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Fujifilm X100V Camera Review

Tested using Methodology v0.12
Review updated Jan 12, 2023 at 10:59 am
Latest change: Test bench update Dec 14, 2022 at 09:34 am
Fujifilm X100V Picture
7.6
Travel Photography
8.1
Landscape Photography
7.7
Sport & Wildlife Photography
6.3
Vlogging
6.9
Studio Video
4.8
Action Video

The Fujifilm X100V is a premium point-and-shoot with an APS-C sensor and the fifth iteration of Fujifilm's X100 series of compact cameras, beloved by street photographers and enthusiasts everywhere. Upgrading the lens from its predecessor but keeping its classic 35mm full-frame equivalent focal length, Fujifilm has kept true to all the things that work about this formula: a relatively compact body with a retro rangefinder design, dedicated exposure dials for hands-on control, and the pièce de résistance—a hybrid viewfinder that lets you toggle between an optical viewfinder for easier framing and an electronic viewfinder for real-time exposure adjustments.

Our Verdict

7.6 Travel Photography

The Fujifilm X100V is good for travel photography. While it's pretty big for a point-and-shoot, its compact fixed-lens design is still much smaller than most interchangeable-lens cameras and makes it easy to travel with. Out-of-the-box image quality is excellent, and the camera performs well in low light thanks to good high ISO performance and a wide-aperture lens. The lens has a built-in ND filter, meaning you can use a wider aperture or slower shutter speed on brighter days. Its fixed 35mm-equivalent focal length forces you to move around to properly compose your shots, which some people may prefer, though it isn't as versatile as a fixed zoom lens for farther-away subjects. Unfortunately, the camera isn't the most comfortable due to its small handgrip. It isn't fully weather-sealed unless you purchase separate sealing accessories for its lens.

Pros
  • Compact design.
  • Impressive build quality.
  • Excellent image quality.
Cons
  • Ergonomics are somewhat lacking.
  • Somewhat short battery life.
8.1 Landscape Photography

The Fujifilm X100V is great for landscape photography. Out-of-the-box image quality is amazing, with fantastic noise handling capability and great dynamic range to capture more detail in high-contrast landscapes. The camera also feels solidly built and is partially weather-sealed, though you need to purchase extra accessories to get full weather-sealing. The built-in ND filter on the lens gives you a bit of extra leeway in widening aperture or slowing down shutter speed in bright environments. Unfortunately, the camera isn't especially comfortable, but its compact and lightweight design make it easy to take on hikes or to remote shooting locations.

Pros
  • Compact design.
  • Impressive build quality.
  • Excellent image quality.
  • Built-in ND filter.
Cons
  • Ergonomics are somewhat lacking.
  • Somewhat short battery life.
7.7 Sport & Wildlife Photography

The Fujifilm X100V is pretty good for sports and wildlife photography, though this isn't its intended use. While it has a reasonably fast burst rate, and its autofocus system is decent overall, it can struggle to keep faster subjects in focus. Its fixed focal-length prime lens isn't well-suited to shooting far-away subjects like players on a field or skittish wildlife. It can also be a little uncomfortable to use for extended periods due to its small handgrip. On the upside, though it doesn't have the largest image buffer, it can clear it pretty quickly, so you can fire off extended bursts without long interruptions.

Pros
  • Impressive build quality.
  • Excellent image quality.
  • Short buffer clearing time.
  • Quick max burst rate.
Cons
  • Fixed lens focal length isn't ideal for capturing far-away subjects.
  • Ergonomics are somewhat lacking.
  • No image stabilization features.
6.3 Vlogging

The Fujifilm X100V is okay for sit-down style vlogs, but it isn't intended for video work. While its screen tilts, it can't flip or rotate to face you. It also doesn't have any stabilization feature, so video can turn out shaky depending on how steady your hands are. It can also easily overheat and shut down while recording 4k video. On the plus side, it's lightweight and compact, making it easy to carry around, with or without a gimbal. Video quality is also impressive, particularly in well-lit environments, and it has a reasonably effective autofocus system.

Pros
  • Compact design.
  • Wide selection of inputs and outputs.
  • Impressive overall video quality.
Cons
  • Screen doesn't fully articulate.
  • Overheats easily.
  • No image stabilization features.
  • Video battery life is disappointing.
6.9 Studio Video

The Fujifilm X100V is decent for studio video, though it's mainly geared toward photography, not video. Video quality in 4k and 1080p is great, with sharply rendered details and colors that pop. It supports Log recording to capture a wider dynamic range in video, and on top of F-Log, there's a wide selection of film simulation profiles if you prefer to set the look of your videos in-camera. It has a wide complement of inputs and outputs, including a microphone jack, an HDMI output for using an external recorder, but sadly no headphone jack. The camera also overheats and shuts down very easily when recording video. But so long as you stick to short takes and are careful about the camera's temperature, it can still be a decent choice for capturing B-roll or miscellaneous footage.

Pros
  • Wide selection of inputs and outputs.
  • Impressive overall video quality.
  • Plenty of picture profiles, including F-Log.
Cons
  • Overheats easily.
  • Short recording time limits.
  • Video battery life is disappointing.
4.8 Action Video

The Fujifilm X100V isn't designed for action video. It isn't meant to be attached to a chest or helmet rig and isn't rugged or waterproof. It's also incapable of recording at more than 30 fps in 4k or 60 fps in 1080p, though it does include a high-speed recording mode in 1080p for slow-motion capture.

Pros
  • Compact design.
  • Impressive build quality.
Cons
  • Limited selection of frame rates in 4k.
  • Not rugged or water-resistant.
  • Video battery life is disappointing.
  • 7.6 Travel Photography
  • 8.1 Landscape Photography
  • 7.7 Sport & Wildlife Photography
  • 6.3 Vlogging
  • 6.9 Studio Video
  • 4.8 Action Video
  1. Updated Jan 12, 2023: Added full text to review and rewrote existing text for clarity. Also corrected 'Optical Image Stabilization' and 'Headphones' fields from 'Yes' to 'No'.
  2. Updated Dec 14, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.12.
  3. Updated Dec 01, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.11.
  4. Updated Sep 16, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.10.
  5. Updated Aug 17, 2022: After running into issues with RawTherapee during retesting for Test Bench 0.9, we decided to process the 'Photo RAW Dynamic Range' test scene in Lightroom instead. The test scene photo has been reuploaded.
  6. Updated Jul 29, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.9.
  7. Updated Apr 22, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.8.
  8. Updated May 26, 2021: Review published.
  9. Updated May 21, 2021: Early access published.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Fujifilm X100V comes in two color variants: 'Black' and 'Silver'. We tested the 'Black' variant. You can see our unit's label here. We expect the other color variant to perform similarly.

Let us know in the discussions if you come across another variant, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Cameras

The Fujifilm X100V is a premium compact camera. With its prime lens and dedicated exposure dials, it's geared more toward enthusiast photographers who want an all-in-one camera to take on the go, or for street photos. What sets it apart from similar cameras like the RICOH GR III is its hybrid viewfinder, giving you the option to shoot with an optical viewfinder for more precise framing or an electronic viewfinder to see adjustments to exposure, white balance, and focus in real-time.

For more options, check out our recommendations for the best point-and-shoot cameras, the best cameras for street photography, and the best compact cameras for travel.

Fujifilm X-E4

The Fujifilm X-E4 is almost like an interchangeable-lens version of the Fujifilm X100V, so one may suit you better than the other. Discounting the lens, the two cameras are similar in size and design, and they both use the same 26MP X-Trans 4 sensor, resulting in similar overall image quality. The X100V has a better hybrid electronic/optical viewfinder and feels a bit more comfortable in the hand thanks to its small handgrip and more physical controls and dials. It isn't as well suited for video work, though, due to poor heat management and a much shorter recording time limit than the X-E4.

RICOH GR III

The Fujifilm X100V is better overall than the RICOH GR III. Both cameras use APS-C sensors and deliver excellent image quality, but they use different focal lengths that may suit different preferences. The Fujifilm has a 35mm equivalent lens, while the RICOH has a 28mm equivalent lens, though it also comes in a GR IIIx variant with a 40mm lens. Otherwise, the Fujifilm camera offers more features, including a tilting screen, a hybrid viewfinder, a better autofocus system, and better video capabilities. However, the RICOH may suit you better if portability is a priority since it's much more compact than the Fuji.

Sony RX100 VII

The Fujifilm X100V and the Sony RX100 VII are both premium point-and-shoot cameras. The Fujifilm is a little better overall, but each camera has different strengths and weaknesses. The Fujifilm has a larger APS-C sensor that results in better image quality and uses a fixed focal length prime lens, while the Sony is more compact and has a more versatile zoom lens. While the Sony has a better autofocus system and faster burst rate, the Fujifilm has a much better hybrid viewfinder that makes it easier to frame your shots, along with better battery life overall.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
7.5
Design
Portability
Height
2.8" (7.0 cm)
Width
5.4" (13.7 cm)
Depth
2.4" (6.1 cm)
Volume
35.7 inยณ (585.0 cmยณ)
Weight
1.04 lbs (0.47 kg)

The Fujifilm X100V is quite portable. Though it isn't quite "pocketable" in the same way the RICOH GR III is, it's still notably smaller than interchangeable-lens models like the Fujifilm X-T4.

8.0
Design
Build Quality

The build quality is great. The top and bottom plates are made of milled aluminum, giving the camera a more premium feel. The rest of the body is made mostly of plastic, but all its buttons, dials, and the tilting screen feel sturdy and well-built, with plenty of physical feedback.

Unlike previous models in the X100 series, this camera is partially weather-sealed. However, to get full weather-sealing for the lens, you need to purchase the AR-X100 adapter ring and PRF-49 protection filter from Fujifilm at an additional cost.

Design
Body
Body Type
Large Sensor Compact
Water Resistance
No
Mirrorless
Yes
Rugged
No
Hot Shoe
Yes
Customizable Button
Yes
Command Dial
5
Tripod Mount
Yes
Lens Mount
No Lens Mount
Built-In Flash
No
Fastest Shutter Speed
1/4,000 s
Design
In The Box

  • Fujifilm X100V camera
  • 1x NP-W126S battery
  • Lens cap
  • Shoulder strap
  • Shoulder strap accessories
  • Shoulder strap ring tool
  • USB-A to USB-C cable
  • User manual

6.0
Design
Ergonomics & Comfort
Hand Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Extra-Large Hand
Yes

Though it has a small bump of a handgrip, the camera can still feel a bit slippery in the hand. Overall, it's okay as far as ergonomics go but is naturally limited by its more compact size. The plastic around the viewfinder can feel uncomfortable to press your eye against. Thankfully, the dedicated exposure dials make it easy for seasoned photographers to adjust settings. There's also a small thumbstick for menu navigation and focus point selection, as well as touch capability.

Design
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Type
Electronic and Optical
Advertised Coverage
100%
Advertised Resolution
3.69 million dots
Advertised Magnification
0.66

Like the Fujifilm X-Pro3, this camera has a hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder offset from the center of the body. You can press the toggle switch at the front of the camera to switch between optical and electronic modes. When using the OVF, you can also toggle a small electronic rangefinder window, which gives you a small focus preview in the bottom corner of the viewfinder window. The OVF includes frame lines that show roughly what the image will capture but also gives you a view outside of just the frame, meaning you can frame your subject more easily. The EVF works like any other mirrorless camera viewfinder and allows you to preview exposure settings, depth of field, white balance, and focus in real-time.

The resolution, magnification, and coverage results shown above are for the EVF, which has a higher resolution than previous models in the X100 series. The OVF, meanwhile, has an advertised magnification of roughly 0.52x and a coverage area of 95%.

7.1
Design
Screen
Screen Articulation Type
Tilting
Screen Max Brightness
800 cd/mยฒ
Advertised Resolution
1.62 million dots
Size
3.0" (7.6 cm)
Touchscreen
Limited

Unlike previous models in the series, this camera has a tilting screen. The screen sits flush with the body until you pop it out, and the tilting mechanism feels very solid and works well for waist-level shooting. It's also bright, which is good for fighting glare on sunny days, and it has a high resolution that gives you a crisp view of your shots.

There's some neat touch functionality, including customizable swipe functions that let you adjust or access certain settings by flicking up, down, right, or left. You can also use it to select focus points, as a touch shutter, or to zoom in and out on photos in playback mode.

8.0
Design
Menu System
Guide Mode
No
App Name
FujiFilm Camera Remote

The menu is fairly simple and easy to navigate, though some settings are buried in submenus and harder to find. Thankfully, the camera also includes some visual graphics for certain settings and functions, though there's no additional info button or 'guide' mode. Fujifilm also uses its own terminology for certain settings, like 'photometry' for metering settings.

7.6
Design
Built-In Lens
Maximum Aperture
2.0
Max Aperture (Full-Frame Equivalent)
f/3.1
Minimum Focal Length
23 mm
Maximum Focal Length
23 mm
Max Focal Length (Full-Frame Equivalent)
35 mm
Optical Image Stabilization
No
Luminance
89.7%
Light Falloff
60.9%

The Fujifilm X100V has a built-in lens with a fixed focal length of 35mm (full-frame equivalent). That said, it does have a digital zoom function, which crops the image to simulate a focal length of 50mm or 70mm. With a max aperture of f/2, it's also quite a fast lens among compact fixed-lens cameras and makes it easier to get a shallow depth of field.

The lens also has a built-in four-stop ND filter that effectively reduces the amount of light captured by the camera. It can be helpful if you want to shoot at a larger aperture or slower shutter speed in a brightly lit environment without over-exposing your image.

Design
Sensor
Sensor Type
CMOS
Advertised Effective Pixels
26.1 MP
Sensor Size
APS-C
Processor
X-Processor 4
Extended ISO Minimum
80
Native ISO Minimum (Base ISO)
160
Native ISO Maximum
12,800
Tested Firmware
Ver.2.10
6.6
Design
Battery
Battery Type
Fujifilm NP-W126S
USB Charging
Yes
Use When Charging
Yes
Advertised Battery Life In Photo
350 photos
Tested Battery Life In Video
61.5 min

The Fujifilm X100V has an advertised CIPA rating of 350 shots when using the EVF and 420 shots when using the OVF, which is pretty good overall. Of course, real-world usage can vary drastically depending on how you use your camera. Still, in comparison to other compacts and mirrorless cameras, it's quite good, though you can expect fewer shots than cameras with larger batteries like the Fujifilm X-T4.

Video battery life is disappointing, on the other hand, yielding just over an hour of continuous 4k video recording. The camera can also frequently overheat and shut down during recording when using the highest video quality settings.

Photo General
8.0
Photo General
Photo Shooting Speed
Low Speed Continuous
3 fps
High Speed Continuous
11 fps
Silent Shooting Continuous
11 fps
Raw Buffer Size
16 Photos
JPEG Buffer Size
47 Photos
Buffer Empty Time
4 s

The Fujifilm X100V can shoot at a fairly quick max burst rate, which is good for capturing sequential bursts of action or movement. In its high-speed continuous mode, you can choose between either eight or eleven frames per second, while low-speed continuous mode gives you the option to choose between three, four, five, or six frames per second, giving you a wide variety of speeds to choose from to suit different subjects. Unfortunately, its photo buffer isn't especially deep, particularly if you prefer to shoot RAW, but thankfully, empty time isn't too long, so you can get back to shooting relatively quickly if you manage to fill up the buffer.

5.4
Photo General
Photo AF-C Tracking
Autofocus Tracking Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
37%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
64%

The camera's autofocus tracking is inconsistent. You can still get a fair amount of usable shots when shooting continuously, but the camera's AF can struggle to keep up with faster or more erratic subjects. Still, it supports both face and eye tracking and will be alright with slower subjects.

9.7
Photo General
Photo AF-C Center Point
Autofocus Center Point Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
96%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
99%

When using a static focus point and moving the camera with your subject, as opposed to letting the camera's AF track them automatically, AF is a lot more reliable. You can get plenty of usable and in-focus shots when using the camera this way, which is especially useful in scenarios in which you can reliably predict a subject's movement.

7.0
Photo General
Photo Image Stabilization
Minimum Shutter Speed Achieved
1/25 s
In-Body Image Stabilization
No

The Fujifilm X100V doesn't have any image stabilization. Thankfully, the short focal length of its lens and the fast f/2 aperture make it relatively easy for most people to capture stable handheld shots. Even without stabilization, you can get fairly clear images at relatively slow shutter speeds.

Photo Image Quality
8.2
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Dynamic Range
Dynamic Range At Base ISO
10.5 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/500s Exposure Time
9.2 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/2000s Exposure Time
6.9 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/4000s Exposure Time
6.1 f-stops

Dynamic range is great on the Fujifilm X100V. It can capture a wide range of highlight and shadow detail at its base ISO of 160, which is great for high-contrast scenes. With less available light, there's a drop-off in usable dynamic range, but overall, it's very good.

8.8
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Sharpness
Vertical Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
2,167 LW/PH
Horizontal Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
2,218 LW/PH

The camera uses a high-resolution sensor, the same one found in models like the Fujifilm X-T4, so it does an excellent job of resolving fine details. That gives you plenty of leeway to crop in without losing too much visible sharpness or detail.

7.8
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Noise
SNR 18% At 1/8 Exposure Time (125 ms)
33.7dB
SNR 18% At 1/125 Exposure Time (8 ms)
25.5 dB
SNR 18% At 1/1000 Exposure Time (1 ms)
N/A
SNR 18% At 1/4000 Exposure Time (0.25 ms)
N/A

RAW noise handling is good. The camera performs well even in low light when you have to boost the ISO. Of course, it doesn't do as well as full-frame options, but it's very good for a compact fixed-lens camera. That said, Fujifilm cameras tend to have lower max ISO settings, giving you less flexibility to shoot at extremely high ISOs. In practice, however, the cases in which you'd need such high ISOs are rare.

Pictures Sample Gallery
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Skate Park Picture
JPEG Skate Park Picture Download
RAW Skate Park Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Polish Church Picture
JPEG Polish Church Picture Download
RAW Polish Church Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Studio Picture
JPEG Studio Picture Download
RAW Studio Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Stairway Picture
JPEG Stairway Picture Download
RAW Stairway Picture Download
Video General
Video General
Video Features
Full HD Video
Yes
4k Video
Yes
6k Video
No
Clean HDMI Output
Yes
Advertised Max Chroma Sampling Over HDMI
4:2:2
Advertised Max Bit Depth Over HDMI
10 bits
Log Picture Profile
Yes
Recording Light
Yes
Video General
Audio
Audio Test Sample
Audio Recording
Stereo
Microphone Level Display
Yes
Video General
Video File Format And Compression
MP4 H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
MP4 H.265 / HEVC
No
MOV H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MOV H.265 / HEVC
No
AVCHD H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
All-I Compression
No
4k Video
8.5
4k Video
4k Video Frame Rate
240 fps In 4k
No
120 fps In 4k
No
60 fps In 4k
No
30 fps In 4k
Yes
24 fps In 4k
Yes
4k Crop At Max Available fps
1 x
5.6
4k Video
4k Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In 4k
202 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In 4k
102 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In 4k
4:2:0
Bit Depth In 4k
8 Bit
Record Time Limit In 4k
10 min
Overheat Recording Interruptions in 4k
14

The Fujifilm X100V suffers from frequent overheating when shooting extended takes in 4k. It's capped at a 10-minute recording time limit, but in practice, the camera will likely overheat before you even reach that limit. On the upside, it can capture video files with fairly high bit rates, meaning higher-quality video. You also have both UHD 4k and DCI 4k if you prefer a more cinematic resolution and aspect ratio.

7.2
4k Video
4k Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In 4k
6.7
Face Tracking In 4k
6.6
Face Detection In 4k
Yes
Eye Detection In 4k
Yes

Autofocus performs decently well in 4k. The camera supports both face and eye detection in video mode, which is great, but its face-tracking feature is just okay. It doesn't always keep up with its target, especially with faster or more erratic movements, but it isn't bad. The general subject tracking is similarly effective. Once locked on, it's accurate, but it can sometimes be a bit slow to keep up with faster subjects.

8.3
4k Video
4k Video Quality
Low Light Capability In 4k
7.5
Test Scene Extract In 4k
9.0

4k video quality is impressive. It's especially good in more controlled lighting, with colors that pop and sharply-rendered details. It's good in low light, with fairly minimal noise and solid dynamic range.

6.4
4k Video
4k Video Rolling Shutter Effect
4k Rolling Shutter
5.7ยฐ

The rolling shutter is somewhat slow but not bad overall, so while there is some noticeable distortion and skewing when panning the camera, it isn't as bad as on a camera like the Sony ZV-1.

Full HD Video
9.2
Full HD Video
FHD Video Frame Rate
240 fps In FHD
No
120 fps In FHD
Yes, with a Crop
60 fps In FHD
Yes
30 fps In FHD
Yes
24 fps In FHD
Yes
FHD Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

Like other Fujifilm cameras, it has a high-speed recording mode in FHD, which lets you record 1080p footage at either 100 or 120 fps with slow-motion playback. You have the option to slow footage down to 2x, 4x, or 5x slow-motion. This mode incurs a slight crop and doesn't record any sound. Otherwise, regular 1080p recording is capped at 60 fps, which is still great for fast action.

6.9
Full HD Video
FHD Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In FHD
203 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In FHD
50 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In FHD
4:2:0
Bit Depth In FHD
8 Bit
Record Time Limit in FHD
15 min

Internal recording capability is a bit better in FHD than in 4k. There's a slightly longer 15-minute time limit, and the camera is less likely to overheat. Bit rates are also excellent.

6.8
Full HD Video
FHD Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In FHD
6.0
Face Tracking In FHD
6.4
Face Detection In FHD
Yes
Eye Detection In FHD
Yes

In 1080p, autofocus performs alright. It's about on par with its 4k performance, so it's fairly quick and accurate overall, but there's a bit of hunting sometimes, and it's less reliable with very fast or erratic subjects.

7.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Quality
Low Light Capability In FHD
7.0
Test Scene Extract In FHD
8.0

Video quality is good in 1080p. Colors look great out of the camera, and brightly lit scenes are rendered with plenty of detail. It isn't as good in low light, with some visible noise and loss of detail in the shadows.

7.0
Full HD Video
FHD Video Rolling Shutter Effect
FHD Rolling Shutter
4.0ยฐ

There's less rolling shutter distortion in 1080p, but you'll still notice skewing with faster camera movements.

Storage And Connectivity
Storage And Connectivity
Storage
Card 1 Slot
SD Card UHS-I
Card 2 Slot
No 2nd Card Slot

There's a single SD card slot, and it's located on the bottom of the camera, which makes it harder to switch out cards when using a tripod. However, the placement isn't surprising, given the camera's small size.

8.5
Storage And Connectivity
Inputs / Outputs
USB
USB-C
HDMI
Micro (Type D)
Headphones
No
Microphone
Stereo
Wi-Fi
Yes
Bluetooth
Yes

The camera has a USB-C port for charging and file transfer, along with a Micro HDMI port to connect to an external display or monitor and a microphone input. However, there's no headphone jack, and unlike models like the Fujifilm X-T4, this camera doesn't come with a USB-C to 3.5mm adapter in the box.

Discussions