The 5 Best Ergonomic Keyboards - Spring 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Ergonomic Keyboards
121 Keyboards Tested
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Typing all day on a keyboard can be uncomfortable for some. Straight boards might force your wrists to bend in a way that can be painful after hours of typing. That's why you might see weirdly designed keyboards. These keyboards aim for better ergonomics to create a more comfortable typing experience. We don't test for the long-term benefits of ergonomic designs and the medical impact of a more natural typing posture, but we tested some of these designs.

We've tested over 110 keyboards, and below are our top picks for the best ergonomic keyboards. If you prefer a more typical straight design, check out our recommendations for the best keyboards, the best keyboards for writers, and the best mechanical keyboards.


  1. Best Wireless Ergonomic Keyboard: Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard

    6.3
    Gaming
    6.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.8
    Office
    7.1
    Programming
    5.4
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best ergonomic wireless keyboard that we've tested is the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard. This full-sized model has remarkable ergonomics with a fixed wrist rest and two incline settings that create negative angles. It has a curved design with two different key sections, and it feels fairly well-built overall. You can use it wired or wirelessly and connect it with up to three different devices at the same time.

    It uses standard tactile scissor switches that require quite a bit of force to actuate but that remain fairly responsive overall. They provide a great typing experience and are very quiet, so it shouldn't bother anyone even in a noise-sensitive environment. It's compatible with the Logitech Options software, which allows you to customize some keys with a list of preset commands, whether you're using Windows or macOS.

    Unfortunately, it's rather large, especially considering that the wrist rest is non-detachable, so it may take a lot of space on your desk. Its curved design may also feel a bit odd at first for some people, and it doesn't have any backlighting, making it harder to use it in dark environments. That said, this is still a great option for the office, and it's one of the best wireless keyboards that we've tested.

    See our review

  2. Best Wired Ergonomic Keyboard: Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB

    9.0
    Gaming
    3.2
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.3
    Office
    8.0
    Programming
    5.0
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best ergonomic wired keyboard we've tested is the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. This mechanical TenKeyLess model is an outstanding choice for gamers thanks to its light and responsive feel. It has a sturdy build that doesn't show any signs of flex, and the stable keycaps are an improvement over the Kinesis Freestyle Pro. Each key is backlit, and you can control the brightness of the RGB lighting directly on the board.

    The model we tested uses Cherry MX Brown switches, which offer subtle tactile feedback over a small bump. If you don't like the feeling of Brown switches, you can also get it with Cherry MX linear Red, clicky Blue, or linear Speed Silver switches. Typing quality is great overall, plus the split design and plushy wrist rest allow for a very comfortable typing experience. It's also compatible with the RGB SmartSet software, which allows you to program macros and customize the RGB backlighting.

    Unfortunately, due to the unconventional split design, typing may feel awkward at first. Also, there are no incline settings, but you can buy a 'Lift Kit' separately if you want to adjust the height. Lastly, while all of its keys work on Windows and Linux, the Pause Break key doesn't work on macOS. That said, if you want a wired model with great ergonomics, then this is an impressive option as it's one of the best mechanical keyboards we've tested.

    See our review

  3. Compact Alternative: Dygma Raise

    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Compact (60%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you want a smaller keyboard, check out the Dygma Raise. It doesn't have any macro-programmable keys like the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB, and its companion software is still in development, but its compact size should help you free up more space on your desk. It has outstanding ergonomics and feels incredibly well built. It can be split into two halves, or you can choose to connect them with metal pins. The Cherry MX Brown switches on our unit give great tactile feedback and feel light to press, resulting in a remarkable typing experience. It's also available in a wide variety of other switches, and they're hot-swappable. Unfortunately, its unique design may take a while to get used to and there aren't any incline settings, though it still feels very comfortable without it.

    If you want an ergonomic keyboard with dedicated macro keys and remarkable software support, get the Kinesis, but if you want a more compact option, go with the Dygma.

    See our review

  4. Best Customizable Ergonomic Keyboard: ErgoDox EZ

    7.6
    Gaming
    3.4
    Mobile/Tablet
    9.0
    Office
    7.6
    Programming
    3.7
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best ergonomic keyboard we've tested with outstanding customizations is the ErgoDox EZ. This unique TenKeyLess, fully-split model has incredible ergonomics thanks to three rotating feet on each half. If you combine the feet with the included O-rings, you can configure the height and angle exactly to your needs. It feels excellently well-built, with a solid frame and textured PBT keycaps.

    While it comes in a wide variety of Cherry and Kailh switch types, our unit uses tactile Cherry MX Brown switches with a bump that requires some force to get over but otherwise feels light to actuate. The long pre-travel distance should help prevent unintentional keystrokes. The board is built in a way that allows you to easily change your keycaps and key switches. Also, all of its keys are macro-programmable, and it has plenty of unmarked keycaps so that you can easily set whatever task to whichever key you prefer.

    Unfortunately, since it has an unconventional layout, the learning curve is quite steep. Also, while the ErgoDox EZ Configurator provides an exceptional amount of customization, it can be a bit difficult to use since it requires quite a few steps to set macros. However, once you learn how to use it, it allows you to have up to 32 different customization layers. All in all, this is an amazing office keyboard, and it's the best ergonomic keyboard for customization that we've tested.

    See our review

  5. Best Budget Ergonomic Keyboard: Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard

    7.0
    Mixed usage
    5.9
    Gaming
    7.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.3
    Office
    6.1
    Programming
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best ergonomic keyboard we've tested in the budget category is the Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard. This full-sized model features a curved board with a fixed wrist rest and three feet that create a negative angle. Though we don't test for it, this design should result in a more natural typing position and reduce stress on your wrist. It connects via Bluetooth or with its USB receiver, and you can pair it with up to two devices at once.

    It uses tactile rubber dome switches that are fairly light to type on and feel quite responsive. The overall typing quality is decent, and you shouldn't feel too much fatigue from using it. It's also very quiet and shouldn't bother people around you, even in a noise-sensitive environment. It's fully compatible with Windows, and while some keys don't work on other operating systems, all the alphanumerical ones work on macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS.

    Unfortunately, the build quality is only decent as the board feels rather cheap and has a lot of flex to it. It also lacks backlighting, making it harder to use it in the dark, and there isn't any software support to help you customize it to your liking. Nevertheless, this is still an impressive office keyboard if you're on a budget, and it should feel very comfortable once you get used to the split-key layout.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Matias Ergo Pro: The Matias Ergo Pro is a great fully split office keyboard that has a wrist rest and incline settings, but it doesn't come with customization software, so you can't reprogram any of the keys like you can with the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. See our review
  • Microsoft Surface Ergonomic Keyboard: The Microsoft Surface Ergonomic Keyboard is a great office option that feels exceptionally well-built, but it lacks the incline settings and multi-pairing capabilities the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard has. See our review
  • Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard: The Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard is a cheaper alternative to the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard with a detached Numpad and macro-programmable function keys; however, it only has one incline setting, and it doesn't have Bluetooth. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Mar 26, 2021: Updated text for clarity and accuracy; no change in recommendations.

  2. Jan 26, 2021: Made ErgoDox EZ the 'Best Customizable Ergonomic Keyboard'. Moved Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard to Notable Mentions.

  3. Nov 27, 2020: Minor text and structure changes, no change in recommendations.

  4. Sep 29, 2020: Moved ErgoDox EZ to Notable Mentions and moved Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB to 'Best Wired Ergonomic Keyboard', updated text for clarity.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best ergonomic keyboards for most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper product wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no keyboard that is difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our keyboard reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no keyboard is perfect for every use, most are good enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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