sensor and 8k video recording, making it a powerhouse for both stills and video. While it lacks the dedicated exposure dials and vintage aesthetic that Fuji fans are used to with the X-T lineup, including the Fujifilm X-T4, its sturdy weather-sealed body, large grip, and relatively long battery life are great for long days of extensive use.

Our Verdict

8.0 Travel Photography

The Fujifilm X-H2 is good for travel photography, especially if you prioritize image quality over portability. It isn't very small or lightweight, but its high-resolution sensor can capture stunningly detailed images. In-body image stabilization makes it easier to capture photos at slower shutter speeds. The camera is also sturdy and weather-sealed to give you some peace of mind when shooting outdoors. Battery life is also great for a mirrorless camera. However, it isn't the best option for low-light situations.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • High-res sensor produces incredibly detailed photos.
  • Great battery life.
Cons
  • Not very portable.
  • Low light noise handling is only decent.
8.3 Landscape Photography

The Fujifilm X-H2 is great for landscape photography. Its high-resolution sensor captures an incredible amount of detail, which is great for making large-scale prints and gives you more leeway to crop in your photos. Dynamic range is superb, so it can capture a wide range of shadow and highlight detail. It doesn't have the greatest noise handling in low light. It also isn't the most portable camera.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • High-res sensor produces incredibly detailed photos.
  • Wide dynamic range.
  • Great battery life.
Cons
  • Not very portable.
  • Low light noise handling is only decent.
8.3 Sport & Wildlife Photography

The Fujifilm X-H2 is great for sports and wildlife, though its high-resolution sensor is best suited to static subjects. Its slow readout speed means that shooting at its fastest burst rate with the e-shutter can cause rolling shutter artifacts. On the upside, its max mechanical burst rate is still fast. It also has a highly effective autofocus system with various subject-tracking modes that work very well. Battery life is solid, too. Its photo buffer is surprisingly large, considering the file sizes from that high-res sensor, though working with such large files may not be preferable when shooting extended bursts.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • High-res sensor produces incredibly detailed photos.
  • Great battery life.
  • Quick burst shooting.
  • Large photo buffer.
Cons
  • Not very portable.
  • Slow readout speed can cause distortion with e-shutter.
7.1 Vlogging

The Fujifilm X-H2 is decent for vlogging, but this isn't its intended use. It's mostly suited for sit-down vlogs, as it's not portable enough for on-the-go vlogging. On the upside, its fully articulated screen makes it easy to monitor your footage when self-recording. It also has plenty of frame rate and resolution options. That said, rolling shutter distortion can be an issue if you pan the camera rapidly.

Pros
  • Fully articulated screen.
  • Amazing video quality.
Cons
  • Not very portable.
  • Noticeable rolling shutter effect.
8.4 Studio Video

The Fujifilm X-H2 is great for studio video. It can record in a wide range of resolutions, including 8k, 6.2k, oversampled 4k, and sub-sampled 4k. Video quality is amazing in controlled lighting situations, and it has a very effective subject-tracking feature. It can also output RAW video to a compatible external recorder via HDMI and supports 10-bit 4:2:2 video internally, including support for ProRes codecs when using a CFexpress card slot. That said, while battery life is generally good, it can overheat during longer recording sessions, especially when recording in 8k. It also suffers from rolling shutter distortion, which can be a problem with panning shots and quicker camera movements.

Pros
  • Video recording up to 8k.
  • RAW video output via HDMI.
  • Internal ProRes 422 codec support.
  • Amazing video quality.
Cons
  • Noticeable rolling shutter effect.
  • Can overheat during longer recording sessions.
6.4 Action Video

The Fujifilm X-H2 isn't meant for POV-style action video. That said, it's a very capable video camera if you want to record high-resolution footage of sports or action from the sidelines. It has a lot of frame rate options, with 8k up to 30 fps, 4k up to 60 fps, and 1080p up to 240 fps in its FHD high-speed recording mode. That said, rolling shutter distortion can cause artifacts with quicker camera movements.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • Amazing video quality.
  • Plenty of frame rate options.
Cons
  • Not portable enough for POV action footage.
  • Noticeable rolling shutter effect.
  • Not waterproof.
  • 8.0 Travel Photography
  • 8.3 Landscape Photography
  • 8.3 Sport & Wildlife Photography
  • 7.1 Vlogging
  • 8.4 Studio Video
  • 6.4 Action Video
  1. Updated May 29, 2023: We noticed an error in our 'Photo RAW Noise' scoring and have corrected it. The text and score have been updated.
  2. Updated May 04, 2023: Review published.
  3. Updated May 01, 2023: Early access published.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Fujifilm X-H2 comes in one color: Black. You can see our unit's label here.

You can buy the camera body on its own or bundled with a single kit lens, like the XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR zoom lens, or multiple lenses, depending on the retailer.

Having said that, Fujifilm has a list of recommended lenses to use with this camera to take full advantage of its high-resolution sensor. These are Fujifilm lenses that have the best edge-to-edge resolving power at max aperture. However, Fujifilm also notes that even if you use a lens not listed here, you'll still see the effects of its high-resolution sensor; it just may not be the sharpest possible image.

We purchased the Fujifilm XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR lens, included on the list of recommended lenses, to test the camera with (excluding our image quality tests, for which we use a standardized lens for comparability across all interchangeable-lens cameras). You can see how a photo taken with the XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR looks here, compared to a sample photo taken with the XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R OIS (not included on the list of recommended lenses) here.

If you come across a different variant, let us know, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Cameras

The Fujifilm X-H2 is a high-end APS-C camera. It has a high-resolution sensor that lets it capture remarkably detailed photos compared to other APS-C offerings, along with 8k video recording, giving many cameras in a similar price range a run for their money. However, its slow readout speed can be an issue when taking photos or shooting video of faster subjects.

For more options, check out our recommendations for the best mirrorless cameras, the best cameras for landscape photography, or the best cameras for filmmaking.

Sony α7 IV

The Sony α7 IV and the Fujifilm X-H2 are both high-end hybrid cameras, but they use different-sized sensors. The Sony has a full-frame sensor, while the Fujifilm has a higher-resolution APS-C sensor and can record 8k video. That said, the Sony is better for low-light shooting.

Fujifilm X-T4

The Fujifilm X-H2 and the Fujifilm X-T4 are both excellent APS-C cameras, but they're aimed at slightly different users. The X-H2 is a bit more powerful, with a higher-resolution sensor, upgraded autofocus system, and video recording in up to 8k resolution. However, it's a lot bulkier than the Fujifilm X-T4, which is the better choice for users who want a more portable hybrid camera.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
3.9
Design
Portability
Height
3.7" (9.5 cm)
Width
5.4" (13.7 cm)
Depth
3.3" (8.5 cm)
Volume
67.1 in³ (1,099.5 cm³)
Weight
1.49 lbs (0.67 kg)

The Fujifilm X-H2 isn't especially portable. It's heavy and bulkier than the Fujifilm X-T4, but overall, it'll feel well-balanced with moderately large lenses.

9.0
Design
Build Quality

Build quality is superb. The camera feels very durable and well-built. Fujifilm advertises it to have 79 weather-sealed points to keep out dust and moisture and says it can withstand temperatures as low as 14°F (-10°C). All of the inputs are covered with secure plastic doors, while the memory card compartment and battery compartment both have locking hinged doors. You can even remove the memory card door if needed.

Design
Body
Body Type
SLR-Style
Water Resistance
Weather-Sealed
Mirrorless
Yes
Rugged
No
Hot Shoe
Yes
Customizable Button
Yes
Command Dial
2
Tripod Mount
Yes
Lens Mount
X Mount
Built-In Flash
No
Fastest Shutter Speed
1/8,000 s

Compared to the Fujifilm X-H1, the X-H2 has a few key design differences. The joystick on the back has been redesigned and repositioned, as you can see here. Just like the Fujifilm X-S10, the X-H2 has a PSAM dial instead of the typical Fuji exposure dials that you get with the X-H1. You can see how the tops of the X-H1 and X-H2 differ here.

Design
In The Box

  • Fujifilm X-H2 mirrorless camera body
  • Sensor cap
  • Removable eye cup
  • Hot shoe cover
  • Shoulder strap
  • 1x NP-W235 battery
  • AC adapter with international plug adapters
  • USB-C to USB-C cable
  • Cable management accessory
  • User manual and documentation

9.0
Design
Ergonomics & Comfort
Hand Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Extra-Large Hand
Yes

The X-H2 has fantastic ergonomics. Though the camera is on the larger side, it feels well-balanced when shooting with a lens like the Fuji XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR and doesn't get tiresome to use for longer periods. The grip is very deep and comfortable, with a sufficiently grippy texture. That said, without dedicated exposure dials, like you get with the older X-H1 or the Fujifilm X-T4, it's not as easy to adjust exposure settings on the fly. Unlike the X-T4, the command dials don't have click functionality, giving you less customizability. The rubber eyecup is also on the harder side. The joystick can be hard to reach if you have smaller hands, but otherwise, the buttons and dials are well-placed.

Design
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Type
Electronic
Advertised Coverage
100%
Advertised Resolution
5.76 million dots
Advertised Magnification
0.8

At 5.76 million dots, the viewfinder has a very high resolution that gives you an incredibly detailed view. The manufacturer advertises it to have a 120fps refresh rate, so blur and lag are minimal.

9.0
Design
Screen
Screen Articulation Type
Fully-Articulated
Screen Max Brightness
900 cd/m²
Advertised Resolution
1.62 million dots
Size
3.0" (7.5 cm)
Touchscreen
Limited

The Fujifilm X-H2 has a fully articulated screen, which is great for video work and makes it easy to monitor your footage if you're recording yourself. The screen has a fairly high resolution, so the image on the monitor looks quite sharp. Touch capability is limited to selecting autofocus points and shutter control. You can only use the touchscreen to change settings in video mode.

There's a secondary display on top of the camera that shows info about battery life, storage space, and settings at a glance. You can toggle it between light and dark mode.

8.0
Design
Menu System
Guide Mode
Yes
App Name
FujiFilm Camera Remote

The user interface is great. It's easy to navigate using the joystick or the directional pad on the back of the camera. It has a fairly intuitive layout, although some of Fujifilm's terminology differs from other brands, e.g., metering settings are called 'Photometry' settings. While the menu may take some to get used to, it's easy to navigate once you get a handle on it. There's also an info function to explain certain settings, but it's somewhat limited, especially compared to cameras like the Canon EOS R6 Mark II, which has a more comprehensive guide function.

There's also a quick menu for commonly used settings, which you can customize to your preference. Another nice touch is that the quick menu doesn't fully obstruct your view on the screen, so you can see any adjustments as you make them. You also have customizable 'My Menu' pages for both photo and video, allowing you to create a custom menu limited to the specific settings you wish to access. Overall, these extensive customization options, including swipe motions for the screen and almost all of the camera's buttons, allow you to tailor the shooting experience to your preferences.

not tested
Design
Built-In Lens
Maximum Aperture
No built-in lens
Max Aperture (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Minimum Focal Length
N/A
Maximum Focal Length
N/A
Max Focal Length (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Optical Image Stabilization
No
Luminance
N/A
Light Falloff
N/A
Design
Sensor
Sensor Type
BSI CMOS
Advertised Effective Pixels
40.2 MP
Sensor Size
APS-C
Processor
X-Processor 5
Extended ISO Minimum
60
Native ISO Minimum (Base ISO)
125
Native ISO Maximum
12,800
Tested Firmware
2.00
8.7
Design
Battery
Battery Type
Fujifilm NP-W235
USB Charging
Yes
Use When Charging
Yes
Advertised Battery Life In Photo
540 photos
Tested Battery Life In Video
110 min

Battery life is excellent. It's CIPA-rated for 540 photos on a full charge, which is a little higher than the Fujifilm X-T4. While that number is just a ballpark figure that can vary with real-world usage, it's great relative to other mirrorless models, though it falls far short of DSLR numbers.

For video, the camera lasts for almost two hours of continuous video recording in 4k at 30 fps. In 8k, that drops to about an hour, which is still good considering the higher processing power required for 8k recording.

Photo General
7.7
Photo General
Photo Shooting Speed
Low Speed Continuous
4 fps
High Speed Continuous
12 fps
Silent Shooting Continuous
15 fps
Raw Buffer Size
116 Photos
JPEG Buffer Size
10,000 Photos
Buffer Empty Time
14 s

The Fujifilm X-H2 can shoot at a very quick max burst rate with both its mechanical shutter and its electronic shutter. E-shutter burst shooting is a little faster but has more risk of artifacts from rolling shutter. The buffer is very deep, too. When shooting in JPEG, the buffer clears photos quickly enough that you'll never have to worry about filling it up. When shooting in RAW, it fills up after about 115 shots, which is still excellent. However, it takes about 14 seconds to clear afterward, which can interrupt if you fill it at a critical moment.

8.3
Photo General
Photo AF-C Tracking
Autofocus Tracking Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
76%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
77%

The Fujifilm X-H2 has a very good hybrid autofocus system with impressive tracking capabilities. It has an automatic subject detection feature that can track human eyes and faces, as well as animals like cats and dogs, birds, cars, bikes, airplanes, and trains. With human faces, it does a great job of keeping moving subjects in focus. Though you won't get a perfect hit rate with more erratic subjects or in busier settings, it's a highly effective and intuitive auto-tracking feature.

9.6
Photo General
Photo AF-C Center Point
Autofocus Center Point Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
95%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
99%

When using a single focus point, the autofocus works very well, especially when using a lens that has a quick focusing motor. You'll have no trouble keeping subjects behind the focus point in focus, whether they're static or moving predictably.

8.3
Photo General
Photo Image Stabilization
Minimum Shutter Speed Achieved
1/8 s
In-Body Image Stabilization
Yes

The Fujifilm X-H2 has a five-axis in-body image stabilization system that's advertised to offer up to 7 stops of compensation. We tested image stabilization using a lens without optical stabilization and still managed to capture clear handheld shots at very slow shutter speeds, so the IBIS works well to minimize the effects of camera shake.

Photo Image Quality
9.0
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Dynamic Range
Dynamic Range At Base ISO
11.5 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/500s Exposure Time
9.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/2000s Exposure Time
7.2 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/4000s Exposure Time
6.7 f-stops

RAW dynamic range is fantastic. The camera can capture a very wide range of highlight and shadow detail. It also maintains a solid amount of dynamic range in low light.

8.4
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Sharpness
Vertical Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,955 LW/PH
Horizontal Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,973 LW/PH

The X-H2 uses a 40.2-megapixel sensor, so it can capture an impressive level of fine detail. You have plenty of room to crop in your photos without losing too much resolution.

Thanks to the sensor's high resolution, the X-H2 can also take advantage of Fujifilm's 'Pixel Shift Multi Shot' feature, which was previously only available on some of their medium format GFX cameras. The Pixel Shift mode takes a series of 20 RAW photos, using the camera's in-body image stabilization to move the sensor in tiny increments for each frame. Then, using the Fujifilm 'Pixel Shift Combiner' software, you can combine the images into an ultra-high-resolution composite photo of up to 160 megapixels. Here's a sample Pixel Shift photo taken of our test scene, which you can compare with the standard test scene photo. It's worth noting that you should only use this mode for static scenes, and it's best used with a tripod. If there's any kind of movement with the camera or in the scene, like trees blowing in the wind or birds flying through the sky, you can get artifacts. You can see an example of some of these artifacts here when you zoom in on the trees or rooftops.

7.3
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Noise
SNR 18% At 1/8 Exposure Time (125 ms)
32.8dB
SNR 18% At 1/125 Exposure Time (8 ms)
24.2 dB
SNR 18% At 1/1000 Exposure Time (1 ms)
N/A
SNR 18% At 1/4000 Exposure Time (0.25 ms)
N/A

The Fujifilm X-H2 has decent noise handling. The high-resolution sensor manages noise fairly well in low light, but noise is more apparent at very high ISO values than the lower-resolution Fujifilm X-T4.

Pictures Sample Gallery
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Skate Park Picture
JPEG Skate Park Picture Download
RAW Skate Park Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Polish Church Picture
JPEG Polish Church Picture Download
RAW Polish Church Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Studio Picture
JPEG Studio Picture Download
RAW Studio Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Stairway Picture
JPEG Stairway Picture Download
RAW Stairway Picture Download
Video General
Video General
Video Features
Full HD Video
Yes
4k Video
Yes
6k Video
Yes
Clean HDMI Output
Yes
Advertised Max Chroma Sampling Over HDMI
4:2:2
Advertised Max Bit Depth Over HDMI
12 bits
Log Picture Profile
Yes
Recording Light
Yes

The Fujifilm X-H2 can record 8k, 6.2k, and oversampled 4k video (called '4k HQ') at up to 30 fps. You can also record normal, sub-sampled 4k at up to 60 fps and 1080p at up to 240 fps. The camera includes DCI 4k options and a 17:9 FHD option for a slightly wider, more cinematic aspect ratio.

The camera supports 12-bit RAW video output via HDMI with a compatible external recorder, with support for both Apple ProRes RAW and Blackmagic RAW.

Video General
Audio
Audio Test Sample
Audio Recording
Stereo
Microphone Level Display
Yes
Video General
Video File Format And Compression
MP4 H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MP4 H.265 / HEVC
No
MOV H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MOV H.265 / HEVC
Yes
AVCHD H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
All-I Compression
Yes

In addition to most common recording formats and codecs, the Fujifilm X-H2 can also record in Apple ProRes 422 HQ, Apple ProRes 422, and Apple ProRes LT formats. However, you need to use a CFexpress card to use these ProRes formats.

4k Video
9.2
4k Video
4k Video Frame Rate
240 fps In 4k
No
120 fps In 4k
No
60 fps In 4k
Yes, with a Crop
30 fps In 4k
Yes
24 fps In 4k
Yes
4k Crop At Max Available fps
1.14 x

In its normal 4k mode, the camera can capture video at up to 60 fps, although shooting in 4k / 60 fps incurs a slight crop. That gives you room to slow down your footage slightly or capture smooth action video. In the oversampled 4k HQ mode, it's limited to a max of 30 fps.

9.0
4k Video
4k Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In 4k
1,783 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In 4k
729 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In 4k
4:2:2
Bit Depth In 4k
10 Bit
Record Time Limit In 4k
N/A
Overheat Recording Interruptions in 4k
2

4k internal recording is superb. The camera supports F-Log and F-Log 2 to get a wider dynamic range. Internal 10-bit 4:2:2 recording also gives you more to work with in post-production. There's no time limit on recording, which is great for long-form content, although it can occasionally overheat and shut down during long recording sessions at higher resolutions.

The exceptionally high bit rates noted above were achieved when shooting in ProRes 422 HQ. When using H.265 All-Intra, the max bit rate we got was 699 Mbps, and the minimum was 108 Mbps. The bit rates you get will vary depending on the file format, codec, and other settings.

In 8k, using the ProRes 422 HQ codec, you'll get even higher bit rates, with a max of 3263 Mbps and a minimum of 2749 Mbps. With H.265, we got a max of 684 Mbps and a min of 93 Mbps. When shooting in 8k, the camera is also quicker to overheat, but Fujifilm sells a cooling fan that screws onto the back of the camera for extended 8k recording. However, we haven't tested the camera with the cooling fan, so we can't say how effective it is at reducing overheating.

7.9
4k Video
4k Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In 4k
6.0
Face Tracking In 4k
9.0
Face Detection In 4k
Yes
Eye Detection In 4k
Yes

The camera has very good video autofocus. In video mode, it has various subject detection modes on top of face/eye detection. With continuous autofocus, you can choose between two area modes: 'Multi', which automatically detects and tracks a subject in the frame, and 'Area', which gives you a moveable focus area. There's no general selectable subject tracking outside the camera's automatic subject detection modes. For that reason, it didn't perform amazingly in our object-tracking test. When using the 'Area' AF mode, it can stay with an object that's within or behind the focus area somewhat well, but it's slower to react whenever that object moves, so you get somewhat choppy transitions. Thankfully, there are settings to fine-tune the sensitivity and speed, which can help reduce the jerkiness of the autofocus but results in a trade-off in transition speed.

The face and eye tracking feature, on the other hand, performs incredibly well. It's super sticky and reliable and doesn't have any trouble keeping up with faster-moving subjects. That stays true in 8k as well. In 8k, the camera scores a 9.1 for face tracking, and you can see the sample video for that here. It scores a 7.7 for object tracking, which you can see here.

8.8
4k Video
4k Video Quality
Low Light Capability In 4k
8.0
Test Scene Extract In 4k
9.5

Video quality is excellent on the Fujifilm X-H2. The high-resolution sensor shines, with incredibly detailed footage in more controlled lighting conditions. It does a great job in low light, though some noise is inevitable.

For comparison, you can see the 8k video test scene extract here, the 6.2k test scene extract here, and the 4k HQ test scene extract here. You can also see how 8k video looks in low light here.

6.7
4k Video
4k Video Rolling Shutter Effect
4k Rolling Shutter
4.8°

The Fujifilm X-H2 has a slow sensor readout speed, resulting in fairly noticeable rolling shutter distortion. It's most noticeable with quicker camera movements or panning.

In 8k, rolling shutter effect is even worse, with a rolling shutter degree of 8.3° (resulting in a score of 4.9). You can see the 8k rolling shutter video here.

Full HD Video
9.7
Full HD Video
FHD Video Frame Rate
240 fps In FHD
Yes, with a Crop
120 fps In FHD
Yes, with a Crop
60 fps In FHD
Yes
30 fps In FHD
Yes
24 fps In FHD
Yes
FHD Crop At Max Available fps
1.3 x

Like other Fujifilm cameras, the X-H2 includes an FHD high-speed recording mode that lets you capture 1080p footage in slow motion at up to 240 fps, with settings for 2x, 4x, or 8x slow motion. This mode incurs a noticeable crop. Otherwise, you can record standard 1080p videos at up to 60 fps.

10
Full HD Video
FHD Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In FHD
451 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In FHD
181 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In FHD
4:2:2
Bit Depth In FHD
10 Bit
Record Time Limit in FHD
N/A

Internal recording capability is superb in 1080p. There's no recording time limit, and the camera can capture 10-bit 4:2:2 footage internally, giving you more leeway to edit and process your videos.

We recorded the above bit rates using the ProRes 422 HQ codec, which requires a CFexpress card. When recording in H.265 All-I, we got a max bit rate of 395 Mbps and a minimum of 51 Mbps. Bit rates will vary depending on your settings.

7.6
Full HD Video
FHD Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In FHD
6.0
Face Tracking In FHD
8.4
Face Detection In FHD
Yes
Eye Detection In FHD
Yes

Just as in 4k, the camera does well when there's an identifiable subject. It picks up different subjects well and does an impressive job of keeping moving human subjects in focus, even with faster movements or when they pop in and out of the frame. That said, it's more limited if you want to manually select a target. When using the 'Area' AF mode, you can choose the AF area, and it does an okay job keeping whatever is in the selected area in focus. However, it's less reliable, and you can't select a target for it to track—you can only move the AF area to the particular spot the object or subject may be in.

8.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Quality
Low Light Capability In FHD
7.5
Test Scene Extract In FHD
9.5

Video quality is remarkable in 1080p as well. The camera captures incredibly detailed footage in well-lit conditions, with sharply rendered details and colors that pop. It's good in low light too. While there's some noise and loss of detail, it looks good overall.

6.8
Full HD Video
FHD Video Rolling Shutter Effect
FHD Rolling Shutter
4.7°

Rolling shutter effect is similar in 1080p. It can be quite noticeable, especially when moving the camera more quickly.

Storage And Connectivity
Storage And Connectivity
Storage
Card 1 Slot
CFexpress
Card 2 Slot
SD Card UHS-II

There are two memory card slots, including one SD card slot and one CFexpress card slot. They're located on the side of the camera, making it easy to switch out cards, even when using a tripod.

10
Storage And Connectivity
Inputs / Outputs
USB
USB-C
HDMI
Full Size (Type A)
Headphones
Yes
Microphone
Stereo
Wi-Fi
Yes
Bluetooth
Yes

The Fujifilm X-H2 includes a full-sized HDMI port, which is a nice touch for videographers who don't want to use an adapter to connect an external recorder. You also have all the other ports you might need, including a microphone input and a headphone jack. On the other side of the camera, you also have a remote input. On the bottom, there's also the battery grip connection.