The 5 Best Monitors For MacBook Pro - Fall 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Monitors For MacBook Pro
213 Monitors Tested
  • Store-bought monitors; no cherry-picked units
  • Easily comparable results
  • No ads; unbiased reviews
  • Supported directly by you via insider access and when you purchase through our affiliate links
Learn more about our approach to product reviews here.

The MacBook Pro has a great screen, but sometimes, it's just too small. Preferably, you want a monitor that supports USB-C with power delivery, which allows you to connect your MacBook Pro to the display and charge it using a single cable. Also, macOS works best with monitors that have a pixel density close to either 110 or 220 PPI. So while our recommendations have the optimal pixel density for the best performance, they don't necessarily have a USB-C port.

Due to numerous complaints of compatibility issues and Dell's unwillingness to offer support to those affected, all Dell monitors have been removed from our list of recommendations for the time being and until the situation is resolved. At this time, we don't test for compatibility; if you run into any issues using a monitor when connected to a MacBook, please let us know in the discussions.

We've tested more than 210 monitors, and below are our recommendations for the best displays for MacBook Pro to purchase. Also, check out our recommendations for the best monitors, the best ultrawide monitors, and the best monitors for Mac Mini.


  1. Best Monitor For MacBook Pro: ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV

    8.4
    Office
    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    75 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    Adaptive Sync

    The best monitor for MacBook Pro we've tested is the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV. It's a great 27 inch monitor designed for media creators. It has great connectivity, with a USB-C port that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode and can deliver up to 65W of power back to your MacBook. While that's not enough to keep a high-end MacBook fully charged, it helps. The built-in USB-A ports on the monitor are great for connecting legacy devices without a bunch of messy dongles and adapters, and they free up your limited USB-C ports for other things.

    It has fantastic ergonomics, so you can easily adjust it to the perfect position without buying a separate mount. The IPS panel delivers wide viewing angles, and glare isn't an issue thanks to the good reflection handling and great peak brightness. It has impressive gradient handling, an amazing SDR color gamut, and excellent gray uniformity. It's also factory calibrated, great if accurate colors are important to you.

    Unfortunately, the IPS panel comes with a few downsides, as it's not as well-suited for a dark room. The low contrast ratio and just mediocre black uniformity result in grayish-looking blacks, and there's no local dimming feature to improve them. Overall, though, it's a great monitor that should please most people.

    See our review

  2. Alternative With Wide Gamut Support: MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD

    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    165 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    Adaptive Sync

    If you need a monitor that supports HDR and can display a wide color gamut, check out the MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD. Like the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV, it's also a 27 inch, 1440p monitor, but it supports a wide color gamut with exceptional DCI P3 coverage, in addition to its full sRGB and Adobe RGB coverage. It has exceptional gradient handling, with almost no noticeable banding in any shade. There's some color bleed, which is a bit unfortunate, but it shouldn't be noticeable with most real content. Unfortunately, its USB-C's power delivery is limited to 15W, which is only enough for small devices like smartphones. On the upside, it has an exceptional response time, a 165Hz refresh rate, and VRR support because it's primarily a gaming monitor, making the desktop experience feel significantly smoother and more responsive.

    If you only use the monitor for work, go with the ASUS because it has better ergonomics, more USB ports, and it's cheaper. However, if you need a wide color gamut, then go with the MSI.

    See our review

  3. Best Ultrawide For MacBook Pro: LG 34GP83A-B

    7.7
    Office
    Size 34"
    Resolution 3440x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    160 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    Adaptive Sync

    The LG 34GP83A-B is the best ultrawide monitor for MacBook Pro. This 34 inch model is great for multitasking as its 21:9 aspect ratio gives you plenty of space for side-by-side windows. The screen is slightly curved to bring the sides closer for a more immersive and comfortable viewing experience. It has decent viewing angles, and it provides good visibility in bright settings.

    Because this is a gaming monitor, it has a fast response time, high refresh rate, and low input lag. This means it feels noticeably smoother and more responsive than a typical 60Hz display, like when moving the mouse cursor, dragging windows, or scrolling quickly through a document. It has full sRGB coverage and supports a wide color gamut for HDR content. Unfortunately, the overall HDR experience is okay at best because it has a low contrast ratio and doesn't get bright enough for true HDR.

    Although it has a USB hub, it has no USB-C input, which means you'll need an adapter or a dock. Overall, while the lack of USB-C connectivity might disappoint some, this is still a good monitor that should please most people.

    See our review

  4. Super Ultrawide Alternative: LG 49WL95C-W

    Size 49"
    Resolution 5120x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    60 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    No VRR

    If you need something bigger than the LG 34GP83A-B, check out the LG 49WL95C-W. It's a massive 49 inch monitor with a 5120x1440 display, which is the equivalent of two 27 inch 1440p monitors side-by-side. This wide-format screen is excellent for productivity, as you can work comfortably with multiple windows open or see more of your workflow at once if you're a content creator. It has a built-in USB-C port, which supports DisplayPort Alt Mode and can deliver up to 85W of power, so you can charge your MacBook while using the monitor, with a single USB-C cable going back to your laptop. The large size of this display can also be its biggest weak point, though, as it takes up a lot of space and isn't portable. We've seen some reports of issues with this monitor and M1 MacBooks, but it seems like it's an easy fix with a third-party app known as SwitchResX.

    Overall, the 34GP83A-B is cheaper and should be big enough for most people. However, if you need more screen space for better multitasking, then go with the 49WL95C-W.

    See our review

  5. Best Budget MacBook Pro Monitor: Gigabyte M27Q

    8.0
    Office
    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    170 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    The Gigabyte M27Q is the best monitor for MacBook Pro in the budget category that we've tested. Although it's primarily a gaming monitor, it's packed with features that make it a great choice for productivity. It has a large, high-resolution screen, wide viewing angles, and it gets impressively bright, more than enough to overcome glare in well-lit settings. However, it has a low contrast ratio that makes blacks appear gray in the dark and no local dimming to improve the black level.

    It has full sRGB and Adobe RGB coverage, making it a fantastic choice for content creators. It also supports a wide color gamut, with decent peak brightness in HDR. Its gaming performance is excellent, and it supports VRR, which means it can double as your gaming monitor. There are two USB 3.0 ports and a USB-C port on the back. You can use the USB-C port to connect your MacBook and use the built-in USB ports, but sadly, although it supports power delivery, it's way too low to charge your laptop.

    It has a Picture-in-Picture mode that lets you display two input signals simultaneously, and its built-in KVM lets you control both source devices with one set of peripherals. It also has a blue light filter and a flicker-free backlight to help reduce eye strain. All in all, this is a feature-rich and versatile monitor that's easy on the wallet.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx: The Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx is a great monitor with a high refresh rate, wide color gamut, and a 65W USB-C port, but it isn't well-suited for content creation because it has color bleed. See our review
  • Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q-X: The Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q-X is a great monitor if you need a high refresh rate, but it lacks USB-C connectivity. See our review
  • LG 38WN95C-W: The LG 38WN95C-W is a great ultrawide monitor with a USB-C input that supports Thunderbolt 3 and 94W of power delivery, but it's only available through third-party sellers at a much higher price than usual. See our review
  • ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV: The ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV is an older and cheaper version of the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV but without USB-C input. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Oct 15, 2021: Validated our picks and refreshed the text throughout. No changes to our actual picks.

  2. Sep 16, 2021: Verified picks for accuracy and refreshed the text.

  3. Aug 20, 2021: Replaced Gigabyte M27Q with ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV and moved the M27Q to 'Best Budget'. Replaced LG 38WN95C-W with LG 34GP83A-B because it's hard to find.

  4. Jul 23, 2021: Replaced ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV with Gigabyte M27Q because it's out of stock. Added MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD as 'Alternative With Better Stand'.

  5. Jun 25, 2021: Verified accuracy of picks. No change in recommendations.

All Reviews

Our recommendations are based on what we think are the best external monitors for MacBook Pro that are currently available. They are adapted to be valid for most people, in each price range. Rating is based on our review, factoring in price, and feedback from our visitors.

If you would prefer to make your own decision, here is the list of all of our monitor reviews, except Dell monitors. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. Most monitors are good enough to please most people, and the things we fault monitors on are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

Discussions