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Mountain Everest Max Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.0
Reviewed Nov 24, 2021 at 11:06 am
Mountain Everest Max Picture
8.9
Gaming
2.7
Mobile/Tablet
7.9
Office
7.7
Programming
5.4
Entertainment / HTPC
Connectivity Wired
Size
Full-size (100%)
Mechanical
Yes

The Mountain Everest Max is a highly customizable keyboard. It's a modular keyboard that comes with a detachable media dock and numpad, so you can place them on either side of the keyboard or remove them entirely. There are a few variants, and the Everest Max version comes with these accessories, including a wrist rest. If you don't want them, you can also buy the Everest Core version that's just the TKL board, and there's even a barebones variant if you want to use your own switches and keycaps. When you purchase it, you get the option of choosing between different Cherry MX switches, and it's also hot-swappable, so you can use whichever compatible three-pin switch you prefer. As for customizing the setting, the Mountain Base Camp software is easy-to-use for reprogramming the keys, but unfortunately, it doesn't work on macOS.

Our Verdict

8.9 Gaming

The Mountain Everest Max is excellent for gaming. All its keys are macro-programmable, and the dedicated software is easy-to-use, but it's only available on Windows. The keyboard is available with different Cherry MX switches, so you can get the ones you prefer, and it's hot-swappable. It's also customizable, as you can remove the numpad if you want some extra space on your desk. Its latency is low enough for most competitive gamers, but it's still a bit higher than other gaming keyboards.

Pros
  • Hot-swappable and available with different Cherry MX switches.
  • All keys are macro-programmable on Windows.
  • Modular keyboard with removal numpad and media dock.
  • Good ergonomics with a nice wrist rest.
Cons
  • Dedicated software not available on macOS.
  • Low latency, but not as low as some other gaming keyboards.
2.7 Mobile/Tablet

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard is wired-only and isn't designed for use with mobile devices.

7.9 Office

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard is very good to use in the office. It's available with different switches, and it's hot-swappable, so you can get the ones you prefer the most. Typing feels great because its included wrist rest is comfortable, it has good ergonomics, and the keys are stable, but the ABS keycaps don't feel as good as PBT. Nearly all keys work on macOS, but the software isn't available on it, so you can't customize the settings.

Pros
  • Hot-swappable and available with different Cherry MX switches.
  • Modular keyboard with removal numpad and media dock.
  • Good ergonomics with a nice wrist rest.
Cons
  • Dedicated software not available on macOS.
  • Comes with ABS keycaps instead of PBT.
7.7 Programming

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard is good for programmers. Typing feels great because it has good ergonomics, and the Cherry MX Brown switches on our unit are light to type on. You can also get it with different types of Cherry MX switches, and it's hot-swappable, so you can choose whichever you prefer. You can reprogram any of the keys through the dedicated software, which is only available on Windows, and not macOS.

Pros
  • Hot-swappable and available with different Cherry MX switches.
  • All keys are macro-programmable on Windows.
  • Good ergonomics with a nice wrist rest.
Cons
  • Dedicated software not available on macOS.
  • Comes with ABS keycaps instead of PBT.
5.4 Entertainment / HTPC

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard is disappointing to use as a home theater PC keyboard, but it's not designed for this. It's wired-only, so you have to connect it directly to the TV and have it close to it. It also lacks a trackpad, but it has dedicated media keys and full RGB backlighting.

Pros
  • Modular keyboard with removal numpad and media dock.
Cons
  • Wired-only.
  • Lacks a trackpad.
  • 8.9 Gaming
  • 2.7 Mobile/Tablet
  • 7.9 Office
  • 7.7 Programming
  • 5.4 Entertainment / HTPC
  1. Updated Nov 24, 2021: Review published.
  2. Updated Nov 22, 2021: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Height
1.6" (4.1 cm)
Width 18.1" (46.1 cm)
Depth
6.7" (17.1 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
9.6" (24.3 cm)
Weight
2.70 lbs (1.224 kg)

The Mountain Everest Max is a highly customizable modular keyboard. The keyboard itself is TenKeyLess, but it comes with a numpad that you can attach on either side, and you can even it attach it via a USB-C cable if you want it off to the side a bit. However, the numpad has to be connected to the keyboard, as you can't use it independently. You can also place the media dock on either side; the photo above is with all the accessories, including the wrist rest, and you can see photos of different configurations below:

SizeWrist RestNumpad PositionMedia Dock PositionPhotoNotes
TKLNo--Photo
TKLYes--Photo
FullNoLeftLeftPhoto
FullYesLeftLeftPhoto
FullNoLeftLeftPhotoNumpad attached by USB-C
FullYesLeftLeftPhotoNumpad attached by USB-C
FullNoLeftRightPhoto
FullYesLeftRightPhoto
FullNoRightLeftPhoto
FullYesRightLeftPhoto
FullYesRightLeftPhotoNumpad attached by USB-C
FullNoRightRightPhoto
FullYesRightRightPhoto
FullNoRightRightPhotoNumpad attached by USB-C

The dimension and weight measurements above are with the numpad and media dock attached because that's how we expect most people to use it. Without the numpad it measures 14.4" (36.6 cm) wide, and the depth without the wrist rest or media dock is 6.02" (15.3 cm) thick. The depth with the wrist rest, but without the media dock, is 8.82" (22.4 cm).

As for the weight, we also decided to measure the Mountain Everest Max gaming keyboard with the media dock, numpad, wrist rest, and extra feet in different configurations, which you can see below:

  • Keyboard only: 1.940 lbs (0.880 kg)
  • Keyboard with media dock only: 2.072 lbs (0.940 kg)
  • Keyboard with media dock, numpad, and 8 extra feet: 2.853 lbs (1.294 kg)
  • Keyboard with media dock, numpad, extra feet, and wrist rest: 3.214 lbs (1.458 kg)

7.5
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material ABS

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard has good build quality, but it feels like it could be better for a high-end gaming keyboard. It's made out of a solid plastic frame with a sturdy metal base plate, and there's minimal flex. It features ABS keycaps instead of PBT, so they're prone to oil shine from your fingers, but you can buy PBT keycaps with various color schemes from Mountain's website. The keys are stable when typing, and the larger keys have good stabilizers, but the spacebar has a bit more wobble.

However, it's not a perfect keyboard as we experienced some issues with it. The left side of the wrist rest doesn't attach magnetically to the keyboard, and only the right side does, so the wrist rest moves around easily, which is annoying. Also, we experienced an issue where one of the magnets in the incline feet came off, and we had to glue it back together. Besides these small issues, it feels well-built, but it's not as good as something like the Corsair K100 RGB due to those small issues and the ABS keycaps.

7.5
Design
Ergonomics
Board Design
Straight
Minimum Incline
3.6°
Medium Incline
8.5°
Maximum Incline
14°
Wrist Rest Detachable

The Mountain Everest Max gaming keyboard has good ergonomics because it has adjustable incline settings and a detachable wrist rest. The wrist rest feels nice as it's plushy but also a bit stiff at the same time, so it's not too soft. Overall, it feels comfortable to type on, and you shouldn't feel fatigue. However, the lack of the magnet on the left side of the wrist rest is disappointing.

The measurements of the incline settings above are with the keyboard without the numpad, as there are eight incline feet. You can put four in each slot of the keyboard for the maximum incline of 14 degrees. However, if you're using the numpad, you can put two feet in each of the four slots on the keyboard for a maximum of 8.5 degrees. If you put one foot in each of the slots, you get an incline of 5.8 degrees.

9.6
Design
Backlighting
Backlighting Yes
Color
RGB
Individually Backlit Keys
Yes
Color Mixing
Poor
Effects
Yes
Programmable
Yes

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard has full RGB backlighting with individually lit keys. The RGB colors look nice, but it does a bad job at displaying pure white as it has a pink hue, and there are even green and red reflections.

Design
Cable & Connector
Detachable
Yes (Wired Only Keyboard)
Length 6.4 ft (2.0 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
USB type-C

The Mountain Everest Max comes with two cables. One is a USB-C to USB-A cable that you use to attach the keyboard to the PC, and the other is a USB-C female to male to connect the numpad to the keyboard if you want to have it off to the side a bit. The braided cables are stiff and retain kinks from packaging.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
No
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
No
Proprietary Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard is wired-only, and you can't use it with wireless devices.

Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Dedicated
Macro Programmable Keys
All
Trackpad / Trackball No
Wheel Yes
USB Passthrough
Yes
Numpad Yes
Windows Key Lock
Yes
Lock Indicator Caps, Scroll & Num lock

The Mountain Everest Max is a highly customizable keyboard with a ton of features. As mentioned, it's modular, so you can attach the numpad and media dock how you like. The numpad connects via USB-C with connectors that slide in and out for the right and left connections. You can see the keyboard connector here. The numpad even has four customizable displays onto which you can display anything you want and reprogram them how you like; for example, you can program one of them to open up Word if you use it often. There's a USB-A passthrough at the top of the keyboard, and underneath there are tracks you can use for cable management.

There's a display on the media dock that can display a bunch of different things, including the date and time, the keyboard's profile, PC info (CPU, GPU, RAM), the actions per minute, and you can also use it to control the volume of the PC or the brightness of the keyboard. The media dock includes dedicated media buttons.

Design
In The Box

  • Mountain Everest Max keyboard
  • Wrist rest
  • Detachable numpad
  • Media dock
  • USB-C to USB-A cable
  • USB-C female to male cable
  • 8x incline feet
  • 1x Esc key
  • 2-in-1 keycap and switch remover
  • 5x Cherry MX switch samples (Brown, Blue, Speed Silver, Red, Silent Red)
  • User guide
  • Stickers

Typing Experience
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Key Switches
Cherry MX Brown
Feel
Tactile
Operating Force
55 gf
Actuation Force
44 gf
Pre-Travel
2.1 mm
Total Travel
4.1 mm

Our Mountain Everest Max unit comes with Cherry MX Brown switches. They feel standard for MX Brown as they're light and provide good tactile feedback. However, this keyboard is also available with Cherry MX Red, Blue, Speed Silver, and Silent Red switches, and it's hot-swappable, so you can choose the switches you prefer.

8.0
Typing Experience
Typing Quality

The Mountain Everest Max has great typing quality. It feels like other keyboards with Cherry MX Brown switches, with standard key spacing and keycap shape. The key are stable, including the larger keys, and even though there's a bit of wobble, it isn't noticeable during typing. You shouldn't feel much fatigue either because the wrist rest is comfortable and the switches feel light. However, this keyboard doesn't stand out versus the competition because it has ABS keycaps instead of PBT, but you can buy PBT keycaps separately. However, the ABS keycaps don't feel too bad and aren't slippery, but they just aren't as good as PBT. Also, since it's hot-swappable and sold with different types of Cherry MX switches, your typing experience depends on the switches you use.

Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Noise
Quiet

The Cherry MX Brown switches on our Mountain Everest Max gaming keyboard are quiet. However, it's available in different types of switches, and the clicky ones are loud.

8.7
Typing Experience
Latency
Latency Wired
6.5 ms
Latency Receiver
N/A
Latency Bluetooth
N/A

The Mountain Everest Max has low latency for a responsive gaming experience, but it's a bit higher than other gaming keyboards like the Corsair K100 RGB.

Software and Operating System
9.3
Software and Operating System
Software & Programming
Software Name Mountain Base Camp
Account Required
No
Profiles
5
Onboard Memory
Yes
Cloud Sync
No
Macro Programming
Software and Onboard
Ease Of Use
Easy
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
No

The Mountain Base Camp is an easy-to-use software to program macros and customize the keyboard's settings. You can reprogram the custom keys on the numpad to repeat the same tasks, like if you constantly need to type the same word. It also uses the Razer Chroma RGB software to customize the backlighting. You can save up to five profiles in the software, and the Mountain Everest Max keyboard has onboard memory, but it doesn't offer a cloud sync option if you need to use it on another computer. Also, the software isn't available on macOS, which is disappointing.

7.2
Software and Operating System
Keyboard Compatibility
Windows Full
macOS Partial
Linux Partial
Android No
iOS No
iPadOS No

The Mountain Everest Max only fully works on Windows because all keys work and the software is available. On macOS and Linux, the extra keys on the numpad don't work, the media dock doesn't properly display the PC's diagnostics, and the software isn't available. The Scroll lock and Pause/Break keys don't work on macOS either.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the Mountain Everest Max with Cherry MX Brown switches. It's a modular keyboard that comes with a numpad, media dock, and wrist rest, and the only differences with other keyboards in the Mountain Everest lineup are the included accessories, which you can see below. The keyboard itself is TenKeyLess, but it's considered full-size when you attach the numpad.

Name Size Available Colors Numpad Wrist Rest Media Dock Cherry MX Switches Notes
Mountain Everest Core Barebone TKL Gunmetal Grey, Midnight Black No No No None Barebones keyboard
Mountain Everest Core TKL Gunmetal Grey, Midnight Black  No No No Red, Blue, Brown, Speed Silver, Silent Red  
Mountain Everest Max Full Gunmetal Grey, Midnight Black Yes Yes Yes Red, Blue, Brown, Speed Silver, Silent Red  

All variants are compatible with Mountain's accessories, like the wrist rest and numpad, meaning you can get the Everest Core variant with the wrist rest and media dock if you don't want the numpad with the Everest Max version. Their keyboards also come with the standard ABS keycaps, but you can buy extra PBT sets with various color schemes, too.

If you have a variant of the Everest Max gaming keyboard that doesn't correspond to our review, let us know in the discussions, and we'll update it. You can see our unit's label here.

Compared To Other Keyboards

The Mountain Everest Max keyboard is a highly customizable gaming keyboard, and it's great if you don't always want to use the numpad, as you can just remove it. the hot-swappable switches are also great if you want to replace them. For a high-end gaming keyboard, there are a few downfalls, like some of its build quality issues, the lack of dedicated software on macOS, and the latency is higher than some other high-end gaming keyboards. There are cheaper options available with better gaming performance, like the Corsair K100 RGB.

Also see our recommendations for the best gaming keyboards, the best keyboards for programming, and the best mechanical keyboards.

Corsair K100 RGB

The Corsair K100 RGB is better for gaming than the Mountain Everest Max, but they're different types of keyboards. The Corsair is a full-size keyboard with dedicated macro keys, and it feels better-built because it has PBT keycaps instead of ABS like on the Mountain. It's only available with linear switches, and the latency is much lower. On the other hand, the Mountain is a modular keyboard with a detachable numpad, so you can remove it to make it TKL. It's available with different Cherry MX switches, and it's hot-swappable, so you can put whichever switches you prefer.

SteelSeries Apex Pro

The SteelSeries Apex Pro is better for gaming than the Mountain Everest Max. They're each customizable keyboards but in different ways. The SteelSeries is only available with linear OmniPoint switches, and you can adjust their pre-travel distance on a per-key basis. It also has lower latency for a more responsive gaming experience. On the other hand, the Mountain is a modular keyboard, so you can remove and move around the numpad and media dock as you wish, and the switches are hot-swappable, so you can use whichever you prefer.

ASUS ROG Claymore II

The ASUS ROG Claymore II and the Mountain Everest Max are both excellent modular gaming keyboards. They each come with detachable numpads, meaning you can use them as TKL keyboards, but the wrist rest on the ASUS is full-size, so it sticks out from the side if you use it in TKL mode, but the Mountain comes with a TKL sized wrist rest. The ASUS is available with proprietary linear or clicky optical switches, while the Mountain is more versatile because it's hot-swappable, and it's sold with different Cherry MX switches. You can use the ASUS wirelessly, but only through its USB receiver, and if you use it wired, it has lower latency than the Mountain.

Razer BlackWidow Elite

The Razer BlackWidow Elite is better for gaming than the Mountain Everest Max, but the Mountain is a more customizable keyboard. The Razer is available with clicky Razer Green, tactile Orange, and linear Yellow switches, and it has lower latency than the Mountain for a more responsive gaming experience. The Razer also feels better built and offers better typing quality, but each keyboard has ABS keycaps. As for the Mountain, it's a modular keyboard that comes with a detachable numpad and media dock, so you can place them or remove them how you like, and because the switches are hot-swappable, you can use whichever ones you prefer the most.

Discussions