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We've recently released our Test Bench 1.7 update for Headphones! Read the Noise isolation R&D Article to learn more.

JBL Tune 520BT Wireless Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.7
Reviewed May 27, 2024 at 03:41 pm
JBL Tune 520BT Wireless Picture
7.7
Neutral Sound
6.6
Commute/Travel
6.9
Sports/Fitness
6.6
Office
5.7
Wireless Gaming
5.5
Wired Gaming
6.3
Phone Calls

The JBL Tune 520BT Wireless on-ear headphones represent the evolution of the previous JBL Tune 510BT Wireless. They're simple Bluetooth headphones with an improved battery life over the last generation. Despite landing in a pretty budget-friendly tier, they have app support to expand their utility. So, let's see how they stack up and if they suit your needs.

Our Verdict

7.7 Neutral Sound

The JBL Tune 520BT are good for neutral sound listening sessions. They sound somewhat excited and warm, and if you prefer a different tuning, you can use the EQ presets or create your own. Their buttons help control playback easily, and the app has a volume limiter. You'll want to ensure you get a good seal because they don't isolate well, and bass delivery can be impeded if you wear glasses. They're also somewhat stiff and not cozy to wear for long periods.

Pros
  • Comprehensive app support.
  • Long battery life.
  • Intuitive controls.
  • Parametric EQ.
Cons
  • Poor isolation.
  • Plasticky build.
  • Not very comfortable for long sessions.
6.6 Commute/Travel

The JBL Tune 520BT are fair for commute and travel use. Their long battery life will get you through many long trips without a recharge, and their dedicated controls make playback easy. However, their noise isolation is poor, so you'll hear the rumbling of the bus, your fellow travelers' conversations, and squealing brakes. They're also not very comfortable, and despite their smaller on-ear design, they don't have a case to stow them away.

Pros
  • Comprehensive app support.
  • Long battery life.
  • Parametric EQ.
Cons
  • Poor isolation.
  • Plasticky build.
  • Not very comfortable for long sessions.
6.9 Sports/Fitness

The JBL Tune 520BT are fair for sports and fitness. While they have a few good traits, such as their smaller form factor, lightweight, and easy-to-access button controls, they're not stable headphones. As on-ears, they don't grip tight enough for you to perform most exercises without needing to monitor the headphones from shifting around.

Pros
  • Long battery life.
  • Intuitive controls.
  • Parametric EQ.
Cons
  • Poor isolation.
  • Plasticky build.
  • Too unstable for most exercises.
6.6 Office

The JBL Tune 520BT are okay for office use. Their multi-pair function easily switches between your phone and computer. They also have a long battery life, so they'll easily last you through a week or more. If you take a lot of meetings, their mic isn't the most professional-sounding, but it captures your speech fine. They're lightweight and don't clamp hard, but they're not very comfortable and barely block much office noise at all.

Pros
  • Comprehensive app support.
  • Long battery life.
  • Multi-device pairing.
Cons
  • Poor isolation.
  • Plasticky build.
  • Not very comfortable for long sessions.
5.7 Wireless Gaming

The JBL 520BT aren't suitable for wireless gaming because they connect via Bluetooth only, and their latency is too high even in video mode when used for mobile games.

5.5 Wired Gaming

The JBL 520BT are Bluetooth-only headphones and don't have any wired connection.

6.3 Phone Calls

The JBL 520BT are not bad for phone calls. While their microphone isn't the most true-to-life sounding, your speech sounds intelligible. Their app also has an adjustable sidetone so you can hear yourself better. However, their mic doesn't reject environmental noise very well, so the caller can have trouble hearing your voice when you're in noisy spaces. If you're participating in a video call where there's media sharing, music and movies sound worse because the headphones' frequency response changes during calls by cutting treble and lowering bass.

Pros
  • Comprehensive app support.
  • Intuitive controls.
  • Adjustable sidetone.
Cons
  • Poor isolation.
  • Not very comfortable for long sessions.
  • Mic noise handling is just okay.
  • 7.7 Neutral Sound
  • 6.6 Commute/Travel
  • 6.9 Sports/Fitness
  • 6.6 Office
  • 5.7 Wireless Gaming
  • 5.5 Wired Gaming
  • 6.3 Phone Calls
  1. Updated May 27, 2024: Review published.
  2. Updated May 17, 2024: Early access published.
  3. Updated May 07, 2024: Our testers have started testing this product.
  4. Updated Apr 09, 2024: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  5. Updated Mar 29, 2024: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The JBL Tune 520BT come in 'Black,' 'Blue,' 'Purple,' and 'White.' Our unit is the 'Blue' variant, and you can see the labels here and here. Besides color, they're all the same model and expected to function the same. If you come across another variant of these headphones, please let us know in the forums, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Headphones

The JBL Tune 520BT Wireless are similarly priced to the JBL Tune 510BT Wireless, but the Tune 510BT have a slightly better mic and are limited without a companion app. Consider the Sony WH-CH520 Wireless on-ears, at roughly the same price point, which go the extra mile with virtual surround sound support for a more immersive experience. At a slightly pricier tier, the Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless feel more comfortable and are built better. Unlike the Tune 520BT, you can use them wirelessly or wired. However, they don't have EQ, and they charge via the older micro USB port.

Keep in mind that the JBL Tune 520BT's battery life outlasts all of these on-ear models.

For more options, check out the best budget wireless headphones, the best on-ear headphones, and the best JBL earbuds and headphones to see what else the brand is doing.

Sony WH-CH520 Wireless

The Sony WH-CH520 Wireless and JBL Tune 520BT Wireless share more than the number '520'. Both headphones are lightweight and fit on-ears with app support and multi-device pairing despite being budget-tier. Overall, the Sony are slightly better than the JBL, but it's close enough that prices can easily decide which pair is better. The Sony include the brand's virtual soundstage, which requires a compatible streaming service like TIDAL. Their sound profile is a bit more balanced but not too dissimilar from the JBL cans. Lastly, their mic sounds better, and they're slightly better made. The JBL don't have any virtual soundstage compatibility. However, they have a longer battery life and shorter latency with video mode, but latency depends quite a bit on devices, so your experience may vary. Their sound is a bit boomier by default.

Sony WH-CH510 Wireless

Overall, the JBL Tune 520BT Wireless are better than the Sony WH-CH510 Wireless. The Sony sound very similar to the JBL out of the box, but only the JBL have app compatibility with an EQ to adjust the sound to your tastes. The JBL cans also have a significantly longer battery life and take half as long as the Sony to fully recharge. While neither has an impressive microphone, the JBL includes a sidetone you can adjust so you can hear yourself, or not, during a call. The JBL also support multi-device pairing, and the Sony cans don't. The Sony are slightly more stable-fitting, but they're otherwise more stripped back.

JBL Tune 510BT Wireless

The JBL Tune 520BT Wireless are the updated version of the JBL Tune 510BT Wireless. The Tune 520BT Wireless have a much longer battery life and support the brand's app for greater flexibility, including an equalizer. On the other hand, both headphones have many of the same features, like button controls, and are similarly lightweight with unstable on-ear fits. The Tune 510BT Wireless have a more excited V-shaped sound profile out of the box and a better-sounding microphone. Otherwise, they're very alike.

Anker Soundcore Life Q20 Wireless

If you want active noise cancelling (ANC), the Anker Soundcore Life Q20 Wireless are better than the JBL Tune 520BT Wireless in that regard. While the JBL fit on-ears and can only passively isolate, they have other features missing from the Anker headphones, such as multi-device pairing with lower latency and a comprehensive app that includes an equalizer. Their battery also lasts about twice as long. On the other hand, the Anker headphones have a better mic, support both Bluetooth and wired listening, and are more comfortable. You can't change the very bassy sound profile on the Anker, which can be a dealbreaker. However, depending on your needs, the Anker's ANC can outweigh the upsides of the JBL headphones.

Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless

The Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless and JBL Tune 520BT Wireless are both on-ear headphones with Bluetooth capabilities. The Pioneer DJ are simpler in design without any companion app support or multi-device pairing, but they feel more comfortable to wear. They also work wired, which the JBL don't. They sound bassy with fairly natural mids and slightly warm highs. Their battery life is a bit shorter, and they use the older micro USB standard. The JBL come with a companion app that expands their utility with features like EQ and multi-device pairing. They sound thumpy with a slightly cluttered mid-range and a less detailed treble range that can be piercing. Their battery life is longer, and they charge via USB-C. Over Bluetooth, their latency is lower than the Pioneer DJ, but they don't have an analog connection. They're also less comfortable and not as well-made.

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Type On-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless Yes
Transducer Dynamic

The JBL Tune 520BT are monochromatic on-ear headphones, with a very similar look to the JBL Tune 510BT Wireless. Their yokes integrate into the ear cup's housing, and their matte and shiny smooth plastic textures add some visual interest. Your color options include 'Black,' 'Blue,' 'Purple,' and 'White.'

6.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.35 lbs
Clamping Force
0.7 lbs

The JBL Tune 520BT feel okay for comfort. They're very lightweight, so their insubstantial padding along the headband isn't too noticeable when you wear them. Their yokes swivel horizontally, and the ear cups' vertical range of motion is good to fit on different head and ear shapes, but they're stiff and can distribute clamping force unevenly. The ear cups are shallow, so your ears can push up against the driver's grille. Lastly, the friction of your ears rubbing against the faux leather padding makes an unpleasant scratching sound when you walk around.

7.1
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
Not OS specific
Ease Of Use Good
Feedback Good
Call/Music Control Yes
Volume Control Yes
Microphone Control Mute/Unmute
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls Voice Assistant

Their four-button control scheme is decent. All but two of the buttons have distinctly different feeling shapes so that you can differentiate them for the most part. However, while they're clicky, so you can sense when you've input a command, the buttons feel a bit loose and shift around in the housings. They chime if you minimize or max out the volume, and a voice prompts you during pairing mode, but there aren't any other sound indicators.

'+' button:

  • Single press: Raises volume.
  • Press-and-hold: Skips to the next track.

'-' button:

  • Single press: Lowers volume.
  • Press-and-hold: Skips to the previous track.

Multi-function button:

  • Single press: Play/pause playback. Answer/reject incoming call.
  • Press-and-hold: Activates voice assistant. Mute/unmute the microphone during a call.

Power button:

  • Double press: Power on/off.
  • Press-and-hold: Enter Bluetooth pairing mode.

7.0
Design
Portability
L 3.9" (9.8 cm)
W 7.0" (17.8 cm)
H 1.3" (3.4 cm)
Volume 36.19 inยณ (593.00 cmยณ)
Transmitter Required No

The JBL Tune 520BT are decently portable. They're on-ears, so they're a bit smaller than over-ear headphones. Their hinges bend, and the ear cups can rotate flat to make their footprint smaller. You can wear them around your neck easily because they're light and small, but they don't include a case.

0
Design
Case
Type No case
L N/A
W N/A
H N/A
Volume N/A
6.0
Design
Build Quality

The JBL Tune 520BT have passable build quality. Their frame, housings, and hinges are plastic and don't feel particularly dense. The moving parts, such as hinges and yokes, are stiff and not very durable, but they all have a good range of motion. Meanwhile, the padding feels cheap and makes noise against your ears when you move. The headphones could probably survive a drop, but a bad angle on a joint could cause a crack.

5.5
Design
Stability

The JBL Tune 520BT have sub-par stability. Like the previous JBL Tune 510BT Wireless, they're on-ear headphones with a low clamping force, so they don't hold on to your head tightly. Tilting your head forward or backward can shift them off, and high-intensity movements will knock the cans off, too. You can walk around and sit at a desk just fine, but they're too unstable for exercising.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • JBL Tune 520BT Wireless headphones
  • USB-C to USB-A 9.8-inch (25 cm) charging cable
  • Quick Start Guide and warranty paper

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
-0.61 dB
Treble Amount
-2.19 dB

The JBL Tune 520BT have a somewhat excited sound profile by default, which works well for rock, pop, and R&B music. The tuning exaggerates high-bass frequencies, such as kick drums, but without low-end extension rumble to sub-bass synths. The mid-range is a bit uneven, but lead guitars and keys sound natural for the most part. Treble frequencies, such as the detail and harmonic content of cymbals and vocals, come across as inconsistently bright, dark, and piercing, depending on the frequency.

If you use the headphones for calls, they sound quite differentโ€”here's a comparison with the default sound profile. This works fine for voices, but if you're on a video call with others sharing media, music will lack a lot of boom, while high-treble frequencies are severely cut, leaving a warm and not detailed sound.

The headphones' companion app includes an EQ with seven presets, which you can see here. You can create your own, too. If you leave the EQ flat, it's the same as the headphones' default frequency response. We also observed that our unit has one driver that's quieter than the other (more on this in Imaging), which we corrected somewhat using the L/R channel balance function in the app.

6.9
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.63 dB

Their frequency response consistency is fair. The combination of the ear pads' material and stiff hinges can make it challenging to achieve a good seal. You'll want to take the time to force the hinges to apply even pressure against your ears. If you wear glasses, you might struggle to get a proper seal and fit for a predictable delivery of bass and treble.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
8.2
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.64 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
27.88 Hz
Low-Bass
-1.14 dB
Mid-Bass
3.62 dB
High-Bass
1.5 dB

The bass accuracy is great. The headphones roll off low-bass, so they're not especially rumbly, but the boom of a kick drum sits prominently in the mix. As a result, the walking bassline, kick, and toms during post-punk songs like Academy Fight Song by Mission of Burma sound weighty. For genres like EDM and dubstep, the low-bass doesn't quite have the depth, but for the most part, you'll hear a good amount of thump.

9.2
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
1.1 dB
Low-Mid
-0.13 dB
Mid-Mid
0.57 dB
High-Mid
0.15 dB

Their mid-accuracy is outstanding. They convey a balanced and natural-sounding mid-range, with keys and guitars sounding true to life. A slight peak where the mid-mid transitions to the high-mid can sound a tiny bit boxy on vocals. Only a gradual roll-off in the high-mid pushes the presence of guitars down in the mix slightly.

7.1
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
4.3 dB
Low-Treble
-0.4 dB
Mid-Treble
-0.17 dB
High-Treble
-10.49 dB

These headphones have decent treble accuracy. They're somewhat inconsistent, so while they have decent articulation of trebly guitar parts, a dip midway through the low-treble that continues into the mid-treble strongly dulls the details of sibilants (S and T sounds) of vocals. A prominent peak follows and can sound overly bright and piercing on cymbal hits.

6.8
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
2.27 dB
Dips
1.27 dB

The JBL Tune 520BT have an okay peaks and dips performance, indicating they control their sound profile to an extent, but not exceptionally well. In the bass range, there's a large peak with dips on either side, leading to a weighty bass sound. A series of small dips in the mids slightly thins out lead instruments and weakens them compared to the bass and treble, while the small peaks add some boxiness. In the low treble, a peak causes a somewhat artificially bright harshness to vocals and trebly guitars, while a significant dip hollows out harmonic detail. Following the dip, a strong peak causes sibilants (S and T sounds) to sound too bright and fatiguing.

7.2
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.31
Weighted Phase Mismatch
9.38
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
2.9
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.84

These on-ear headphones have a decent imaging performance. Other JBL headphones we've tested have variable imaging results, so while one pair can exhibit excellent imaging, another might have sub-pair performance. This inconsistency can indicate the manufacturer's quality control and ergonomics, but it's worth noting that imaging varies between different units, so our results are valid only for our unit.

Our unit's group delay is below the audibility threshold, so the bass is tight, and the treble sounds transparent. Their phase response shows deviations in the mid-range and high-treble, which isn't noticeable in real-world use.

The right driver of our unit is quieter than the left driver, which you can see here. If your pair of these headphones presents the same issue, you probably won't notice when playing normal content. However, if it bothers you, you can correct it using the channel balance function in the companion app. This reduces the amplitude of the louder of the two drivers. Using the channel balance feature helps to even out the L/R drivers to about the same amplitude as we did with our unit.

5.7
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
5.11 dB
PRTF Size (Avg.)
4.72 dB
PRTF Distance
12.46 dB
Openness
6.1
Acoustic Space Excitation
2.9

The JBL Tune 520BT have sub-par passive soundstage performance, which isn't unusual for closed-back on-ear headphones. They don't meaningfully interact with your outer ear or with the room you're in while wearing them. As a result, your audio sounds focused like it's coming from the inside of your head, instead of from the room itself.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No
7.2
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.337
WHD @ 100
0.273

These have decent weighted harmonic distortion performance. At high volumes, the high-bass and mid-range distort more, while at lower volumes, the treble range sees peaks of distortion. Your audio will still sound fairly clean and pure, but you might notice some slight harmonic distortion in the treble range and at high volumes in the mids and bass.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
3.5.0
Power
On
Connection
Bluetooth 5.3
Codec
SBC, 16-bit, 48kHz
EQ
No EQ
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
Integrated

These are the settings used to test the JBL Tune 520BT. Our results are only valid in this configuration.

Isolation
3.8
Isolation
Noise Isolation - Full Range
Noise Cancelling No
Overall Attenuation
-9.03 dB
Bass
1.23 dB
Mid
-6.56 dB
Treble
-23.78 dB

These have poor full-range noise isolation, which is common for on-ear headphones without active noise cancelling (ANC). Deep rumbles from jackhammers and bus engines will reach your ears unimpeded. Similarly, chatter and ambient din aren't blocked much at all either. However, high-pitched shrieking and clinking sounds like brake squeals and dish clatter in a cafe are muffled somewhat by the headphones' passive isolation.

3.8
Isolation
Noise Isolation - Common Scenarios
Airplane Noise Attenuation
-7.71 dB
Airplane Noise Isolation Audio
Office Noise Attenuation
-8.26 dB
Office Noise Isolation Audio
Street Noise Attenuation
-8.84 dB
Street Noise Isolation Audio

These don't block noise very differently between scenarios because there's no onboard ANC that adapts. As passive isolating headphones, how well they handle noise in various environments depends on your ability to get an effective seal and the inherent isolating qualities of their materials. You can expect high-pitched sounds to get muffled a bit, but you'll still hear your environment well.

A note on the bump in the lowest frequencies in the graph: it's not noticeable when you actually listen and wear the headphones. After numerous checks (shown here for the Airplane Noise attenuation), compared with experiential use, we know it's limited to the testing rig and not representative of your day-to-day experience with the headphones. However, we're still looking into it.

Isolation
Noise Isolation - Voice Handling
Female Voice 1
Male Voice 1
Female Voice 2
Male Voice 2
Isolation
ANC Wind Handling
ANC Wind Noise
N/A
7.5
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
36.8 dB

Their sound leakage performance is good. What escapes is mostly a bright and mid-rangey representation of your audio, with not much audible bass. This depends on how loud you set your music, but in a moderately quiet space, vocals, leads, and bright percussive elements will be audible but not too bothersome.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
Yes
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No
Mic Yes
6.8
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
LFE
310.89 Hz
FR Std. Dev.
2.39 dB
HFE
4,974.24 Hz
Weighted THD
5.458
Gain
13.27 dB

The integrated mic's recording quality sounds fair. While your voice is intelligible, the severe cut to the high frequencies causes you to sound congested. This effect will be more noticeable if your voice sits in a higher register. Similarly, the roll-off of bass frequencies causes speech to lack body; if your voice is deep, it'll sound thinner. Compared to the previous JBL Tune 510BT Wireless, the mic lacks clarity, which hinders the articulation of your words.

6.3
Microphone
Noise Handling
SpNR
13.44 dB
Noise Gate
No
Speech + Pink Noise Handling
6.5
Speech + Pink Noise Audio Sample
Speech + Subway Noise Handling
6.0
Speech + Subway Noise Audio Sample

The noise-handling performance of their mic is mediocre. The mic doesn't really reject constant background noise except by cutting the high and low frequencies as it does with your voice. As a result, background sounds are rendered nearly as clear as your voice. Still, most of your speech remains intelligible, except with overwhelmingly loud background sounds, which can obscure your voice.

Active Features
8.6
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
Rechargable
Continuous Battery Life
65.2 hrs
Additional Charges
0.0
Total Battery Life
65.2 hrs
Charge Time
1.9 hrs
Power-Saving Feature
Auto-Off Timer
Audio While Charging
No
Passive Playback
No
Charging Port USB-C

The JBL 520BT have excellent battery performance. They're advertised to last 57 hours, and in testing, they reached about 65 hours of playback. Compared to the JBL Tune 510BT, that's roughly 25 more hours of juice. Your actual mileage can vary depending on use; for example, if you listen to music at a lower volume, you'll probably experience a longer battery life.

The headphones charge via a USB-C cable, and according to the manufacturer, you can get three hours of playback with a five-minute charge. In their companion app, you can adjust the auto-off timer to conserve the battery.

7.5
Active Features
App Support
App Name JBL Headphones
iOS Yes
Android Yes
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
Parametric + Presets
ANC Control
No
Mic Control Mute/Unmute
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
No

The JBL 520BT's app is good. It's the same app that many other JBL headphones use but stripped down because they don't support all of the same features; for example, they don't have ANC. You can take a look here to see how the app works. Inside, you can access a parametric EQ with presets or make your own. You can adjust the sidetone during calls, whether you want it at all or at a different volume. The app includes a volume limiter you can enable at 85 decibels (dB) for your hearing health. There's access to audio and video modes to compensate for latency (you can find more on that in Bluetooth Connection). The left and right channel balance feature is accessed through the app, which we successfully tested to better match the drivers' amplitude. You can set a timer to automatically turn the headphones off (either 30 minutes, one hour, or two hours). Lastly, you can change the language of the voice prompts.

Connectivity
0
Connectivity
Wired Connection
Analog Audio
No
USB Audio
No
Detachable
No
Length
N/A
Connector
No Wired Option
Latency - Analog
N/A
Latency - USB
N/A
Recorded Latency
N/A
Recorded Latency Connection No Wired Audio

The headphones include a USB-C to USB-A cable that only works for charging. The port's location makes it difficult to listen to music over Bluetooth while they're charging. They can't send audio over a wired connection.

8.4
Connectivity
Bluetooth Connection
Bluetooth Version
5.3
Multi-Device Pairing
2 Devices
Quick Pair (Android)
Yes
Quick Pair (iOS)
No
Line Of Sight Range
334.65 ft (102.00 m)
Latency - SBC
119 ms
Latency - aptX
N/A
Latency - aptX Adaptive (High Quality)
N/A
Latency - aptX Adaptive (Low Latency)
N/A
Latency - LDAC
N/A
Recorded Latency
Recorded Latency Codec SBC
AAC Support
No

They have great Bluetooth connectivity. You can pair the headphones with two devices to switch between. They have Quick Pair for Android devices and support Swift Pair with Microsoft devices. In their companion app, you can select between an audio and video mode, and while video mode reduces delay, it's still pretty noticeable. As expected, the video mode's latency is lower than using audio mode. Compared to other headphones that also don't support adaptive codecs, their latency is better than plenty of others. Latency varies between devices, and some apps compensate for it, so your experience may differ. Despite using Bluetooth 5.3, these headphones only support the basic SBC codec and don't support higher-quality codecs like aptX for Android or AAC for iOS devices.

0
Connectivity
Wireless Connection (Dongle)
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Latency - Dongle
N/A
Recorded Latency
N/A
Connectivity
PC Compatibility
Analog
No
Wired USB
No
Non-BT Wireless
No

The JBL Tune 520BT can only connect wirelessly to Bluetooth-compatible PCs for full audio and mic support.

Connectivity
PlayStation Compatibility
PS4 Analog
No
PS4 Wired USB
No
PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
PS5 Analog
No
PS5 Wired USB
No
PS5 Non-BT Wireless
No
Connectivity
Xbox Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
No
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
Xbox Series X|S Analog
No
Xbox Series X|S Wired USB
No
Xbox Series X|S Non-BT Wireless
No
0
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
No Base/Dock
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
No Base/Dock