The 7 Best Keyboards For Writers - Spring 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Keyboards For Writers
122 Keyboards Tested
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For writers, spending countless hours typing on a bad keyboard can be tiring and potentially lead to other issues. Writers also have very unique requirements when it comes to keyboards; some prefer mechanical switches, while others prefer the silent typing noise of a membrane keyboard. As such, we've compiled a list of our recommendations for the best keyboards for writers, from feature-packed models to budget options; hopefully, you can find one that will inspire you to keep writing.

We've tested more than 110 keyboards, and below are our recommendations for the best keyboards for writers that are available for purchase. For other options, see our recommendations for the best keyboards, the best gaming keyboards, and the best mechanical keyboards.


  1. Best Mechanical Keyboard For Writers: Razer BlackWidow Elite

    9.5
    Gaming
    2.7
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.0
    Office
    8.2
    Programming
    5.5
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    The best keyboard for writers with mechanical switches that we've tested is the Razer BlackWidow Elite. This wired, full-sized option is a great choice for writers due to its excellent typing quality and overall design. It has a solid build that doesn't have much flex, and the ABS plastic keycaps don't feel cheap. Even if it's a straight keyboard, the ergonomics are great thanks to the two incline settings and the included wrist rest.

    The model we tested has proprietary Razer Orange switches, which have short pre-travel and give nice tactile feedback while also being fairly quiet. You can also choose clicky Razer Green or linear Razer Yellow switches if that's what you prefer. The keys are stable and well-spaced out, which should help reduce typos. It has full RGB backlighting and programmable macros, both of which can be customized in the companion software.

    Unfortunately, the Razer Synapse 3 software is only available on Windows, and the board itself is only partially compatible with macOS. Also, the wrist rest is prone to sliding around when using it, which may be annoying if you plan on typing for hours on end. That said, if you want a mechanical model with great typing quality and comfort, this is a good choice, and it's the best keyboard for typing all day.

    See our review

  2. Wireless Alternative: Razer Pro Type

    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you prefer a wireless mechanical keyboard for writing, check out the Razer Pro Type. It doesn't have as many extra features as the Razer BlackWidow Elite, and it lacks a wrist rest for increased comfort. However, you can connect it with Bluetooth or its USB receiver and pair it with up to four devices at the same time, which is great for multitasking. It feels very well-built and has white backlighting that allows you to work in dark environments. It also offers an excellent typing experience and doesn't cause much fatigue over time. Its keys are well-spaced, and the Razer Orange switches feel light and responsive while also giving satisfying feedback. Unfortunately, most keys wobble a bit, though it isn't really noticeable while typing normally.

    If you're looking for a keyboard with lots of extra features and more comfort, get the Elite, but if you prefer an option that connects wirelessly and supports multi-device pairing, then the Pro Type is a good alternative.

    See our review

  3. Best Ergonomic Keyboard For Writers: Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard

    6.3
    Gaming
    6.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    8.8
    Office
    7.1
    Programming
    5.4
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best ergonomic keyboard for writers that we've tested is the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard. This full-sized option is an excellent choice for those working in an office or writing all day. It has outstanding ergonomics and feels very comfortable to use, thanks to the curved design. The frame itself is entirely made out of plastic and has a bit of flex to it, but it doesn't feel cheap.

    It features typical scissor switches that have nice tactile feedback. There's a noticeable bump before actuation that requires a lot of force to get over, but it remains very quiet and shouldn't bother anyone around you. Because it has a curved design, the keys are in a non-standard layout and may feel odd at first, which could increase typos. However, once you get used to it, you should have a great typing experience.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't have any backlighting, and it depends on AAA batteries to function. Also, while you can reprogram some keys to a preset list of functions, you can't program any macros. The keycaps are pad-printed, which means the key legends might fade or chip over time. That said, if you want a very comfortable typing experience for long days of writing, this is the best keyboard for writers with an ergonomic design.

    See our review

  4. Alternative With Mechanical Switches: Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB

    Connectivity Wired
    Size
    TenKeyLess (80%)
    Mechanical
    Yes

    If you prefer an ergonomic keyboard with mechanical switches, check out the Kinesis Freestyle Edge RGB. It doesn't have a curved design or incline settings like the Logitech ERGO K860 Wireless Split Keyboard, but it still has excellent ergonomics and is available with a variety of mechanical switches. It has a fully split design that allows you to position each half the way you want. It's great for writing all day as it doesn't cause much fatigue and has impressive typing quality. Our unit uses Cherry MX Brown switches, which give satisfying tactile feedback while still feeling light, but you can also choose Cherry MX Red, Blue, or Speed Silver if you prefer. Unfortunately, it doesn't have any wireless capabilities. However, unlike the Logitech, it has full RGB backlighting, which is great if you work in the dark.

    If you want an extremely comfortable keyboard with more ergonomic features, choose the Logitech, but if you prefer mechanical switches, then the Kinesis is a good option for you.

    See our review

  5. Best Non-Mechanical Keyboard For Writers: Logitech MX Keys

    8.0
    Gaming
    7.0
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.8
    Office
    7.8
    Programming
    6.9
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best non-mechanical keyboard for writers that we've tested is the Logitech MX Keys. This full-sized option features scissor switches that are great to type on, which makes it an ideal choice for office work. The entire frame is made of metal, while the keys themselves are stable and made of good-quality plastic. Despite the lack of a wrist rest and incline settings, its low profile means you shouldn't get too tired during long periods of use.

    Typing feels good thanks in part to its indented keys, which help to type faster and with fewer typos. The switches also feel light to type on and are quiet enough to use in any kind of work environment. The keyboard connects via Bluetooth or with its USB receiver and allows you to pair it with up to three different devices. Switching between them is fast and easy, thanks to the three buttons directly on the keyboard.

    Unfortunately, it has minimal extra features and doesn't let you set any macros, though you can reprogram the media keys to a preset list of functions. Also, it lacks onboard memory and the companion software is rather disappointing, but it should still be fine for most daily or office uses. All in all, if you're looking for a non-mechanical option for writing, this is the best we've tested.

    See our review

  6. Best Budget Keyboard For Writers: Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard

    6.6
    Gaming
    6.9
    Mobile/Tablet
    7.6
    Office
    6.4
    Programming
    5.0
    Entertainment / HTPC
    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Full-size (100%)
    Mechanical
    No

    The best keyboard for writers that we’ve tested in the budget category is the Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard. This full-sized model is well-built and feels solid, even if its body has a bit of flex to it. The keys are stable, and the ergonomics are decent, so you should be able to type on it without much fatigue over time. It’s wireless-only and connects with Bluetooth, which is great if you’re trying to avoid clutter on your desk.

    The overall typing quality is good, with tactile rubber dome switches that need a bit of force to actuate and offer decent feedback. The short pre-travel distance helps to keep the typing light and responsive, and it’s quiet enough for any kind of working environment. You can only set macros to four function keys, but you can reprogram them to pretty much anything you’d like within the companion software.

    Unfortunately, there aren’t any incline settings and wrist rest, and the lack of backlighting means it’s not the best option if you work in a dark environment. Also, you can only connect it with one device at a time and it uses two AAA batteries, so you’ll need to change them eventually. That said, it offers good value, and if you’re looking for good typing quality, this is the best we’ve tested in this price range.

    See our review

  7. Multi-Device Pairing Alternative: Logitech K380

    Connectivity Wireless
    Size
    Compact (65%)
    Mechanical
    No

    If you prefer a budget keyboard with multi-device pairing, check out the Logitech K380. It doesn’t have any macro-programmable keys, and it’s not as well-built as the Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard, but you can pair it with up to three different devices via Bluetooth, and it’s a fantastic choice to use with mobiles or tablets. The typing quality is good as the keys are stable, and it has a low profile that makes it comfortable enough for long periods of use. It uses scissor switches that require a bit of force to get over the tactile bump, but the overall feeling remains light and responsive. However, the very short pre-travel distance could lead to more typos if you’re not used to it. There’s also no backlighting, so this isn’t the best choice if you work in a dark environment. That said, its small size makes it easy to carry around if you like to write on the go.

    If you want the best budget keyboard for writing, get the Microsoft, but if you’re looking for an option that supports multi-device pairing and is a better fit to use with mobile devices, go for the Logitech.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Apple Magic Keyboard 2017: The Apple Magic Keyboard 2017 is a good alternative to the Logitech MX Keys if you prefer a smaller size, but its compatibility is limited when using it with non-Apple operating systems. See our review
  • Ducky One 2 RGB TKL: The Ducky One 2 RGB TKL has one of the best typing experiences we've tested, but it may be hard to find in-store or online. See our review
  • Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard: The Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard is similar in design to the Logitech ERGO, but it has a worse typing quality. See our review
  • ErgoDox EZ: The ErgoDox EZ is a highly customizable ergonomic keyboard, but it's more expensive than the Kinesis. See our review
  • Logitech Craft: The Logitech Craft is very similar to the MX Keys with some extra features, but it costs more. See our review
  • SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL: The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL comes with a wrist rest, but it's not worth the price difference over the BlackWidow Lite. See our review
  • Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard: The Kensington Pro Fit Ergo Wireless Keyboard is a good budget option with outstanding ergonomics, but its typing quality is only decent. See our review
  • Logitech K780: The Logitech K780 is a full-sized keyboard with multi-device pairing, but it's more expensive than the K380 and heavier to carry around. See our review
  • Razer BlackWidow Lite: The Razer BlackWidow Lite is a good alternative to the Razer BlackWidow Elite if youโ€™re looking for a smaller mechanical keyboard, but its ergonomics are only okay, and its design may cause some fatigue after typing on it for extended periods. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Mar 15, 2021: Verified that picks were still available and updated text for more clarity.

  2. Jan 14, 2021: Removed the smaller alternative for the best mechanical keyboard, the Razer BlackWidow Lite, and added a wireless alternative, the Razer Pro Type, to better answer writers' needs.

  3. Nov 17, 2020: Replaced the Logitech K780 with the Logitech K380.

  4. Sep 18, 2020: Added Logitech Craft to Notable Mentions.

  5. Jul 21, 2020: Replaced the Vortex 3 with the BlackWidow Lite and the ErgoDox EZ with the Kinesis; moved the Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard as the main budget pick and removed the Apex 3, then added the K780 as an alternative.

  6. Apr 07, 2020: Replaced Kinesis FreeStyle Edge RGB with ErgoDox EZ, added Microsoft Bluetooth Keyboard.

All Reviews

Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best keyboards for writers for most people. We factor in the price, feedback from our visitors, and availability.

If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all our keyboard reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no keyboard is perfect for every use, most are good enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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