HyperX Alloy Origins Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.0
Reviewed Jan 31, 2020 at 08:29 am
HyperX Alloy Origins Picture
9.2
Gaming
2.8
Mobile/Tablet
7.8
Office
8.0
Programming
4.9
Entertainment / HTPC
Connectivity Wired
Size
Full-size (100%)
Mechanical
Yes

The HyperX Alloy Origins is an exceptional gaming keyboard. It's amazingly well-built and has full RGB backlighting. Its linear switches have a short pre-travel distance and are easy to actuate, resulting in a light and responsive typing experience. Every key is macro-programmable; however, its customization software is only available for Windows. Unfortunately, it isn't ideal for use with mobile devices and home theater PCs because it's a wired-only keyboard. 

Our Verdict

9.2 Gaming

The HyperX Alloy Origins is an outstanding gaming keyboard. Its linear switches are incredibly responsive and require very little force to actuate. It has excellent build quality, and its full RGB backlighting is great for dark room gaming. Although every key can be reprogrammed, it lacks dedicated macro keys for MMO games.

Pros
  • Outstanding build quality.
  • Excellent typing experience.
  • Programmable keys.
  • Full RGB backlighting.
Cons
  • Customization software only available on Windows.
  • Doesn't include wrist rest.
2.8 Mobile/Tablet

The HyperX Alloy Origins is a wired-only keyboard and can't be used with mobile devices.

7.8 Office

The HyperX Alloy Origins is good for office use. It's easy to type on and doesn't feel tiring, but some may need a wrist rest, and one isn't included in the box. Typing noise is fairly minimal, great for quiet office environments. Unfortunately, customization is only available to Windows users, although most keys work on Linux and macOS.

Pros
  • Outstanding build quality.
  • Excellent typing experience.
  • Quiet typing noise.
Cons
  • Customization software only available on Windows.
  • Doesn't include wrist rest.
8.0 Programming

The HyperX Alloy Origins is a great keyboard for programming. The typing feels light and shouldn't cause fatigue, even on long coding sessions. Every key can be reprogrammed or set to a macro, but unfortunately, this feature is only available to Windows users.

Pros
  • Outstanding build quality.
  • Excellent typing experience.
  • Programmable keys.
  • Full RGB backlighting.
Cons
  • Customization software only available on Windows.
  • Doesn't include wrist rest.
4.9 Entertainment / HTPC

The HyperX Alloy Origins is bad for use with a home theater PC. It's a wired-only keyboard, which isn't ideal if you want to avoid running a cable across the living room. On top of that, it doesn't have a trackpad, so you'll need a separate mouse.

Pros
  • Outstanding build quality.
  • Excellent typing experience.
  • Full RGB backlighting.
Cons
  • Customization software only available on Windows.
  • Wired-only.
  • No trackpad.
  • 9.2 Gaming
  • 2.8 Mobile/Tablet
  • 7.8 Office
  • 8.0 Programming
  • 4.9 Entertainment / HTPC
  1. Updated Feb 04, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.0.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Height
1.4" (3.6 cm)
Width 17.4" (44.1 cm)
Depth
5.1" (13.0 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
N/A
Weight
2.87 lbs (1.300 kg)

The HyperX Alloy Origins is fairly large, as it's a full-size keyboard with a NumPad. There's a TKL (tenkeyless) variant of this keyboard called the HyperX Alloy Origins Core, or you can also consider the Hyperx Alloy FPS Pro, though the latter has a single red color backlight instead of RGB.

8.5
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material ABS

This keyboard has an excellent build quality. It has a full aluminum body that's coated with a soft finish, and the whole keyboard feels solid and hefty, with no signs of flex. The keycaps are made of high-quality ABS plastic and are double shot, so you shouldn't have any issues with key legends fading or chipping over time. If you want a keyboard with PBT keycaps instead, consider the Varmilo VA87M.

6.5
Design
Ergonomics
Board Design
Straight
Minimum Incline
3 °
Medium Incline
7 °
Maximum Incline
11 °
Wrist Rest No

This keyboard has okay ergonomics. It has two incline settings, but it doesn't come with a wrist rest. The kickstands feel solid and shouldn't collapse if you push the keyboard forward. Check out the Corsair K68 for a similar keyboard with a detachable wrist rest.

9.6
Design
Backlighting
Backlighting Yes
Color
RGB
Individually Backlit Keys
Yes
Color Mixing
Poor
Effects
Yes
Programmable
Yes

This keyboard has full RGB backlighting, and each key can be individually customized via HyperX's NGENUITY software. The backlight is brighter than other keyboards with RGB backlight, which results in a slight color bleed.

Design
Cable & Connector
Detachable
Yes (Wired Only Keyboard)
Length 5.9 ft (1.8 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
USB type-C

This cable is detachable, making it easy to replace if it gets damaged.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
No
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
No
Proprietary Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries

This keyboard has no wireless capabilities.

Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Hot Keys
Macro Programmable Keys
All
Trackpad / Trackball No
Wheel No
USB Passthrough
No
Numpad Yes
Windows Key Lock
Yes
Lock Indicator Caps & Num Lock

Every key on the HyperX Alloy Origins can be programmed with the NGENUITY software. There's a 'Game Mode' option that locks the Windows key to prevent accidentally minimizing your game, and it can be activated directly from the keyboard or through the software. If you want dedicated media keys and a USB passthrough, check out the HyperX Alloy Elite 2.

Design
In The Box

  • HyperX Alloy Origins keyboard
  • USB-A to USB-C cable
  • User guide

Typing Experience
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Key Switches
HyperX Red
Feel
Linear
Operating Force
46 gf
Actuation Force
45 gf
Pre-Travel
2.0 mm
Total Travel
3.9 mm

The HyperX Alloy Origins uses proprietary linear switches that feel similar to Cherry MX reds. These switches have a short pre-travel distance, require very little force to actuate, and don't provide any tactile feedback. This keyboard is also available with HyperX Aqua and HyperX Blue switches, which are tactile and clicky switches, respectively.

If you prefer switches that provide tactile feedback, check out the Ducky Shine 7, as it can be customized with your preferred type of switches.

8.5
Typing Experience
Typing Quality

Typing experience is excellent. The keys are stable and well-spaced, which is great for typing accuracy, but the spacebar has a slight rattle. Although the keycaps are made of ABS plastic, they don't feel cheap and are nice to type on. The linear switches provide a light and responsive typing experience and shouldn't cause any fatigue, even during long gaming sessions.

Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Noise
Quiet

Typing noise is quiet and shouldn't be bothersome, even in a quiet office environment.

9.4
Typing Experience
Latency
Latency Wired
4.8 ms
Latency Receiver
N/A
Latency Bluetooth
N/A

The latency is exceptionally low, which results in a responsive gaming experience.

Software and Operating System
9.3
Software and Operating System
Software & Programming
Software Name HyperX NGENUITY
Account Required
No
Profiles
6+
Onboard Memory
Yes
Cloud Sync
Yes
Macro Programming
Software
Ease Of Use
Easy
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
No

The HyperX Alloy Origins has outstanding software support. It can be customized with the NGENUITY software, which can only be downloaded from the Microsoft Windows Store. Although this severely limits its compatibility with other operating systems, it does make its cloud sync feature easier to use, as it relies on your Microsoft account to import your settings instead of having to create a separate account with HyperX. This software allows you to customize the backlight, program macros, and save profiles on top of the three that you can save on the keyboard's onboard memory.

7.2
Software and Operating System
Keyboard Compatibility
Windows Full
macOS Partial
Linux Partial
Android No
iOS No
iPadOS No

This keyboard has decent compatibility. Since the NGENUITY software is only available on Windows, Linux and macOS users won't be able to customize the keyboard. All the keys function properly on Linux, but Scroll Lock and Pause/Break don't work on macOS.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

Our unit has HyperX Red switches, which are linear, but you can also get it with HyperX Aqua and HyperX Blues. The Aqua is a tactile switch that resembles Cherry MX Browns, and the Blue is a clicky switch, like Cherry MX Blues. Our typing experience result is only valid for the HyperX Red switch. There's a TenkeyLess (TKL) variant of this keyboard called the HyperX Alloy Origins Core. It offers similar features, just without a NumPad. There's also a 60% compact variant called the HyperX Alloy Origins 60

Compared To Other Keyboards

The HyperX Alloy Origins doesn't have any features that make it stand out in the crowded market of mechanical gaming keyboards; however, it does have one of the best build quality, as it's uncommon to see a full aluminum frame on a keyboard at this price point. For other options, check out our recommendations for the best gaming keyboards, the best mechanical keyboards, and the best keyboards.

HyperX Alloy FPS RGB

The HyperX Alloy Origins performs better than the HyperX Alloy FPS RGB for all uses, though both are fantastic full-sized gaming keyboards. The Origins provides a better typing experience, thanks to its well-spaced and stable keys and proprietary linear HyperX Red switches that feel light and responsive. The FPS RGB uses linear Kailh Silver Speed switches, which have an even lower pre-travel distance, giving it a very responsive feel that’s great for gaming, but may lead to more typos.

HyperX Alloy Elite 2

The HyperX Alloy Origins is better than the HyperX Alloy Elite 2. The Origins feels better-built, the linear switches have a lower pre-travel distance, and the typing quality is better. However, the Elite 2 has dedicated media keys and a USB passthrough.

Razer Huntsman Mini

The Razer Huntsman Mini and the HyperX Alloy Origins share many similarities but are also very different. The HyperX is full-sized, while the Razer is a 60% compact keyboard that lacks a numpad and dedicated arrow keys. Both keyboards have full RGB backlighting, programmable keys, and software for customization. Although the build quality is excellent on both keyboards, the Razer has PBT keycaps while the HyperX's are ABS. The Razer is available with clicky and linear optical switches, you can get the ones that you prefer, while the HyperX is only available with linear HyperX Red switches.

Razer BlackWidow Elite

The Razer BlackWidow Elite is better than the HyperX Alloy Origins for gaming. We tested the Razer with Orange switches, which have a shorter pre-travel distance but higher operating force than the HyperX Reds. The Razer has dedicated media controls, a USB passthrough, and onboard memory to save custom profiles. Additionally, it has lower latency and comes with a wrist rest.

Razer Huntsman

The HyperX Alloy Origins and the Razer Huntsman are both outstanding full-size gaming keyboards with full RGB backlighting and programmable keys. The Razer's Clicky Optical switches have a shorter pre-travel distance but a slightly higher operating force than the HyperX Reds. They provide tactile feedback, which the HyperX Reds don't; however, they're also much louder, making them less ideal for quiet office environments. The Razer has onboard memory to save custom profiles, but on the other hand, the HyperX has a detachable USB-C cable.

HyperX Alloy FPS Pro

The HyperX Alloy Origins is significantly better than the HyperX Alloy FPS Pro for gaming. The Alloy Origins has a much better build quality and full RGB backlighting, whereas the Alloy FPS Pro's is only in red. The Alloy Origins' latency is much lower, and it uses proprietary linear switches that are easier to actuate. It's also more customizable because it has software support, which the Alloy FPS Pro lacks.

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition

The HyperX Alloy Origins and the Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition are both outstanding gaming keyboards. While they both have proprietary linear switches, the HyperX provides a much better overall typing experience because the Razer's Linear Optical switches are overly sensitive, which leads to more typos. On the other hand, the Razer is more responsive because it has lower latency, and its switches have a shorter pre-travel distance. Also, some gamers might prefer its TKL design because it leaves more space to move the mouse.

HyperX Alloy Core RGB

The HyperX Alloy Origins is a significantly better keyboard than the HyperX Alloy Core RGB. The Alloy Origins has a much better build quality due to its full aluminium frame, and it has mechanical switches that provide a much better typing experience. Also, the Alloy Origins has software support for customization, however, the Alloy Core makes slightly less noise when typing, which is more suitable for noise-sensitive environments.

SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL

The HyperX Alloy Origins is slightly better than the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL for gaming, mainly because the HyperX has lower latency, and its linear switches have a shorter pre-travel distance. However, the SteelSeries has more features, like an OLED screen, a volume wheel, a USB passthrough, and onboard memory. Also, it comes with a wrist rest. The HyperX provides a better typing experience, but its linear switches don't give tactile feedback, which the SteelSeries Brown switches do.

HyperX Alloy Origins 60

The HyperX Alloy Origins and the HyperX Alloy Origins 60 are very similar gaming keyboards, but they have different layouts. The Origins is a full-sized keyboard, while the Origins 60 has a compact 60% layout. Aside from that, the Origins 60 comes with PBT keycaps instead of ABS keycaps like the Origins, and you can set the RGB brightness to a much lower setting on the Origin 60 if you don't like the lighting being too bright. They use the same HyperX Red switches which feel very light and responsive, but the Origins 60's compact layout might cause you to type slower if you aren't used to the smaller size.

SteelSeries Apex Pro

The SteelSeries Apex Pro is better than the HyperX Alloy Origins. The SteelSeries has linear switches, which you can change its pre-travel distance on a per-key basis for better responsiveness. It comes with a wrist rest and has more features, like an OLED screen and a USB passthrough. The HyperX provides a better typing experience, but it doesn't come with a wrist rest like the SteelSeries.

Corsair K70 RGB MK.2

The HyperX Alloy Origins is slightly better for gaming than the Corsair K70 RGB MK.2. The HyperX comes with proprietary linear switches only, but the Corsair is available with various Cherry MX switches. Our Corsair unit has Cherry MX Brown switches that feel slightly heavier than the HyperX Reds; however, they provide tactile feedback, which some might prefer for typing. The Corsair has dedicated media controls, software support for macOS, and includes a wrist rest.

Ducky One 2 Mini V1

The Ducky One 2 Mini V1 and the HyperX Alloy Origins are very different keyboards. Unlike the HyperX, which is designed for gaming, the Ducky is better suited for productivity, mainly because it has high latency. That said, some might prefer its compact design over the HyperX's full-size layout, and it also provides a better typing experience. The HyperX has more customization options because it has software support.

Logitech G512 Special Edition

The Logitech G512 Special Edition and the HyperX Alloy Origins are two wired-only keyboards that perform somewhat similarly. The HyperX has one more incline settings and feels better-built overall. All of its keys are macro-programmable, while the Logitech only lets you set macros to function keys. That said, the Logitech is available with different types of switches, so you can choose according to your own preferences.

Corsair K100 RGB

The HyperX Alloy Origins and the Corsair K100 RGB are two fantastic gaming keyboards. The Corsair has dedicated media keys and a wrist rest for better comfort. It also has lower click latency, but most people won't notice a difference between the keyboards. They're each available with linear switches, and the Cherry MX Speed switches on our unit of the Corsair has a lower pre-travel distance than the HyperX Red switches.

SteelSeries Apex 5 Hybrid Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

The SteelSeries Apex 5 Hybrid Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is better than the HyperX Alloy Origins for gaming, mainly because the SteelSeries has much higher latency. The HyperX's linear switches are easier to actuate and provide a better typing experience. However, the SteelSeries has some extra features like its OLED screen and volume wheel. Also, its customization software is compatible with macOS, while HyperX's NGENUITY software is only available for Windows users.

Cooler Master MK730

The HyperX Alloy Origins is slightly better than the Cooler Master MK730. The HyperX is better built and it has proprietary linear HyperX Red switches, which require very little force to actuate, and the typing quality is better. However, the Cooler Master has a wrist rest and it's available with three different types of switches, so you can get the ones you prefer.

Corsair K68 RGB

The HyperX Alloy Origins is a slightly better gaming keyboard than the Corsair K68 RGB. It's noticeably better-built but doesn't have a wrist rest like the Corsair, which some may prefer. The RGB lighting on the HyperX bleeds a lot more than on the Corsair and its cable is detachable, which is great if you like to customize your keyboard. 

Corsair K65 RGB MINI

The HyperX Alloy Origins and the Corsair K65 RGB MINI are both outstanding mechanical gaming keyboards. The HyperX is a full-size keyboard with two incline settings and ABS keycaps. Its companion software allows you to sync settings with the cloud, but it isn't compatible with macOS. It's available with linear HyperX Red, tactile Aqua, or clicky Blue switches. On the other hand, The Corsair is a compact 60% keyboard with PBT keycaps and an 8000Hz maximum polling rate. Its companion software is compatible with Windows and macOS but can't sync settings to the cloud. It's available with linear Cherry MX Speed switches. The Corsair has lower latency, but both keyboards have exceptionally low latency.

Ducky Shine 7

The Ducky Shine 7 and the HyperX Alloy Origins are very similar. The main difference is that the Ducky feels better built because it has PBT keycaps. Both keyboards are available in various switch options. 

Corsair K55 RGB PRO XT

The Corsair K55 RGB PRO XT and the HyperX Alloy Origins are full-size, wired keyboards, but the HyperX is a better gaming keyboard. The HyperX is a mechanical keyboard available with linear HyperX Red, tactile Aqua, or clicky Blue switches. It also feels much better-built and has full RGB backlighting that you can customize on a per-key basis using the companion software. It also has a detachable USB-C cable and two incline settings, but it lacks a wrist rest. On the other hand, the Corsair has rubber dome switches and RGB backlighting with individually lit keys but only five customizable lighting zones. It also has software compatible with Windows and macOS. Both keyboards have exceptionally low latency, and while the Corsair's is slightly lower, it's unlikely to be a noticeable difference.

Wooting one

The Wooting one and the HyperX Alloy Origins are two amazing keyboards, but for different reasons. The Wooting has unique optical switches and allows for analog inputs, while the HyperX is just solid all-around. The HyperX comes in a variety of switches, offers bright RGB lighting, and feels very premium and well-made.

Das Keyboard X50Q

The HyperX Alloy Origins is slightly better than the Das Keyboard X50Q. The HyperX has a much better typing and build quality, and its software allows for profile saving. The HyperX has linear switches that are better suited for gaming, however, the Das is more comfortable, as it comes with a wrist rest.

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