The 7 Best Computer Monitors - Spring 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Monitors
175 Monitors Tested
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It can be hard to choose the best monitor for your needs, as they vary significantly in size, shape, and performance. There are different types of monitors depending on the desired use, and there's no catch-all monitor that is perfect for everyone. However, some monitors are more versatile than others. From ultrawide office monitors to high-performance gaming monitors, there's something for everyone on this list.

We've tested over 160 monitors, and below you'll find our picks for the best monitors available for purchase. You can also check our recommendations for the best gaming monitors, the best 4k monitors, and the best monitors for photo editors.


  1. Best Office Monitor: Dell U2720Q

    7.9
    Mixed Usage
    8.3
    Office
    7.5
    Gaming
    7.9
    Multimedia
    8.2
    Media Creation
    6.8
    HDR Gaming
    Size 27"
    Resolution 3840x2160
    Max Refresh Rate
    60 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    No VRR

    The best monitor for office use that we've tested is the Dell UltraSharp U2720Q. It's a 27 inch 4k monitor that delivers incredibly sharp text and provides plenty of space for multitasking. The stand allows for height, tilt, and swivel adjustments, and you can also rotate the screen to portrait mode. It has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles, ideal for sharing work and content with coworkers.

    It has full sRGB and great Adobe RGB coverage, making it a good choice for content creators working in those color spaces. However, color accuracy is only decent out of the box, so you may have to calibrate it before doing any color work. It has good peak brightness, but it doesn't handle reflections all that well, so it's best to avoid placing it opposite bright lights. It has good response times to deliver reasonably clear images in fast-moving scenes, fast enough for gaming casually, but the refresh rate is limited to 60Hz, and there's no variable refresh rate (VRR) support.

    There aren't many extra features, but you do get a very generous port selection. It has three USB 3.0 and two USB-C inputs. One of the USB-C inputs supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, which lets you dock a laptop and charge it with a single cable, and the other is on the side of the monitor for easy access. The backlight is flicker-free, and there's also a blue light filter to help reduce eye strain. Overall, this is a great office monitor that should make most people happy.

    See our review

  2. Cheaper Alternative: ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV

    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    75 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    Adaptive Sync

    If you don't want to spend that much on a 4k monitor and prefer something cheaper, then check out the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV. It doesn't support HDR like the Dell UltraSharp U2720Q, but that shouldn't be a problem if you're using it for office use. The lower 1440p resolution on the ASUS still delivers fairly clear text, and in a well-lit room, it gets bright enough to combat glare and has good reflection handling. It has a USB-C input, which supports DisplayPort Alt Mode, allowing you to display an image from your laptop and charge it at once. It's advertised to deliver up to 65W of power, which should be good enough for most lightweight office laptops. It has an IPS panel with wide viewing angles; sadly, that means it has a low contrast ratio.

    If you want the best monitor for office use with a 4k resolution, check out the Dell, but if you want to save some money and go for a 1440p option, look into the ASUS.

    See our review

  3. Best Ultrawide Office Monitor: Dell U3818DW

    7.2
    Mixed Usage
    7.8
    Office
    6.8
    Gaming
    7.1
    Multimedia
    7.3
    Media Creation
    5.2
    HDR Gaming
    Size 38"
    Resolution 3840x1600
    Max Refresh Rate
    60 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    No VRR

    The best monitor for office use that's available in an ultrawide format is the Dell U3818DW. Although the market for high-resolution, 38 inch monitors is limited, there are a few good options, but they can get expensive, and this one offers the best value for its price. Its unique 3840x1600 resolution results in about the same pixel density as a 27 inch, 1440p monitor, so text is fairly sharp and legible. 

    It's packed with office-oriented features to help with productivity. It has a USB-C input that supports a Power Delivery mode with 95W of power, so you can charge your laptop. With the DisplayPort Alt Mode, you can also display an image from a compatible device. It has USB-B upstream ports, so if you connect the monitor to your computer with it, you can use the monitor's KVM feature, allowing you to connect your mouse and keyboard directly to the monitor instead of the PC. It also has Picture-in-Picture and Picture-by-Picture modes, so you can display images from two sources at once.

    Sadly, it has a slow response time, so motion looks blurry. It can be noticeable while scrolling through long documents, and because of it, this monitor isn't the best choice for gaming. It's also limited to a 60Hz refresh rate and lacks VRR. It has wide viewing angles, great gray uniformity, and decent peak brightness, but its reflection handling isn't the best. This is still one of the best monitors we've tested.

    See our review

  4. Gaming Alternative: LG 34GN850-B

    Size 34"
    Resolution 3440x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    160 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    If you want an ultrawide monitor better suited for gaming than the Dell U3818DW, consider the LG 34GN850-B. It has a smaller 34 inch screen, but with a 3440x1440 resolution, the pixel density is roughly the same as the Dell's, so images still look sharp. It has a significantly faster response time, a higher refresh rate, and FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility to reduce screen tearing. It can display a wide color gamut for HDR, but it doesn't get bright enough for a true cinematic HDR experience. Unfortunately, it doesn't have a USB-C port or Picture-in-Picture/Picture-by-Picture modes like the Dell does, and its ergonomics are worse because it doesn't allow for any swivel adjustment.

    Overall, if you mainly need a monitor for office use, the Dell is a better choice due to its wider viewing angles, better ergonomics, and wider connectivity options. However, if you mainly want to game, go with the LG, as it has much better gaming performance.

    See our review

  5. Best Gaming Monitor: Samsung LC32G75TQSNXZA

    8.1
    Mixed Usage
    7.7
    Office
    8.8
    Gaming
    7.9
    Multimedia
    8.0
    Media Creation
    7.8
    HDR Gaming
    Size 32"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    240 Hz
    Pixel Type
    VA
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    The best monitor for gaming that we've tested is the Samsung LC32G75TQSNXZA. It's an excellent gaming monitor with great overall performance that should make most people happy. It's packed with gaming-oriented features, including an RGB lighting ring to set the mood in your gaming setup. It's available in both a 27 and 32 inch size, and we tested the 32 inch model; they each have a high 1440p resolution to deliver crisp images.

    It has a high 240Hz refresh rate with native FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility. Motion looks smooth whether you're gaming at its max refresh rate or 60Hz, thanks to its outstanding response time. It also has a Black Frame Insertion feature, but you can't use it with VRR enabled. Input lag is incredibly low to deliver a responsive gaming experience. Thanks to its VA panel, it's a good choice for dark room gaming as it displays deep blacks and has okay black uniformity. If you want to use it for HDR gaming, it displays a wide color gamut and has alright HDR peak brightness.

    Sadly, even though it has a local dimming feature, it performs terribly and doesn't improve the contrast. The VA panel has narrow viewing angles, so the image looks inaccurate if you want to share your screen with others or if you sit too close, as the edges of the screen may look darker. On the plus side, it performs well in bright rooms thanks to its high peak brightness and very good reflection handling. Overall, this is one of the best monitors we've tested.

    See our review

  6. Higher Refresh Rate Alternative: ASUS VG279QM

    Size 27"
    Resolution 1920x1080
    Max Refresh Rate
    280 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    If you prefer something with a 240Hz refresh rate that you can overclock to 280Hz, check out the ASUS VG279QM. It has a lower 1080p resolution than the Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T and can't display deep blacks, but instead, the ASUS has wider viewing angles if you want to use it for co-op gaming. The ASUS has an exceptional response time that remains nearly as fast at 60Hz. Its input lag is extremely low, but it increases significantly at 60Hz, so it's not ideal for console gaming. It has outstanding ergonomics that allow you to place the screen how you like, and if you have it in a well-lit room, it has high peak brightness and decent reflection handling. It also supports HDR10, but sadly, it doesn't display a wide color gamut for HDR content.

    If you want the best monitor for gaming that we've tested, you can't go wrong with the Samsung, but if you want a higher refresh rate and don't mind compromising on resolution, check out the ASUS.

    See our review

  7. Best Large Monitor: LG OLED48CXPUB

    8.4
    Mixed Usage
    8.1
    Office
    8.7
    Gaming
    8.4
    Multimedia
    8.1
    Media Creation
    8.7
    HDR Gaming
    Size 48"
    Resolution 3840x2160
    Max Refresh Rate
    120 Hz
    Pixel Type
    OLED
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    If you're in the market for a large screen display, then the best monitor with a large screen that we've tested is the LG OLED48CXPUB. Although it's a TV, LG advertises it for monitor use, and we tested it as such. It provides a large 48 inch screen, which is fantastic for multitasking while still maintaining a standard 16:9 aspect ratio. However, it doesn't have an ergonomic stand because it's a TV, so you can't easily adjust it.

    The advantage of an OLED panel over its LED competitors is its ability to individually turn off pixels, resulting in perfect blacks. It's great for dark room gaming, and there's no blooming around bright objects either. If you also want to use it for co-op gaming, it has wide viewing angles. Unlike most monitors, it doesn't have a DisplayPort input but instead has HDMI 2.1 support, allowing you to play 4k @ 120Hz games with compatible HDMI 2.1 devices. It has a near-instant response time and very low input lag for gaming.

    Sadly, OLED panels are prone to permanent burn-in with constant exposure to static elements, like the user interface. If you plan on using it as a monitor, we suggest watching varied content, like movies or shows to avoid the burn-in. If that's the case, it comes with a built-in smart system that features many apps, including Netflix, Disney+, and Amazon Prime Video. All in all, if you don't mind the risk of permanent burn-in, the LG is the best monitor with a 48 inch display that we've tested.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Dell Alienware AW2521H: The Dell Alienware AW2521H is an excellent gaming monitor with a 360Hz refresh rate, but it may be hard to find. Unless your PC can produce such a high frame rate, it may not be worth getting a 360Hz monitor. See our review
  • Dell AW2721D: The Dell Alienware AW2721D is a great 240Hz monitor that performs well even outside of its intended use as a gaming monitor and has a higher 1440p resolution than the VG279QM, but it's costly. See our review
  • Acer Nitro XV273: The Acer Nitro XV273X Xbmiiprzx is a great gaming monitor, but it's not as good as the ASUS VG279QM due to its lower refresh rate, and it's more expensive. See our review
  • Dell S2721QS: The Dell S2721QS is a cheaper alternative to the Dell UltraSharp U2720Q, but it might be hard to find due to low availability, and it lacks a USB-C port. See our review
  • LG 38WN95C-W: The LG 38WN95C-W is a great ultrawide monitor, but it's much more expensive than the Dell U3818DW. That said, it gets a lot brighter and is a better option for well-lit rooms, and it has a better SDR color gamut for content creators. See our review
  • ASUS TUF VG27AQ: The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a great and cheaper alternative to the Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T if you don't think you can fully utilize the G7's 240Hz refresh rate. It also has an IPS panel, which has wider viewing angles but a lower contrast. See our review
  • Gigabyte M27Q: The Gigabyte M27Q is an excellent and versatile gaming monitor that's more affordable than the Samsung Odyssey G7 LC32G75T. It has an exceptional response time, but its refresh rate is lower at 170Hz, and it's not as good for HDR gaming. See our review
  • LG 27GN950-B: The LG 27GN950-B is a great 4k gaming monitor with a 144Hz refresh rate, but it requires high-end hardware with a graphics card that supports Display Stream Compression to achieve the full 144Hz. See our review
  • Acer Nitro XF243Y Pbmiiprx: The Acer Nitro XF243Y Pbmiiprx is an excellent budget gaming monitor. It has exceptional response time and a 165Hz refresh rate, but it's limited to a 1080p resolution, unlike the ASUS ProArt. See our review
  • Acer Nitro XV340CK: The Acer Nitro XV340CK Pbmiipphzx is a low-cost ultrawide monitor with good ergonomics, but it has a slower response time than the 34GN850-B. See our review
  • MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD: The MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD is an excellent gaming monitor with a 1440p resolution, but it has a lower refresh rate than the Odyssey G7 LC32G75T and VG279QM, and colors look over-saturated on it. See our review
  • Philips 436M6VBPAB: The Philips Momentum 436M6VBPAB is cheaper than the CX and has a VA panel immune to permanent burn-in, but it has a slower response time. See our review
  • ASUS PG259QN: The ASUS ROG Swift 360Hz PG259QN is an excellent 360Hz gaming monitor, but it's not worth the price difference over the VG279QM. See our review
  • ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV: The ASUS PA278QV is a great budget-friendly 1440p monitor similar to the PA278CV, but it lacks a USB-C port. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Apr 23, 2021: Replaced the ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV with the PA278CV because it has a USB-C input; updated Notable Mentions according to availability.

  2. Mar 24, 2021: Updated text for clarity; added the MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD, LG 27GN850-B, Philips 436M6VBPAB, and the ASUS PG259QN to Notable Mentions.

  3. Feb 26, 2021: Replaced the Dell S2721QS with the Dell U2720Q as 'Best Office' because the U2720Q is easier to find; replaced the Acer Nitro XV340CK with the LG 34GN850-B because the LG has a quicker response time.

  4. Feb 12, 2021: Added the Dell Alienware AW2721D and the Gigabyte M27Q to Notable Mentions; updated text for clarity.

  5. Jan 15, 2021: Verified accuracy of picks, minor text and structure changes.

All Reviews

Our recommendations are based on what we think are the best computer monitors currently available. They are adapted to be valid for most people, in each price range. Rating is based on our review, factoring in price and feedback from our visitors.

If you would prefer to make your own decision, here is the list of all of our monitor reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. Most monitors are good enough to please most people, and the things we fault monitors on are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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