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Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.4
Reviewed Dec 04, 2019 at 10:02 am
Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless Picture
7.2
Mixed Usage
6.8
Neutral Sound
7.7
Commute/Travel
8.0
Sports/Fitness
6.9
Office
5.6
Wireless Gaming
5.5
Wired Gaming
6.6
Phone Calls
Type In-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless Truly Wireless
Noise Cancelling No
Mic Yes
Transducer Dynamic

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are a decent pair of truly wireless headphones that are a good upgrade over the previous version, offering some high-end features like wireless charging and a dedicated companion app. They have a well-balanced sound profile that has a little extra kick of bass, but should be versatile enough for most genres. They also isolate a decent amount of background chatter and have an amazing battery life for truly wireless headphones.

Our Verdict

7.2 Mixed Usage

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are decent truly wireless in-ears for mixed usage. They're decently comfortable for in-ears and have a good stable fit that makes them good for sports. They block a fair amount of background chatter and have a long battery life, making them good for office use as well. Their sound profile is versatile enough for most music genres, and they have a dedicated companion app with a full graphic EQ, so you can fine-tune the sound to match your personal taste.

Pros
  • Great price-to-performance ratio.
  • Well-balanced sound profile.
  • Excellent battery life for truly wireless headphones.
  • Premium look and feel for budget headphones.
Cons
  • Mediocre microphone performance.
  • Disappointing touch-sensitive controls.
6.8 Neutral Sound

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are okay for neutral sound. While their sound profile is decently well-balanced, it's a little bass-heavy and their mid-range is slightly recessed. Like all closed-back in-ears, they also have a very poor soundstage. On the upside, their harmonic distortion and imaging performances are both very good, and their companion app includes a graphic EQ so you can change the sound profile to better match your own personal preference.

7.7 Commute/Travel

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are good headphones for commuting or travel. Even without ANC, their noise isolation performance is quite good, though they'll block out background chatter better than plane or train engines. They're decently comfortable for in-ear headphones and are extremely portable thanks to their truly wireless design. On the downside, they won't quite last a full day off a single charge, though this is normal for truly wireless headphones, and they can be charged five additional times from their case, which is great.

8.0 Sports/Fitness

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are great headphones for fitness use. Once you find the right sized silicone tip, they feel quite stable in your ear and will likely be able to withstand most workouts without falling out. They're also fairly comfortable and have a decent touch-sensitive control scheme so you can change your music without taking out your phone. They're rated IPX5 for sweat and water resistance, though we don't test for this.

6.9 Office

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are decent headphones for office use. They do a very good job of blocking out background chatter, which will help you stay focused at work. Unfortunately, their battery lasts just under 6.5 hours, meaning you'll likely have to take a break to charge them in the middle of the day. They also may not be the most comfortable for everyone due to their in-ear fit.

5.6 Wireless Gaming

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 aren't recommended for wireless gaming. They can only be used via Bluetooth, which means they aren't compatible with Xbox One of PS4. While they'll connect to Bluetooth-enabled PCs, their high latency may not be suitable for gaming.

5.5 Wired Gaming

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are Bluetooth-only headphones that can't be used wired.

6.6 Phone Calls

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 are okay for phone calls. Like most Bluetooth headphones, their microphone will make your voice sound slightly muffled and lacking in detail. Their noise handling is also sub-par, meaning the person on the other end of the line won't be able to hear you in even moderately noisy environments.

  • 7.2 Mixed Usage
  • 6.8 Neutral Sound
  • 7.7 Commute/Travel
  • 8.0 Sports/Fitness
  • 6.9 Office
  • 5.6 Wireless Gaming
  • 5.5 Wired Gaming
  • 6.6 Phone Calls
  1. Update 2/5/2020: Converted to Test Bench 1.4.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 have a very similar style to the first generation. Our unit has a nice matte black finish which shouldn't attract as many fingerprints as the previous version's glossy black finish, and they have a small splash of red color on the bottom of the stems. Overall, they look slightly more premium than the first-gen SoundCore Liberty Air. If you don't like the stem design, check out the more earbud-like looking Anker Soundcore Liberty 2 Pro.

7.0
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.02 lbs
Clamping Force
0.0 lbs

The Liberty Air 2 are decently comfortable, though their in-ear fit may not be for everyone. They come with five different silicone tip sizes to help ensure you get the most comfortable fit. If you want a pair of truly wireless headphones that are even more comfortable, check out the Google Pixel Buds 2020 Truly Wireless.

6.3
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
Not OS specific
Ease Of Use Decent
Feedback Mediocre
Call/Music Control Yes
Volume Control Yes
Microphone Control No
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls Voice Assistant

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2's touch-sensitive control scheme is decent and significantly improved over the previous model. Unfortunately, the headphones only offer four programmable controls which can be customized within the companion app: a double-tap and long hold on each ear. There's no feedback on the touch controls, and you only get audio cues when powering on/off or pairing the headphones. If you prefer physical buttons, check out the more affordable Anker SoundCore Life P2.

9.2
Design
Breathability
Avg.Temp.Difference 0.8 C

Like most in-ear headphones, the Liberty Air 2 don’t trap any heat inside your ear, so you shouldn’t notice a difference in temperature when wearing them. This makes them a good option for sports as you shouldn’t sweat more than usual.

9.3
Design
Portability
L 1.7 "
W 1.2 "
H 1.1 "
Volume 2.2 Cu. Inches
Transmitter Required No

These truly wireless headphones are very small and lightweight and have excellent portability. Their charging case is also on the smaller side and should easily be able to fit into most pockets or bags.

8.0
Design
Case
Type Hard case
L 2.2 "
W 1.0 "
H 2.0 "
Volume 4.4 Cu. Inches

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2's charging case is great. It feels slightly more premium than the previous model thanks to its matte finish, and it now includes wireless charging capabilities that should work with any Qi-enabled charger. It's worth noting that while we don't test this, we tried it on various wireless chargers around the office and found that it seems to be very susceptible to placement on the charging pad, and we had to place it in just the right spot to ensure charging.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2's build quality is good. Both the earbuds and the case feel less plasticky and slightly more premium than the Anker SoundCore Liberty Air. The case feels sturdy enough, with a good quality hinge that doesn't feel wobbly or loose, and overall it should be able to withstand a few drops or bumps without sustaining damage. The headphones are also rated IPX5 for sweat and water resistance, though we don't currently test for this.

7.5
Design
Stability

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 feel quite stable in your ear once you find the proper fit with the included tips. Once you achieve a decent seal, the buds likely will stay in your ear even during runs or light workouts. Unfortunately, they don't have optional stability fins, which would help improve this even further.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 headphones
  • 5 tip sizes
  • Charging case
  • USB-C charging cable
  • Manuals

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
4.37 db
Treble Amount
0.47 db

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 have a fairly well-balanced sound profile that's slightly bass-heavy but without the bass being too over-powering. Unfortunately, their mid-range is slightly recessed, which may push leads and vocals to the back of the mix. Overall, these headphones will likely please fans of thumpy bass, though they should be versatile enough for most genres. They also have a companion app with a ton of available presets, so you can pick the one that best suits your personal preference.

9.7
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.06 dB

The frequency response consistency is outstanding. Once you achieve a proper fit and seal with the included tips, you'll likely get consistent bass and treble response every time you use the headphones.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
6.2
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
5.36 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
10 Hz
Low-Bass
6.64 dB
Mid-Bass
6.45 dB
High-Bass
4.63 dB

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2's bass accuracy is excellent. They're slightly overemphasized in the low-bass range which will give a bit of thump and should please fans of dubstep or EDM. The rest of the range evens out a bit more, giving them a deep, well-balanced, and punchy bass response that shouldn't sound muddy or boomy.

9.0
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
1.34 dB
Low-Mid
1.44 dB
Mid-Mid
-0.54 dB
High-Mid
-0.25 dB

The Liberty Air 2's mid accuracy is good. While this range is mostly flat, unfortunately it's underemphasized throughout the entire frequency range. This results in leads and vocals that may sound slightly distant, weak, and pushed back in the mix.

7.3
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
3.58 dB
Low-Treble
1.19 dB
Mid-Treble
3.12 dB
High-Treble
2.96 dB

The Liberty Air 2's treble accuracy is excellent. They follow our target curve fairly well and while they're slightly over-emphasized in the upper mid-treble range, they shouldn't sound too harsh or piercing.

8.0
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
1.3 db
Dips
1.04 db

The peaks and dips performance is great. They're reasonably well-balanced and stay fairly flat throughout all frequency ranges. However, there's a bit of a dip throughout the entire mid-range, which may make leads and vocals sound ever so slightly weak and distant. There are also two peaks in the treble range, though these are in high enough frequencies that they likely won't be too audible for most people.

8.9
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.16
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
0.59
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.62
Weighted Phase Mismatch
2.07

The Liberty Air 2's stereo imaging is excellent. The group delay is below the audibility threshold for the entire range, ensuring a tight bass and transparent treble reproduction. Also, the L/R drivers of our test unit were very well-matched. This is important for the accurate placement and localization of objects (like voices or footsteps) in the stereo image. These results are only valid for our unit and yours may perform differently.

0.6
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
N/A
PRTF Size (Avg.)
N/A
PRTF Distance
N/A
Openness
2.1
Acoustic Space Excitation
0.6

Like all closed-back in-ear headphones, their soundstage is poor. This is because creating an out-of-head and speaker-like soundstage is largely dependent on activating the resonances of the pinna (outer ear). The design of in-ears and earbuds is in such a way that fully bypasses the pinna and doesn't interact with it.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No
8.3
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.146
WHD @ 100
0.081

The Liberty Air 2's weighted harmonic distortion is very good. All frequencies fall within very good limits, which should result in a clear and pure audio reproduction.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
04.18
Power
On
Connection
Bluetooth 5.0
Codec
aptX, 16-bit, 48kHz
EQ
Default
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Silicone (small)
Microphone
Integrated
Isolation
7.9
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-22.52 dB
Bass
-11.33 dB
Mid
-20.95 dB
Treble
-36.13 dB

The Liberty Air 2's noise isolation performance is quite good. They don't have ANC and only block noise passively, though they do a good job of this assuming you've got a proper seal with the included tips. They do a great job at blocking out background chatter, making them a good choice for the office, though, unfortunately, they do a sub-par job at blocking out the rumble of a bus or plane engine.

9.5
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
24.27 dB

The Liberty Air 2's leakage performance is outstanding. They leak almost no audio, and shouldn't bother those around you.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
Yes
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No
6.3
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
LFE
427.15 Hz
FR Std. Dev.
4.43 dB
HFE
6088.74 Hz
Weighted THD
0.95
Gain
3.2 dB

The microphone recording quality on the Liberty Air 2 is passable. Like most Bluetooth headphones, the speech recorded with this microphone will sound muffled and lacking in detail.

6.3
Microphone
Noise Handling
Speech + Pink Noise
Speech + Subway Noise
SpNR
15.92 dB

The microphone's noise handling is only adequate. The person on the other end of the line should have no problem hearing you in very quiet situations, but likely won't hear you in even moderately loud environments like a busy street.

Active Features
6.0
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
Rechargable
Continuous Battery Life
6.4 hrs
Additional Charges
3.0
Total Battery Life
25.6 hrs
Charge Time
2.8 hrs
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
Yes
Passive Playback
No
Charging Port USB-C

The Liberty Air 2's battery life is mediocre overall, but good for truly wireless headphones. Their continuous battery life is on the longer side, and their overall battery life of nearly 26 hours is very good. You can also charge one earbud while listening to the other.

Update 01/17/2020: We previously incorrectly stated that the case provided an additional five charges, when it actually provides three, resulting in a shorter total battery life than originally claimed. The review has been updated to reflect these changes.

7.5
Active Features
App Support
App Name Anker Soundcore
iOS Yes
Android Yes
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
Graphic + Presets
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping Yes
Surround Support
No

The Liberty Air 2's dedicated companion app is good. It offers 20 EQ presets as well as an 8-band graphic EQ to fully customize your sound profile. The app also contains Anker's HearID feature, which creates an EQ personally for you. While we don't officially test this, we tried it in the office and found it didn't make much of a difference. The app also allows you to button-map the four available touch-sensitive buttons. If you'd rather something with EQ presets built directly into the earbuds, consider the JLab Audio JBuds Air Executive Truly Wireless.

Update 01/17/2020: Upon updating the Anker Soundcore app we've found that Anker has added an 8-band Graphic EQ. The review has been updated to reflect this.

Connectivity
7.0
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth Version
5.0
Multi-Device Pairing
No
NFC Pairing
No
Line Of Sight Range
230 ft
PC Latency (aptX)
268 ms
PC Latency (aptX HD)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX-LL)
N/A
iOS Latency
101 ms
Android Latency
102 ms

The Liberty Air 2 are Bluetooth-only truly wireless headphones. Unlike the first generation, these headphones now support aptX, which is a nice addition.

Note: Unfortunately, our Bluetooth dongle encountered issues and we were unable to test their SBC latency. Considering how slightly high their aptX latency is, we'd expect their SBC performance to be slightly worse and they likely aren't a good option for watching video content. We'll update this score when we can properly test latency. If you want more gaming-oriented truly wireless headphones, check out the Razer Hammerhead True Wireless.

0
Connectivity
Non-Bluetooth Wireless
Non-BT Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Non-BT Latency
N/A

These headphones are Bluetooth-only.

0
Connectivity
Wired
Analog Audio
No
USB Audio
No
Detachable No
Length N/A
Connection No Wired Option
Analog/USB Audio Latency
N/A

These truly wireless headphones are Bluetooth-only. Their charging case charges via USB-C, and a 1.9ft cable is included.

Connectivity
PC / PS4 Compatibility
PC/PS4 Analog
No
PC/PS4 Wired USB
No
PC/PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No

These headphones can only be used via Bluetooth on PCs and aren't compatible with the PS4. Due to their high latency, they aren't recommended for gaming.

Connectivity
Xbox One Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
No
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Wireless
No

These Bluetooth-only headphones aren't compatible with the Xbox One.

2.2
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
Charging Case
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
Yes
Power Supply
USB-C

The case holds five additional charges. It supports charging via USB-C and wireless Qi charging, which is a nice addition at this price point.

Compared to other headphones

Comparison picture

The Liberty Air 2 are a nice upgrade over the previous model, with a more premium look and a much better battery life. They have a well-balanced sound profile that should be versatile enough for most genres, and are decently comfortable for in-ears. While they don't have some high-end features like ANC, they are very impressive for their price-point and outperform some more expensive options. We suggest taking a look at our recommendations for the best truly wireless earbuds, the best wireless earbuds, and the best noise cancelling earbuds and in-ears.

Samsung Galaxy Buds+ Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless and the Samsung Galaxy Buds+ Truly Wireless are both versatile, well-rounded truly wireless earbuds. The Samsung have a much more neutral sound out-of-the-box, which makes them more versatile for a wider range of genres by default. The Anker sound a lot more exciting, and their companion app provides a lot of sound customization options, including a graphic EQ. The Samsung have a more comfortable, compact earbud design, however, and a significantly better battery performance.

Jabra Elite 65t Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Jabra Elite 65t Truly Wireless and the Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are two great truly wireless headphones. There's a noticeable difference in style, but when it comes to performance, both are rather similar, especially when it comes to sound and isolation. However, the Jabra can connect simultaneously to two devices, but the Anker's case can hold more additional charges.

Apple AirPods Pro Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are similar truly wireless in-ears to the Apple AirPods Pro Truly Wireless. The Apple are more comfortable, have a better case, feel better-built, and have ANC. On the other hand, the Anker have better controls, a more bass-heavy sound profile, and a better-dedicated app.

Jabra Elite 75t Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Jabra Elite 75t Truly Wireless are similar to the Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless. The Jabra are more comfortable, have better controls, feel better-built, and have a better-dedicated app. On the other hand, the Anker support wireless charging, have a similar sound profile, and have a longer battery life.

Skullcandy Indy Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are better truly wireless earbuds than the Skullcandy Indy Truly Wireless. Their default sound profile is better-balanced, and their companion app gives you lots of sound customization options to choose from. Although they don't have a standby mode like the Skullcandy, their battery lasts a lot longer on a single charge, and they feel much better-built overall.

Sony WF-1000XM3 Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Sony WH-1000XM3 are better noise cancelling over-ears than the Anker Soundcore Life Q20. The Sony are more comfortable, they isolate significantly more noise, and they feel a lot better-built. They're also compatible with an excellent companion app which gives you access to tons of sound customization features. There's a premium price to pay for the Sony, though. The Anker are a lot more affordable, and still perform decently overall, so they may provide better value for some users.

Anker SoundCore Life P2 Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are better headphones than the Anker SoundCore Life P2 Truly Wireless. The Air 2 sound reproduction, design, and fit are almost identical, but the Life have wireless charging, a dedicated app, a more durable-feeling case, and touch-sensitive controls. On the other hand, the Life have a longer overall battery life.

Samsung Galaxy Buds Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Samsung Galaxy Buds Truly Wireless are slightly better truly wireless in-ears than the Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless. The Samsung are more comfortable, feel more stable, have a slightly more accurate sound profile, and last longer off a single charge. On the other hand, the Anker have better controls, isolate more noise, and have longer overall battery life.

Anker SoundCore Liberty Air Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are better than the Anker SoundCore Liberty Air Truly Wireless. The Libert Air 2 look very similar but have much better controls, a more premium-feeling design, a much better battery life, and a dedicated companion app. On the other hand, the first generation have a slightly better-balanced sound profile and are cheaper.

Anker Soundcore Liberty 2 Pro Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are slightly better headphones than the Anker Soundcore Liberty 2 Pro Truly Wireless. The Air 2 have a better-balanced sound profile out-of-the-box, isolate more background noise, and have a better microphone. On the other hand, the Liberty 2 Pro are more stable and have a better battery life.

TaoTronics SoundLiberty 79 Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are slightly better truly wireless headphones than the TaoTronics SoundLiberty 79 Truly Wireless. The Anker have a better charging case that feels more premium, a longer single-charge battery life, and a dedicated companion app with a ton of EQ presets and a graphic EQ. They also isolate much more background noise passively and leak less audio. On the other hand, the TaoTronics have a better-balanced sound profile out-of-the-box and a better microphone. The TaoTronics may also represent a better overall value for some people.

Apple AirPods 2 Truly Wireless 2019
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are better true wireless headphones than the Apple AirPods 2 Truly Wireless 2019. Although the Apple feel better made, the Anker have a noticeably more neutral sound profile, and they pack a lot more accurate bass thanks to their closed-back design. That also means that the Anker block out more ambient noise thanks to their typical in-ear fit. On the other hand, if the Apple fit your ears, they're very comfortable. However, the Anker come with a lot of tip options to help you find the most comfortable fit.

JLab Audio JBuds Air Executive Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are much better truly wireless earbuds than the JLab Audio JBuds Air Executive Truly Wireless. Both models have an exciting default sound signature, but the Anker's is less exaggerated, and they have more sound customization options with their companion app. The JLab's battery life isn't quite as good, but they do charge more quickly. The Anker isolate more noise though and feel better-built.

Razer Hammerhead True Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are much better truly wireless in-ears than the Razer Hammerhead True Wireless since they have a much better-balanced sound profile, block more ambient noise, are more comfortable, have better controls, better battery life, a dedicated companion app, and feel more premium. On the other hand, the Razer have a lower latency with gaming mode enabled.

TOZO T6 Truly Wireless
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are better truly wireless in-ears than the TOZO T6 Truly Wireless. The Anker have a better-balanced default sound profile, and their companion app gives you a lot of different sound customization options. The Anker's battery also lasts longer on a single charge. However, the TOZO's touch controls are easier to use.

Monster Clarity 101 AirLinks Truly Wireless
Unavailable
Amazon.com

The Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless are much better-performing earbuds than the Monster Clarity 101 AirLinks Truly Wireless. While the Anker's battery life is slightly less than the Monster's, if you're charging the Anker one earbud at a time, you can still listen to audio. The Monster also don't have a companion app, but Anker's app support comes with 20 preset EQs, making it easy to find the right sound profile for you.

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Anker SoundCore Liberty Air 2 Truly Wireless Price

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