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Sony α6000 Camera Review

Tested using Methodology v0.12.1
Review updated May 01, 2024 at 02:36 pm
Sony α6000 Picture
7.4
Travel Photography
7.7
Landscape Photography
6.9
Sport & Wildlife Photography
7.6
Raw Photo Performance
5.8
Vlogging
3.4
Studio Video
3.3
Action Video

The Sony α6000 is the predecessor to the Sony α6100. First released in 2014, this APS-C mirrorless camera is lightweight and portable, with a 24.3-megapixel sensor that holds up surprisingly well against newer competition. While it can't shoot 4k video, and its autofocus isn't as snappy as newer Sony models, this is still a viable option for beginners or budget shooters, with a large ecosystem of compatible E-mount lenses.

Our Verdict

7.4 Travel Photography

The Sony a6000 is decent for travel photography. It's portable and lightweight, making it easy to store and travel with. Image quality is good, too, thanks to its high-resolution sensor and good dynamic range, though it performs best in brighter conditions. Battery life is decent, though you may still need a spare battery or portable power bank for longer days on the go. Its autofocus system is relatively good, but its AF tracking isn't nearly as reliable as newer cameras.

Pros
  • Very lightweight and portable.
  • JPEGs look sharp and detailed.
  • Decent battery life.
Cons
  • AF system is showing its age.
  • High ISO performance is lacking.
7.7 Landscape Photography

The Sony a6000 is good for landscape photography. It's very portable, making it easy to take on hikes or to remote shooting locations. It also has a decent battery life, but you'll likely need an extra battery for longer shooting days. Image quality is nice overall, but while it has good usable dynamic range, RAW files don't fare too well when making extensive exposure adjustments, which can introduce noise and digital artifacts. This is especially true at high ISOs, where its noise handling is just okay, meaning the camera isn't as well-suited to capturing landscapes at night or in low light.

Pros
  • Very lightweight and portable.
  • JPEGs look sharp and detailed.
Cons
  • High ISO performance is lacking.
6.9 Sport & Wildlife Photography

The Sony a6000 is okay for sports and wildlife photography. Image quality is good overall, and it can shoot at a fairly quick max burst rate. However, its image buffer is quite small, which can interrupt your shooting if you fill it up at a critical moment. Its autofocus system does well with slower subjects, but it loses track of faster-moving subjects, and it's a little slow to catch up compared with newer AF systems.

Pros
  • Very lightweight and portable.
  • JPEGs look sharp and detailed.
  • Fairly quick max burst rate.
Cons
  • AF system is showing its age.
  • High ISO performance is lacking.
  • Small photo buffer.
7.6 Raw Photo Performance

The Sony a6000 has good RAW photo performance. Its dynamic range is good, though it can't capture as wide a range of detail as newer or larger sensors. It also only does a decent job of managing noise in low light. On the upside, its high-resolution sensor captures plenty of fine detail, so images appear sharp.

Pros
  • Good dynamic range.
  • High resolution.
Cons
  • High ISO performance is lacking.
5.8 Vlogging

The Sony a6000 isn't well-suited for vlogging. It doesn't have a fully articulated screen, and you can't flip its tilting screen up to face forward, making it hard to monitor yourself for walk-and-talk vlogs. It also can't record 4k video. On the upside, it can shoot at up to 60 fps in 1080p, which is good for recording smooth action footage or light slow motion.

Pros
  • Very lightweight and portable.
  • Video quality is decent.
Cons
  • AF system is showing its age.
  • No 4k video.
  • Screen doesn't articulate.
3.4 Studio Video

The Sony a6000 isn't suitable for studio video. It can only record 1080p video with 8-bit 4:2:0 color, giving you less flexibility when editing and processing your footage. Video quality is decent, but it doesn't have the best dynamic range and doesn't perform very well in low light. Its autofocus system also shows its age compared to newer Sony models, as it can sometimes lose its target and be a bit slow to catch up. Finally, it doesn't have a headphone jack or microphone input, making it much harder to capture quality audio.

Pros
  • Very lightweight and portable.
  • Video quality is decent.
Cons
  • AF system is showing its age.
  • No 4k video.
  • Limited to 8-bit 4:2:0.
3.3 Action Video

The Sony a6000 isn't suitable for action video. It isn't designed to be mounted on action cam rigs or helmets, and it doesn't record in 4k. Plus, it can only record 1080p at up to 60 fps without any higher frame rate options for slow-motion recording. It also lacks any waterproofing or weather-sealing.

Pros
  • Very lightweight and portable.
  • Video quality is decent.
Cons
  • No 4k video.
  • No water resistance.
  • Limited high-speed frame rates.
  • 7.4 Travel Photography
  • 7.7 Landscape Photography
  • 6.9 Sport & Wildlife Photography
  • 7.6 Raw Photo Performance
  • 5.8 Vlogging
  • 3.4 Studio Video
  • 3.3 Action Video
  1. Updated May 01, 2024: We've touched up some of the text throughout this review to ensure that it's up to date and meets our current standards for quality.
  2. Updated Jan 29, 2024: Added text to the 'Raw Photo Performance' verdict box.
  3. Updated Jan 29, 2024: Converted to Test Bench 0.12.1.
  4. Updated Sep 07, 2023: We've updated the 'Sensor Type' from 'Exmor CMOS' to 'CMOS' to reflect the general sensor type without Sony-specific terminology.
  5. Updated Sep 06, 2023: Added reference to the Sony α7 II in the 'Sensor' box.
  6. Updated Aug 30, 2023: We adjusted this camera's 'Menu' score and slightly updated the text to better represent the differences between older and newer versions of Sony's user interface.
  7. Updated May 11, 2023: Updated text for clarity.
  8. Updated Apr 05, 2023: Converted to Test Bench 0.12.
  9. Updated Jan 23, 2023: Added text to 'Photo AF-C Tracking' and 'Photo AF-C Center Point' boxes, with minor touch-ups throughout the review for clarity.
  10. Updated Jan 23, 2023: Converted to Test Bench 0.11.
  11. Updated Sep 16, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.10.
  12. Updated Aug 16, 2022: After running into issues with RawTherapee during retesting for Test Bench 0.9, we decided to process the 'Photo RAW Dynamic Range' test scene in Lightroom instead. The test scene photo has been reuploaded.
  13. Updated Jul 29, 2022: Converted to Test Bench 0.9.
  14. Updated Jun 16, 2022: A previous version of this review incorrectly stated that this camera had a microphone input. The review has been corrected and the 'Inputs / Outputs' score has been updated.
  15. Updated May 16, 2022: Review published.
  16. Updated May 06, 2022: Early access published.
  17. Updated Apr 25, 2022: Our testers have started testing this product.
  18. Updated Apr 25, 2022: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  19. Updated Jan 17, 2022: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Sony Alpha 6000 has four different color variants: 'Black,' 'Silver,' 'White,' and 'Graphite Gray.' However, the non-black models are more difficult to find. We purchased the black model, and you can see our unit's label here.

You can buy the camera body on its own or bundled with a kit lens like the Sony E 16-50mm 3.5-5.6/PZ OSS. You can also find it bundled with different lens combinations, depending on the retailer.

Compared To Other Cameras

The Sony Alpha 6000 is an older camera that still offers some value in a very competitive mirrorless camera market. Though it lacks the refinements of newer cameras, it's a popular and affordable entry point into the world of mirrorless photography, especially if you buy a used model. If you don't need the most advanced autofocus or 4k video capability, the α6000 makes for a solid beginner or travel camera.

For more options, check out our recommendations for the best cameras for beginners, the best travel cameras, and the best mirrorless cameras.

Sony α6100

The Sony α6100 is a bit better than the Sony α6000. They look and perform similarly overall. However, because the α6100 is a newer model, it has an improved autofocus system and a newer sensor with slightly better dynamic range and high-ISO performance. It can also record 4k video. The α6000 still offers a lot of value for its price, especially if you don't do a lot of video work.

Sony α6400

The Sony α6400 is better overall than the Sony α6000, especially if you're interested in video as well as photography. The biggest difference is that the α6400 can record video in 4k resolution. It also has a higher-resolution EVF, a newer sensor with better high-ISO performance, and an improved autofocus system. The α6000 is a bit more portable and offers similar photo performance at a fraction of the price since it's an older model.

Sony α7 III

The Sony α7 III is better than the Sony α6000. It's a higher-end camera with a full-frame sensor, so it captures images with greater dynamic range and better manages noise in low light. It's also better for video with 4k recording and has a better battery life and higher-resolution viewfinder. However, it isn't as portable as the α6000.

Canon EOS M50

The Canon EOS M50 is better overall than the Sony α6000. It's a newer camera with better processing, better ergonomics, a higher resolution viewfinder, and better video capabilities. The Sony has a much wider range of lens options, so it may be better if you want to go beyond a kit lens.

Sony ZV-E10

The Sony α6000 and the Sony ZV-E10 are both solid budget cameras, but the ZV-E10 is better overall. It's much better for video, with 4k recording and more video features, and uses a newer sensor with better processing. Its autofocus is also more effective. However, it doesn't have a viewfinder, which may be a dealbreaker for some photographers.

Sony α6700

The Sony α6700 is significantly better than the Sony α6000. It's an upgrade in almost every way, with better autofocus, image quality, in-body image stabilization, and video capabilities, not to mention better ergonomics, a higher-resolution screen, and an EVF.

Canon EOS R50

The Canon EOS R50 is better than the Sony α6000. It has a sharper viewfinder and screen, a more effective autofocus system, quicker burst shooting, and better video capabilities. 

Sony α6600

The Sony α6600 is a significant upgrade over the Sony α6000. The α6600 takes what works about the α6000, like a low-profile form factor and extensive customization options, and adds a bigger battery, a more ergonomic handgrip, and in-body image stabilization. The α6600 also has a newer sensor with better dynamic range and high-ISO performance, as well as an improved autofocus system and 4k video capability. It also includes more connectivity options and weather-sealing, although it isn't as portable as the α6000.

Canon EOS R100

The Canon EOS R100 and the Sony α6000 are both cheap mirrorless cameras that'll get you started in photography. Neither is worth getting in today's camera market if you can afford slightly pricier models, like those we recommend in our best cameras under $1,000 article. That said, the Canon is newer, so it offers a few advantages, including 4k video capability, a better viewfinder, a more effective overall autofocus, and a more intuitive user interface.

Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D

The Canon EOS Rebel T7/2000D and the Sony α6000 are different camera types, and each has its own advantages. The Sony is a mirrorless model, so it's significantly more portable, has a better autofocus system, and shoots at a faster max burst rate. Conversely, the Canon has a longer battery life and a lag-free optical viewfinder, as well as a more intuitive user interface.

Nikon D3500

While the Sony α6000 and the Nikon D3500 are both entry-level cameras, they use different camera technologies with different advantages. The Sony is an older mirrorless camera, so it's much more portable than the Nikon. It also has a quicker autofocus system, a faster burst rate, and a tilting screen. The Nikon, on the other hand, is a DSLR, so it has a much better battery life, and its optical viewfinder gives you a clearer, lag-free view of your subjects. It also comes with a 'Guide Mode' to walk new users through the basics of photography.

Canon EOS M200

The Sony α6000 and the Canon EOS M200 are both good entry-level cameras with APS-C sensors, though they have some key differences. The Canon has a more compact body, making it a bit easier to store and take on the go, but it also lacks a viewfinder and handgrip, making it less comfortable to shoot with. The Canon has slightly better noise performance at higher ISO settings and a newer, more effective autofocus system. It can record 4k video and has a screen that flips up to face you, making it a better choice for vlogging. The Sony has a faster continuous shooting speed and better battery life.

Canon EOS M50 Mark II

The Canon EOS M50 Mark II and the Sony α6000 are both solid beginner mirrorless cameras. Even though it's older, the Sony holds its own against the Canon, with a faster max burst rate, a better battery life, and a wider range of available lenses. However, the Canon offers 4k video recording (albeit with a severe crop and limited frame rates), a more reliable autofocus system, a higher-resolution viewfinder, and a much easier-to-use menu system.

Nikon D5600

The Sony α6000 and the Nikon D5600 are different types of cameras. The Nikon is a DSLR, so it has a longer battery life and a lag-free optical viewfinder, while the Sony is a mirrorless model, with a more portable body and quicker burst shooting. 

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
8.3
Design
Portability
Height
2.8" (7.0 cm)
Width
4.7" (12.0 cm)
Depth
2.4" (6.0 cm)
Volume
30.8 in³ (504.0 cm³)
Weight
0.73 lbs (0.33 kg)

The Sony α6000 is very portable. Its body has a low-profile design, and it's very lightweight, making it easy to throw into a bag or take on the go. It's even more compact than newer models in the lineup, like the Sony α6100 and especially the slightly bulkier Sony α6600.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

The camera's build quality is good. It's similar to the Sony α6100, though its plastic construction feels cheaper than the magnesium alloy body of the Sony α6400. The inputs and battery compartment are covered by sturdy hinged doors. The buttons also provide nice physical feedback. However, some of the inputs, like the top command dial, aren't the most responsive, as it has a slight delay when you change an input.

Design
Body
Body Type
SLR-Style
Water Resistance
No
Mirrorless
Yes
Rugged
No
Hot Shoe
Yes
Customizable Button
Yes
Command Dial
2
Tripod Mount
Yes
Lens Mount
E-Mount
Built-In Flash
Yes
Fastest Shutter Speed
1/4,000 s
Design
In The Box

  • Sony a6000 camera body
  • Sony E 16-50mm 3.5-5.6/PZ OSS lens
  • Lens caps
  • Sensor cap
  • Viewfinder eyecup
  • 1x NP-FW50 battery
  • Shoulder strap
  • AC adapter
  • Micro-USB to USB-A cable
  • User manual

8.0
Design
Ergonomics & Comfort
Hand Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Extra-Large Hand
No

The camera feels quite comfortable to shoot with, though its relatively small handgrip and body can feel cramped for those with larger hands. The video record button is also strangely placed by the thumb rest, making it a little awkward to start recording in movie mode. Still, the camera feels lightweight and well-balanced with smaller lenses. It's also easy to adjust settings with either eye to the viewfinder, though the offset EVF is better suited to right-eye shooters.

Design
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Type
Electronic
Advertised Coverage
100%
Advertised Resolution
1.44 million dots
Advertised Magnification
0.7

The EVF is decently sized and fairly comfortable to look through. However, its resolution falls short of newer models like the Sony α6400, so the image doesn't look as crisp. Thankfully, there isn't too much lag.

6.5
Design
Screen
Screen Articulation Type
Tilting
Screen Max Brightness
834 cd/m²
Advertised Resolution
0.92 million dots
Size
3.0" (7.6 cm)
Touchscreen
No

The camera has a tilting screen, which is great for waist-level shooting. The screen is bright enough to see clearly in sunnier conditions, but it lacks touch capability, making it more cumbersome to navigate the menu and change the settings. The lack of touch capability also means there's no option to use touch focus, as on newer models, so you're stuck with using the control wheel to manually select focus points.

6.0
Design
Menu System
Guide Mode
No
App Name
Imaging Edge Mobile

The Sony a6000 uses Sony's older menu system, which is notoriously confusing and difficult to navigate. It's an even older version than what you'll find on the Sony α6400 and that generation of Alpha cameras; there is no 'My Menu' option to save all your most frequently accessed settings in one place. More advanced settings are buried within submenus that aren't all logically organized. However, you can set it to tile view, which makes it a little quicker to get to the right section of the menu. Thankfully, it has a lot of customization options, allowing you to configure the buttons and a custom menu to your preference, so you don't have to dive into the labyrinthine menu as frequently.

not tested
Design
Built-In Lens
Maximum Aperture
No built-in lens
Max Aperture (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Minimum Focal Length
N/A
Maximum Focal Length
N/A
Max Focal Length (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Optical Image Stabilization
No
Luminance
N/A
Light Falloff
N/A
Design
Sensor
Sensor Type
CMOS
Advertised Effective Pixels
24.3 MP
Sensor Size
APS-C
Processor
BIONZ X
Extended ISO Minimum
N/A
Native ISO Minimum (Base ISO)
100
Native ISO Maximum
25,600
Tested Firmware
Version 3.21

If you'd prefer a camera with a full-frame sensor, consider the Sony α7 II, which is from the same generation of Sony Alpha cameras as the Sony α6000.

8.0
Design
Battery
Battery Type
Sony NP-FW50
USB Charging
Yes
Power Delivery While Recording
Yes
Advertised Battery Life In Photo
360 photos
Tested Battery Life In Video
113 min

The battery life for photos is decent, with a 360-shot CIPA rating. CIPA ratings tend to fall on the conservative side, so your mileage will vary in real-world scenarios, but overall, the camera's battery life still pales compared to most DSLR cameras. On the upside, it does support external power delivery, which is great. In video mode, on the other hand, the battery life is quite good, but that's mostly because the camera's limited to 1080p recording, which doesn't drain the battery as fast as more demanding 4k video.

Photo General
6.7
Photo General
Photo Shooting Speed
Low Speed Continuous
4 fps
High Speed Continuous
11 fps
Silent Shooting Continuous
N/A
Raw Buffer Size
22 Photos
JPEG Buffer Size
49 Photos
Buffer Empty Time
12 s

The Sony α6000 can shoot at a fairly quick max burst rate in its high-speed drive mode, which is good for capturing stills of fast-moving subjects. In addition to 'Low' and 'High,' there's also a 'Mid' drive mode that can shoot at 6 fps. Unlike newer models, it doesn't offer a fully electronic/silent shutter option, though it does have an electronic front-curtain shutter (EFCS) mode. Unfortunately, the camera also has a small photo buffer, especially if you shoot in RAW format. The buffer also takes a fair amount of time to empty once full. Though it isn't the worst, it's slow enough that you could miss a key moment while waiting for it to finish clearing.

5.0
Photo General
Photo AF-C Tracking
Autofocus Tracking Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
35%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
59%

The autofocus on the Sony a6000 isn't all that great by today's standards, though it was an impressive AF system at the time of its release in 2014. Like other Sony Alpha models, it uses a hybrid on-sensor AF system with both phase-detection and contrast-detection AF points, although it has fewer focus points than newer models.

It includes both face and eye detection for more precise focusing. However, the auto tracking feature isn't nearly as fast or reliable as newer models like the Sony α6400. With faster-moving subjects, you likely won't get an amazing hit rate. However, you can still get an okay usable hit rate for general-purpose and casual photography.

5.3
Photo General
Photo AF-C Center Point
Autofocus Center Point Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
52%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
81%

If you're sticking with the center point for continuous shooting, the camera's accuracy is disappointing. You can still get a solid amount of keepers, especially with slower subjects, but it's a lot slower to acquire focus than newer models in the Alpha lineup.

7.3
Photo General
Photo Image Stabilization
Minimum Shutter Speed Achieved
1/20 s
In-Body Image Stabilization
No

The Sony a6000 doesn't have in-body image stabilization, but you can use an optically stabilized lens to help reduce camera shake and shoot handheld at slower shutter speeds. The Sony E 16-50mm 3.5-5.6/PZ OSS kit lens that we used for the stabilization test includes 'Optical SteadyShot,' Sony's optical stabilization system. It does a decent job of stabilizing the camera for photos. That said, stabilization performance can vary depending on different factors, including the lens, focal length, and even how steady your hands are.

Photo Image Quality
7.5
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Dynamic Range
Dynamic Range At Base ISO
9.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/500s Exposure Time
7.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/2000s Exposure Time
6.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/4000s Exposure Time
6.1 f-stops

The Sony a6000 has a good dynamic range. While it isn't as impressive as newer, higher-end models like the Sony α6600, especially at higher ISO settings in low light, it still captures a fairly wide range of detail in high-contrast scenes. You do lose some shadow detail, but highlights are preserved quite well. That said, the camera doesn't have the best noise handling, and pushing the exposure of your RAW files too much results in noticeable noise and banding. Overall, that means you can take photos of high-contrast scenes with a fair amount of detail preservation, but you don't have as much leeway when making exposure adjustments as you might with a newer camera.

8.4
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Sharpness
Vertical Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,917 LW/PH
Horizontal Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,986 LW/PH

The camera's high-resolution sensor resolves an impressive amount of fine detail. You can punch in on or crop your photos and still retain plenty of detail.

7.0
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Noise
SNR 18% At 1/8 Exposure Time (125 ms)
33.4dB
SNR 18% At 1/30 Exposure Time (33 ms)
30.2 dB
SNR 18% At 1/125 Exposure Time (8 ms)
25.4 dB
SNR 18% At 1/500 Exposure Time (2 ms)
21.3dB

The camera's RAW noise handling is decent. It performs well at lower ISO values, but noise begins to creep in as you raise the ISO, and it doesn't handle noise as well at higher ISOs in low-light situations. If you want an entry-level mirrorless camera with better RAW noise handling, check out the Fujifilm X-T30 II.

Pictures Sample Gallery
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Skate Park Picture
JPEG Skate Park Picture Download
RAW Skate Park Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Polish Church Picture
JPEG Polish Church Picture Download
RAW Polish Church Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Studio Picture
JPEG Studio Picture Download
RAW Studio Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Stairway Picture
JPEG Stairway Picture Download
RAW Stairway Picture Download
Video General
Video General
Video Features
Full HD Video
Yes
4k Video
No
6k Video
No
Clean HDMI Output
Yes
Advertised Max Chroma Sampling Over HDMI
Not Advertised
Advertised Max Bit Depth Over HDMI
N/A
Log Picture Profile
No
Recording Light
No

The Sony α6000 can only record video in 1080p and lacks more advanced video features like Log profiles or RAW video output.

Video General
Audio
Audio Test Sample
Audio Recording
Stereo
Microphone Level Display
Yes
Video General
Video File Format And Compression
MP4 H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
MP4 H.265 / HEVC
No
MOV H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
MOV H.265 / HEVC
No
AVCHD H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
All-I Compression
No
4k Video
0
4k Video
4k Video Frame Rate
240 fps In 4k
No
120 fps In 4k
No
60 fps In 4k
No
30 fps In 4k
No
24 fps In 4k
No
4k Crop At Max Available fps
N/A
0
4k Video
4k Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In 4k
N/A
Bitrate Minimum In 4k
0 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In 4k
No
Bit Depth In 4k
0 Bit
Record Time Limit In 4k
0 min
Overheat Recording Interruptions in 4k
N/A
0
4k Video
4k Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In 4k
0
Face Tracking In 4k
0
Face Detection In 4k
N/A
Eye Detection In 4k
N/A
0
4k Video
4k Video Quality
Low Light Capability In 4k
0
Test Scene Extract In 4k N/A
not tested
4k Video
4k Video Rolling Shutter Effect
4k Rolling Shutter
N/A
Full HD Video
8.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Frame Rate
240 fps In FHD
No
120 fps In FHD
No
60 fps In FHD
Yes
30 fps In FHD
Yes
24 fps In FHD
Yes
FHD Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

The Sony a6000 can record 1080p video at up to 60 fps. Though it lacks higher frame rate options, 60 fps is still good for capturing smooth action footage or incorporating slightly slowed-down clips.

7.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In FHD
50 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In FHD
50 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In FHD
4:2:0
Bit Depth In FHD
8 Bit
Record Time Limit in FHD
30 min

The camera's internal recording capability is good for its class, but it's behind the times. Bit rates are more limited than newer Alpha models, so the camera can't capture video with as much detail or information. Unfortunately, there's also a 30-minute cap on recording.

7.0
Full HD Video
FHD Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In FHD
5.7
Face Tracking In FHD
9.0
Face Detection In FHD
Yes
Eye Detection In FHD
No

The Sony a6000 has a decent autofocus system for video. It has a face detection feature but no eye tracking. It does a good job with tracking human subjects, especially with slower movements, but it's not as "sticky" as the AF on newer Sony cameras, meaning there's occasionally a slight delay for the AF to catch up to your subject after they've moved or popped back into the frame. The same goes for the general subject/object tracking, which can be slow to find its target after it's moved.

6.5
Full HD Video
FHD Video Quality
Low Light Capability In FHD
6.0
Test Scene Extract In FHD
7.0

Video quality is decent. It isn't the sharpest or most detailed 1080p, but it's suitable for more casual recording. Unfortunately, it struggles a bit more in low light, where video looks noisy and muddy. You also lose a lot of detail in the shadows.

6.7
Full HD Video
FHD Video Rolling Shutter Effect
FHD Rolling Shutter
4.7°

There's some noticeable rolling shutter effect when panning the camera from side to side, but it isn't too distracting when the camera's moving at a slower pace.

Storage And Connectivity
Storage And Connectivity
Storage
Card 1 Slot
SD Card UHS-I
Card 2 Slot
No 2nd Card Slot

The Sony a6000 has just a single SD card slot, rated for UHS-I cards. The card slot is in the battery compartment, located on the bottom of the camera, making it harder to switch out cards when using a tripod.

4.8
Storage And Connectivity
Inputs / Outputs
USB
Micro USB
HDMI
Micro (Type D)
Headphones
No
Microphone
No Microphone input
Wi-Fi
Yes
Bluetooth
No

Inputs and outputs are limited to a Micro USB port and a Micro HDMI port. Unfortunately, it doesn't have a headphone jack or a microphone input, so you're out of luck if you want to record higher-quality audio with an external mic. It's an older camera, so it doesn't support Bluetooth, but you can still transfer files over Wi-Fi if you prefer wireless connectivity.