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HyperX Alloy Core RGB Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v0.8
Reviewed Feb 10, 2020 at 09:49 am
HyperX Alloy Core RGB Picture
5.5
Mixed usage
4.7
Gaming
0.8
Mobile/Tablet
6.6
Office
5.7
Programming
Connectivity Wired
Size
Full-size (100%)
Mechanical
No

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a poor gaming keyboard. Its rubber dome switches feel unresponsive due to their high pre-travel distance, and the absence of programmable keys and software support is disappointing as well. However, its quiet typing noise makes it suitable for noise-sensitive work environments, and it has good compatibility with most desktop operating systems. On the whole, it doesn't feel much different from an average office keyboard and may be a good option for those on a tight budget.

Our Verdict

5.5 Mixed usage

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a sub-par keyboard for most uses. It has a fairly quiet typing noise, but the keys' high pre-travel distance can feel unresponsive and it doesn't come with a wrist rest. The lack of programmable keys is disappointing for gamers and programmers, and even though it has full RGB backlighting, customization is limited.

Pros
  • Good compatibility.
  • Dedicated media keys.
Cons
  • No software support for customization.
  • Rubber dome switches can be tiring.
4.7 Gaming

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a poor keyboard for gaming. The keys have a high pre-travel distance that can feel unresponsive, and the keyboard doesn't have any dedicated macro keys for MMO games. As there's no software support or onboard memory, gamers won't be able to save profiles. The RGB backlight is great for gaming in a dark room, however, customization is limited to presets only.

0.8 Mobile/Tablet

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a wired-only keyboard and can't be used with mobile devices.

6.6 Office

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is decent for office use. The keys have a low actuation force that feels light and shouldn't cause any fatigue. Although the keyboard doesn't have a particularly high profile, you may still need a wrist rest for optimal comfort, and there isn't one included in the box. Fortunately, typing noise is kept to a minimum, so you won't have to worry about bothering your surrounding colleagues.

5.7 Programming

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a sub-par keyboard for programming. The keys are easy to press, but they feel unresponsive and can be fatiguing when typing for a long time. The lack of programmable macro keys can be frustrating and its backlight has limited customizability.

  • 5.5 Mixed usage
  • 4.7 Gaming
  • 0.8 Mobile/Tablet
  • 6.6 Office
  • 5.7 Programming

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Height
1.3" (3.3 cm)
Width 17.4" (44.2 cm)
Depth 6.9" (17.5 cm)
Weight 2.4 lbs (1.1 kg)

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a large, full-size keyboard with an added row of dedicated media keys at the top. If you prefer a more compact keyboard, check out the HyperX Alloy FPS Pro, which is a tenkeyless (TKL) keyboard.

6.5
Design
Build Quality

The build quality is okay. The keyboard has a full plastic frame that exhibits quite a bit of flex, and the keycaps are made of ABS plastic, which feel cheap. The rubber dome switches are mediocre, but slightly better than the ones found on the Razer Cynosa Chroma. HyperX advertises this keyboard as being spill-resistant, though this isn't something we test for. If you want a keyboard with better build quality, check out the SteelSeries Apex 3.

6.5
Design
Ergonomics
Board Design
Straight
Incline Settings
1
Wrist Rest No

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB's ergonomics are decent. It doesn't have a particularly high profile and the keys have a fairly standard spacing. It has one incline setting; however, it doesn't come with a wrist rest, though you can purchase one separately from HyperX. If you want a similar keyboard that comes with a wrist rest, check out the Logitech G213 Prodigy.

5.7
Design
Backlighting
Backlighting Yes
Color Multi-color
Brightness Settings
Yes
Individually Backlit Keys
No

This keyboard's backlighting is disappointing. There are five lighting zones and customization is done on the keyboard, since there's no software support at this time. There are 10 color presets and six lighting effects to choose from, one of which is a rainbow effect, as shown in the picture. If you want a similar keyboard with individually-lit keys, check out the Razer Cynosa Chroma.

Design
Cable
Detachable
No
Length 5.9 ft (1.8 m)
Connector (Keyboard side) Not Detachable

The keyboard has a braided cable and it's not detachable.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
No
Proprietary Receiver
No
Multi-Device Pairing
No
Battery Type
No Batteries

This is a wired-only keyboard.

Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Dedicated
Macro Programmable Keys
No
Extra Controls
No
USB Passthrough
No
Numpad Yes
Windows Key Lock
Yes

There are dedicated media keys at the top right corner of the keyboard. At the top left corner, there are keys to control the backlight, as well as a 'Game Mode' key, which locks the Windows key to prevent accidentally minimizing your game.

Design
In The Box

  • HyperX Alloy Core RGB keyboard
  • User guide

Typing Experience
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Key Switches
Rubber Dome
Feel
Tactile
Actuation Force
32.3 gf
Pre-Travel
2.65 mm
Total Travel
3.89 mm

This keyboard uses rubber dome switches. Although it doesn't take much force to actuate the keys, there's a fairly big hump to get over before a keystroke is registered, as the pre-travel distance is quite high.

6.0
Typing Experience
Typing Quality

Typing quality on the HyperX Alloy Core RGB is mediocre at best and doesn't feel any different from a typical office keyboard with rubber dome switches. It doesn't require much force to actuate the keys, but their high pre-travel distance make them feel unresponsive. The keys are stable and well-spaced, which is great for typing accuracy, though the ABS keycaps feel rather cheap to type on.

Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Noise
Quiet

Typing noise on this keyboard is quiet and shouldn't be bothersome for surrounding colleagues. The keys are stable and they don't rattle at all.

Software and Operating System
0
Software and Operating System
Software
Software No Software
Account Required
No Software
Profiles
No Profile
Onboard Memory
No
Cloud Sync
No
Backlight Programming
No
Macro Programming
No
Software Windows Compatible
No
Software macOS Compatible
No

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB doesn't have software for customization. Backlight customization is done on the keyboard itself. The Corsair K55 RGB Gaming Keyboard is similar and has a dedicated software for customization.

7.6
Software and Operating System
Keyboard Compatibility
Windows Full
macOS Partial
Linux Full
Android No
iOS No
iPadOS No

The HyperX Alloy Core has good compatibility. It's fully functional on Windows and Linux; however, the Scroll Lock and Pause/Break buttons don't work on macOS.

Differences Between Sizes and Variants

There are no other variants of this keyboard. The other keyboards in the HyperX Alloy lineup all have mechanical switches instead of rubber domes.

Compared to other keyboards

The HyperX Alloy Core RGB is a budget keyboard with rubber dome switches and shouldn't be compared to other mechanical gaming keyboards. Overall, it feels like a regular office keyboard with basic RGB backlighting and is very similar to the Razer Cynosa Chroma. For other options, check out our recommendations for the best gaming keyboards, the best keyboards for writers, and the best RGB keyboards.

HyperX Alloy Origins

The HyperX Alloy Origins is a significantly better keyboard than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The Alloy Origins has a much better build quality due to its full aluminium frame, and it has mechanical switches that provide a much better typing experience. Also, the Alloy Origins has software support for customization, however, the Alloy Core makes slightly less noise when typing, which is more suitable for noise-sensitive environments.

Corsair K55 RGB Gaming Keyboard

The Corsair K55 RGB Gaming Keyboard is much better than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. Each key is macro programmable, it has a dedicated software, zone-lit RGB backlighting, and the ergonomics are much better. Although the HyperX also uses rubber dome switches, they require much less actuation force, so it's less tiring typing on this keyboard.

HyperX Alloy FPS Pro

The HyperX Alloy FPS Pro is much better than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The Alloy FPS Pro has mechanical switches that feel much more responsive than the rubber dome switches found on the Alloy Core, and it has a significantly better build quality. The Alloy FPS Pro has individually lit backlighting instead of the zone lighting of the Alloy Core, but the Alloy Core has dedicated media keys.

Logitech G213 Prodigy

Overall, the Logitech G213 Prodigy is much better than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The Logitech is more comfortable due to the built-in wrist rest, it has macro-programmable keys, and software support for customization. However, the HyperX has a better build quality and brightness control for its backlighting.

Razer Cynosa Chroma

The Razer Cynosa Chroma and the HyperX Alloy Core RGB are similar keyboards in most uses, as they're both budget membrane keyboards with RGB backlighting. The only real difference is that the Cynosa has more customization options due to its software support, and the Alloy Core has dedicated media keys instead of hotkeys.

SteelSeries Apex 3

The SteelSeries Apex 3 is much better than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The Apex 3 has a significantly better build quality, typing experience, and ergonomics. Also, it comes with a wrist rest and the keyboard is much more customizable, since every key can be reprogrammed and it has software support, which the HyperX Alloy Core doesn't have.

Redragon K552-RGB

The Redragon K552-RGB is a much better keyboard than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The K552 has mechanical switches that provide a better typing experience, though the clicky switches may be bothersome for some. The K552 has a significantly better build quality and its RGB backlighting has more customization options; however, it may not be the best choice if you like having a NumPad, as the K552 is a tenkeyless keyboard.

Logitech K840 Mechanical Keyboard

The Logitech K840 Mechanical Keyboard is significantly better than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The K840 has a better build quality thanks to its aluminium plate, and it has mechanical switches that feel light and responsive. The K840 has software support for customization, but it doesn't have dedicated media keys like the Alloy Core and typing noise can be louder if you bottom out the keys.

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