The 5 Best Monitors For Mac Mini - Summer 2021 Reviews

Updated
Best Monitors For Mac Mini
196 Monitors Tested
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If you have a recent Mac Mini or Mac Pro, chances are it'll work with pretty much any monitor out there. Some monitors are a bit better-suited for Mac users, including USB-C connectivity, making it easy to connect your Mac to the monitor. Also, macOS works best with monitors with around 110 or 220 PPI pixel density, as it affects the scaling of some user interface elements. As such, our recommendations will prioritize optimal performance over connectivity options, so some of the picks may not include a USB-C port.

We've tested over 190 monitors, and below are our recommendations for the best monitors for Mac to purchase. Check out our recommendations for the best monitors for MacBook Pro, the best ultrawide monitors, and the best 34 inch + monitors.

Note: Due to numerous complaints of compatibility issues and Dell's unwillingness to offer support to those affected, we removed all Dell monitors from our list of recommendations for the time being and until the situation resolves. At this time, we don't test for compatibility; if you run into any issues using a monitor when connected to a Mac Mini, please let us know in the discussions.


  1. Best Monitor For Mac: ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV

    8.0
    Mixed Usage
    8.4
    Office
    8.3
    Gaming
    7.6
    Multimedia
    7.8
    Media Creation
    5.8
    HDR Gaming
    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    75 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    Adaptive Sync

    The best monitor for Mac Mini we've tested is the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV. It's a newer version of our budget pick, the ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV, and it comes with a few improvements, like a USB-C input. It has a 27 inch IPS panel with a 1440p resolution and 75Hz refresh rate. The slight increase in refresh rate isn't much, but it does make navigating the desktop environment feel just a bit more responsive than a typical 60Hz panel.

    The ergonomics are fantastic, as it allows for all manner of adjustments, making it easier to place the screen in an ideal viewing position. It has wide viewing angles so that you don't lose image accuracy when viewing from the side, and it gets bright enough to combat glare in most lighting conditions. Designed for content creators, it has full sRGB coverage and excellent accuracy out of the box. Its Adobe RGB coverage is good, but it might not be enough for professional photo editors.

    Unfortunately, it doesn't support HDR. The backlight is only flicker-free at maximum brightness, but the flicker frequency at lower brightness levels is so high that it shouldn't be noticeable to most people. In addition to its USB-C input, it has four other USB 3.0 ports, two of which are on the side of the screen for easy access. Overall, this is a great monitor for the Mac Mini and one that should please most people.

    See our review

  2. Better Adobe RGB Alternative: LG 27GP83B-B

    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    165 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    If you're a photo editor and need something with better coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, then check out the LG 27GP83B-B. It has much worse ergonomics than the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV, so it may be harder to place in an ideal viewing position if you don't buy a mounting arm. However, the LG also has extra gaming features if you want to game with it, like a 165Hz refresh rate, variable refresh rate (VRR) support, and a quick response time. There aren't any USB-C ports, but there's one USB input. The 27GP83B-B has HDR support, but it doesn't deliver the best HDR experience because of its low contrast, so blacks look gray in a dark room.

    If you want the best monitor for Mac Mini, you should be happy with the ASUS, but if you need a wider SDR color gamut, then check out the LG.

    See our review

  3. Best Ultrawide Mac Monitor: LG 38WN95C-W

    8.0
    Mixed Usage
    7.9
    Office
    8.3
    Gaming
    7.9
    Multimedia
    8.1
    Media Creation
    7.4
    HDR Gaming
    Size 38"
    Resolution 3840x1600
    Max Refresh Rate
    144 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    The best monitor for Mac Mini with an ultrawide screen is the LG 38WN95C-W. It has a curved screen and 21:9 aspect ratio, giving you a ton of space to work with a more immersive feel. It's especially great for multitasking, allowing you to open multiple windows side-by-side. Due to its size, it can't rotate into portrait mode, but it offers tilt, swivel, and height adjustments so you can set it to your ideal viewing position.

    It gets very bright, enough to overcome glare in most lighting conditions. It also has great HDR brightness as far as monitors go, so it can bring out highlights in HDR content. On top of that, it also has a wide color gamut. Its HDR performance is good, with great coverage of the DCI P3 color space used in most HDR content. Its SDR color gamut is remarkable, with full coverage of the sRGB color space and excellent coverage of the wider Adobe RGB used by content creators.

    That said, it has a low contrast ratio, making blacks appear closer to gray in the dark. While it also has a local dimming feature, it's pretty terrible and doesn't improve the image much. On the upside, it has other features that make productivity a breeze, including two USB 3.0 ports and a USB-C port with Thunderbolt 3. It also has built-in speakers and a Picture-by-Picture mode. All in all, this is among the best ultrawide monitors we've tested for the Mac Mini.

    See our review

  4. Best Budget Mac Monitor: ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV

    8.0
    Mixed Usage
    8.4
    Office
    8.3
    Gaming
    7.7
    Multimedia
    7.8
    Media Creation
    5.8
    HDR Gaming
    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    75 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    Adaptive Sync

    The best monitor for Mac Mini if you're on a budget is the ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV. It's an older version of the ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV, but without a USB-C input, which explains its more budget-friendly price. Like its successor, it's also a 1440p IPS display with a 75Hz refresh rate. It has wide viewing angles, good reflection handling, and gets bright enough to fight glare, even in very well-lit environments.

    Color accuracy is good out of the box. It has near-full sRGB coverage, but its Adobe RGB coverage is only decent and might not be good enough for professionals in print media. It has excellent gradient handling, and there are no signs of color bleed. If you want to play games, it has great response times and VRR support to reduce screen tearing. While the lack of a USB-C input is disappointing, it does provide four USB 3.0 ports and a USB-B upstream port, which means you can plug your peripherals into the monitor.

    Unfortunately, there's no HDR support, which we expect for a budget productivity monitor. Lastly, it has a flicker-free backlight that helps reduce eye strain on long workdays. So, if you need USB-C input and you can afford to spend a bit more, it's probably best to go with the newer version, but this is still a great choice if you're shopping on a tighter budget.

    See our review

  5. HDR Alternative: Gigabyte M27Q

    Size 27"
    Resolution 2560x1440
    Max Refresh Rate
    170 Hz
    Pixel Type
    IPS
    Variable Refresh Rate
    FreeSync

    If you want something that supports HDR, then consider the Gigabyte M27Q. It has a BGR subpixel layout, which is different from the RGB layout on the ASUS ProArt Display PA278QV, and not all programs support it, so text may look a bit blurry on some macOS programs. If that doesn't bother you, the M27Q offers a ton of features like a USB-C input that supports DisplayPort Alt Mode and a KVM feature that allows you to control two devices using one set of a mouse and keyboard. It performs well in bright environments because it has great peak brightness and decent reflection handling. Our unit has fantastic out-of-the-box color accuracy too, but this can vary. It displays a wide color gamut for HDR, but since it has low contrast, it's not a good choice for dark room viewing.

    If you're in the market for the best monitor for Mac Mini and you're on a budget, you can't go wrong with the ASUS. However, if you need basic HDR support, then the Gigabyte is a good alternative.

    See our review

Notable Mentions

  • Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx: The Acer Predator XB273U GXbmiipruzx is a great 1440p monitor with perfect Adobe RGB coverage, but it may be hard to find. See our review
  • LG 38GL950G-B: The LG 38GL950G-B is a good ultrawide monitor, but it has narrower viewing angles than the LG 38WN95C-W, and it lacks USB-C input. See our review
  • ASUS TUF VG27AQ: The ASUS TUF VG27AQ is a good alternative to the ASUS ProArt PA278CV, but it lacks a USB-C port, and its color gamut isn't as good as the MSI's. See our review
  • Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q-X: The Gigabyte AORUS FI27Q-X is a good alternative to the Gigabyte M27Q if you want better ergonomics and full Adobe RGB coverage. It's significantly more expensive, and it lacks a USB-C input. See our review
  • LG 27GN850-B: The LG 27GN850-B is a good monitor that costs about the same as the LG 27GP83B-B, but it may be harder to find since it's an older model. See our review
  • MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD: The MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD is a great alternative to the Gigabyte M27Q, but it has some color bleed, which isn't ideal for photo editors. It has a wide color gamut and displays more colors than the Adobe RGB color space encompasses, which means some colors appear over-saturated. See our review
  • LG 27GP850-B: The LG GP850-B is a slightly better version of the LG 27GP83B-B with better Adobe RGB coverage, but it costs more. See our review
  • Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx: The Acer Nitro XV272U KVbmiiprzx is a gaming monitor that offers great office performance, but it lacks a USB-C port and has low peak brightness. See our review
  • ASUS TUF Gaming VG34VQL1B: The ASUS TUF Gaming VG34VQL1B is an ultrawide option that has excellent coverage of the Adobe RGB color space, but it's smaller than the LG 38WN95C-W and doesn't have a USB-C port. See our review
  • LG 27GN800-B: The LG 27GN800-B is a low-cost option that has a wider color gamut than the LG 27GP83B-B, but it has much worse ergonomics. See our review
  • Gigabyte G27Q: The Gigabyte G27Q is similar to the Gigabyte M27Q and has a more program-friendly RGB subpixel layout, but it may be harder to find. See our review

Recent Updates

  1. Jul 16, 2021: Moved the Gigabyte M27Q to 'Budget Alternative' in place of the Gigabyte G27Q for consistency; added the LG 27GP83B-B; updated Notable Mentions.

  2. Jun 17, 2021: Verified accuracy of picks. Replaced Gigabyte G27QC with Gigabyte G27Q because it has better DCI P3 coverage and higher HDR brightness.

  3. May 21, 2021: Checked picks for accuracy and availability; no change to recommendations.

  4. Apr 21, 2021: Minor text and structure changes. Removed LG 49WL95C-W because it's discontinued. Replaced MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD with ASUS ProArt Display PA278CV.

  5. Feb 23, 2021: Replaced ASUS TUF VG27AQ with MSI Optix MAG274QRF-QD, replaced Samsung Odyssey G7 with Gigabyte M27Q as 'Cheaper Alternative', replaced LG 34GN850-B with LG 38WN95C-W.

All Reviews

Our recommendations are based on what we think are the best monitors for a Mac Mini or a Mac that are currently available. They are adapted to be valid for most people, in each price range. Rating is based on our review, factoring in price and feedback from our visitors.

If you would prefer to make your own decision, here is the list of all of our monitor reviews. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. Most monitors are good enough to please most people, and the things we fault monitors on are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

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