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Panasonic LUMIX G9 II Camera Review

Tested using Methodology v0.12.1
Reviewed Jan 11, 2024 at 11:48 am
Latest change: Writing modified Jan 29, 2024 at 09:10 am
Panasonic LUMIX G9 II Picture
7.7
Travel Photography
7.9
Landscape Photography
7.7
Sport & Wildlife Photography
7.6
Raw Photo Performance
7.6
Vlogging
9.0
Studio Video
6.9
Action Video

The Panasonic LUMIX G9 II is a flagship Micro Four Thirds (MFT) camera and the follow-up to 2017's Panasonic LUMIX G9. It has a newly redesigned body that's more reminiscent of the Panasonic LUMIX S5 II than its predecessor, and it offers plenty of upgrades under the hood that make it a good fit for hybrid photo and video shooters. That includes a 25-megapixel dual gain sensor, a new and improved phase-detection autofocus system, and a very effective five-axis in-body image stabilization system, along with a plethora of advanced video features. That said, with comparable full-frame or even APS-C cameras hovering around the same price point—including Panasonic's own S5 II—the G9 II makes the most sense for those who are already invested in the MFT lens ecosystem or prefer the reach and portability offered by that system.

Our Verdict

7.7 Travel Photography

The Panasonic G9 II is good for travel photography. While it isn't the most portable MFT camera, it still benefits from smaller MFT lenses, which can bring down the size of your kit. The camera also has an excellent IBIS system, which helps reduce the need for a tripod. Its autofocus is okay but can get tripped up with busier scenes or faster subjects. Battery life is good overall, but depending on your shooting habits, you might still need a portable power bank for long days on the go.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • Excellent ergonomics.
  • Great stabilization.
Cons
  • Bulky for a MFT camera.
  • Autofocus isn't the most reliable.
7.9 Landscape Photography

The Panasonic G9 II is great for landscape photography. It has a relatively high-resolution sensor for a Micro Four Thirds camera, capturing a good amount of fine detail, and it has an impressive amount of dynamic range, so it's fairly well-suited for high-contrast scenes. It also includes a pixel-shift mode that lets you capture very high-res images of up to 100 megapixels. On top of that, it's a sturdy weather-sealed camera with excellent ergonomics, though it isn't the most portable option, especially compared to some other MFT peers.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • Excellent ergonomics.
  • Impressive dynamic range.
  • High-res pixel-shift mode.
Cons
  • Bulky for a MFT camera.
7.7 Sport & Wildlife Photography

The Panasonic G9 II is good for sports and wildlife photography. It can shoot at very quick speeds in burst mode, though its fastest burst rates are reserved for single-AF shooting. Still, it offers a pre-burst function to help you time your burst to the perfect moment. Its autofocus system isn't the most accurate, especially with faster subjects or busier scenes, but it's adequate for most subjects. The camera itself feels well-built, with a weather-sealed body to keep out dust and moisture, and its ergonomics are excellent. The Micro Four Thirds format also offers the benefit of more compact telephoto lenses. That said, if you fill up the photo buffer, it takes a very long time for it to empty, which can slow you down when you're in the thick of the action.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • Excellent ergonomics.
  • Quick max burst rate.
  • Pre-burst mode.
Cons
  • Bulky for a MFT camera.
  • Burst rate drops to 10 fps (mechanical shutter) or 60 fps (e-shutter) with AF-C.
  • Very long wait for buffer to empty when filled up.
7.6 Raw Photo Performance

The Panasonic G9 II has good RAW image quality. It has impressive dynamic range to bring out a broad range of detail in high-contrast scenes. Its relatively high-resolution sensor also captures images with a good level of fine detail when punching in. It also has a high-resolution mode that captures composite images of up to 100 megapixels. That said, it isn't the best choice for low light situations, with noise handling that's just okay, though noise can be mitigated by shooting with a wider aperture or slower shutter speed.

Pros
  • Impressive dynamic range.
  • High-res pixel-shift mode.
Cons
  • Noise handling is just okay.
7.6 Vlogging

The Panasonic G9 II is good for vlogging, though this isn't its main intended use. It's a very capable video camera with plenty of resolution and frame rate options for different types of vlogs. It also has a fully articulated screen to help you monitor yourself. Its autofocus also does a pretty good job of keeping faces in focus in video. That said, it isn't the most portable option for walk-and-talk style vlogs, and rolling shutter effect can be distracting with quicker camera pans.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • Fully articulated screen.
  • Great stabilization.
Cons
  • Bulky for a MFT camera.
  • Noticeable rolling shutter effect.
9.0 Studio Video

The Panasonic G9 II is fantastic for studio video. It has excellent internal recording specs, with 1080p at up to 240 fps and 4k at up to 120 fps. It also supports 5.8k open gate recording at up to 30 fps to give you more flexibility to crop into different aspect ratios. There's internal 10-bit 4:2:2 capture and V-Log recording for more flexible color grading, and the camera can record 4k ProRes 422 and ProRes 422 HQ formats to an external SSD, with internal ProRes support in 1080p. That said, it can overheat with prolonged recording sessions at higher resolutions.

Pros
  • Internal 10-bit 4:2:2 recording.
  • Open gate 5.8k.
  • 4k up to 120p.
  • Apple ProRes support.
Cons
  • Can overheat in more strenuous shooting conditions.
  • Need an SSD to take advantage of ProRes formats in 4k.
  • Noticeable rolling shutter effect.
6.9 Action Video

The Panasonic G9 II isn't meant for POV-style action video, but it's well-suited to recording action from the sidelines. It can capture 4k at up to 60 fps and 1080p at up to 240 fps, with a dedicated slow-motion mode that records 1080p at up to 300 fps. It also has an excellent stabilization system for smoother camera movements. That said, it isn't the most portable camera and isn't designed to be used with action video mounts.

Pros
  • Sturdy, weather-sealed construction.
  • Great stabilization.
  • High frame rate options.
Cons
  • Bulky for a MFT camera.
  • Not designed for action video rigs.
  • Not waterproof.
  • Noticeable rolling shutter effect.
  • 7.7 Travel Photography
  • 7.9 Landscape Photography
  • 7.7 Sport & Wildlife Photography
  • 7.6 Raw Photo Performance
  • 7.6 Vlogging
  • 9.0 Studio Video
  • 6.9 Action Video
  1. Updated Jan 29, 2024: Added text to the 'Raw Photo Performance' verdict box. We also completely re-ran the 'Photo RAW Noise' test after noticing that the exposure was off in the original files we used for this test; the score has been updated accordingly.
  2. Updated Jan 29, 2024: Converted to Test Bench 0.12.1.
  3. Updated Jan 11, 2024: Review published.
  4. Updated Jan 03, 2024: Early access published.
  5. Updated Dec 04, 2023: Our testers have started testing this product.
  6. Updated Nov 17, 2023: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  7. Updated Sep 22, 2023: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Panasonic LUMIX G9 II comes in one color variant, Black.

You can buy the camera body on its own or in a bundle with a lens like the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-35mm f/2.8 ASPH. POWER O.I.S. lens or the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. POWER O.I.S. lens, depending on the retailer. We purchased the camera bundled with the 12-35mm f/2.8 lens, and you can see our unit's label here.

Let us know if you come across a different variant, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Cameras

The Panasonic G9 II is Panasonic's most advanced Micro Four Thirds camera to date and a worthy follow-up to the original Panasonic LUMIX G9. It's the first Four Thirds camera in the manufacturer's lineup to feature phase-detection autofocus, previously seen in the full-frame Panasonic LUMIX S5 II, offering the brand's best AF yet. It still leaves much to be desired compared to the AF systems found on leading cameras like the Sony α7C II or the Canon EOS R6 Mark II. The camera isn't as portable as an MFT rival like the OM SYSTEM OM-1, but it offers significantly better video specs and faster burst shooting, making it a compelling choice for anyone invested in the Micro Four Thirds system.

If you're looking for more options, check out the best cameras for wildlife photography, the best cameras for hiking and backpacking, and the best mirrorless cameras.

Panasonic LUMIX GH6

The Panasonic LUMIX G9 II and Panasonic LUMIX GH6 are both excellent Micro Four Thirds cameras. Though they're both hybrid cameras, the G9 II is billed as more of a photography-first camera, while the GH6 is more of a videography-first camera. The G9 II uses a phase-detection autofocus system that makes it a little better suited to capturing images of fast-moving subjects. It's also a tad lighter and more portable. On the other hand, the GH6 features built-in heat vents to reduce overheating and has slightly better internal video recording capabilities.

OM SYSTEM OM-1

The Panasonic LUMIX G9 II and the OM SYSTEM OM-1 are both high-end Micro Four Thirds cameras. The OM SYSTEM is a bit more portable, with a higher-resolution EVF and a longer battery life. It also uses a stacked sensor, resulting in less rolling shutter effect. On the other hand, the Panasonic has a higher-resolution sensor and offers better video specs, making it better suited for hybrid and video shooters.

Panasonic LUMIX GH5 II

The Panasonic LUMIX G9 II is better overall than the Panasonic LUMIX GH5 II. It has a higher-resolution sensor and newer processor, with faster burst shooting and a more reliable phase-detection autofocus system, making it more well-rounded. Also, while it's marketed as a stills-oriented camera, its video specs are on par with, and in some ways even surpass, the more video-oriented GH5 II.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
3.9
Design
Portability
Height
4.1" (10.4 cm)
Width
5.2" (13.3 cm)
Depth
3.3" (8.5 cm)
Volume
71.7 in³ (1,175.7 cm³)
Weight
1.46 lbs (0.66 kg)

The Panasonic G9II isn't especially portable for a Micro Four Thirds camera. It's similar in size to the full-frame Panasonic LUMIX S5 II, although it's a bit lighter due mostly to its smaller sensor. Though it's a relatively large body, it's well-suited to larger telephoto lenses and is similar in size and weight to its predecessor.

9.0
Design
Build Quality

The camera feels remarkably well-built. The body is made of plastic and magnesium alloy, and it's weather-sealed to keep out dust and moisture. Panasonic also notes that it can be operated in temperatures down to −10°C (14°F). The buttons and dials feel sturdy and tactile, and the battery compartment and SD card compartment are both covered with locking hinged doors that feel secure. Like the S5 II, the shoulder strap attachments are fixed, so they won't rattle around when shooting video. However, unlike that model, there are no heat vents around the viewfinder, suggesting that the G9 II is intended as a stills-first camera.

Design
Body
Body Type
SLR-Style
Water Resistance
Weather-Sealed
Mirrorless
Yes
Rugged
No
Hot Shoe
Yes
Customizable Button
Yes
Command Dial
3
Tripod Mount
Yes
Lens Mount
Micro Four Thirds
Built-In Flash
No
Fastest Shutter Speed
1/4,000 s
Design
In The Box

  • Panasonic LUMIX DC-G9 II camera body (not pictured)
  • Sensor cap
  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-35mm f/2.8 ASPH Power OIS lens
  • Lens cap
  • Rear lens cover
  • Lens hood
  • Soft pouch for lens
  • Hot shoe cover
  • Battery grip connector cover
  • 1x Panasonic DMW-BLK22 battery
  • AC adapter
  • USB-C to USB-A cable
  • Shoulder strap
  • User manual and documentation

9.0
Design
Ergonomics & Comfort
Hand Grip: Small Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Medium Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Large Hand
Yes
Hand Grip: Extra-Large Hand
Yes

The Panasonic G9II has excellent ergonomics. Though it has slightly different dimensions, its design is nearly identical to the Panasonic LUMIX S5 II, with extensive, well-spaced physical controls that make it easy to adjust your settings. The dedicated ISO, white balance, and exposure compensation buttons near the shutter are also nice to have and really give you full control over the most important settings without having to dive into the menus. The hand grip is also large enough for most hand sizes and has a rubbery finish that provides a secure grip. Overall, the handling and ergonomic design feel very well thought-out, and there are a wide range of customization options to tailor the controls to your preferences.

Design
Viewfinder
Viewfinder Type
Electronic
Advertised Coverage
100%
Advertised Resolution
3.68 million dots
Advertised Magnification
0.8

The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is nice and large, with a high-res 3.68 million dot display, giving you a crisp image when shooting through the viewfinder. The eyecup is also soft and comfortable.

9.7
Design
Screen
Screen Articulation Type
Fully-Articulated
Screen Max Brightness
1,042 cd/m²
Advertised Resolution
1.84 million dots
Size
3.0" (7.5 cm)
Touchscreen
Yes

The camera has a fully articulated display with full-touch navigation. You can use it to scroll the menu, activate the shutter, select focus points, and even adjust the size of the focus area or move around the manual focus preview box. The screen gets bright enough to overcome glare in sunny conditions and has a very high resolution, giving you a crisp image when shooting in Live View or reviewing images.

9.0
Design
Menu System
Guide Mode
Yes
App Name
LUMIX Sync

The menu system is fantastic. Settings are clearly organized and labeled, making finding what you're looking for easy. You can also create a custom menu for all of your most-used settings, and there are plenty of customization options. Some nice quality-of-life touches make it easier to navigate. For example, when selecting from the many resolution and frame rate options, you can filter the settings by resolution, frame rate, or codec to more easily find the settings you need. That said, more advanced settings, like HDMI output settings, can be a bit hard to find, and the quick menu is somewhat limited, although you can still customize it to your preferences.

not tested
Design
Built-In Lens
Maximum Aperture
No built-in lens
Max Aperture (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Minimum Focal Length
N/A
Maximum Focal Length
N/A
Max Focal Length (Full-Frame Equivalent)
N/A
Optical Image Stabilization
No
Luminance
N/A
Light Falloff
N/A
Design
Sensor
Sensor Type
CMOS
Advertised Effective Pixels
25.21 MP
Sensor Size
4/3 (MFT)
Processor
Unspecified
Extended ISO Minimum
50
Native ISO Minimum (Base ISO)
100
Native ISO Maximum
25,600
Tested Firmware
Ver. 1.0

The G9 II uses a new 25 MP Micro Four Thirds sensor, which offers more resolution than the 20 MP sensor of the original Panasonic LUMIX G9. Panasonic also advertises a new processing engine developed with Leica as part of their L² Technology agreement. The new sensor has a dual output gain design that allows it to capture 16-bit RAW files.

The camera also has a 'High Resolution' photo mode, which shifts the sensor around in increments for a series of frames and then combines those frames in-camera into a composite image with a resolution of up to 100 megapixels, depending on your quality and aspect ratio settings. The standard 'High Resolution' setting is meant to be used with a tripod, but there's also a 'Handheld High Resolution' mode. You can see a sample of the 'High Resolution' (tripod) mode here (RAW file download), compared to a regular image of the same scene here (RAW file download). Likewise, you can see a 'Handheld High Resolution' image here (RAW file download), compared to a regular image here (RAW file download).

8.6
Design
Battery
Battery Type
Panasonic DMW-BLK22
USB Charging
Yes
Power Delivery While Recording
Yes
Advertised Battery Life In Photo
390 photos
Tested Battery Life In Video
130 min

The camera has great battery performance overall. It's CIPA-rated for approximately 390 shots on a full charge, though the rating also varies depending on the lens. With the Lumix G 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6, the camera's rated for 390 shots, but with the Lumix G 12-60mm f/2.8-4.0, it's rated for 370 shots. In any case, CIPA ratings should be taken with a grain of salt. Your real-world battery performance will vary depending on how your shooting habits and settings. Though it isn't the highest CIPA rating for its class, it's still respectable, so you can expect to go a reasonable length of time before having to recharge the battery.

In video mode, the camera performs very well, capturing over two hours of continuous 4k video before running out of battery, with 'Recording Max Temperature' set to 'High'. In 'High', the camera doesn't stop recording even if the temperature rises. When set to 'Standard', we recorded a battery life closer to 100 minutes, with two overheating interruptions. If you need to extend the battery life further, the camera supports external power supply via USB-C with a PD charger or power source.

Photo General
6.9
Photo General
Photo Shooting Speed
Low Speed Continuous
2 fps
High Speed Continuous
14 fps
Silent Shooting Continuous
75 fps
Raw Buffer Size
163 Photos
JPEG Buffer Size
201 Photos
Buffer Empty Time
68 s

The Panasonic G9II can shoot at a very quick 14 fps max burst rate with its mechanical shutter, although you'll only get speeds that fast in single autofocus (AF-S) mode. If you want to use continuous autofocus (AF-C), the burst rate maxes out at 10 fps, which is still respectable but nothing extraordinary. When using the electronic shutter, on the other hand, the camera can shoot up to a whopping 75 fps with AF-S or 60 fps with AF-C. That being said, you're more likely to experience rolling shutter artifacts with the e-shutter, so it's less suited to tracking moving subjects. In addition, the camera has a useful 'Pre-Burst' function that lets you capture frames for 0.5, 1, or 1.5 seconds before you fully press down the shutter to start burst shooting. This is helpful when you're anticipating a subject's movement—for example, a bird about to take flight—to ensure you don't miss the critical moment.

While the camera doesn't have the largest JPEG buffer size compared to some of its peers, it does have a fairly large buffer overall. However, if you manage to fill it up, it takes a long time for the buffer to clear, slowing you down.

Note: This camera behaves a bit unusually when it comes to emptying its buffer. We noticed that empty times were quite inconsistent when shooting RAW files, and after investigating further, we noticed a pattern. After an initial burst, the buffer fills up after about 170 frames and it takes about 55 seconds before you can start shooting again, but on the second burst, the buffer fills up after about 120 frames and takes about 80 seconds to empty. The pattern repeats for subsequent bursts. This indicates that after filling up the first time, the camera will let you shoot before the buffer is fully empty but will empty the buffer completely on every second burst. Given this behavior, we've used an average of the buffer empty times to get the figure noted in the results above. If you fill up the buffer with JPEG files, on the other hand, it more consistently takes about 30 seconds for the buffer to empty.

6.9
Photo General
Photo AF-C Tracking
Autofocus Tracking Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
55%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
75%

This is the first LUMIX G camera to feature a hybrid phase-detection autofocus system, following in the footsteps of the full-frame Panasonic LUMIX S5 II. The Panasonic G9 II has dedicated subject detection modes for Humans, Animals, Cars, and Motorcycles, with the option to focus on either bodies or faces/eyes when using the former two detection modes. Overall, the autofocus tracking performs fairly well. It's even a little more reliable than its full-frame stablemate and competitors like the OM SYSTEM OM-1. While it won't nail focus every time and can fall behind with fast-moving subjects, it's a notable step up in performance from older Panasonic cameras.

8.9
Photo General
Photo AF-C Center Point
Autofocus Center Point Shots
Perfect Focus Hit Rate
87%
Usable Focus Hit Rate
95%

When using center point AF without tracking, the Panasonic G9 II does an excellent job of quickly and accurately adjusting focus. If you can keep your subject under the focus point, you'll likely have plenty of keepers.

8.3
Photo General
Photo Image Stabilization
Minimum Shutter Speed Achieved
1/8 s
In-Body Image Stabilization
Yes

The Panasonic G9 II has a five-axis in-body image stabilization (IBIS) that's advertised to offer up to 8 stops of compensation, according to CIPA standards. The 'Dual I.S. 2' system combines in-body stabilization with optical stabilization from Dual I.S.-compatible Panasonic lenses. Overall, the camera does a great job of stabilizing shots taken at very slow shutter speeds. That said, stabilization performance can vary depending on your lens, focal length, and even the steadiness of your hands. We tested image stabilization using the Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-35mm f/2.8 lens, which also includes optical stabilization.

Photo Image Quality
8.3
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Dynamic Range
Dynamic Range At Base ISO
10.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/500s Exposure Time
8.2 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/2000s Exposure Time
6.8 f-stops
Dynamic Range At 1/4000s Exposure Time
6.6 f-stops

The Panasonic G9 II has impressive usable dynamic range, particularly for an MFT camera. While it can't capture as wide a range of detail as full-frame models like the Panasonic LUMIX S5 II, it still captures high-contrast scenes with good detail preservation.

7.5
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Sharpness
Vertical Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,648 LW/PH
Horizontal Edge MTF50 At Base ISO
1,692 LW/PH

The camera is good at resolving fine detail. While there isn't as much leeway to crop in as cameras with higher-resolution sensors, images still appear quite sharp. You can also use the 'High Resolution' drive mode to capture composite images with an even greater level of detail.

6.9
Photo Image Quality
Photo RAW Noise
SNR 18% At 1/8 Exposure Time (125 ms)
33.1dB
SNR 18% At 1/30 Exposure Time (33 ms)
30.0 dB
SNR 18% At 1/125 Exposure Time (8 ms)
25.1 dB
SNR 18% At 1/500 Exposure Time (2 ms)
19.4dB

The Panasonic G9 II has okay noise handling. With bright lighting or settings that allow adequate light to hit the sensor, you're unlikely to see much noise, but otherwise, the camera's only decent at managing noise levels in low light.

Pictures Sample Gallery
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Skate Park Picture
JPEG Skate Park Picture Download
RAW Skate Park Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Polish Church Picture
JPEG Polish Church Picture Download
RAW Polish Church Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Studio Picture
JPEG Studio Picture Download
RAW Studio Picture Download
Pictures Sample Gallery
The Stairway Picture
JPEG Stairway Picture Download
RAW Stairway Picture Download
Video General
Video General
Video Features
Full HD Video
Yes
4k Video
Yes
6k Video
No
Clean HDMI Output
Yes
Advertised Max Chroma Sampling Over HDMI
4:2:2
Advertised Max Bit Depth Over HDMI
10 bits
Log Picture Profile
Yes
Recording Light
No

Though it's billed as a still-first camera, the Panasonic G9II is no slouch regarding video features, matching up in many ways to the more video-oriented Panasonic LUMIX GH6. In addition to 4k (16:9) capture, the camera can record in C4k (17:9), 4.4k (4:3), 5.7k (17:9), and open gate 5.8k (4:3), which is great if you want more flexibility to crop into different aspect ratios. You can see sample test scene extracts for each of these below:

There's also a wide range of 'Photo Style' picture profiles to choose from, including V-Log to capture a wider dynamic and tonal range for those who prefer to color grade their own footage. You can even apply these profiles to JPEG images in photo mode. That includes the new Leica Monochrome profile (sample snapshots here and here).

The 'View Assist' feature is available for both V-Log and HLG formats and lets you simulate what your footage will look like after processing with any LUTs saved to the camera. You can even import up to 10 custom LUTs to preview or apply in-camera. Unlike most other brands, Panasonic includes a vectorscope tool in addition to waveform to help you monitor exposure levels in video. On top of that, connecting an external SSD lets you shoot with Apple ProRes 422 or ProRes 422 HQ codecs to get higher bit rates. On Dec 20, 2023, Panasonic also released firmware Ver.2.0, which adds 12-bit RAW video output, in either Apple ProRes RAW or Blackmagic RAW, to a compatible Atomos or Blackmagic external recorder via HDMI. That's a pretty impressive suite of video features for a "photo-first" camera.

Video General
Audio
Audio Test Sample
Audio Recording
Stereo
Microphone Level Display
Yes
Video General
Video File Format And Compression
MP4 H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MP4 H.265 / HEVC
Yes
MOV H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
Yes
MOV H.265 / HEVC
Yes
AVCHD H.264 / MPEG-4 AVC
No
All-I Compression
Yes

Although the camera can only record ProRes formats in 4k to an external SSD, it does support ProRes internally when shooting in 1080p. Note also that All-Intra compression is only available when using MOV format.

4k Video
10
4k Video
4k Video Frame Rate
240 fps In 4k
No
120 fps In 4k
Yes
60 fps In 4k
Yes
30 fps In 4k
Yes
24 fps In 4k
Yes
4k Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

The camera can record at up to 120 fps in 4k without a crop, making it well-suited to capturing high-speed action or generating slow-motion footage.

10
4k Video
4k Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In 4k
600 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In 4k
68 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In 4k
4:2:2
Bit Depth In 4k
10 Bit
Record Time Limit In 4k
N/A
Overheat Recording Interruptions in 4k
0

The Panasonic G9 II has fantastic internal recording capabilities. It supports 10-bit internal recording, though 4:2:2 chroma sampling is only available when using MOV or ProRes formats. The camera can capture very high bit rates when using the highest quality settings; the max bit rate noted above was recorded in 4k 60p in MOV format, with 10-bit 4:2:2 color, All-I compression, and LPCM. In MP4, you'll get more manageable bit rates. If you want even higher bit rates, you'll have to use an external SSD, which allows you to use ProRes codecs for less compressed video files in C4k and 5.7k.

Additionally, there's no recording time limit, and the camera doesn't overheat too easily, though it can still overheat in more strenuous conditions. When 'Recording Max Temperature' is set to 'High', it raises the temperature threshold at which the camera stops recording, which is how we managed to get the zero recording interruptions noted above; however, the camera still gets hot and, in hotter conditions, it may still shutdown. When set to 'Standard', the camera shut down twice throughout its battery life. Unlike the Panasonic LUMIX S5 II or the Panasonic LUMIX GH6, it doesn't have heat dissipation vents to help reduce overheating.

8.5
4k Video
4k Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In 4k
8.0
Face Tracking In 4k
8.5
Face Detection In 4k
Yes
Eye Detection In 4k
Yes

The camera's AF system does an excellent overall job in 4k video mode. While it isn't totally seamless, it stays with moving subjects very well, even as they move around the frame. It's quick to shift focus on moving objects, though again, the transitions aren't as seamless as the leading AF systems seen on a camera like the Sony α7C II, for example.

8.3
4k Video
4k Video Quality
Low Light Capability In 4k
8.0
Test Scene Extract In 4k
8.5

The Panasonic G9II records excellent 4k video quality, especially when shooting in more controlled lighting conditions. It does great in low light as well, but noise handling is more limited.

Besides regular IBIS, the camera also includes an 'E-Stabilization' setting in video mode, combining IBIS, OIS, and electronic stabilization. You can set it to either 'Standard', which incurs a 1.09x crop, or 'High' for even greater camera shake compensation, which incurs a 1.26x crop. While it can help give you a bit of added stability, the e-stabilization is also prone to warping at the edges of the frame, which can be distracting. There's also a 'Boost I.S.' setting, which, according to Panasonic, boosts the effectiveness of the camera's IBIS for "when you want to perform recording from a fixed perspective." This is most useful for getting tripod-like stability when shooting a stationary handheld shot but isn't meant to be used when panning or moving the camera. Finally, there's an 'Anamorphic' stabilization setting for anamorphic lenses. You can see a comparison of the different video stabilization modes here.

6.2
4k Video
4k Video Rolling Shutter Effect
4k Rolling Shutter
6.0°

There's some fairly noticeable rolling shutter effect when panning the camera from side to side, indicating that the sensor readout speed isn't the fastest. It's most noticeable with quicker camera movements, but it can still distract in scenes with a lot of vertical lines present in the background or when tracking moving subjects horizontally.

Full HD Video
10
Full HD Video
FHD Video Frame Rate
240 fps In FHD
Yes
120 fps In FHD
Yes
60 fps In FHD
Yes
30 fps In FHD
Yes
24 fps In FHD
Yes
FHD Crop At Max Available fps
1 x

The Panasonic G9II can record at up to 240 fps in 1080p without a crop and in its standard recording mode, which is excellent. Many competitors can only manage such high frame rates in dedicated slow-motion modes without audio, but this gives you more flexibility to slow your footage down however you need to. In addition, you can record 1080p at up to 300 fps in the dedicated 'Slow & Quick' mode, with various playback speed options.

10
Full HD Video
FHD Video Internal Recording
Bitrate Maximum In FHD
453 Mbps
Bitrate Minimum In FHD
20 Mbps
Chroma Sampling In FHD
4:2:2
Bit Depth In FHD
10 Bit
Record Time Limit in FHD
N/A

Internal recording specs are just as excellent in 1080p. The camera can record 10-bit 4:2:2 internally in MOV and ProRes formats, with very high bit rates using the highest quality settings. The max bit rate noted above was recorded in 1080p at 60 fps in Apple ProRes 422 HQ format. If you use MOV, you'll get bit rates closer to 200 Mbps, while MP4 will nab you around 30 Mbps.

9.2
Full HD Video
FHD Video Autofocus Performance
Object Tracking In FHD
8.5
Face Tracking In FHD
9.5
Face Detection In FHD
Yes
Eye Detection In FHD
Yes

The autofocus does a fantastic job in 1080p, particularly when tracking moving human faces. It's quite smooth and accurate overall. When manually selecting a subject to track, like an object, it still does an impressive job, but transitions aren't always seamless.

8.0
Full HD Video
FHD Video Quality
Low Light Capability In FHD
8.0
Test Scene Extract In FHD
8.0

The camera's 1080p video quality is great overall. In brighter conditions, it looks quite detailed and well-rendered. It's also quite good in low light, with fairly well-preserved details and relatively little noise.

6.3
Full HD Video
FHD Video Rolling Shutter Effect
FHD Rolling Shutter
5.8°

As with 4k, there's noticeable skewing from the rolling shutter in 1080p.

Storage And Connectivity
Storage And Connectivity
Storage
Card 1 Slot
SD Card UHS-II
Card 2 Slot
SD Card UHS-II

The Panasonic G9II has dual SD card slots, both rated for faster UHS-II cards, which is great for those who like to have backup storage on the go or prefer to keep RAW and JPEG files separate. The slots are easily accessible on the side of the camera.

10
Storage And Connectivity
Inputs / Outputs
USB
USB-C
HDMI
Full Size (Type A)
Headphones
Yes
Microphone
Stereo
Wi-Fi
Yes
Bluetooth
Yes

The Panasonic G9 II has a full suite of ports, including a full-sized HDMI port, a USB-C port for charging and file transfer, along with both a headphone jack and a microphone input.