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Razer Pro Type Ultra Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.3.1
Reviewed Dec 17, 2021 at 10:19 am
Latest change: Test bench update Nov 29, 2023 at 09:32 am
Razer Pro Type Ultra Picture
8.5
Gaming
8.0
Office
6.5
Mobile/Tablet
8.2
Programming
6.3
Entertainment / HTPC
8.6
Raw Performance

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is a straight, wireless keyboard designed for office use. It's Razer's second productivity keyboard, and it looks nearly identical to the Razer Pro Type, except the Ultra comes with a wrist rest and different switches. You can pair it with up to three Bluetooth devices or one device via its USB receiver. It uses a Razer Productivity Dongle, meaning you can use the same receiver to connect other devices that use the same receiver as well, like the Razer Pro Click Mini. It uses linear Razer Yellow switches, which feel very light and are quiet compared to other mechanical switches, but there's no tactile feedback, which may bother some people.

Our Verdict

8.5 Gaming

While the Razer Pro Type Ultra is designed for office use, it's still an excellent choice for gaming. Its latency is very low, and the Razer Yellow switches feel light and responsive. It has a wristrest and two incline settings for better comfort, and you can set macros to any key on the board. Although it has backlighting, it's white only, which might be a dealbreaker if you want to sync all your RGB peripherals together.

Pros
  • Very low and consistent latency.
  • Has two incline settings and a wrist rest.
  • All keys are macro-programmable.
Cons
  • Lack of RGB may bother some gamers.
8.0 Office

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is great for office use. It's comfortable to type on for a long time, thanks to its wrist rest and two incline settings, so you can adjust it in whatever way feels best. You can pair it with up to three Bluetooth devices or one device via the receiver. The linear Razer Yellow switches feel light to type on, and they're quiet; however, there's no tactile feedback when you actuate a key, which some people may not like.

Pros
  • Unifying USB receiver.
  • Has two incline settings and a wrist rest.
  • Supports multi-device pairing.
Cons
  • Available with linear switches only.
6.5 Mobile/Tablet

The Razer Pro Type Ultra isn't bad for mobile device or tablet use, but it's larger and heavier than most dedicated mobile device boards. That said, it's wireless and can pair with up to three Bluetooth devices or one device via its USB receiver. It's compatible with most mobile operating systems, but some keys don't work on certain devices.

Pros
  • Unifying USB receiver.
  • Supports multi-device pairing.
Cons
  • Taller and heavier than most mobile boards.
  • Some keys don't work on mobile operating systems.
8.2 Programming

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is excellent for programming. You can pair it with up to three devices via Bluetooth or one device via its USB receiver. The linear Razer Yellow switches feel light to type on, but there's no tactile feedback, which some people may not like. It comes with a wrist rest, two incline settings, and bright white backlighting. Also, you can set macros to any key on the board.

Pros
  • Has two incline settings and a wrist rest.
  • All keys are macro-programmable.
  • Supports multi-device pairing.
Cons
  • Available with linear switches only.
6.3 Entertainment / HTPC

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is decent for use with a home theater PC setup, even though it isn't designed for this. It's wireless, so you won't need to worry about a cable running from your board to the TV. You can pair it with up to three Bluetooth devices or one via its USB receiver, and it's compatible with most common operating systems, though some keys don't work on certain OSes. It has bright white backlighting and media hotkeys, too. Unfortunately, there's no built-in trackpad, so you'll need a mouse on the side. Also, it's a full-size board, so it's big, which may not be ideal on your lap.

Pros
  • Unifying USB receiver.
  • Wireless.
Cons
  • No built-in trackpad.
8.6 Raw Performance

The Razer Pro Type Ultra has amazing raw performance with outstanding single-key and excellent multi-key latency. It also has full n-key rollover and an effective update rate of 1000Hz, providing an extremely responsive and consistent experience for gaming in any genre at a casual or competitive level.

  • 8.5 Gaming
  • 8.0 Office
  • 6.5 Mobile/Tablet
  • 8.2 Programming
  • 6.3 Entertainment / HTPC
  • 8.6 Raw Performance
  1. Updated Nov 29, 2023: We've concerted this review to Test Bench 1.3.1, which adds a new estimated PCB latency test to the Single-Key Latency section and a new Analog test to the Switches section of this review. You can see the full changelog here.
  2. Updated Aug 30, 2023: We've added text to this review for the new tests added in TBU 1.3.
  3. Updated Aug 30, 2023: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.3, which overhauls how key input is evaluated. We've added new tests for Single Key Latency, Multi Key Latency, Data Transmission, and Chord Split. We've also introduced a new Raw Performance usage and adjusted how the Gaming and Office usage scores are calculated. You can see the full changelog here.
  4. Updated Jun 12, 2023: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.2. This update introduces new Backlight Features and Backlight Clarity test boxes. We've also added a new Switches test box, added additional test comparisons to our Hardware Customizability test box that we introduced with our last Test Bench. For an in-depth look at our changes, you can see our full changelog here.
  5. Updated May 19, 2023: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.1. This update adds several new tests addressing Hardware Customization, Macro Keys And Programming, and Wireless Mobile Compatibility. We've also added new objective evaluations to the Typing Noise test, and we've simplified several tests and removed several others that were no longer relevant. For an in-depth look at all our changes, you can see our full changelog here.
  6. Updated Dec 17, 2021: Review published.
  7. Updated Dec 13, 2021: Early access published.
  8. Updated Dec 03, 2021: Our testers have started testing this product.
  9. Updated Dec 01, 2021: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  10. Updated Nov 16, 2021: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is available in a white and gray colorway, and there are no other colors available. It's only available with linear Razer Yellow switches. It's an updated version of the Razer Pro Type, which has tactile Razer Orange switches but doesn't come with a wrist rest. You can see our unit's label here.

Compared To Other Keyboards

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is a great office keyboard. It's one of the few boards in Razer's Productivity lineup, which prioritizes wireless connectivity and multi-device pairing. While it doesn't have an ergonomic design or a negative incline like some other dedicated office boards, it offers inline settings and a plushy wrist rest. It uses mechanical switches rather than the scissor switches or rubber dome switches on most other office boards, but it's only available with linear Razer Yellow switches. This may not be a problem if you like this switch feel, but anyone who prefers tactile feedback may be disappointed. That said, you could get the near-identical Razer Pro Type board that has tactile Razer Orange switches instead.

See our recommendations for the best keyboards for typing, the best mechanical keyboards, and the best wireless keyboards.

Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED

The Razer Pro Type Ultra and the Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED are wireless boards designed for different uses. The Razer is an office keyboard with a wrist rest and white-only backlighting. You can pair it with more devices via Bluetooth, and it comes with a unifying receiver that you can connect to a compatible mouse. It's available with Razer Yellow switches only, which are linear and standard-sized. On the other hand, the Logitech is a gaming board with RGB backlighting, dedicated macro keys, a game mode key, and dedicated media controls. While the Logitech is available in more switches, it's only available with low-profile switches, which some people may not like.

Razer Pro Type

The Razer Pro Type and the Razer Pro Type Ultra are nearly identical, but the Ultra comes with a wrist rest. Also, the Ultra uses the Razer Productivity Dongle, meaning you can connect another device to it if it uses the same receiver as well. While the Pro Type comes with tactile Razer Orange switches only, the Ultra comes with linear Razer Yellow switches only.

Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro

The Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro and the Razer Pro Type Ultra are both wireless mechanical boards, but the V3 Pro is designed for gaming while the Pro Type Ultra is designed for office use. The BlackWidow V3 Pro has RGB backlighting, dedicated media keys, a volume control wheel, and onboard memory. On the other hand, the Pro Type Ultra has white backlighting and a plainer, professional look. The BlackWidow V3 Pro is available with clicky Razer Green switches and linear Razer Yellow switches, while the Type Pro Ultra is available with linear Razer Yellow switches only.

Razer Huntsman V2

The Razer Huntsman V2 is a wired gaming keyboard, while the Razer Pro Type Ultra is a wireless office board. The Huntsman V2 has a gamer aesthetic, with its RGB backlighting and a Windows Key lock. Also, it has onboard memory, you can set macros directly from the board instead of only through the software, and it has dedicated media keys with a volume control wheel. If you prefer a plainer board, the Pro Type Ultra has white backlighting. Also, you can use it wirelessly, and you can pair it with three Bluetooth devices or one device via its unifying receiver.

Logitech MX Mechanical

The Razer Pro Type Ultra and the Logitech MX Mechanical are two wireless mechanical keyboards. However, the Logitech uses low-profile switches and keycaps, which provide a different typing experience from standard mechanical switches like the Razer has. The Razer is also better-suited if you want a multi-purpose board to game and work with as it has much better latency, whereas the Logitech is only suited for productivity tasks.

Keychron K10

The Keychron K10 and the Razer Pro Type Ultra are both full-size wireless office boards. If you want a board to match your white office setup, the Razer is a better choice. It has white backlighting, a wrist rest, and you can pair it with one more device thanks to its USB receiver. Also, all its keys are macro-programmable. It's available with linear Razer Yellow switches only, which may bother you if you prefer a different feel. On the other hand, if you prefer a dark-colored board with RGB backlighting, the Keychron is a better choice. Also, it offers more switch feels to choose from, including linear, tactile, and clicky Gateron switches.

Logitech MX Keys

The Logitech MX Keys and the Razer Pro Type Ultra are both wireless office boards, but they use different switch types. The Logitech has typical scissor switches, which provide tactile feedback when you actuate a key. On the other hand, the Razer comes with Razer Yellow switches, which are linear and don't provide feedback. Also, its backlighting is brighter. If you're looking for a board you can also occasionally game with, the Razer has much lower latency.

Corsair K100 RGB

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is a wireless office board, while the Corsair K100 RGB is a wired gaming board. The Razer can pair with up to three devices via Bluetooth, and it comes with a unifying receiver that you can connect to a compatible mouse. It's available with linear Razer Yellow switches only. On the other hand, the Corsair has more gamer-centric features, like dedicated macro keys, dedicated media control keys, and a programmable multi-function wheel. Also, it has customizable RGB backlighting. Like the Razer, the Corsair is only available with linear switches, but you can choose between mechanical Cherry MX Speed switches or optical Corsair OPX switches.

Razer Huntsman

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is a wireless office board, while the Razer Huntsman is a wired gaming board. The Pro Type Ultra comes with a wrist rest and white backlighting. Also, you can pair it with up to three devices via Bluetooth and switch between them with hotkeys. It's available with linear Razer Yellow switches only. On the other hand, the Huntsman has customizable RGB backlighting, onboard memory, and it comes with clicky Razer Optical switches.

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Video

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Size
Full-size (100%)
Height
1.6" (4.0 cm)
Width 17.4" (44.1 cm)
Depth
5.2" (13.3 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
8.7" (22.2 cm)
Weight
2.13 lbs (0.966 kg)

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is the same size as the Razer Pro Type, but it comes with a wrist rest.

8.5
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material ABS

The Razer Pro Type Ultra feels very well built, and it looks and feels identical to the Razer Pro Type. Its chassis is plastic and feels solid, though there's a bit of flex, with an aluminum top plate to give more rigidity. It has 6 rubber pads on the underside that help keep the board in place. There's rubber ends on all inline feet as well. Also, there's a space to store the receiver on the underside. While the keycaps are ABS plastic, they feel nice and have a soft-touch coating. The keys feel stable, and while there's some slight wobbling with the larger keys, it's hardly noticeable.

6.0
Design
Ergonomics
Curved/Angled
No
Split Keyboard
No
Key Alignment
Staggered
Minimum Incline
Medium Incline
Maximum Incline
Home Row Height
33.2 mm (1.3")

The Razer Pro Type Ultra is a straight board with two incline settings. However, unlike the nearly-identical Razer Pro Type, the Ultra has a plushy wrist rest. It isn't magnetic, so it simply sits in front of the board. That said, it doesn't slide around easily.

6.0
Design
Hardware Customizability
Replaceable Cherry Stabilizers
Yes
Stabilizer Fixation
Plate-Mounted
Spacebar Stabilizer Size
6.25u
Size Of Right Mod Keys
1.25u
Hot-Swappable Switches
No
Switch Stem Shape
Cherry MX Style
Switch PCB Socket
Soldered
North-Facing Cherry MX Interference
Yes
8.0
Design
Backlight Features
Backlighting Yes
RGB
No
Per-Key Backlighting
Yes
Effects
Yes
Software Controllable
Yes

The Razer Pro Type Ultra has bright white backlighting. You can adjust the brightness and change the lighting effect from Static to Breathing through the Razer Synapse 3 software. Also, you can dim and brighten the lighting with the F11 and F12 keys. It looks brighter than the backlighting on the Razer Pro Type; this is likely because the casing on the Razer Yellow switches isn't grey like the Razer Orange switches on the Pro Type, which affects the lighting tone slightly.

9.0
Design
Backlight Clarity
Design
Cable & Connector
Connectivity Wireless
Detachable
Yes (Wired Mode and Charge)
Length 5.9 ft (1.8 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
USB type-C

The Razer Pro Type Ultra has a simple white USB-C cable, similar to the one on the Razer Pro Type.

10
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
Yes
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
3
Proprietary Receiver
Yes
Battery Type
Rechargeable

The Razer Pro Type Ultra pairs with up to three devices via Bluetooth or one device via its USB receiver. You can switch between the Bluetooth devices by holding 'FN' and pressing either 1, 2, or 3. There's also a switch next to the USB-C port to switch between Bluetooth and receiver mode. It uses the unifying Razer Productivity Dongle, meaning you can use the same receiver to connect the Razer Pro Click Mini, which is a mouse that's also part of the productivity line.

Razer claims the battery life is up to 214 hours over Bluetooth and 207 hours with its receiver, though they don't specify if this is with the backlighting on or off.

4.0
Design
Macro Keys And Programming
Dedicated Macro Keys Count 0
Onboard Macro Programming
No
Macro Programming With Software
Yes
Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Non-Dedicated
Trackpad / Trackball No
Scroll Wheel
No
Control Knob
No
USB Passthrough
No
Numpad Yes
Windows Key Lock
No
Lock Indicator Caps, Scroll & Num lock

You can set macros to any key on the Razer Pro Type Ultra, except for the Windows key and the Fn key. Also, unlike on the Razer Pro Type, the F-keys are no longer the default functions, meaning you won't need to hold down Fn when you want to use the media keys.

Design
In The Box

  • Razer Pro Type Ultra
  • Razer Productivity Dongle
  • Wrist rest
  • USB-C to USB-A cable with USB caps
  • User manual

Typing Experience
8.5
Typing Experience
Typing Quality
Key Spacing
19.0 mm (0.748")

The Razer Pro Type Ultra's typing experience is excellent. The ABS keycaps have a soft-touch coating, and they feel very nice for ABS plastic. The keys have a slight wobble to them, especially the larger keys, but it isn't noticeable while typing. The shape and spacing of the keys are standard, so you shouldn't cause you to make more typos or type slower than usual. The wrist rest is very comfortable to use, and it should help prevent fatigue when using the board for many hours. The linear Razer Yellow switches feel light to type on, but there's no tactile feedback. If you like linear switches, this shouldn't bother you, but if you prefer to feel a bump when the key is actuated, you might prefer the Razer Pro Type's tactile Razer Orange switches.

7.1
Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Average Loudness
54.4 dBA
High Pitch Clicks
No

The linear Razer Yellow switches on the Razer Pro Type Ultra are quiet to type on, but they aren't as quiet as some other models. That said, it shouldn't bother people around you in a silent room.

Typing Experience
Switches
Switch Name
Razer Yellow
Switch Type
Mechanical
Feel
Linear
Analog
No
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Operating Force
44 gf
Actuation Force
44 gf
Pre-Travel
1.4 mm
Total Travel
3.5 mm

The Razer Pro Type Ultra uses linear Razer Yellow switches, which don't provide any tactile feedback. They feel very light and responsive, but it doesn't come with any other switch, which is disappointing if you want a different feel. If you prefer tactile feedback, the Razer Pro Type uses Razer Orange switches.

Performance
9.2
Performance
Single-Key Latency
Best Connection
3.2 ms
Best Connection Std Dev ±0.4 ms
Wired
3.2 ms
Receiver
4.6 ms
Bluetooth
12.7 ms
PCB (Estimated)
1.9 ms

The Razer Pro Type Ultra has outstanding and very consistent single-key latency. It provides an extremely responsive-feeling gaming experience in any genre.

8.6
Performance
Multi-Key Latency
Connection Evaluated Receiver
Key Press
4.8 ms
Key Release
8.7 ms

This keyboard has excellent multi-key latency performance, making it very well-suited for playing games requiring inputs while multiple keys are pressed and maintained.

8.7
Performance
Data Transmission
Connection Evaluated Receiver
USB Polling Rate
1,000 Hz
Effective Update Rate
1,000 Hz
N-Key Rollover (NKRO)
Yes
Multiple Keys Per USB Report
Yes

This keyboard has excellent data transmission performance. It can send multiple keys per USB report and has full n-key rollover. It also has an effective polling rate of 1000Hz, making it capable of taking full advantage of its 1000Hz polling rate.

7.6
Performance
Chord Split
4 Chord Split Delay
6.3 ms
8 Chord Split Delay
12.6 ms

This keyboard has good chord split performance, with low 4-chord delay and reasonably low 8-chord split delay, making it a good candidate for playing rhythm games requiring many simultaneous inputs.

Software and Operating System
Software and Operating System
Configuration Software
Software Name Razer Synapse 3
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
No
Onboard Memory
No
Profiles
6+

Razer Synapse 3 offers some customizations, like remapping keys, setting macros, and adjusting the backlighting brightness and effects. Unfortunately, there's no onboard memory, so your settings and keybindings won't stay when you use the Razer Pro Type Ultra on a computer that doesn't have the software installed. Since the software isn't available on macOS or Linux, you can't make customizations or set macros.

10
Software and Operating System
Computer Compatibility
Windows
Fully Compatible
macOS
Fully Compatible
Linux (Ubuntu 22)
Fully Compatible
Media Key Compatibility
Windows, MacOS & Linux

All functions work as intended on Windows. Most of them work on other operating systems, but some keys don't register. The Pause Break, Scroll Lock, and My Computer keys don't work on macOS. Only the My Computer key doesn't work on Linux. The software is only available on Windows, so you can't customize your settings if you're on any other operating system.

10
Software and Operating System
Wireless Mobile Compatibility
Android
Fully Compatible
iOS
Fully Compatible
iPadOS
Fully Compatible
Media Key Compatibility
Android, iPhone & iPad

The Pause Break, Scroll Lock, Calculator, and My Computer keys don't work on Android, iOS, and iPadOS.