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Updated

The 5 Best Ergonomic Keyboards - Spring 2020
Reviews

Best Ergonomic Keyboards
56 Keyboards Tested
  • Store-bought keyboards; no cherry-picked units
  • Easily comparable results
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Typing all day on a keyboard can be uncomfortable for some. Straight boards might force a wrist-bend that can be painful after hours of typing. That's why you might see weirdly designed keyboards. These keyboards aim for better ergonomics to create a more comfortable typing experience. We don't test for long-term benefits of ergonomic designs and the medical impact of a more natural typing posture, but we reviewed some of these designs.

We've reviewed over 50 keyboards, and below are our top picks for the best ergonomic keyboards so far. If you'd prefer a more typical straight design, check out our recommendations for the best keyboards, the best keyboards for writers, and the best mechanical keyboards.


  1. Best Wireless Ergonomic Keyboard: Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard

    Test Methodology v0.8
    7.4
    Mixed usage
    6.6
    Gaming
    5.9
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.7
    Office
    6.6
    Programming
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best ergonomic keyboard with a wireless connection we've reviewed so far is the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard. This full-size board has a nice and comfortable curved design and a split key layout. The design of this board aims to reduce wrist strain by putting your forearms in a more natural typing position. It also has feet at the front of the frame, meaning you can create a negative angle and have your arms at a bigger angle than 90 degrees, which should be more comfortable.

    This wireless keyboard can be used with its USB receiver, and it also features Bluetooth-compatibility. You can pair up to three devices simultaneously and easily change between them. It uses 2x AAA batteries so it should last you a while before having to change them. This board features scissor switches that offer a nice typing experience. There's a tactile bump that requires a bit of force, but the overall typing feels light, with slightly more total travel than keyboards with similar switches like the Apple Magic Keyboard or the Logitech MX Keys.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't have backlighting, which means it won't be the best option if you often work in darker environments. The ergonomic split key-layout might also take a bit of time to get used to. Nevertheless, it's one of the best ergonomic keyboards we've seen yet, and its wrist rest is very comfortable for long writing sessions.

    See our review

  2. More Affordable Alternative: Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard

    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    If you're on a tighter budget but want a keyboard with a similar design to the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard, check out the Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard instead. Its wrist rest might not be as comfortable as the Logitech's and it can't be connected to multiple devices simultaneously since it doesn't support Bluetooth. On the other hand, it features a separate NumPad that can be moved around to better suit your setup. However, its software allows minimal customization and isn't available on macOS. On the upside, you can also create a negative angle that prevents your wrists from bending in an unnatural typing position.

    If you want the best build quality and would like to use your keyboard with your phone via Bluetooth, go for the Logitech, but if you're on a tighter budget and only want a keyboard for your work computer, the Microsoft can be a more affordable option.

    See our review

  3. Best Wired Ergonomic Keyboard: ErgoDox EZ

    Test Methodology v0.8
    8.0
    Mixed usage
    8.2
    Gaming
    1.8
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.9
    Office
    7.7
    Programming
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best ergonomic keyboard that has a wired connection to your computer we've tested so far is the ErgoDox EZ. This keyboard has a truly unique design and aims to be the most complete ergonomic keyboard possible. It features a fully split design, with an infinite number of incline possibilities and an ortholinear key-layout. It also comes with two wrist rests for both halves for better support when typing.

    This keyboard has a lot of blank keycaps, so you can program any command and create the best and most comfortable key layout for you. It supports up to 32 different layers of keybindings, and each key can have two different inputs, one by a single keystroke and another one when holding down the key. The board is also available in a wide variety of Cherry MX and Kailh switches and the board allows you to quickly change the switches without soldering, which is amazing.

    Unfortunately, our unit doesn't have any backlighting, but there are model variants with full RGB backlight if you're someone who often works in darker environments. This keyboard is also very hard to learn to type on, but you can find a lot of tutorials on the manufacturer's website to help you out. This is an amazing wired ergonomic keyboard and if you can get used to its design, it might just be the last keyboard you'll buy for a while.

    See our review

  4. Gaming Alternative: Dygma Raise

    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Compact (60%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you're playing games for hours and want an ergonomic keyboard, go for the Dygma Raise. This compact 60% keyboard can also be split into two halves, features an overall low profile, and has built-in wrist rests. It might not have an ortholinear key layout or blank keycaps like the ErgoDox EZ, but this keyboard features full RGB backlighting on top of having a nice underglow. It also features a hot-swap board that allows you to change your mechanical switches easily without soldering, which is great. While every key can be reprogrammed, macro-programming isn't yet available but should be once the manufacturer updates the software.

    If you type all day, the ErgoDox's layout might be better for you, but if you always want to be able to play games and would prefer a more typical key layout, go with the Dygma.

    See our review

  5. Best Budget Ergonomic Keyboard: Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard

    Test Methodology v0.8
    7.0
    Mixed usage
    5.9
    Gaming
    7.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.3
    Office
    6.1
    Programming
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    If you're on a tight budget, the best ergonomic keyboard we've reviewed so far is the Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard. This keyboard has a similar curved and split-key layout to others on this list but isn't as well-built, which allows it to bet set at a more affordable price point. It has a very comfortable wrist rest and feet to create a negative angle for a more natural typing position.

    This wireless keyboard can be used with its receiver or via Bluetooth, and you can easily switch between two devices. Unfortunately, the switch is on the underside of the board, which isn't the most convenient place. The overall typing experience is decent. The rubber dome switches are fairly light to type on, but the keycaps feel a bit cheap and wobble.

    On the upside, thanks to its Bluetooth compatibility, you can easily connect it to a tablet or phone, making it very versatile. This keyboard might not be the most high-end we've reviewed, but its all-plastic frame feels solid enough and most people should be satisfied with it.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB: The Freestyle Edge RGB is a good alternative to the Dygma Raise if you want dedicated macro keys, but it isn't as well-built. See our review
  • Matias Ergo Pro: The Matias Ergo Pro is a good fully split alternative to the ErgoDox EZ if its learning curve is too steep for you. See our review

Recent Updates

03/31/2020: Changed some picks as we reviewed more products. The text has been updated.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best ergonomic keyboards for most people. We factor in the price (a cheaper product wins over a pricier one if the difference isn't worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no keyboard that is difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our keyboard reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no keyboard is perfect for every use, most are good enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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