SteelSeries Sensei Ten Mouse Review

Tested using Methodology v0.8.1
Reviewed Jun 23, 2020 at 08:08 am
SteelSeries Sensei Ten Picture
7.5
Mixed Usage
7.3
Office/Multimedia
5.2
Travel
8.0
Video Games (FPS)
8.6
Video Games (MMO)
7.9
Ultra-Light Gaming
Connectivity Wired
Type
Standard

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a great wired gaming mouse. It has excellent performance and has a very wide, customizable CPI range. It has buttons on both the left and right sides and has a symmetrical shape, making it ambidextrous. Each of the ten buttons are fully programmable with the SteelSeries Engine 3. Unfortunately, the mouse can feel slippery, and the cable has noticeable stiffness. On the upside, any hand size should be able to easily reach all the buttons when using claw grip, while only small and medium hands will have a difficult time with fingertip grip.

Our Verdict

7.5 Mixed Usage

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a good mixed usage mouse. It has a comfortable design, includes buttons on both sides, and has RGB lighting on the logo and mouse wheel. It has a solid build and can be used for both gaming and office use. It has a lightweight design that is useful for FPS gaming but doesn't include a honeycomb pattern for ultra-light gaming. It's also good for MMO players but doesn't have a large number of buttons like most MMO mice.

Pros
  • Excellent software with SteelSeries Engine 3.
Cons
7.3 Office/Multimedia

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a decent mouse for office or multimedia use. The mouse feels very center-weighted, and the buttons on both sides, combined with its symmetrical shape, make this mouse good for ambidextrous use. Unfortunately, there are no L/R tilt buttons on the mouse wheel, which may be a deal-breaker if you have to scroll sideways through long documents like spreadsheets.

Pros
  • Buttons on both sides making it ambidextrous.
Cons
  • Slippery texture.
  • No L/R tilt options on mouse wheel.
5.2 Travel

Because the SteelSeries Sensei 10 is a wired gaming mouse, travel isn't something that needs to be considered. However, the mouse is well-built and sturdy enough to travel with if you need to.

8.0 Video Games (FPS)

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a great mouse for FPS video games. The mouse is quite lightweight, and all of its buttons can be programmed, including the up/down scrolls. The sensor performance is excellent, and because it's wired, the click latency is also good. Unfortunately, small and medium hands may have a tough time with the fingertip grip.

Pros
  • Good click latency.
  • All buttons can be programmed, including the mouse wheel.
  • Excellent software with SteelSeries Engine 3.
Cons
  • Stiff cable with kinks when opened.
  • Slippery texture.
8.6 Video Games (MMO)

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a great mouse for gaming because it has more buttons than typical mice, but not as many as designed MMO mice. It has exceptional software with the SteelSeries Engine 3 and all of its inputs are programmable. It has a good comfort of use but can feel slippery, especially if you have small hands and are using a palm grip. However, the buttons are easy to reach and are available on both sides of the mouse.

Pros
  • Good click latency.
  • All buttons can be programmed, including the mouse wheel.
  • Excellent software with SteelSeries Engine 3.
Cons
  • Stiff cable with kinks when opened.
  • Slippery texture.
7.9 Ultra-Light Gaming

The SteelSeries Sensei 10 is a good ultra-light gaming mouse. It's light for a wired mouse, especially if you bungee the cable. Also, because it's wired, the click latency is good. Unfortunately, the cable can be quite stiff and still has kinks once opened.

Pros
  • Good click latency.
  • All buttons can be programmed, including the mouse wheel.
  • Excellent software with SteelSeries Engine 3.
Cons
  • Stiff cable with kinks when opened.
  • Slippery texture.
  • 7.5 Mixed Usage
  • 7.3 Office/Multimedia
  • 5.2 Travel
  • 8.0 Video Games (FPS)
  • 8.6 Video Games (MMO)
  • 7.9 Ultra-Light Gaming

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten has a similar shape to that of the SteelSeries Rival 3, but feels slippery and lacks grips on either side of the mouse. It has an ambidextrous frame with two buttons on both the left and right sides. It comes with RGB lighting on the SteelSeries logo and the scroll wheel.

Design
Weight
Maximum Weight With Wire
131 g
Maximum Weight Without Wire
88 g
Minimum Weight Without Wire
88 g

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is fairly light, especially if you use a bungee to remove the weight of the cable. Unfortunately, there aren't any weight optimization options.

5.6
Design
Portability
Length 5.0" (12.6 cm)
Height 1.5" (3.9 cm)
Width 2.7" (6.8 cm)
Volume
20.38 Cu. Inch (334 Cu. centimeter)
Cable/Receiver Storing
No

Because the SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a wired mouse, portability isn't an issue, especially considering most people will use it at home with their gaming setup. However, if you were to travel with it, it might be difficult to fit into a laptop bag because of how tall it is. The cable can also be an issue with its solid rubbery texture.

8.0
Design
Build Quality

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a very solid mouse with no noticeable wobble or flex. The PFTE feet are pretty good but don't have the best glide. Considering the mouse wheel does not have the ability for left to right tilt, it feels very stable.

7.5
Design
Comfort Of Use
Right-handed
No
Left-handed
No
Ambidextrous
Yes
Grip Width
62 mm

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten has a good comfort of use. The mouse feels very center-weighted, and the buttons on both sides combined with its symmetrical shape make this mouse good for ambidextrous use. However, because it's so slippery, it can be difficult to use if you don't grip it the right way. If you prefer a slanted design that might be a bit more comfortable for long periods of use, check out the SteelSeries Rival 710 instead.

Design
Palm Grip: Hand Size Recommendation
Palm Grip: Small Hand
No
Palm Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Palm Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Palm Grip: X.Large Hand
Yes

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten might not be the easiest to palm grip if you have small hands because it can feel slippery, and could struggle to reach all of the buttons and the scroll wheel.

Design
Claw Grip: Hand Size Recommendation
Claw Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Claw Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Claw Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Claw Grip: X.Large Hand
Yes

Like many other SteelSeries mice, the Sensei Ten is designed to be used with the claw grip. Any size hand will have little problem having a comfortable hold of the mouse and reaching all the buttons. However, with extra-large hands, it's still a bit slippery.

Design
Fingertip Grip: Hand Size Recommendation
Fingertip Grip: Small Hand
No
Fingertip Grip: Medium Hand
No
Fingertip Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Fingertip Grip: X.Large Hand
Yes

This mouse is too big to fingertip grip for people with small or medium hands. They will have a difficult time hitting the scroll wheel and will find the mouse slippery.

0
Design
Wireless
Bluetooth
No
Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries
Use When Charging
No
On/Off Activation
None

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a wired-only mouse.

6.0
Design
Cable
Cable Length 5.9 ft (1.8 m)
Braided
No
Port Type: Mouse End
No Port
Port Type: PC End
USB

The cable on this mouse is slightly worse than the SteelSeries Rival 3, with an immediately noticeable stiffness. However, it's still a good quality rubber cable.

Design
In The Box

  • SteelSeries Sensei Ten mouse
  • Manuals

Control
Control
Sensor
Sensor Technology
Optical (LED)
Works On Glass
No
7.8
Control
Click Latency
Click Latency: Receiver
N/A
Click Latency: Bluetooth
N/A
Click Latency: Wired
16 ms

The click latency of this mouse is very low, similar to most wired gaming mice. Even competitive gamers likely won't notice any delay or lag.

9.4
Control
Performance
Minimum CPI (DPI)
50 CPI (DPI)
Maximum CPI (DPI)
18000 CPI (DPI)
CPI (DPI) Adjustment Steps
50 CPI (DPI)
CPI (DPI) Error
4.7 %
Mouse Acceleration
No
Lift Off Distance
2.4 mm
Maximum Polling Rate
1000 Hz

The performance of this mouse is excellent, and it includes a very wide CPI range. Using the SteelSeries Engine 3 software, you can set the sensitivity fairly precisely to the setting of your choosing. The polling rate can be set to 125Hz, 250Hz, 500Hz, or 1000Hz.

8.7
Control
Buttons
Buttons Activation
Mechanical
Number Of Buttons
8
Number Of Programmable Inputs
10
Profile Switching Button
Yes
CPI (DPI) Switching Button
Yes

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten has four additional side buttons, giving this mouse 10 programmable buttons. The side buttons are wider and protrude a bit more than the SteelSeries Rival 3. You can program a specific profile to a button, but unfortunately, there isn't a button where you can flip back and forth between profiles. If you want a SteelSeries mouse with more programmable buttons, check out the SteelSeries Rival 500.

6.0
Control
Mouse Wheel
Vertical Wheel
Physical
Vertical Wheel Incremented
Yes
Vertical Wheel Unlock Button
No
Vertical Wheel Tilt
No
Horizontal Wheel
None
Horizontal Wheel Incremented
No horizontal Wheel

The mouse wheel is smooth and rubberized, with medium bumps when scrolling. It includes RGB lighting on the sides, and it feels softer with the more pressure that you apply. Unfortunately, it doesn't have left to right tilt buttons.

Operating System And Software
10
Operating System And Software
Compatible Software Option
Software Name SteelSeries Engine 3
Software Windows Compatibility
Yes
Software macOS Compatibility
Yes
Account Needed
No
On-Board Memory
Yes
CPI (DPI) Adjustment
Yes
Polling Rate Adjustment
Yes
Profile Configuration
Yes
RGB On/Off
Yes

SteelSeries Engine 3 is an outstanding piece of software when paired with this mouse. It can be installed on either Windows or macOS, and you can customize every aspect of the mouse. This mouse also features on-board memory so you can save your customization options to the mouse and maintain them when switching computers. You can also adjust the angle snapping and polling rate.

10
Operating System And Software
Mouse Compatibility
Windows Compatibility Fully
macOS Compatibility Fully

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is fully compatible with both Windows and macOS, as the software can be installed on either OS.

Differences Between Sizes and Variants

We reviewed the standard SteelSeries Sensei Ten mouse, but there's a SteelSeries Ten Neon Rider variant available in collaboration with Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Our review and test results are valid for both of these.

Compared to other mice

The SteelSeries Sensei 10 has a well-built symmetrical design, with buttons on both sides, making it different compared to most other FPS mice. It's a fairly straightforward gaming mouse and is light enough for ultra-light gaming. Check out our recommendations for the best wireless gaming mice, or if you're looking for a mouse that's not entirely dedicated to gaming, see our picks for the best mice and the best wireless mice.

SteelSeries Rival 3
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten and the SteelSeries Rival 3 are two similar mice, but the Rival 3 is a tad bit better. The Sensei Ten suffers from a somewhat slippery texture, and is a bit heavier, making the Rival 3 a better option if you prefer lighter mice. Both come with the excellent SteelSeries Engine 3 software, which allows great performance and lighting customization.

SteelSeries Rival 600
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

Both the SteelSeries Rival 600 and the SteelSeries Sensei Ten are great gaming mice. The Sensei Ten includes 10 programmable buttons, whereas the Rival 600 only has nine. Both are comfortable, unfortunately, the Rival 600 may not suitable for people with small hands, as they may have a hard time reaching some of the buttons.

SteelSeries Rival 710
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten is a better wired FPS gaming mouse than the SteelSeries Rival 710. The Sensei Ten is better-suited for a claw grip regardless of hand size and has a wider and more adjustable CPI range. It also has one more programmable side button than the Rival 710 and is lighter. On the other hand, the Rival 710 is much more comfortable and feels better-built.

Razer DeathAdder V2
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Razer Death Adder V2 is a better FPS gaming mouse than the SteelSeries Sensei Ten.  The Razer has an extremely low click latency and weighs less than the SteelSeries. The Razer's wire is also a huge improvement over previous versions and is more flexible and less rigid than the SteelSeries.

Razer Viper
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The SteelSeries Sensei Ten and the Razer Viper are both excellent gaming mice. However, the Viper is surprisingly lightweight for a non-honeycomb-patterned mouse and has amazing performance making it the better option for ultra-light gaming. The Viper is also more comfortable to use in an office setting.

Razer Viper Ultimate
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Razer Viper Ultimate is a better gaming mouse than the SteelSeries Sensei Ten. Both mice come with an ambidextrous design and two side buttons on each side, but the Razer has a more solid design and doesn't feel slippery. The Razer also comes with a unique charging station that also acts as a receiver range extender for better performance.

SteelSeries Rival 500
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The SteelSeries Rival 500 is a better gaming mouse than the SteelSeries Sensei Ten. The Rival 500 includes 17 fully programmable buttons compared to ten for the Sensei Ten. Both mice have excellent performance. However, the Rival 500 can only be used by right-handed people, whereas the Sensei 10 is ambidextrous.

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