The 5 Best Ergonomic Keyboards - Fall 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Ergonomic Keyboards
139 Keyboards Tested
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Typing all day on a keyboard can be uncomfortable for some. Straight boards might force your wrists to bend in a way that can be painful after hours of typing. That's why you might see some unconventional-looking ergonomic keyboards. These keyboards aim for better ergonomics to create a more comfortable typing experience. We don't test for the long-term benefits of ergonomic designs and the medical impact of a more natural typing posture, but we tested some of these designs.

We've tested over 130 keyboards, and below are our top picks for the best ergonomic keyboards. If you prefer a more typical straight design, check out our recommendations for the best keyboards, the best keyboards for writers, and the best mechanical keyboards.


  1. Best Wireless Ergonomic Keyboard: Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard

    6.3
    Gaming
    6.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.8
    Office
    7.1
    Programming
    5.4
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best ergonomic wireless keyboard that we've tested is the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard. This full-size model has remarkable ergonomics, with a fixed wrist rest, two incline settings that create negative angles, and a curved design with a split key layout. You can use it wired or wirelessly and pair it with up to three different devices at the same time. Switching between each device is easy too.

    It uses standard tactile scissor switches that require quite a bit of force to actuate, but they remain fairly responsive overall. They provide a great typing experience and are very quiet, so it shouldn't bother those around you even in a noise-sensitive environment. It's compatible with the Logitech Options software, which allows you to customize some keys with a list of preset commands, whether you're using Windows or macOS.

    Unfortunately, it's rather large, especially considering that the wrist rest is non-detachable, so it may take a lot of space on your desk. Its curved design may also feel a bit odd at first for some people, and it doesn't have any backlighting, making it harder to use it in dark environments. That said, this is still a great option for the office, and it's one of the best ergonomic wireless keyboards we've tested.

    See our review

  2. Best Wired Ergonomic Keyboard: Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB

    9.0
    Gaming
    3.2
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.3
    Office
    8.0
    Programming
    5.0
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best ergonomic wired keyboard we've tested is the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. This TenKeyLess mechanical model feels sturdy and solid, with no sign of flex. It has excellent ergonomics with two detachable wrist rests and a fully split design that allows you to position each half the way you want. Thanks to that, typing on it doesn't get too tiring, even if you're using it for long periods.

    Our unit uses Cherry MX Brown switches, which feel light to type on and give good tactile feedback without being too noisy. That said, if you prefer another feel, this keyboard is also available with Cherry MX linear Red, clicky Blue, or linear Speed Silver switches. The Kinesis comes with the RGB SmartSet software, which gives you plenty of customization options like programming macros or customizing the full RGB backlighting.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't have any adjustable incline settings, though you could buy a 'Lift Kit' separately if you want. The keyboard is also quite large, especially if you decide to split the two halves, so it may take quite a bit of space on your desk. That said, this is a great option that's very versatile, whether you're using it at the office or for gaming, making it one of the best ergonomic keyboards we've tested.

    See our review

  3. Compact Alternative: Dygma Raise

    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Compact (60%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you prefer a more compact size, the Dygma Raise is a fantastic alternative. While it doesn't have dedicated macro keys like the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB and it doesn't have indicators for CapsLock or Scroll Lock, it takes up less space on your desk, leaving you more room to move your mouse. It feels incredibly well-built, with an anodized aluminum top plate and PBT keycaps. You can remove its cables and replace them with longer ones if you want to have more freedom to place the halves where you want. While it may take time to get used to the split layout and eight-piece spacebar, it should feel very comfortable.

    If you want a fully split keyboard with dedicated macro keys, go with the Kinesis. On the other hand, if you want a more compact split alternative, get the Dygma.

    See our review

  4. Best Customizable Ergonomic Keyboard: ErgoDox EZ

    7.6
    Gaming
    3.4
    Mobile/Tablet
    9.0
    Office
    7.6
    Programming
    3.7
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The ErgoDox EZ is the best ergonomic keyboard we've tested in terms of customization options. When you purchase this keyboard directly through the manufacturer's website, there are a ton of different combinations and customization options you can choose from. You can pick your own switches, color scheme, type of RGB lighting, or even if you want the tilt settings and wrist rest included.

    The variant we purchased is black with Cherry MX Brown switches, which offer excellent typing quality and, combined with the outstanding ergonomics, you shouldn't feel any fatigue during long typing sessions. Our unit has printed keycaps, which all have the same shape, but you can also get blank sculpted keycaps that each have a different shape to help with ergonomics, but we haven't tested that. Our unit doesn't have RGB lighting either, but you can get it with individually lit keys or RGB underglow.

    You can set macros and reprogram any key, but programming can be a bit complicated as the dedicated software isn't very user-friendly. It has a really unique design, so it may take some time to get used to. However, you should enjoy using it once you do and its incline feet can be adjusted to provide both negative and positive inclines. All in all, it's one of the best ergonomic keyboards we've tested.

    See our review

  5. Best Budget Ergonomic Keyboard: Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard

    7.0
    Mixed usage
    5.9
    Gaming
    7.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.3
    Office
    6.1
    Programming
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best ergonomic keyboard we've tested in the budget category is the Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard. This full-size model features a curved board with a fixed wrist rest and three feet that create a negative angle. Though we don't test for it, this design should result in a more natural typing position. It connects via Bluetooth or with its USB receiver, and you can pair it with up to two devices at once.

    It uses tactile rubber dome switches that are fairly light to type on and feel quite responsive. The overall typing quality is decent, and you shouldn't feel too much fatigue from using it. It's also very quiet and shouldn't bother people around you. It's fully compatible with Windows, and while some keys don't work on other operating systems, all the alphanumerical ones work on macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS.

    Unfortunately, the build quality is only decent as the keyboard feels rather cheap and has a lot of flex to it. It also lacks backlighting, making it harder to use it in the dark, and there isn't any software support to help you customize it to your liking. Nevertheless, this is still an impressive office keyboard if you're on a budget, and it should feel very comfortable once you get used to the split-key layout.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Matias Ergo Pro: The Matias Ergo Pro is a great fully split office keyboard that has a wrist rest and incline settings, but it doesn't come with customization software, so you can't reprogram any of the keys like you can with the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. See our review
  • Microsoft Surface Ergonomic Keyboard: The Microsoft Surface Ergonomic Keyboard is a great office option that feels exceptionally well-built, but it lacks the incline settings and multi-pairing capabilities that the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard has. See our review
  • Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard: The Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard is a cheaper alternative to the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard with a detached Numpad and macro-programmable function keys. However, it only has one incline setting and doesn't support Bluetooth. See our review
  • ZSA Moonlander: The ZSA Moonlander is a fully split mechanical keyboard like the ErgoDox EZ, and it offers similar customizations and ergonomics. The ZSA has moveable thumb clusters, but it has fewer keys, and macros have a five-character limit to them. See our review
  • Kinesis Freestyle Pro: The Freestyle Pro is cheaper than the Freestyle Edge RGB because it doesn't have a wrist rest or incline settings, so it's not worth the price decrease. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Sep 21, 2021: Updated text for clarity; added the Kinesis Freestyle Pro to Notable Mentions.

  2. Jul 23, 2021: Added the ZSA Moonlander to Notable Mentions.

  3. May 25, 2021: Verified that picks were still available and updated text for more clarity.

  4. Mar 26, 2021: Updated text for clarity and accuracy; no change in recommendations.

  5. Jan 26, 2021: Made ErgoDox EZ the 'Best Customizable Ergonomic Keyboard'. Moved Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard to Notable Mentions.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best ergonomic keyboards for most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper product wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no keyboard that is difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our keyboard reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no keyboard is perfect for every use, most are good enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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