The 6 Best Wireless Keyboards - Fall 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Wireless Keyboards
146 Keyboards Tested
  • Store-bought keyboards; no cherry-picked units
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
  • Supported directly by you via insider access and when you purchase through our affiliate links
Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

Wireless technologies have greatly improved over the past few years, and we're even starting to see wireless gaming keyboards. They can help reduce your desk's clutter by getting rid of the cable, which gives off a much cleaner look. However, there are many different keyboards, whether they're for the office or playing games, so finding the best wireless keyboard for your needs all depends on how you're going to use it.

We've tested over 140 keyboards, and here are our recommendations for the best wireless keyboards. Check our picks for the best keyboards, the best mechanical keyboards, and the best gaming keyboards.


  1. Best Wireless Mechanical Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro

    9.1
    Gaming
    6.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.8
    Office
    8.5
    Programming
    7.7
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best wireless keyboard we've tested with mechanical switches is the Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro. We tested it with clicky Razer Green switches, but it's also available with linear Razer Yellow switches. The switches are fairly light with a short pre-travel distance while offering good tactile feedback, but they're too loud if you want to use this keyboard in an open-office environment. That said, the Yellow switches should be quieter.

    It's a very well-built keyboard with a solid aluminum frame that shows little flex. The keycaps are doubleshot ABS, and the keys are stable, which helps provide a great typing experience. It also has good ergonomics with a comfortable wrist rest. If you're a gamer, you should be happy to know it has low latency and all keys are macro-programmable.

    All customization is through the Razer Synapse 3 software, which sadly isn't available on macOS. It means that you'll have to save your macro settings to the onboard memory if you want to use it on a Mac computer. You can connect it with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth or its proprietary receiver. Overall, it's one of the best wireless keyboards we've tested.

    See our review

  2. Best Wireless Compact Mechanical Keyboard: Obinslab Anne Pro 2

    8.9
    Gaming
    7.9
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.6
    Office
    8.4
    Programming
    5.6
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Compact (60%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best Bluetooth keyboard we've tested that's compact and mechanical is the Obinslab Anne Pro 2. It's a 60% compact board that's available with multiple Cherry MX, Gateron, and Kailh switches, so you can get the feel you prefer. Our unit came with Gateron Brown switches, which feel light and provide nice tactile feedback. This helps prevent typos since you can feel when a key is registered.

    While it doesn't have a USB receiver, you can pair it with up to four devices via Bluetooth, which is more than most of our wireless keyboards. Also, it has customizable RGB backlighting, macro-programmable keys, and its customization software is available on both Windows and macOS. While the latency over Bluetooth is a bit too high for competitive gaming, it's fine for casual gaming and simple tasks. If you play with a wired connection, the latency is significantly lower.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't come with a wrist rest, and there aren't any incline settings. While this wouldn't matter for a low profile board, it matters for this model since it has a high profile, so your wrist needs to curve upwards a lot to hit the keys, which might not feel comfortable. That said, if you're looking for a compact, mechanical board with Bluetooth, this is an excellent option.

    See our review

  3. Best Wireless Office Keyboard: Logitech MX Keys

    8.0
    Gaming
    7.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.8
    Office
    7.8
    Programming
    6.9
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best wireless keyboard for office use that we've tested is the Logitech MX Keys. This low-profile model can connect wirelessly via its USB receiver and Bluetooth, and you can pair it with up to three devices. You can easily swap between devices using the dedicated keys next to the functions keys.

    This model is a great option for Windows and macOS users since it's fully compatible with both operating systems. Most of its control keys have legends dedicated to both systems, but you can also get a variant with Mac-specific key legends only. It has indented keys to help you hit them in the center, which helps prevent typos. The scissor switches are fairly light and quiet, making the board a great choice for your office setup.

    Unfortunately, its software doesn't offer much customization. You can only reprogram some of the keys, and you're limited to a drop-down list of functions. Also, you can't set any macros. If you prefer a more compact model, the Logitech MX Keys Mini is a very similar board in a 65% size. That said, if you're looking for a full-size, wireless keyboard to use with Windows or macOS, this is a very good choice.

    See our review

  4. Ergonomic Alternative: Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard

    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    If you prefer something with a more ergonomic design, look into the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard. Although made by the same company, it's very different compared to the Logitech MX Keys. It doesn't have any backlighting, which isn't ideal if you work in a dark room. However, it has a split design, it comes with a wrist rest, and it has negative incline feet meant to relieve stress on your wrists. Typing quality is great once you get used to the design and the scissor switches are quiet. You can reprogram the function keys to a preset list of commands, but you can't set macros.

    If you're in the hunt for the best wireless keyboard for the office with non-mechanical switches, you can't go wrong with the MX Keys. However, if you're a fan of ergonomic keyboards, then look into the K860.

    See our review

  5. Best Wireless Keyboard For TV: Corsair K83 Wireless Entertainment Keyboard

    8.7
    Gaming
    8.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.6
    Office
    8.1
    Programming
    9.5
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best wireless keyboard for use with TVs we've tested is the Corsair K83 Wireless Entertainment Keyboard. It's among the few we've tested specifically designed for home theater PC setups. It has a built-in trackpad on its right, along with L/R mouse click buttons, a volume control wheel, and a joystick to move around the cursor.

    You can connect via its USB receiver or Bluetooth, and you can pair it with up to three devices, which is great if you need to connect the board to the TV, a console, and an HTPC. It has white backlighting to help you see the keys when in the dark, and its scissor switches are light and quiet, which is great if you don't want to make too much noise when binging a show late at night.

    Unfortunately, the spacebar on our unit has a strange, tight feel that creates a squeaking sound when pressed. Also, it has no incline settings or wrist rest, but this shouldn't matter unless you're using it at a desk and typing for long periods.

    See our review

  6. Best Budget Wireless Keyboard: Logitech K780

    6.1
    Gaming
    6.9
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.9
    Office
    6.7
    Programming
    5.5
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best budget wireless keyboard we've tested is the Logitech K780. It's a good office keyboard with a full-size layout, so you get a numpad, and the media hotkeys make it easy to skip through your favorite music while working. It even has a unique cradle to hold your mobile devices.

    It has a USB receiver and Bluetooth support, and you can connect with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth. There are three hotkeys at the top that you can use to easily switch between devices. It has typical scissor switches with a low profile that offer good tactile feedback, and even though they may feel a bit heavy to press, the typing quality is still great.

    Unfortunately, it has limited ergonomics as it doesn't have a wrist rest or any incline settings, but you shouldn't feel too much fatigue because it has a low profile. It doesn't have any backlighting, which is disappointing if you want to use it in a dark room, but that's somewhat expected for a low-cost office keyboard. Overall, it's one of the best wireless keyboards we've tested.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • ASUS ROG Falchion: The ASUS ROG Falchion is a fantastic compact wireless gaming keyboard, but it costs more than the Obinslab Anne Pro 2 and doesn't support Bluetooth. See our review
  • Razer Pro Type: The Razer Pro Type is a good alternative to the Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro if you want something with a more office-oriented design, but it doesn't come with a wrist rest or dedicated media keys. See our review
  • Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED: The Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED is an outstanding gaming keyboard if you prefer low-profile switches. It doesn't come with a detachable wrist rest and or as many macro-programmable keys as the Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro does. See our review
  • Keychron K3: The Keychron K3 is a good alternative to the Obinslab Anne Pro 2 if you want a mechanical keyboard with low-profile switches, but it isn't as slim, and there's no customization software, and latency is high. See our review
  • Apple Magic Keyboard with Touch ID and Numeric Keypad: The Apple Magic Keyboard with Touch ID and Numeric Keypad is a great option if you're looking to complete your Apple setup. However, it isn't as versatile as the Logitech MX Keys. See our review
  • Logitech K380: The Logitech K380 is essentially a smaller version of the Logitech K780 without a cradle, so it's a better choice for use on the go. See our review
  • Microsoft Surface Ergonomic Keyboard: The Microsoft Surface Ergonomic Keyboard is similar to the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard, but it doesn't have multi-device pairing, and it's costly. See our review
  • Logitech K400 Plus: The Logitech K400 Plus is an HTPC keyboard with a trackpad that's cheaper than the Corsair K83, but it doesn't have as many media keys and doesn't have backlighting. See our review
  • Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard: The Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard is a cheaper alternative to the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard if you're looking for an ergonomic keyboard. However, it doesn't feel as well built, and it lacks customization software for key remapping. See our review
  • Logitech Craft: The Logitech Craft is similar to the Logitech MX Keys in terms of build and typing quality, and it has a unique knob on the top left, but it's costly. See our review
  • Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed: The Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed is fantastic for gaming and has Bluetooth and USB receiver support, unlike the Obinslab Anne Pro 2. However, it costs a lot more, so it's not worth the price increase. See our review
  • Keychron K10: The Keychron K10 is a full-size mechanical office keyboard that has multi-device pairing. Some people may not prefer the feel of the mechanical switches over the scissor switches on the Logitech MX Keys. See our review
  • Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard: The Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard is cheaper than the Logitech K780, but it doesn't have multi-device pairing. See our review
  • Logitech MX Keys Mini: The Logitech MX Keys Mini is a compact version of the Logitech MX Keys, with some new function keys like a dictation key, a mute microphone key, and an emoji key. However, it isn't compatible with the unifying receiver like many other Logitech products are. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Nov 26, 2021: Added the Logitech MX Keys Mini to the Notable Mentions, and moved the Obinslab Anne Pro 2 from 'Compact Alternative' to the 'Best Wireless Compact Mechanical Keyboard.'

  2. Oct 29, 2021: Moved the Logitech K380 and Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard to Notable Mentions and added the Logitech K780 as 'Best Budget' because it has multi-device pairing; added the Apple Magic Keyboard with Touch ID and Keychron K10 to Notable Mentions.

  3. Oct 01, 2021: Verified picks for availability and updated text for clarity; added the Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed to Notable Mentions.

  4. Sep 03, 2021: Replaced the Logitech K400 Plus with the Corsair K83 Wireless Entertainment Keyboard because the latter is available now; added the Logitech Craft to Notable Mentions.

  5. Aug 06, 2021: Replaced the Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard with the Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard for 'Best Budget Wireless Keyboard', and made the Logitech K380 a 'Mobile Alternative'; added the ASUS ROG Falchion to Notable Mentions.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best wireless keyboards and the best Bluetooth keyboards for most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper product wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no keyboard that is difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our wireless keyboard reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no product is perfect for every use, most keyboards are great enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them. Be sure to know your key switch preferences before choosing.

Discussions