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Fujifilm X-T30 II Camera Review

Tested using Methodology v0.10
Reviewed Jul 12, 2022 at 10:15 am
Fujifilm X-T30 II Picture
7.8
Travel Photography
7.9
Landscape Photography
7.4
Sport & Wildlife Photography
6.5
Vlogging
7.4
Studio Video
5.8
Action Video
Body Type
SLR-Style
Mirrorless
Yes
Tested Lens
FUJINON XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R OIS
Sensor Size
APS-C

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is a lightly upgraded version of the Fujifilm X-T30. Like its predecessor, the X-T30 II is an interchangeable-lens mirrorless camera aimed at beginners who want to make the step up to a mid-range model. It's a very portable APS-C camera with more physical buttons and dials than the entry-level Fujifilm X-T200 and makes for a nice sweet spot in between the more portable Fujifilm X-E4 and the more video-oriented Fujifilm X-S10.

Our Verdict

7.8 Travel Photography

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is good for travel photography. It has a small, lightweight body that feels well-built and makes it easy to take on the go. JPEG photos look excellent straight out of the camera, with minimal noise and pleasing colors. While it has plenty of physical dials and buttons that make it easy to adjust settings on the fly, it can also feel a bit cramped due to its small size. Its battery life is also somewhat limited, although you can use it while charging via USB.

Pros
  • Portable, lightweight body.
  • Easy to adjust settings on the fly.
  • Excellent JPEG image quality.
Cons
  • Battery life is somewhat limited.
7.9 Landscape Photography

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is good for landscape photography. It has good noise handling for an APS-C sensor, and RAW files have a solid amount of exposure latitude, so you can make adjustments and recover shadow detail without sacrificing too much quality. If you shoot in JPEG, images look great straight out of the camera, with several film simulation profiles to choose from to get a different look and feel. The camera also has an HDR mode, which uses in-camera processing to get an image with higher dynamic range. That said, it isn't the most comfortable camera to shoot with.

Pros
  • Portable, lightweight body.
  • Excellent JPEG image quality.
Cons
  • Doesn't have the best ergonomics.
7.4 Sport & Wildlife Photography

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is decent for sports and wildlife. It has a fairly quick max burst rate for capturing faster subjects, and it has a very large photo buffer if you shoot in JPEG. However, its RAW photo buffer is much more limited, and it takes a long time to empty once full. Its autofocus system is good, but the tracking can sometimes struggle to keep up with faster-moving subjects.

Pros
  • Portable, lightweight body.
  • Excellent JPEG image quality.
  • Decently fast burst rate.
Cons
  • Small RAW photo buffer.
  • Long buffer empty time.
6.5 Vlogging

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is okay for vlogging. It's portable and does an excellent job smoothing out camera shake when paired with an optically stabilized Fuji lens. Video quality is also great. However, you can't flip the screen around to face you while recording, and it suffers from overheating issues when using its highest video quality settings. There's also a lot of rolling shutter in 4k, which can cause distracting skewed lines in the background of your videos.

Pros
  • Portable, lightweight body.
  • Excellent optical stabilization.
  • Great video quality.
Cons
  • Can't turn tilting screen to face forward.
  • Can overheat when recording continuously in 4k.
  • Heavy rolling shutter effect in 4k.
7.4 Studio Video

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is decent for studio video. Video quality is great in more controlled lighting conditions, and the camera can output 10-bit 4:2:2 video over HDMI. It also supports Log recording to get the most out of the sensor. Internally, however, it's limited to 8-bit 4:2:0 color. It also tends to overheat when recording for long periods using its highest video quality settings. While there's a microphone input, the camera doesn't have a headphone jack to monitor your audio while shooting.

Pros
  • Portable, lightweight body.
  • Great video quality.
Cons
  • Can overheat when recording continuously in 4k.
  • Heavy rolling shutter effect in 4k.
5.8 Action Video

The Fujifilm X-T30 II isn't meant for action video, but it's okay for filming sports. The camera is lightweight and portable, though it isn't designed for mounting on a helmet or chest rig. It does an excellent job of smoothing out video footage when using an optically stabilized lens, but you still need a gimbal or stabilizer to get very smooth action footage. The camera's 4k frame rates are also limited for action video, but it does have a high-speed recording mode in 1080p.

Pros
  • Portable, lightweight body.
  • Excellent optical stabilization.
  • High-speed recording mode for slow-mo 1080p.
Cons
  • Can overheat when recording continuously in 4k.
  • Heavy rolling shutter effect in 4k.
  • Not water-resistant.
  • Limited 4k frame rates options.
  • 7.8 Travel Photography
  • 7.9 Landscape Photography
  • 7.4 Sport & Wildlife Photography
  • 6.5 Vlogging
  • 7.4 Studio Video
  • 5.8 Action Video
  1. Updated Sep 23, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.10.
  2. Updated Aug 08, 2022: As a result of Test Bench 0.9, we've updated the 'Photo RAW Dynamic Range' box and score.
  3. Updated Aug 05, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.9.
  4. Updated Jul 12, 2022: Review published.
  5. Updated May 25, 2022: Early access published.

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Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Fujifilm X-T30 II comes in two color variants: Black and Silver. You can purchase the body alone or bundled with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R OIS kit lens.

Let us know if you come across another variant, and we'll update the review.

You can see our unit's label here.

Compared To Other Cameras

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is a fairly well-rounded entry-level APS-C camera. It has a portable, retro-inspired design, which Fujifilm is known for, and physical buttons and dials give it a ton of functionality and customizability. However, while autofocus performance is good overall, it isn't as consistent as the latest cameras from Sony or Canon.

Physically, the X-T30 II is nearly identical to the original Fujifilm X-T30, with the biggest difference being a higher-resolution screen. On the inside, however, the X-T30 II has some nice improvements, including a newer AF system, a larger photo buffer, and longer video recording times. Still, if you already own the X-T30, it probably isn't worth the upgrade.

For more options, check out our recommendations for the best cameras for beginners, the best cameras for photography, and the best cameras.

Fujifilm X-S10

The Fujifilm X-S10 and the Fujifilm X-T30 II are both great starter cameras. They both use the same sensor, so image and video quality is comparable. That said, the X-S10 is more suited to vlogging and video work because of its fully-articulated screen and in-body image stabilization, while the X-T30 II is more portable and has different ergonomics, with dedicated exposure dials and a tilting screen.

Fujifilm X-T30

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is a refreshed version of the Fujifilm X-T30. The cameras look almost identical on the outside, though the Mark II has a higher-resolution tilting screen. The X-T30 II also has internal upgrades, including a newer autofocus system, a slightly larger photo buffer, and longer video recording time limits. Overall, it's a solid improvement, but if you already own an X-T30, it isn't different enough to warrant an upgrade.

Fujifilm X-T4

The Fujifilm X-T4 is better overall than the Fujifilm X-T30 II, though they both use the same sensor, so image quality is roughly on par between them. If you prefer a more robust camera with weather-sealing, a bigger high-resolution viewfinder, and a fully articulated screen, get the X-T4. If you're looking for something smaller and easier to carry around, the X-T30 II is still a great option. However, the X-T4 also has better internal video recording capability, so it's a better option for video work.

Sony ฮฑ7C

The Sony a7C is slightly better than the Fujifilm X-T30 II if image quality is your top priority since it uses a full-frame sensor, especially if you prefer to shoot in RAW. The Fujifilm may be preferable if you want something more portable and lightweight and if you prefer a larger viewfinder and tilting screen.

Nikon Z 50

The Nikon Z 50 and the Fujifilm X-T30 II are both good beginner cameras. The Nikon is less portable than the Fujifilm, but it's a bit more comfortable to shoot with, thanks to a larger handgrip and viewfinder. Otherwise, they both offer well-rounded photo and video performance for casual or beginner shooters.

Sony ZV-E10

The Sony ZV-E10 and the Fujifilm X-T30 II are aimed at different users, though they're both good beginner cameras. The Sony is intended for vloggers, and its design reflects that, with a fully articulated screen, simple button layout, and portable form factor. The Fujifilm, on the other hand, is aimed at photographers and has a viewfinder, dedicated exposure dials, and tilting screen.

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
7.7
Design
Portability
Height
3.3" (8.3 cm)
Width
5.1" (12.9 cm)
Depth
2.0" (5.2 cm)
Volume
34.1 inยณ (559.2 cmยณ)
Weight
0.86 lbs (0.39 kg)
Weight With Lens
1.52 lbs (0.69 kg)

The Fujifilm X-T30 II is quite portable with nearly identical dimensions as the Fujifilm X-T30. Its body is narrow, if a little tall, but it has a slim profile that makes it easy to slip into a camera bag. It also doesn't weigh too much, so it won't cause as much fatigue to carry it around your neck or shoulder on long shooting days.

8.0
Design
Build Quality

The Fujifilm X-T30 II feels very well-built. Like the Fujifilm X-T30, it's made of metal and plastic and feels sturdy and high quality. Inputs are covered by a rubber flap, while the battery and SD card slots are covered by a hinged door.

Design
Body
Body Type
SLR-Style
Water Resistance
No
Mirrorless
Yes
Rugged
No
Hot Shoe
Yes
Customizable Button
Yes
Command Dial
3
Tripod Mount
Yes
Lens Mount
X Mount
Built-In Flash
Yes

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has three command dials. There's a front command dial, a rear command dial, and a dedicated shutter speed dial on top. By default, the front dial controls aperture or ISO, depending on the mode, and the rear dial controls shutter speed, but you can customize these to your preference. The command dials also have press functionality, so you can press the front dial to toggle between two different settings, and you can press the rear dial to zoom in on the focus point to check the focus of your image.

On top of that, the camera also has an exposure compensation dial and a dedicated drive mode dial, so you can easily switch from single to continuous shooting to movie mode and more. On the front of the camera, you also have a focus mode toggle to quickly switch between single autofocus, continuous autofocus, and manual focus. Many of the buttons and dials are customizable as well.

Design
In The Box

  • Fujifilm X-T30 II camera body
  • Fujinon XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R OIS lens
  • Front lens cap
  • Rear lens cap
  • Sensor cap
  • Owner's Manual
  • Shoulder strap
  • 1x NP-W126S battery
  • USB-A to USB-C cable

6.0
Design
Ergonomics & Comfort
Hand Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Large Hand
No
Hand Grip: Extra-Large Hand
No

The Fujifilm X-T30 II isn't bad when it comes to comfort. The small size of its hand grip and body make it feel a bit cramped to hold for those with larger hands. Because of its size, it's also easy to press buttons accidentally, particularly the 'Q' button because of its placement near the back thumb rest. That said, the camera feels well-balanced with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 kit lens attached, and having a dedicated shutter speed dial along with two command dials makes it easy to adjust any aspect of the exposure triangle on the fly. The thumbstick is also intuitive to use for menu navigation.

Design
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Type
Electronic
Advertised Coverage
100%
Advertised Resolution
2.36 million dots
Advertised Magnification
0.62

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has a high-resolution EVF that produces a sharp image. However, it isn't especially big, and the plastic eyecup isn't very comfortable.

7.4
Design
Screen
Screen Articulation Type
Tilting
Screen Max Brightness
975 cd/mยฒ
Advertised Resolution
1.62 million dots
Size
3.0" (7.6 cm)
Touchscreen
Limited

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has a screen bright enough to overcome glare in sunnier conditions, and its tilting design is ideal for waist-level shooting. The screen also has a notably higher resolution than the original Fujifilm X-T30, giving you a sharper image and making it easier to review your photos more clearly. However, the touch capabilities are limited to selecting focus points, use as a touch shutter, and enabling AF tracking.

8.0
Design
Menu System
Guide Mode
Yes
App Name
FujiFilm Camera Remote

The menu system remains unchanged from the Fujifilm X-T30, and it's easy to navigate using the thumbstick. There's a bit of a learning curve, but all submenus and settings are clearly labeled and logically organized. There's also a guide function to explain certain settings.

7.5
Design
Lens
Lens Type
Interchangeable
Maximum Aperture
2.8 - 4.0
Max Aperture (Full-Frame Equivalent)
f/4.3
Tested Lens
FUJINON XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R OIS
Minimum Focal Length
18 mm
Maximum Focal Length
55 mm
Max Focal Length (Full-Frame Equivalent)
84 mm
Optical Image Stabilization
Yes
Luminance
89.1%
Light Falloff
59%
Design
Sensor
Sensor Type
CMOS
Advertised Effective Pixels
26.1 MP
Sensor Size
APS-C
Processor
X-Processor 4
Extended ISO Minimum
80
Native ISO Minimum (Base ISO)
160
Native ISO Maximum
12,800
Tested Firmware
1.11
6.7
Design
Battery
Battery Type
Fujifilm NP-W126S
USB Charging
Yes
Use When Charging
Yes
Advertised Battery Life In Photo
390 photos
Tested Battery Life In Video
60 min

Battery performance is okay on the Fujifilm X-T30 II. It has a 390-shot CIPA rating, which is slightly better than the original Fujifilm X-T30, rated at 380 shots. That's a fairly average CIPA rating for a mirrorless camera, and it should last a solid amount if you shoot conservatively, but more extensive shooting will drain the battery quicker. You also get about an hour of battery life when shooting video continuously in 4k with the highest quality settings, which isn't great. Thankfully, you can keep using it while it charges over USB, which is handy if you have a portable battery pack.

Photo General
Photo General
Photo Features
JPEG File Format
Yes
Raw File Format
RAF
Shutter
Electronic and Mechanical
Slowest Shutter Speed
900 s
Fastest Shutter Speed
1/4,000 s
Silent Shooting
Yes
HDR
Yes
Time Lapse
Yes

You can set the Fujifilm X-T30 II's shutter speed as slow as 15 minutes (900s) in its regular shooting mode, which is fantastic for taking long-exposure photos. If you need even longer shutter speeds, it also has a bulb mode that can go up to 60 minutes.

The camera has both an electronic shutter and a mechanical shutter, and you can get shutter speeds of up to 1/32000s with the electronic shutter, which is useful when shooting with a wide-open aperture in very bright conditions.

6.6
Photo General
Photo Shooting Speed
Low Speed Continuous
3 fps
High Speed Continuous
8 fps
Silent Shooting Continuous
10 fps
Raw Buffer Size
18 Photos
JPEG Buffer Size
10,000 Photos
Buffer Empty Time
13 s

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has an okay continuous shooting speed. It maxes out at 8 fps when using the mechanical shutter, which is decently fast for capturing burst shots of moving subjects and action. In silent mode, with the electronic shutter, it shoots at up to 10 fps, so that's great for capturing bursts when you need to be discreet or when taking photos of skittish wildlife, though the e-shutter can also cause distortion. The RAW photo buffer is quite small, but it's much harder to fill out the buffer when shooting in JPEG. If you do fill it up, it takes a little while to empty, which can interrupt your shooting at a critical moment.

7.4
Photo General
Photo Autofocus
Object Tracking Success Rate
71%
Face Tracking Success Rate
50%
Face Detection Distance
134" (340 cm)
Eye Detection
Yes
Advertised Coverage
N/A
Advertised Focus Points
425

The Fujifilm X-T30 II uses a hybrid autofocus system with decent AF tracking performance. Unlike the Fujifilm X-T30, the Mark II uses Fuji's updated tracking system, the same one found on the Fujifilm X-T4. It's a little more intuitive, with a single tracking box that locks onto your target rather than the busier interface of the older model. The general subject tracking is pretty good at gauging the depth of moving subjects or objects, and for the most part, it keeps them in focus, though it tends to lose focus when the object is closer to the lens. The camera also has face and eye detection. It isn't bad when tracking moving faces, but it can also be somewhat unreliable and lose track of subjects that are moving more quickly or erratically.

8.8
Photo General
Photo Image Stabilization
Minimum Shutter Speed Achieved
1/6 s
In-Body Image Stabilization
No

The Fujifilm X-T30 II doesn't have in-body sensor-shift stabilization. However, you can use optically stabilized lenses if you need to shoot at slower shutter speeds without a tripod, like when there's less light. With the XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 kit lens, which has optical image stabilization (OIS), it does an excellent job of stabilizing handheld shots.

Photo Image Quality
7.8
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Dynamic Range
Dynamic Range At Base ISO
10.0 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/500s Exposure Time
8.5 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/2000s Exposure Time
7.1 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/4000s Exposure Time
6.4 f-stops

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has good usable dynamic range. It can capture a solid range of detail in high-contrast scenes, which you can see by downloading the RAW file of our skate park sample photo here. If you shoot to preserve shadow detail, however, highlights still tend to get blown out quite a bit. Still, it performs well for an APS-C sensor, and if you underexpose your images to preserve those highlights, RAW files do have good exposure latitude, allowing you to brighten shadows a few stops without introducing too much noise.

8.2
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Sharpness
Vertical Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,862 LW/PH
Horizontal Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,886 LW/PH

Photos taken straight out of the Fujifilm X-T30 II are sharp when paired with a high-quality lens. It's on par with the Fujifilm X-T30.

9.5
Photo Image Quality
Photo JPEG Noise
SNR 18% At Base ISO
41.20 dB
SNR 18% At ISO 800
39.42 dB
SNR 18% At ISO 3200
37.49 dB

JPEGs have very little visible noise straight out of the camera. Noise is more visible at higher ISO levels, but unless you're pixel-peeping, noise is hardly noticeable even up to ISO 6400.

7.8
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Noise
RAW SNR 18% At Base ISO
40.14 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 200
39.76 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 400
38.12 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 800
36.09 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 1600
33.64 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 3200
30.82 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 6400
28.14 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 12800
25.04 dB
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 25600
N/A
RAW SNR 18% At ISO 51200
N/A

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has good RAW noise handling. It doesn't compare to cameras with full-frame sensors, but you can get relatively clean files at moderately high ISO settings, allowing you to shoot in dimmer lighting conditions without worrying too much about sacrificing quality.

Photo Image Quality
Test Scene Pictures Download
JPEG Picture At Base ISO Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 400 Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 800 Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 1600 Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 3200 Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 6400 Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 12800 Download
JPEG Picture At ISO 25600 N/A
JPEG Picture At ISO 51200 N/A
RAW Picture At Base ISO Download
RAW Picture At ISO 400 Download
RAW Picture At ISO 800 Download
RAW Picture At ISO 1600 Download
RAW Picture At ISO 3200 Download
RAW Picture At ISO 6400 Download
RAW Picture At ISO 12800 Download
RAW Picture At ISO 25600 N/A
RAW Picture At ISO 51200 N/A
Pictures Sample Gallery
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Skate Park Picture
JPEG Skate Park Picture Download
RAW Skate Park Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Polish Church Picture
JPEG Polish Church Picture Download
RAW Polish Church Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Studio Picture
JPEG Studio Picture Download
RAW Studio Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Stairway Picture
JPEG Stairway Picture Download
RAW Stairway Picture Download
Video General
Video General
Video Features
Full HD Video
Yes
4k Video
Yes
6k Video
No
Clean HDMI Output
Yes
Advertised Max Chroma Sampling Over HDMI
4:2:2
Advertised Max Bit Depth Over HDMI
10 bits
Log Picture Profile
Yes
Recording Light
Yes

The Fujifilm X-T30 II can record FHD, UHD 4k and DCI 4k video. It also supports F-Log recording if you want to color-grade your footage. If you shoot with an external recorder, it can also output 10-bit 4:2:2 video over HDMI, capturing more color information and giving you more leeway when processing your videos.

Video General
Audio
Audio Test Sample
Audio Recording
Stereo
Microphone Level Display
Yes
Video General
Video File Format And Compression
MP4 H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MP4 H.265 / HEVC
No
MOV H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MOV H.265 / HEVC
No
AVCHD H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
All-I Compression
No
4k Video
8.5
4k Video
4k Video Frame Rate
240 fps In 4k
No
120 fps In 4k
No
60 fps In 4k
No
30 fps In 4k
Yes
24 fps In 4k
Yes
4k Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

The Fujifilm X-T30 II can record 4k video at up to 30 fps, which is good for a range of video styles, but the camera lacks any high frame rate options for smooth action video or slow-motion recording.

6.5
4k Video
4k Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In 4k
200 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In 4k
100 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In 4k
4:2:0
Bit Depth In 4k
8 Bit
Record Time Limit In 4k
30 min
Overheat Recording Interruptions in 4k
6

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has adequate internal recording capability in 4k. It can capture video at high bit rates, resulting in higher-quality video files. However, it suffers from severe overheating issues when recording continuous video for long periods in MOV format at the highest quality settings. That said, it has a solid 30-minute recording time limit, which is a significant improvement over the ten-minute cap on the Fujifilm X-T30.

8.5
4k Video
4k Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In 4k
8.5
Face Tracking In 4k
8.0
Face Detection In 4k
Yes
Eye Detection In 4k
Yes

Autofocus performance is excellent overall when shooting 4k video on the Fujifilm X-T30 II. The general subject tracking does an amazing job of keeping subjects in focus, and the camera supports face and eye detection. The face tracking works quite consistently, doing a great job of maintaining focus on moving faces, though it can lose track if subjects turn around or move very quickly, and it sometimes has to hunt to find its target. Overall, it's good for most situations but isn't as consistent as other AF systems like Sony's.

8.3
4k Video
4k Video Quality
Low Light Capability In 4k
7.5
Test Scene Extract In 4k
9.0

4k video quality is impressive, especially in more controlled lighting conditions. Footage looks sharp and detailed, and the camera does a good job in low light. Shadows are preserved pretty well, and there isn't an overwhelming amount of noise or grain.

5.7
4k Video
4k Video Rolling Shutter Effect
4k Rolling Shutter
7.0ยฐ

Unfortunately, the Fujifilm X-T30 II has a slow sensor readout speed, resulting in very noticeable rolling shutter. Vertical lines look heavily skewed with faster camera movements.

Full HD Video
9.7
Full HD Video
FHD Video Frame Rate
240 fps In FHD
Yes, with a Crop
120 fps In FHD
Yes, with a Crop
60 fps In FHD
Yes
30 fps In FHD
Yes
24 fps In FHD
Yes
FHD Crop At Max Available fps
1.2 x

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has a ton of frame rate options in 1080p. In normal recording, it can shoot at up to 60 fps, so you can capture smooth action or incorporate slow-motion. It also has a high-speed recording mode, like other Fujifilm cameras, that records at up to 240 fps in 1080p in slow-motion with no audio. That's an improvement over the 120 fps max of the Fujifilm X-T30. This mode incurs a noticeable crop, however.

7.9
Full HD Video
FHD Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In FHD
200 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In FHD
50 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In FHD
4:2:0
Bit Depth In FHD
8 Bit
Record Time Limit in FHD
30 min

Internal recording is good in 1080p. It captures high video bit rates, resulting in videos with more information and quality. As with 4k, the recording time limit is 30 minutes, improving upon the Fujifilm X-T30's 15 minutes.

8.9
Full HD Video
FHD Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In FHD
9.0
Face Tracking In FHD
8.5
Face Detection In FHD
Yes
Eye Detection In FHD
Yes

Autofocus is still excellent in 1080p, though like with 4k, it can sometimes lose its target or hunt a little before finding it. It still does a great job tracking moving subjects overall and supports both face and eye detection.

7.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Quality
Low Light Capability In FHD
7.0
Test Scene Extract In FHD
8.0

1080p video quality is great in more controlled lighting conditions. It looks relatively sharp, and colors are pleasing straight out of the camera. In low light, video looks decent, though it's more grainy and lacks detail in the shadows.

7.0
Full HD Video
FHD Video Rolling Shutter Effect
FHD Rolling Shutter
4.0ยฐ

There's less rolling shutter in 1080p, but vertical lines still look a bit skewed with faster camera movements.

Storage And Connectivity
Storage And Connectivity
Storage
Card 1 Slot
SD Card UHS-I
Card 2 Slot
No 2nd Card Slot

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has just a single UHS-I SD card slot, so you can't take advantage of the faster read and write speeds of UHS-II cards.

8.5
Storage And Connectivity
Inputs / Outputs
USB
USB-C
HDMI
Micro (Type D)
Headphones
No
Microphone
Stereo
Wi-Fi
Yes
Bluetooth
Yes

The Fujifilm X-T30 II has a wide array of inputs and outputs, but it doesn't have a headphone jack to monitor your audio while you record. Unlike the Fujifilm X-T4, there isn't a USB-C-to-3.5mm adapter in the box.

Discussions