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The 6 Best Mechanical Keyboards - Winter 2022 Reviews

Updated
Best Mechanical Keyboards
151 Keyboards Tested
  • Store-bought keyboards; no cherry-picked units
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
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Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

Mechanical keyboards are quite versatile, depending on what your preferences are. There are many different types of mechanical switches, with the three main types being tactile, clicky, and linear, which you can learn more about here. Each switch type offers a different feel, and even those of the same type made by different companies offer a unique typing experience. It all comes down to personal preference, and thankfully, many options are available in a wide variety of switches to suit your needs.

We've tested over 150 keyboards, and below are our recommendations for the best mechanical keyboards available to buy. Also, see our recommendations for the best keyboards, the best wireless keyboards, and the best gaming keyboards.


  1. Best Mechanical Gaming Keyboard: SteelSeries Apex Pro

    9.5
    Gaming
    2.9
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.0
    Office
    8.0
    Programming
    5.6
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The SteelSeries Apex Pro is the best full-size mechanical keyboard for gaming that we've tested. The variant we bought and tested is the full-sized model with a Numpad, but it's also available in a TenKeyLess format, so you can purchase it as the best mechanical TKL keyboard if you'd prefer. Regardless of the size variant you choose, this keyboard is loaded with features that cater to a hardcore gaming crowd.

    The feature that sets this keyboard apart allows you to adjust the pre-travel distance for each key individually. You can set keys lower for a snappy and responsive gaming experience or higher for better typing accuracy. You can make all these adjustments using the SteelSeries Engine Software, which is easy to use and allows you to reprogram or set macros to every key and customize the RGB lighting. This keyboard also has exceptionally low latency, so it can readily handle any genre of gaming.

    Unfortunately, the SteelSeries OmniPoint switches are linear, so they're not ideal for typing because they don't offer any tactile feedback. Also, although it comes with a wrist rest to help prevent wrist strain, the wrist rest itself is a dust magnet. If these issues don't bother you and you're in the market for the best full-size mechanical keyboard for gaming, this is your best bet.

    See our review

  2. Best Mechanical Keyboard For Typing: Ducky One 2

    7.3
    Gaming
    2.8
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.0
    Office
    7.1
    Programming
    3.4
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you're on the hunt for the best mechanical keyboard for typing, the Ducky One 2 is a great choice. It's a simple mechanical keyboard available in multiple sizes, from full-size to compact 60%. It's also available in a range of different color schemes and switch types, and no matter how you customize it, each keyboard has the same set of winning features at its heart.

    The unit we bought and tested has Cherry MX Brown switches. These switches have a noticeable bump to overcome during actuation but provide a light typing experience overall that won't cause fatigue during long typing sessions. The typing quality also benefits from this keyboard's doubleshot PBT keycaps, which feel great to the touch. The keys are also mostly stable, and they're well-spaced out, so you shouldn't have difficulty with an unusual amount of accidental keystrokes while typing. In terms of ergonomics, this keyboard has two incline settings so you can adjust the tilt to your preference, but sadly, it doesn't come with a wrist rest.

    Unfortunately, it lacks dedicated customization software, so you have to record all macros directly on the keyboard, which can be confusing for beginners. Also, our unit doesn't have backlighting, but there are variants with it. Overall, it's one of the best mechanical keyboards we've tested, and it's an ideal pick for serious typists.

    See our review

  3. Best Ergonomic Mechanical Keyboard: Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB

    9.0
    Gaming
    3.2
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.3
    Office
    8.0
    Programming
    5.0
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you're looking for the best mechanical keyboard with an ergonomic design, you'll want to check out the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. It has a split design that may take some getting used to, but you can arrange either half to the angle and distance you prefer on your desk. Both halves also have a comfortable, detachable wrist rest to help prevent wrist fatigue.

    We purchased our unit with Chery MX Brown switches which provide great all-around typing quality. However, you can also get this keyboard with linear Cherry MX Red or clicky Blue switches if you prefer. While this keyboard excels in an office and productivity role, it also has several gaming-oriented features, including full RGB backlighting, macro-programmable keys, and dedicated customization software. It also has low latency compared to similar keyboards.

    Unfortunately, the keycaps are made of ABS plastic, and although they have a matte coating that gives them a slightly more grip, most users are likely to find them less comfortable than PBT keycaps. Also, this keyboard doesn't have any incline settings despite its overall ergonomic focus. However, you can buy a Lift Kit separately. Aside from these minor shortcomings, this is a great ergonomic option for anyone in need of a mechanical keyboard versatile enough for productivity tasks and gaming.

    See our review

  4. Best Wireless Mechanical Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro

    9.1
    Gaming
    6.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.8
    Office
    8.5
    Programming
    7.7
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best mechanical Bluetooth keyboard we've tested is the Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro. It's a fantastic gaming keyboard that's versatile enough for other uses. It's a full-size model available either with linear Razer Yellow or clicky Razer Green switches, which we tested. It's well-built with an aluminum top plate, and it comes with a plushy wrist rest.

    You can connect with the keyboard wirelessly through its proprietary receiver or with up to three devices over Bluetooth at once, and switching between the connected devices is easy. What sets this keyboard apart is the incredibly low latency through the receiver, one of the best we've tested on a wireless keyboard. The Razer Green switches on our unit are light to press and provide good tactile feedback, but they're loud.

    If you're a gamer, the Razer Synapse 3 software is user-friendly and allows you to set macros to any key, but it's sadly not available on macOS. It's also a large keyboard that's not easy to carry around, disappointing if you need something for your mobile devices. Still, if you need a wireless gaming option, this is the best mechanical keyboard we've tested.

    See our review

  5. Best Compact Mechanical Keyboard: Obinslab Anne Pro 2

    8.9
    Gaming
    7.9
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.6
    Office
    8.4
    Programming
    5.6
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Compact (60%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best compact mechanical keyboard we've tested is the Obinslab Anne Pro 2. Compact sizes are gaining popularity, especially among gamers who may not need as many keys and among users with smaller desk spaces. This is a compact 60% gaming keyboard that feels very well-built and has a stylish design that's likely to fit nicely into most setups.

    It also has remarkably low wired latency, full RGB backlighting with individually-lit keys, and you can program macros to any of the keys using the customization software. The keyboard is available in a wide variety of switch options. We purchased our unit with Gateron Brown switches that provide good tactile feedback and excellent typing quality. You can connect it wirelessly via Bluetooth, but this is only recommended for productivity tasks and everyday browsing as it has much higher latency when using it wirelessly.

    Unfortunately, the keyboard is a little tall, and the lack of incline settings and an included wrist rest means that your wrists may get tired from using it for long periods. Also, as a 60% design, it lacks dedicated arrow keys, which might be a deal-breaker for some. All-in-all, this is an extremely versatile choice for gaming, productivity, or mobile use that won't take up much space on your desk.

    See our review

  6. Best Budget Mechanical Keyboard: EVGA Z15

    9.3
    Gaming
    2.7
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.8
    Office
    7.9
    Programming
    5.4
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best budget mechanical keyboard that we've tested is the EVGA Z15. It's a full-sized keyboard with a surprising number of gaming-oriented features you typically find on more premium boards. It has a solid plastic base and a brushed metal backplate that feels very sturdy and exhibits very little flex.

    Most importantly, it's got exceptionally low latency and should feel more than responsive enough for gamers of all stripes playing in any genre. We tested this keyboard with clicky Kailh Speed Bronze switches, but it's also available with linear Kailh Speed Silver switches. It's also hot-swappable, so you can install the switches you prefer without having to break out the soldering iron. All keys are macro-programmable using EVGA's Unleash RGB software, which allows you to adjust the individually-lit full RGB backlighting.

    Unfortunately, it has cheaper ABS keycaps that can get shiny from use, and most people will find they don't feel quite as comfortable to type on as PBT keycaps. Also, while it has good ergonomics overall and multiple incline settings, its included wrist rest is made of hard plastic, and some users may prefer something a little softer to the touch. That said, this is a superb mechanical keyboard offering performance that goes above and beyond many of its competitors.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Corsair K100 RGB: The Corsair K100 RGB is an excellent alternative to the SteelSeries Apex Pro, especially if you play MMOs, as it has six dedicated macro keys. However, it doesn't let you adjust the pre-travel distance like the Apex Pro, and it costs more. See our review
  • Razer Huntsman Mini: The Razer Huntsman Mini is a fantastic compact gaming keyboard, but it's wired-only, unlike the Obinslab Anne Pro 2. See our review
  • Razer Pro Type Ultra: The Razer Pro Type Ultra is a very good productivity-oriented keyboard with multi-device pairing capabilities. However, it's not available in a variety of switches like the Ducky One 2 is, and it features ABS keycaps. See our review
  • ErgoDox EZ: The ErgoDox EZ is a highly customizable office keyboard with a split design like the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. However, it's expensive, and the unique design may not be for everyone. See our review
  • ASUS ROG Falchion: The ASUS ROG Falchion is a fantastic compact wireless gaming keyboard, but it only connects via its USB receiver and not Bluetooth like the Obinslab Anne Pro 2. See our review
  • Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED: The Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED is a good alternative to the Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro if you prefer low-profile switches. However, it doesn't have a wrist rest like the Razer, and only the macro keys are programmable on the keyboard. See our review
  • Razer Huntsman V2 Analog: The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is an exceptional gaming keyboard. However, it's much more expensive than the SteelSeries Apex Pro, and its analog feature is a bit buggy and hard to get used to. See our review
  • SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL: The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is a lower-end version of the SteelSeries Apex Pro with standard mechanical switches, meaning you can't customize their pre-travel distance. See our review
  • EVGA Z15: The EVGA Z15 is fantastic for gaming, and it costs less than the SteelSeries Apex Pro, but it's not as customizable. See our review
  • Redragon K552 KUMARA RGB: The Redragon K552-RGB is a cheap mechanical keyboard, but it doesn't have programmable keys like the Logitech G413, and the latency is high. See our review
  • Ducky One 2 RGB TKL: The Ducky One 2 RGB TKL is a smaller version of the Ducky One 2 with the same features; get whichever size you prefer. See our review
  • Razer BlackWidow Elite: The Razer BlackWidow Elite is fantastic for gaming and excellent for typing, but it may be hard to find. See our review
  • Keychron K10: The Keychron K10 is a full-size mechanical keyboard designed for the office with great typing quality, but it feels cheaper than the Ducky One 2 because it has ABS keycaps. See our review
  • ROYAL KLUDGE RK61: The ROYAL KLUDGE RK61 is a compact-sized keyboard that's hot-swappable and excellent for mobile use. However, it has significantly higher wired latency than the Obinslab Anne Pro 2, so it's not a great choice for gaming. See our review
  • Logitech G413: The Logitech G413 is an outstanding budget gaming keyboard with exceptionally low latency, but it isn't hot-swappable like the EVGA-15 and lacks an included wrist rest. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Jan 14, 2022: We've replaced the Razer Pro Type on our list of Notable Mentions for its upgraded version, the Razer Pro Type Ultra. We've also verified the availability of all our picks and made minor changes to the text for accuracy and consistency.

  2. Dec 17, 2021: We've converted the 'Ergonomic Alternative' into a new category, 'Best Ergonomic Mechanical Keyboard,' keeping the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB as our pick. We've also changed the 'Compact Alternative' into a new category, 'Best Compact Mechanical Keyboard,' with the Obinslab Anne Pro 2 as our pick. Additionally, we've replaced the Logitech G413 as our 'Best Budget Mechanical Keyboard' pick in favor of the EVGA Z15. Lastly, we've added the Logitech G413 and the ROYAL KLUDGE RK61 to our list of Notable Mentions.

  3. Nov 19, 2021: Verified picks and Notable Mentions for accuracy and availability; updated text for clarity.

  4. Oct 22, 2021: Verified picks for availability and updated text for clarity; added the EVGA Z15 and the Keychron K10 to Notable Mentions.

  5. Sep 24, 2021: Updated text for clarity; added the ASUS ROG Falchion to Notable Mentions.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best mechanical keyboards for most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper product wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no keyboard that is difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our mechanical keyboard reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no product is perfect for every use, most keyboards are great enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them. Be sure to know your key switch preferences before choosing.

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