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The 4 Best Nikon Cameras of 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Nikon Cameras

We've tested 11 Nikon cameras. Nikon is a Japanese multinational company specializing in a wide variety of optical and imaging equipment, from microscopes to X-ray machines for inspecting semi-conductors. For most, the company is best known for its long history of building cameras for novice and professional photographers and all users in between. It currently offers a relatively wide range of DSLR models and lenses, and more recently, has expanded its selection of mirrorless offerings.

Updates

Best Nikon Cameras


  1. Best Nikon Mirrorless Camera

    7.5
    Travel Photography
    8.0
    Landscape Photography
    8.3
    Sport & Wildlife Photography
    5.8
    Vlogging
    8.1
    Studio Video
    5.8
    Action Video
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    Full Frame
    Tested Lens
    Nikkor Z 24-70mm f/4 S

    The best Nikon mirrorless camera that we've tested is the Nikon Z 6II. This full-frame mirrorless camera delivers amazingly sharp image quality out of the box, with excellent noise handling capability and a minimal loss of sharpness as you increase ISO. Using a high transfer speed CFexpress card results in a virtually infinite photo buffer in continuous shooting, allowing you to take full advantage of the camera's maximum shooting speed of 13 fps, which should help capture clear shots of fast-moving subjects. Its in-body stabilization feature also helps smooth out camera shake. Its autofocus system does a good job tracking moving subjects in still photography but performs even better in FHD and 4k video. Video quality in either resolution is sharp and well-rendered, even in low-light environments. However, the rolling shutter effect is somewhat noticeable, distorting subjects when panning from side to side. Depending on your choice of settings and usage patterns, battery performance is very good, and you can use the camera while it charges over USB, which is helpful during long recording sessions. The camera itself feels very well-built, with a magnesium alloy body that's rated as being weather-sealed, although we don't currently test for that. Its large textured handgrip and responsive controls also make it remarkably comfortable to use.

    Unfortunately, this camera is quite heavy, making it a hassle to carry around for extended periods. Consider the Nikon Z 5 if you're looking for a full-frame mirrorless camera that's a little more portable. Its screen only tilts, so you can't see it when the camera is pointed at you. Also, while it can shoot 4k video at 24 fps and 30 fps without a crop, increasing the frame rate beyond that incurs a severe 1.45x crop. Still, its dense feature set, sturdy, comfortable-to-use design, and excellent image quality make it a great option for a wide range of creative tasks.

    See our review

  2. Best Nikon DSLR Camera

    7.8
    Travel Photography
    8.0
    Landscape Photography
    8.1
    Sport & Wildlife Photography
    5.2
    Vlogging
    7.9
    Studio Video
    5.0
    Action Video
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    No
    Sensor Size
    Full Frame
    Tested Lens
    Nikkor 24-120mm f/4G ED VR

    The best Nikon camera with a DSLR design that we've tested is the Nikon D780. This full-frame camera has excellent build quality, with a magnesium alloy and carbon fiber body rated as being weather-sealed, though we don't currently test for that. Its well-textured handgrip, wide variety of dedicated exposure controls, and large thumb rest also make it very comfortable to use, though its bulky size and weight can make it a hassle to bring with you on the go. Its battery life is also more than sufficient for a full day of use, though this can vary in the real world. Out-of-the-box image quality is excellent, as images remain sharp and low in noise even at high ISO levels, which is great for nighttime photography. Its max shooting speed of 8 fps isn't particularly quick, but its virtually instantaneous buffer clearing time keeps interruptions in your shooting to a minimum. Its autofocus system delivers remarkable tracking performance in still photography and does a very good job of maintaining focus on subjects in FHD and 4k video. It also features a full complement of inputs and outputs, including headphone and microphone jacks, a clean HDMI output, and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.

    Unfortunately, this camera lacks in-body stabilization, so you may notice some degree of camera shake when shooting video handheld or snapping photos at an extended focal length. Its tilting screen also doesn't offer the same degree of articulation as the fully articulated display found on the smaller, lighter Nikon D5600. In addition, it's incapable of recording 4k video beyond 30 fps, though it does so without a crop. Overall, this camera's versatility and dense feature set make it one of the best DSLR cameras we've tested.

    See our review

  3. Best Nikon Camera For Beginners

    7.0
    Travel Photography
    7.2
    Landscape Photography
    6.1
    Sport & Wildlife Photography
    3.8
    Vlogging
    4.9
    Studio Video
    3.5
    Action Video
    Body Type
    DSLR
    Mirrorless
    No
    Sensor Size
    APS-C
    Tested Lens
    Nikkor AF-P DX 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR

    The best Nikon camera for beginners that we've tested is the Nikon D3500. This crop-sensor DSLR has an amazingly easy-to-use menu system with an integrated guide mode to help explain core features to novice users. Its textured handgrip, reasonably clicky controls, and lightweight body make it easy and quite comfortable to use. Out-of-the-box image quality is impressive, with a fairly wide dynamic range that helps preserve detail in the darkest and brightest parts of your shot and a relatively minimal loss of sharpness at moderately high ISO levels, which is good for nighttime photography. Despite lacking in-body or digital stabilization functions, it does a good job of smoothing out camera shake in still photography and FHD video. This can vary if you use a lens with an ineffective optical stabilization feature or lacking any optical stabilization.

    Unfortunately, it can't shoot 4k video, and its video quality in FHD is mediocre, especially in poorly-lit environments. Its autofocus system also struggles to track moving subjects in both still photography and FHD video. In addition, its screen is fixed in place and isn't touch-sensitive, which can make it tricky to snap photos from unconventional angles. Consider the mirrorless Nikon Z 50 if you're looking for an easy-to-use camera that offers far more advanced video and photo capabilities, though it's notably pricier.

    See our review

  4. Best Point-And-Shoot Nikon Camera

    6.6
    Travel Photography
    6.9
    Landscape Photography
    6.8
    Sport & Wildlife Photography
    6.9
    Vlogging
    5.9
    Studio Video
    4.6
    Action Video
    Body Type
    Compact
    Mirrorless
    Yes
    Sensor Size
    1/2.3-inch
    Tested Lens
    Built-In Lens

    The best point-and-shoot Nikon camera that we've tested is the Nikon COOLPIX A1000. This compact camera has a built-in lens with a maximum full-frame equivalent focal length of 840 mm, which should allow you to zoom in on faraway subjects, like athletes on a field, without too much difficulty. Image and video stabilization performance are superb, so you should be able to shoot at fairly extended focal lengths without camera shake ruining your shot. Its compact, lightweight design also makes it easy to slip into a pocket or a purse. It also has a tilting and flipping touchscreen that allows you to snap photos from unconventional angles or monitor yourself while holding the camera in a selfie position. Image quality is decent overall, with a wide dynamic range and good noise handling capability, though image sharpness can degrade at moderately high ISO levels, so it isn't the best fit for low-light photography.

    All of that said, the camera's video recording capability is fairly limited. Video quality in both FHD and 4k is middling, as videos recorded in either resolution look soft and noisy. It can only record 4k video at 30 fps, though it does so without a crop, which is helpful. Its autofocus system also has a hard time when it comes to maintaining focus on moving subjects. Battery performance is mediocre overall, though this can vary with settings and usage habits, and it's worth noting that this camera can be charged via USB while in use. If you're looking for a point-and-shoot camera with superior battery performance, the Nikon COOLPIX P950 is a good alternative, but be aware that it's a much bulkier bridge camera.

    See our review

Compared to other brands


  • Intuitive menu systems. Nikon cameras tend to have easy-to-navigate menu systems that are well-suited to novice and experienced users alike.
  • Amazing image quality. Many Nikon models deliver sharp images that are low in noise even at high ISO levels, which is good for low-light photography.
  • Short buffer clearing times. While most Nikon cameras don't have the fastest continuous shooting speeds, many models take very little time to clear their photo buffers, which leads to fewer interruptions when firing off long bursts.
  • Impressive build quality across the model range. Nikon cameras tend to feel quite well-built when compared to alternatives from other manufacturers.
  • Few models have fully articulated screens. Many Nikon cameras use tilting screens, as opposed to fully articulated displays, making it hard to monitor yourself while vlogging or when the camera is mounted on a tripod.
  • Cheaper models have ineffective autofocus systems. Many cheaper compact and DSLR Nikon cameras have autofocus systems that struggle to maintain focus on moving subjects.
  • Few models have in-body image stabilization. Generally speaking, in-body stabilization is only reserved for pricier Nikon models.

Similar to their largest corporate rival, Canon, Nikon has a diverse range of cameras that are meant to suit everyone from first-time photographers to industry professionals. That said, most of their cameras do share some similarities. They're often built very well, with higher-end models being rated as weather-sealed, though we don't currently test for that. Image quality is also often impressively sharp and well-rendered. They also tend to clear their photo buffers faster than the alternatives offered by most other manufacturers. Unfortunately, few Nikon cameras have fully articulated screens, similar to most models found in Sony's lineup. The autofocus systems found in cheaper models also aren't especially effective.

Lineup

Nikon has a varied selection of model lineups to suit different users and their needs.

 Mirrorless

  •  Z Series = Mirrorless full-frame and crop-sensor cameras built to work with Z-mount lenses. Generally speaking, higher model numbers indicate a greater level of overall capability. Exceptions to this naming scheme include the Z 50, the current entry-level APS-C model, and the Z fc, an APS-C model with a retro-inspired body.

DSLR

  •  D(X) Series = Flagship professional-oriented DSLRs that use Nikon FX-format full-frame sensor. The current model is the Nikon D6.
  •  D8(XX) Series = Professional/high-end enthusiast-oriented DSLRs that use Nikon FX-format full-frame sensor. The current model is the Nikon D850.
  •  D7(XX) Series = Enthusiast-oriented DSLRs that use Nikon FX-format full-frame sensor. The current model is the Nikon D780.
  •  D6(XX) Series = Entry-level DSLRs that use Nikon FX-format full-frame sensor. The current model is the D610.
  •  D5(XX) Series = Flagship DSLRs that use Nikon's DX-format APS-C sensor. The current model is the Nikon D500.
  • D7(XXX) Series = Enthusiast-oriented DSLRs that use Nikon's DX-format APS-C sensor. The current model is the Nikon D7500.
  • D5(XXX) Series = Midrange DSLRs that use Nikon's DX-format APS-C sensor. The current model is the Nikon D5600.
  • D3(XXX) Series = Entry-level DSLRs that use Nikon's DX-format APS-C sensor. The current model is the Nikon D3500.

Supercompact/Compact/Bridge

  • COOLPIX P Series = High-end bridge cameras with built-in superzoom lenses.
  • COOLPIX B Series = Bridge cameras with built-in superzoom lenses.
  • COOLPIX A Series = Compact cameras with built-in zoom lenses.
  • COOLPIX W Series = Rugged and waterproof compact cameras with built-in lenses.

Conclusion

Nikon cameras are best known for their amazing out-of-the-box image quality, sturdy construction, and easy-to-use menu systems. Some of the manufacturer's more affordable models offer poor autofocus performance, and in-body image stabilization is a feature generally only reserved for the priciest models in the lineup.

If you're looking for alternatives, check out our list of recommendations of the best mirrorless cameras, the best DSLR cameras, and the best compact cameras.

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