Corsair K70 RGB TKL Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.0
Reviewed May 03, 2021 at 09:43 am
Corsair K70 RGB TKL Picture
9.5
Gaming
3.5
Mobile/Tablet
7.6
Office
7.8
Programming
5.4
Entertainment / HTPC
Connectivity Wired
Size
TenKeyLess (80%)
Mechanical
Yes

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is a fantastic gaming keyboard that's a smaller 80% version of the Corsair K70 RGB MK.2. It's a well-built model that comes with solid doubleshot PBT keycaps. It has a ton of gaming features, like macro-programmable keys, full RGB backlighting, and there's a 'Tournament Mode' switch that disables all macros and displays a single color so you can focus on gaming. Our unit has Cherry MX Speed switches, which are very light to press for a responsive gaming experience, and it's also available with linear Cherry MX Reds. If you want to use it for the office and don't mind the sensitive switches, it has great typing quality, but sadly, it doesn't come with a wrist rest.

Our Verdict

9.5 Gaming

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is a fantastic gaming keyboard. The Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit are very light to press with minimal pre-travel distance. Its latency is also very low for a responsive gaming experience. All keys are macro-programmable, it has full RGB lighting, and it's very well-made. Sadly, it doesn't come with a wrist rest for those long gaming sessions.

Pros
  • Keys are very light to press.
  • Full RGB backlighting.
  • All keys are macro-programmable.
  • Very well-built.
Cons
  • No included wrist rest.
3.5 Mobile/Tablet

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is wired-only and can't be used with mobile devices.

7.6 Office

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is good for office use. It's very well-made, and the doubleshot PBT keycaps feel great. It has great typing quality, but the linear Cherry MX Speed switches don't have any tactile feedback and can cause more typos than usual. Unfortunately, it doesn't come with a wrist rest, which may be disappointing to some.

Pros
  • Very well-built.
  • Great typing quality.
  • Keys are quiet and won't bother people around you.
Cons
  • No included wrist rest.
  • Keys may feel too sensitive for some.
7.8 Programming

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is very good for programming. You can set macros to any key, and it has full RGB backlighting. The typing quality is great, but the linear switches can be too light to press for some, which can cause an increase in typos. It's very well-made with a solid frame, but it doesn't come with a wrist rest.

Pros
  • Full RGB backlighting.
  • All keys are macro-programmable.
  • Very well-built.
Cons
  • No included wrist rest.
  • Keys may feel too sensitive for some.
5.4 Entertainment / HTPC

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is disappointing for home theater PC use. Since it's wired-only, you have to connect it directly to the TV and sit within its cable range. It also lacks a trackpad, so you'll need a mouse to navigate the user interface. However, it has full RGB backlighting, so you can see the keys in the dark, and it has dedicated media keys.

Pros
  • Full RGB backlighting.
  • Dedicated media keys.
Cons
  • Wired-only.
  • No trackpad.
  • 9.5 Gaming
  • 3.5 Mobile/Tablet
  • 7.6 Office
  • 7.8 Programming
  • 5.4 Entertainment / HTPC

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Height
1.2" (3.1 cm)
Width 14.3" (36.4 cm)
Depth
6.5" (16.5 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
N/A
Weight
1.96 lbs (0.887 kg)

Even for a TKL keyboard with dedicated media keys, the Corsair K70 RGB TKL is fairly compact and won't take up too much space on your desk.

8.5
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material PBT

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL has excellent build quality. It has a hard plastic body that shows no signs of flex, and there's an aluminum plate on top, but it feels sharp at the edges. The doubleshot PBT keycaps are advertised to be 1.5 mm thick, and they feel very solid and thicker than most keycaps. They also feel resistant to wear or oil shine. It comes with extra caps with different shapes or textures, but those are ABS plastic. All keys feel stable; only the spacebar has a bit more wobble than other keys, but it's not too bad. There are rubber feet on the bottom that hold the keyboard in place during regular use so it doesn't slide around easily. Overall, it's a premium and well-built keyboard without any obvious quality control issues.

6.5
Design
Ergonomics
Board Design
Straight
Minimum Incline
Medium Incline
N/A
Maximum Incline
Wrist Rest No

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL has okay ergonomics. It's a basic straight keyboard with one incline setting, but there's no wrist rest included like with the Corsair K70 RGB MK.2. However, the incline is low enough that it doesn't put too much strain on the wrists, and you shouldn't feel too tired using it for long periods.

9.9
Design
Backlighting
Backlighting Yes
Color
RGB
Individually Backlit Keys
Yes
Color Mixing
Good
Effects
Yes
Programmable
Yes

This keyboard has full RGB backlighting with individually lit keys. You can rotate through lighting effects by pressing Fn and cycling through the number row. It does a good job at producing pure whites, but it doesn't get very bright, so you may not notice the RGB lighting in bright environments.

Design
Cable & Connector
Detachable
Yes (Wired Only Keyboard)
Length 5.9 ft (1.8 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
USB type-C

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL comes with a braided USB-A to USB-C cable.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
No
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
No
Proprietary Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is a wired-only keyboard that can't be used with mobile devices.

Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Dedicated
Macro Programmable Keys
All
Trackpad / Trackball No
Wheel Yes
USB Passthrough
No
Numpad No
Windows Key Lock
Yes
Lock Indicator Caps & Scroll Lock

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL has a few extra features to improve the user experience. There's a Windows key lock, which you can reprogram to disable other functions. All keys are macro-programmable, and you must record macros through the dedicated software. There's a 'Tournament Mode' switch on the top side next to the USB-C input, and when activated it disables all macros and displays a single static color. You can change which color it displays. Lastly, its polling rate can be set to 125Hz, 250Hz, 500Hz, 1000Hz, 2000Hz, 4000Hz, or 8000Hz.

Design
In The Box

  • Corsair K70 RGB TKL keyboard
  • Extra keys (A, 2x D, E, F, Q, R, S, 2x W)
  • USB-C cable
  • Keycap puller
  • User guides

Typing Experience
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Key Switches
Cherry MX Speed
Feel
Linear
Operating Force
43 gf
Actuation Force
42 gf
Pre-Travel
1.2 mm
Total Travel
3.4 mm

Our unit of the Corsair K70 RGB TKL has Cherry MX Speed switches, and it's also available with linear Cherry MX Red switches. The Speeds have very low pre-travel distance and are light to press. However, we noticed that the switches don't feel completely linear like those on the Corsair K95 PLATINUM because there's a tactile event before the actuation point, similar to tactile switches, but this shouldn't be noticeable for most people.

8.0
Typing Experience
Typing Quality

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL offers great typing quality. The PBT keycaps feel great to touch, and the keys are well-spaced out so they don't feel cramped. They're also stable, and even though the spacebar is a bit wobbly, it's not too bad. The keys are very light to press, so you shouldn't get tired while typing, but that can also cause more typos because they actuate so easily. Overall, you can tell it's designed for a quick gaming experience, but once you get used to the linear feel of the switches, it feels great to type on this keyboard.

Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Noise
Quiet

The Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit are quiet and shouldn't bother those around you. We also expect the Cherry MX Red switches to be quiet.

10
Typing Experience
Latency
Latency Wired
1.3 ms
Latency Receiver
N/A
Latency Bluetooth
N/A

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL has extremely low latency. We tested it with the polling rate to be set to 8000Hz, and we don't expect there to be a significant increase in latency at settings of 1000Hz and above.

Software and Operating System
9.6
Software and Operating System
Software & Programming
Software Name iCUE
Account Required
No
Profiles
6+
Onboard Memory
Yes
Cloud Sync
No
Macro Programming
Software
Ease Of Use
Easy
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
Yes

Corsair's iCUE software is a user-friendly program that's available for both Windows and macOS. You can set macros, customize RGB lighting, and set the polling rate. The keyboard has onboard memory, so you can easily carry over your macros and settings to a computer that doesn't have the program installed.

7.2
Software and Operating System
Keyboard Compatibility
Windows Full
macOS Partial
Linux Partial
Android No
iOS No
iPadOS No

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is only fully compatible with Windows; on Linux every key work, but the software isn't available. On macOS, the Stop, Scroll Lock, and Pause/Break buttons don't do anything. Also, F11 minimizes windows, Print Screen functions as F13, and the volume wheel controls the system volume and not the iTunes volume.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the Corsair K70 RGB TKL with Cherry MX Speed switches, and it's also available with Cherry MX Red switches. In name, this keyboard is a TKL version of the Corsair K70 RGB MK.2, but they have a few different features so they aren't exactly the same.

If you have the Corsair K70 RGB TKL and notice it's different from ours, let us know, and we'll update the review. You can see the label for our unit here.

Compared To Other Keyboards

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is a fantastic gaming keyboard that challenges its competition in terms of gaming performance. It's very well-built, has a ton of features, and the linear Cherry MX Speed switches are light to press. Those looking for a more versatile keyboard may be a bit disappointed with the lack of wrist rest and switch variety, but it should please most gamers.

Also see our recommendations for the best gaming keyboards, the best Corsair keyboards, and the best keyboards for programming.

SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are both fantastic gaming keyboards. They're both well-made and offer great typing quality; however, the SteelSeries is available with tactile, linear, and clicky switches, so you can get the ones you prefer, but the Corsair is only available with linear switches. The SteelSeries comes with a wrist rest, which the Corsair doesn't. The Corsair has lower latency, but the difference between both shouldn't be very noticeable.

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition are two fantastic gaming keyboards. The Razer has proprietary linear optical switches, making for a light gaming experience, but they're too sensitive for typing, so the Corsair has better typing quality. The Corsair also has dedicated media keys, which the HyperX doesn't have. Other than that, they're pretty similar in terms of performance.

Keychron K6

The Keychron K6 and the Corsair K70 RGB TKL are two very different keyboards designed for different uses. The Keychron is a wireless compact 65% keyboard, and you can connect it with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth. It's available in tactile, linear, and clicky switches, while the Corsair is only available in linear. On the other hand, the Corsair is a wired-only TKL keyboard designed for gaming; it has much lower latency, macro-programmable keys, and the Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit have a low pre-travel distance.

Corsair K70 RGB MK.2

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the Corsair K70 RGB MK.2 are fantastic gaming keyboards with similar features. The MK.2 is full-sized and has a wrist rest, which the TKL version doesn't have. The full-sized is available in more switch types, while the TKL is only available with linear switches, so if you prefer tactile switches, the full-sized model would be a better choice. However, the TKL keyboard feels better-built because it has PBT keycaps instead of ABS.

SteelSeries Apex Pro

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the SteelSeries Apex Pro are both fantastic gaming keyboards with different features. The SteelSeries uses proprietary optical switches you can customize to your liking; you can set a low pre-travel distance for quick gaming or a higher one for better typing accuracy. The SteelSeries is also bigger as it has a numpad, and it comes with a wrist rest for better ergonomics. The Corsair is available with two types of linear switches, and the Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit as still very light to press.

Corsair K100 RGB

The Corsair K100 RGB and the Corsair K70 RGB TKL are both fantastic for gaming. The K100 is bigger because it's full-size, has a numpad and wrist rest, and there are also dedicated macro keys on the left side, which the K70 doesn't have. The K100 also has a USB passthrough, so you can connect your peripherals directly to the keyboard, and it has better typing quality because the Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit of the K70 feel a bit more sensitive than those on the K100. Overall, they're very similar in performance, so choosing one over the other comes down to size preference.

HyperX Alloy Origins

The HyperX Alloy Origins and the Corsair K70 RGB TKL are both fantastic gaming keyboards. The HyperX is available with linear, tactile, and clicky switches, so you can get the type you prefer, while the Corsair is only available with linear switches. Since the HyperX is bigger, it has a numpad, but the Corsair has dedicated media keys, which the HyperX doesn't have. Even though the Corsair has PBT keycaps, typing feels better on the HyperX because the keys aren't as sensitive as those on the Corsair.

Logitech G Pro Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL is a much better gaming keyboard than the Logitech G Pro Mechanical Gaming Keyboard. The Corsair is available in two types of linear switches, while the Logitech only has proprietary clicky ones. This means that the Corsair's switches are much lighter to press for gaming but may lead to more typos. You can also set macros to any key on the Corsair, and on the Logitech it's limited to the function keys. The Corsair feels better-built because it has an aluminum plate and PBT keycaps.

Corsair K65 RGB MINI

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the Corsair K65 RGB MINI are fantastic gaming keyboards with similar features. The K70 is TenKeyLess, so it has a function row, control pad, and dedicated arrow keys, which the 60% K65 doesn't have. In terms of performance, they're very similar with low click latency, macro-programmable keys, and the units we tested each have Cherry MX Speed switches. The K65 has onboard memory, which the K70 doesn't. However, the K70 has better ergonomics because it has an incline setting.

Razer BlackWidow Tournament Edition Chroma V2

The Razer BlackWidow Tournament Edition Chroma V2 and the Corsair K70 RGB TKL are fantastic TKL gaming keyboards. The Razer is a bit more versatile for other uses like office use because it's available in more switch types than the Corsair, like clicky and tactile, and it also comes with a wrist rest. However, the Corsair feels better-built because it has a sturdy frame and comes with PBT keycaps. Also, Corsair's iCUE software is compatible with macOS, while Razer's Synapse 3 software isn't.

Ducky One 2 RGB TKL

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the Ducky One 2 RGB TKL are both fantastic gaming keyboards. The Corsair is only available with linear switches, so the Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit are lighter to press than the Cherry MX Brown switches on the Ducky. However, the Ducky is available with a wide range of switches, so you can get the ones you prefer. The Corsair iCUE software allows you to set macros through the software, while on the Ducky, you have to record all macros directly onboard. The Ducky feels better to type on because the keys feel well-spaced out, and the tactile switches on our unit aren't as sensitive as the linear ones on the Corsair.

Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed are compact gaming keyboards that have incredibly low latency. The Corsair is a better choice if you prefer a wired board with a dedicated F-row, dedicated media keys, and a volume control wheel. It's available with linear Cherry MX Speed switches only, which may not be ideal if you prefer a different feel. On the other hand, the Razer is a better choice if you prefer a wireless board that you can pair with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth. It's available with linear Razer Yellow and clicky Razer Green switches.

Fnatic miniSTREAK

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the Fnatic miniSTREAK are both TenKeyLess, mechanical, gaming keyboards, but the Corsair is slightly larger because of its extra top row for dedicated media keys and volume wheel. The Corsair feels slightly better built with its aluminum top plate and doubleshot PBT keycaps, and it's also better at color mixing. Also, the Corsair has much lower latency, making it a better choice for gaming if switch response time is very important to you. Both boards have incredible customization software, but the Fnatic also lets you set macros directly from the board, while the Corsair needs the software to customize your board.

+ Show more

Discussions