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Canon EOS R6 Mark II Camera Review

Tested using Methodology v0.12
Reviewed Feb 22, 2023 at 12:54 pm
Canon EOS R6 Mark II Picture
7.9
Travel Photography
8.6
Landscape Photography
8.4
Sport & Wildlife Photography
7.8
Vlogging
9.2
Studio Video
5.8
Action Video

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II is the follow-up to 2020's Canon EOS R6. This mid-cycle refresh has a few notable upgrades, including a higher-resolution sensor and EVF, along with an updated autofocus system with better tracking and detection algorithms. Canon's also addressed some of the minor drawbacks of the original R6 for advanced video work, with uncropped 4k video, no recording time limit, and better heat management to prevent overheating during long recording sessions. While these changes may not be enough to warrant an upgrade if you already own the R6, they're thoughtful improvements that make an already amazing camera even better.

Our Verdict

7.9 Travel Photography

The Canon R6 II is good for travel if you don't mind a bulkier kit. Image quality is fantastic, and the camera has a well-built, weather-sealed body to give you some peace of mind while shooting outdoors, plus superb ergonomics. On top of that, it has in-body image stabilization, which helps reduce camera shake, allowing you to get clearer shots at slower shutter speeds. Battery life is also excellent for a mirrorless camera, though it doesn't support use while charging over USB.

Pros
  • Excellent photo battery life.
  • Fantastic image quality.
  • Well-built, weather-sealed body.
  • In-body image stabilization.
Cons
  • Not especially portable.
  • Doesn't support use while USB charging.
8.6 Landscape Photography

The Canon R6 Mark II is an excellent option for landscape photography. Its high-resolution full-frame sensor is ideal for capturing detailed photos with plenty of dynamic range, as well as making prints. It also does an exceptional job of keeping noise to a minimum in low light. Aside from its image quality, it's also a very well-built camera with excellent ergonomics. Though its screen isn't the brightest or sharpest, it has a relatively high-resolution EVF. That said, it's a heavy camera, so it isn't the most convenient to take on long hikes or shooting sessions.

Pros
  • Excellent photo battery life.
  • Fantastic image quality.
  • Well-built, weather-sealed body.
  • Wide dynamic range.
Cons
  • Not especially portable.
  • Screen doesn't get too bright.
8.4 Sport & Wildlife Photography

The Canon R6 Mark II is great for taking photos of faster subjects, including sports and wildlife. It has a quick max burst rate and a deep buffer, though it's slow to empty if you manage to fill it up. Still, the camera has an incredibly reliable autofocus system with advanced subject-detection modes for people, animals, and even vehicles. Image quality is generally fantastic, and it performs well even in low light. Plus, it's weather-sealed and feels great in the hand, with well-placed and customizable controls.

Pros
  • Fantastic image quality.
  • Well-built, weather-sealed body.
  • Quick burst shooting.
  • Remarkable autofocus.
Cons
  • Not especially portable.
  • Slow buffer empty time.
7.8 Vlogging

The Canon R6 Mark II can be good for vlogging, depending on the type of vlog you want to create, though it's also likely overkill for most vloggers and content creators. Video quality is excellent, with oversampled 4k video at up to 60 fps, along with high frame rate recording in 1080p for slow-motion flourishes. The fully articulated screen lets you monitor yourself more easily. The camera also has near flawless autofocus tracking, including video-specific settings that prevent it from hunting for new subjects if the tracked subject leaves the frame. That said, it's not the camera to reach for if you want something portable and lightweight for walk-and-talk vlogs.

Pros
  • In-body image stabilization.
  • Fully articulated touchscreen.
  • Impressive video quality.
Cons
  • Not very portable for on-the-go video recording.
9.2 Studio Video

The Canon R6 Mark II is fantastic for studio video. It can record oversampled 4k video at up to 60 fps without a crop, and video quality is impressive. Internally, it can record 10-bit 4:2:2 4k video to preserve a wider range of color information, and it can output 6k RAW video to a compatible external recorder. You also get dual SD card slots and a full set of inputs for peripherals like a mic and headphones. It also has no recording time limit and great heat management to help prevent overheating.

Pros
  • In-body image stabilization.
  • 6k RAW recording via external recorder.
  • Up to 4k / 60 fps without crop.
  • 10-bit 4:2:2 internal recording.
  • Dual SD card slots.
Cons
  • Doesn't support use while USB charging.
5.8 Action Video

The Canon R6 II isn't designed for POV action video, but it's a good choice if you want to film sports or action from the sidelines. Video quality is great, and it can shoot 4k / 60 fps video without a crop. That said, 120 fps recording is limited to 1080p with no sound, which isn't bad, but frame rate options are still limited compared to a dedicated action camera. It's also on the bulkier side. Though it's well-built and weather-sealed, it isn't waterproof.

Pros
  • In-body image stabilization.
  • Impressive video quality.
Cons
  • Not waterproof.
  • Not designed to be mounted to action cam rigs for POV footage.
  • Not very portable for on-the-go video recording.
  • 7.9 Travel Photography
  • 8.6 Landscape Photography
  • 8.4 Sport & Wildlife Photography
  • 7.8 Vlogging
  • 9.2 Studio Video
  • 5.8 Action Video
  1. Updated Feb 22, 2023: Review published.
  2. Updated Feb 16, 2023: Early access published.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Canon R6 Mark II comes in one color variant: 'Black'. You can see our unit's label here.

You can buy the camera on its own without a lens or bundled with either the Canon RF 24-105mm f/4-7.1 IS STM kit lens or the more premium Canon RF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM lens.

Let us know if you come across any other variants, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Cameras

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II represents a notable step up from its predecessor, the Canon EOS R6, which is itself a fantastic hybrid enthusiast camera. With a new 24-megapixel sensor, it now matches up to other enthusiast cameras in its class for resolution. It also sets itself apart from other models with 40 fps e-shutter burst shooting and uncropped 4k / 60 fps video recording, not to mention internal 10-bit 4:2:2 4k recording capability and 6k RAW video output over HDMI with a compatible external recorder.

If you're looking for other options, check out our recommendations for the best mirrorless cameras, the best cameras for photography, and the best 4k cameras.

Canon EOS R6

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II is the mid-cycle refresh of the Canon EOS R6. While the Mark II does offer some notable improvements and quality-of-life upgrades, they're very similarly performing cameras overall. Some of the updates include a higher-resolution sensor with a faster readout speed, an updated autofocus system, and video quality-of-life upgrades like no recording time limits, no 4k crop, and better heat management. While these aren't game-changing updates, they are an improvement that might cinch the deal for you if you're trying to decide between these two cameras. That said, the original EOS R6 is still a fantastic camera, and the Mark II likely isn't worth the upgrade if you already own the older model.  

Sony α7 IV

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II and the Sony α7 IV are very evenly-matched enthusiast cameras. The Sony has a higher-resolution sensor, but the Canon performs a little better in low light. Both can handle advanced video work, with internal 10-bit 4k at up to 60 fps, though the Sony imposes a significant crop on 4k / 60 fps video. The Canon also has a faster burst rate when shooting in uncompressed RAW. Ultimately, if you're choosing between these, the decision will come down to personal preference, ergonomic preferences, and lens selection. 

Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II is better overall than the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV, but they're both fantastic cameras suitable for professional use. The R6 Mark II is a newer mirrorless camera with a more sophisticated autofocus system and faster burst rate that make it a better choice for sports and action photography. It also has better noise handling for low light situations. That being said, the 5D Mark IV has a more established lineup of native lens options that you can use without an adapter, including more affordable options. It's also a bit more tank-like in build, so it can withstand more extensive use. Plus, it's a DSLR, so it has a longer battery life, and you don't have to worry about lag or eye strain with its optical viewfinder.  

Canon EOS RP

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II is better overall than the Canon EOS RP, but the RP is still a good option if you want a more portable and more affordable full-frame camera. The RP can still take excellent photos, and both cameras use the same lens mount, but the R6 Mark II is a more capable camera body, with a better build quality, a higher-resolution EVF, in-body image stabilization, and more advanced video features, including more frame rate options and better internal recording specs.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
3.6
Design
Portability
Height
3.9" (10.0 cm)
Width
5.4" (13.8 cm)
Depth
3.5" (8.8 cm)
Volume
74.1 in³ (1,214.4 cm³)
Weight
1.51 lbs (0.68 kg)

The Canon R6 Mark II has the same dimensions as the Canon EOS R6. While it's more portable than most full-frame DSLRs, it's a heavy camera, so it isn't the most convenient option to carry around during long days on the go.

8.0
Design
Build Quality

Build quality is great and comparable to the original Canon EOS R6. It's made of plastic and magnesium alloy. The buttons and dials offer good physical feedback and feel sturdy, as does the screen swivel mechanism. It's also weather-sealed for a bit of added peace of mind, with locking hinged doors covering your card slot and battery compartments.

Design
Body
Body Type
SLR-Style
Water Resistance
Weather-Sealed
Mirrorless
Yes
Rugged
No
Hot Shoe
Yes
Customizable Button
Yes
Command Dial
3
Tripod Mount
Yes
Lens Mount
RF Mount
Built-In Flash
No
Fastest Shutter Speed
1/8,000 s

There are a couple of design changes on this model compared to its predecessor. For one, there's now a dedicated photo/video mode toggle, and the On/Off switch has been moved and redesigned. The 'Lock' function is now between the 'On' and 'Off' settings. Canon also redesigned the joystick on the back of the camera; you can see the original R6 controller here and the R6 Mark II here. Finally, the hot shoe has been upgraded to what Canon calls a 'multi-function shoe', which includes a 21-pin electronic interface that's supposed to offer more functionality with certain accessories.

Design
In The Box

  • Canon EOS R6 Mark II camera body
  • Sensor cap
  • Hot shoe cover
  • Shoulder strap
  • 1x Canon LP-E6NH battery
  • Battery charger
  • Instruction manual

9.5
Design
Ergonomics & Comfort
Hand Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Extra-Large Hand
Yes

The camera has fantastic ergonomics. It feels great in the hand and will be suitable for most hand sizes. All in all, the controls are well-placed, with all key buttons and dials within easy reach of your fingers. The textured grip and thumb rest on the back are both comfortable and sufficiently grippy. The shutter button offers slightly more resistance when half-pressing than the original Canon EOS R6, though the difference is subtle.

Design
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Type
Electronic
Advertised Coverage
100%
Advertised Resolution
3.69 million dots
Advertised Magnification
0.76

The EVF has been upgraded to an increasingly common 3.69 million dot resolution, which is great and a step up from the Canon EOS R6's 2.36 million dots. The image looks nice and sharp through the viewfinder, and the rubber eyecup is comfortable.

9.0
Design
Screen
Screen Articulation Type
Fully-Articulated
Screen Max Brightness
517 cd/m²
Advertised Resolution
1.62 million dots
Size
3.0" (7.5 cm)
Touchscreen
Yes

The screen is about the same size as its predecessor's, with a high resolution and decent brightness. It's fully articulated, which is good for video work, and it has full touch navigation.

9.0
Design
Menu System
Guide Mode
Yes
App Name
Canon Camera Connect

The menu system is excellent and intuitively organized, just like Canon cameras past. The options are extensive but not overwhelming, and there are plenty of customization options to tailor the settings exactly to your liking. Pressing the 'Info' button when available brings up the 'Help' function, which provides detailed explanations of some of the more complicated features and settings.

not tested
Design
Built-In Lens
Maximum Aperture
No built-in lens
Max Aperture (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Minimum Focal Length
N/A
Maximum Focal Length
N/A
Max Focal Length (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Optical Image Stabilization
No
Luminance
N/A
Light Falloff
N/A
Design
Sensor
Sensor Type
CMOS
Advertised Effective Pixels
24.2 MP
Sensor Size
Full Frame
Processor
Digic X
Extended ISO Minimum
50
Native ISO Minimum (Base ISO)
100
Native ISO Maximum
102,400
Tested Firmware
Ver.1.1.1
7.3
Design
Battery
Battery Type
Canon LP-E6NH
USB Charging
Yes
Use When Charging
No
Advertised Battery Life In Photo
580 photos
Tested Battery Life In Video
92 min

The Canon R6 Mark II has a fantastic battery life for photos, though the camera doesn't support use while charging. It's CIPA-rated for 580 shots when shooting with the screen, which is excellent for a mirrorless camera. That said, it's only rated for 320 shots when shooting through the EVF. You can bump that up to 760 and 450 shots, respectively, if you use the camera's power-saving settings. Ultimately, these figures can vary wildly with real-world usage, so take them with a grain of salt.

Video battery life is fairly typical at about an hour and a half of continuous 4k video recording at the highest quality settings. Unlike the Canon EOS R6, we didn't experience any overheat interruptions during our testing, so heat management has improved, as well.

Photo General
7.4
Photo General
Photo Shooting Speed
Low Speed Continuous
3 fps
High Speed Continuous
11 fps
Silent Shooting Continuous
38 fps
Raw Buffer Size
97 Photos
JPEG Buffer Size
10,000 Photos
Buffer Empty Time
17 s

The Canon EOS R6 II has a quick max burst rate for sports and action photography. With its electronic shutter, it can fire off bursts of almost 40 fps, and while the mechanical shutter isn't nearly as fast, it's still very quick for most needs. The buffer is also very deep, although the larger files from the higher-resolution sensor mean the buffer fills a lot more quickly when shooting in RAW than the Canon EOS R6 does. If you do manage to reach buffer capacity, it's quite slow to empty, but given the size of the buffer, it won't be a huge issue.

8.8
Photo General
Photo AF-C Tracking
Autofocus Tracking Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
79%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
97%

The Canon R6 Mark II has fantastic autofocus. It essentially borrows its autofocus system from the pro-grade powerhouse that is the Canon EOS R3, and it supports face, eye, animal, and vehicle subject detection. There are plenty of different area modes and settings that let you fine-tune how the AF performs. All in all, the AF tracking feature is excellent. It does an amazing job of detecting and keeping moving subjects in focus, even in busier settings or with more erratic movement. If you just want to point your camera at a subject and let the camera do its thing, you're likely to have a high keeper rate.

9.6
Photo General
Photo AF-C Center Point
Autofocus Center Point Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
95%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
100%

When using the center point, autofocusing is quick and accurate, especially when using a lens with a solid focusing motor. You're unlikely to miss many shots in scenarios with more predictably moving subjects.

8.3
Photo General
Photo Image Stabilization
Minimum Shutter Speed Achieved
1/8 s
In-Body Image Stabilization
Yes

The Canon R6 Mark II includes in-body image stabilization, which is rated for up to 8 stops of stabilization. In conjunction with an optically stabilized lens, it does a great job. You can get clear handheld shots at very slow shutter speeds. That said, stabilization performance will vary depending on many factors, including your lens, focal length, and even how steady your hands are.

Photo Image Quality
9.0
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Dynamic Range
Dynamic Range At Base ISO
11.2 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/500s Exposure Time
9.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/2000s Exposure Time
7.9 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/4000s Exposure Time
7.4 f-stops

Dynamic range is fantastic. It captures a very wide range of shadow and highlight detail and does well even in dimmer light.

8.7
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Sharpness
Vertical Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,990 LW/PH
Horizontal Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
2,182 LW/PH

With a new higher-res sensor, the Canon R6 Mark II is noticeably better at resolving fine detail than its predecessor and on par with other full-frame 24MP cameras. That said, this is something that you'll mostly only notice when punching in or cropping heavily.

9.7
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Noise
SNR 18% At 1/8 Exposure Time (125 ms)
35.3dB
SNR 18% At 1/125 Exposure Time (8 ms)
32.1 dB
SNR 18% At 1/1000 Exposure Time (1 ms)
24.1dB
SNR 18% At 1/4000 Exposure Time (0.25 ms)
18.8dB

Noise handling is superb. The camera is very well-suited to low-light shooting, as noise is kept to a minimum even with less available light.

Pictures Sample Gallery
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Skate Park Picture
JPEG Skate Park Picture Download
RAW Skate Park Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Polish Church Picture
JPEG Polish Church Picture Download
RAW Polish Church Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Studio Picture
JPEG Studio Picture Download
RAW Studio Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Stairway Picture
JPEG Stairway Picture Download
RAW Stairway Picture Download
Video General
Video General
Video Features
Full HD Video
Yes
4k Video
Yes
6k Video
No
Clean HDMI Output
Yes
Advertised Max Chroma Sampling Over HDMI
Not Advertised
Advertised Max Bit Depth Over HDMI
N/A
Log Picture Profile
Yes
Recording Light
No

The Canon R6 Mark II records oversampled 4k video. With a compatible Atomos external recorder, it can also capture 6k RAW video from the full width of the sensor. If you want to preserve a wider range of detail in your videos, it supports Log recording with C-Log 3.

Video General
Audio
Audio Test Sample
Audio Recording
Stereo
Microphone Level Display
Yes
Video General
Video File Format And Compression
MP4 H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MP4 H.265 / HEVC
Yes
MOV H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
MOV H.265 / HEVC
No
AVCHD H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
All-I Compression
Yes
4k Video
9.5
4k Video
4k Video Frame Rate
240 fps In 4k
No
120 fps In 4k
No
60 fps In 4k
Yes
30 fps In 4k
Yes
24 fps In 4k
Yes
4k Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

Unlike the Canon EOS R6, the Mark II now has cropless 4k video recording, even at 60 fps. In that sense, it has a leg up on competitors like the Sony α7 IV, which imposes a Super 35/APS-C crop when shooting in 4k / 60 fps.

9.9
4k Video
4k Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In 4k
341 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In 4k
173 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In 4k
4:2:2
Bit Depth In 4k
10 Bit
Record Time Limit In 4k
N/A
Overheat Recording Interruptions in 4k
0

Internal recording capability is fantastic. Canon got rid of the 30-minute time limit on the Canon EOS R6, so you now get unlimited recording times. Heat management has also improved, so it's a lot less likely to overheat. There's a better indicator system for overheating, with a 10-level indicator that provides a heat scale to show you exactly how close the camera is to overheating. Beyond that, it can record 10-bit 4:2:2 internally, giving you more leeway to edit and color grade.

Also worth mentioning: if you use an SDHC memory card, as opposed to an SDXC card, the camera will split your recording into multiple files of 4GB each. With SDXC cards, you'll get one long video file.

9.6
4k Video
4k Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In 4k
9.3
Face Tracking In 4k
9.8
Face Detection In 4k
Yes
Eye Detection In 4k
Yes

Autofocus performs incredibly well in 4k video. It's smooth, sticky, and reliable, so you can rest assured your chosen subject will stay in focus, even if they move around the frame. There are also settings to help fine-tune its performance. For instance, you can set it to either stay with the initial target no matter what, or to change subjects if, say, your initial subject leaves the frame.

There's also an 'AF for close-up demos' focus mode that's available when using the camera for livestreaming or as a webcam via USB. Similar to the 'Product Showcase' feature found on Sony vlogging cameras like the Sony ZV-E10, it quickly switches focus to an object held up close in the frame. You can see that in action here.

8.8
4k Video
4k Video Quality
Low Light Capability In 4k
8.0
Test Scene Extract In 4k
9.5

4k video quality is amazing. The oversampled 4k looks incredible with adequate lighting, with sharply rendered details and color. Low-light video quality is also great, about on par with its predecessor. Noise is inevitable with less light, but generally speaking, you'll get very high-quality videos out of this camera, with plenty of dynamic range.

6.6
4k Video
4k Video Rolling Shutter Effect
4k Rolling Shutter
5.0°

The sensor has an improved readout speed compared to the Canon EOS R6, so there's a noticeable improvement in rolling shutter. Though there's still some skewing with quick pans and faster camera movements, it's a lot less noticeable overall.

Full HD Video
9.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Frame Rate
240 fps In FHD
No
120 fps In FHD
Yes
60 fps In FHD
Yes
30 fps In FHD
Yes
24 fps In FHD
Yes
FHD Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

The camera can record at up to 120 fps in 1080p, which is great for slow-motion video, though it can only record at 120 fps without sound.

9.8
Full HD Video
FHD Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In FHD
91 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In FHD
46 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In FHD
4:2:2
Bit Depth In FHD
10 Bit
Record Time Limit in FHD
N/A
9.6
Full HD Video
FHD Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In FHD
9.3
Face Tracking In FHD
9.8
Face Detection In FHD
Yes
Eye Detection In FHD
Yes

The autofocus performs just as well in 1080p. The tracking is very quick and very accurate—you're unlikely to lose focus regardless of subject type.

8.3
Full HD Video
FHD Video Quality
Low Light Capability In FHD
8.0
Test Scene Extract In FHD
8.5

1080p video quality is great overall. In more controlled lighting, videos are relatively sharp and detailed, and there isn't too much noise when shooting in low light.

8.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Rolling Shutter Effect
FHD Rolling Shutter
1.7°

Rolling shutter effect is much less pronounced in 1080p. There's still some slight distortion when panning the camera very quickly, but it's minimal.

Storage And Connectivity
Storage And Connectivity
Storage
Card 1 Slot
SD Card UHS-II
Card 2 Slot
SD Card UHS-II

The SD card slots are well-placed on the side of the camera, making it very easy to switch out cards when using a tripod.

9.5
Storage And Connectivity
Inputs / Outputs
USB
USB-C
HDMI
Micro (Type D)
Headphones
Yes
Microphone
Stereo
Wi-Fi
Yes
Bluetooth
Yes

You have all your standard inputs and outputs on the left side of the camera. However, unlike the Sony α7 IV, it uses a Micro HDMI port rather than a full-sized HDMI, which can be a bit of a hassle, as you'll likely need an adapter. Still, connectivity options are good, and the rubber flaps feel sturdy.

Discussions