SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.0
Updated Jan 20, 2020 at 09:11 am
SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL Picture
9.0
Gaming
4.2
Mobile/Tablet
8.0
Office
8.0
Programming
5.6
Entertainment / HTPC
Connectivity Wired
Size
TenKeyLess (80%)
Mechanical
Yes

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is an exceptional TenKeyLess gaming keyboard with a wide set of features and superb companion software. It has full RGB backlighting, macro-programmable keys, and an OLED screen that lets you access various settings without minimizing games. It has an excellent build quality that's nearly identical to the SteelSeries Apex Pro, and our unit has SteelSeries Brown switches that provide a light typing experience with good tactile feedback. It's also available with linear SteelSeries Red or clicky SteelSeries Blue switches.

Our Verdict

9.0 Gaming

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is an outstanding gaming keyboard. It has an excellent, sturdy-feeling build, and the SteelSeries Brown switches on our unit are easy to press and provide good tactile feedback. It has full RGB lighting with individually-backlit keys and good ergonomics with an included wrist rest. It also has an OLED screen that lets you change settings without minimizing games and has excellent companion software that allows you to reprogram keys, set macros, and adjust lighting settings.

Pros
  • Excellent build quality.
  • Outstanding gaming features.
  • Superb companion software.
  • Low latency.
Cons
  • Wrist rest tends to attract dust.
4.2 Mobile/Tablet

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL can't be used with mobile devices, as it has no wireless capabilities.

8.0 Office

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is great for office use. It has good ergonomics, comes with a magnetically-attached wrist rest, and most people should find it very comfortable to use, even when typing for long periods. It's made mostly of plastic but has an aluminum plate that makes the keyboard feel very sturdy. Typing noise is minimal, the keys are very stable, and it's fully compatible with Windows and macOS.

Pros
  • Excellent build quality.
  • Great typing experience.
  • Fully compatible with Windows and MacOS.
Cons
  • Wrist rest tends to attract dust.
8.0 Programming

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is great for programming use, and the SteelSeries Brown switches on our unit offer a light typing experience while keeping noise to a minimum. Its exceptional companion software allows you to reprogram keys, set macros, and adjust lighting settings. The keyboard is fully compatible with Windows, macOS, and Linux, but the software only works in Windows and macOS. It also has good ergonomics with a magnetically-attached wrist rest and has RGB lighting with individually-backlit keys.

Pros
  • Excellent build quality.
  • Great typing experience.
  • Superb companion software.
  • Compatible with Windows, MacOS, and Linux.
Cons
  • Wrist rest tends to attract dust.
5.6 Entertainment / HTPC

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is sub-par for home theater PC use. It can't be connected wirelessly, so you'll have to sit within range of the cable, and it doesn't have a trackpad, so you'll likely need a mouse to navigate menus. On the bright side, it has a wheel for volume control, dedicated media keys, and full RGB backlighting.

Pros
  • Excellent build quality.
Cons
  • Wrist rest tends to attract dust.
  • Wired-only.
  • No trackpad.
  • 9.0 Gaming
  • 4.2 Mobile/Tablet
  • 8.0 Office
  • 8.0 Programming
  • 5.6 Entertainment / HTPC
  1. Updated Feb 04, 2021: Converted to Test Bench 1.0.
  2. Updated Jan 20, 2020: Review published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Height
1.6" (4.0 cm)
Width 14.0" (35.5 cm)
Depth
5.5" (13.9 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
8.3" (21.0 cm)
Weight
1.54 lbs (0.700 kg)

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL has a small footprint, as it's a TenKeyLess keyboard, but will take up more space if you choose to use the included wrist rest. If you prefer a full-size keyboard, then check out the SteelSeries Apex Pro.

8.5
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material ABS

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL's build quality is excellent and nearly identical to the SteelSeries Apex Pro. While most of the keyboard is made of plastic, it has an aluminum plate on top to provide rigidity. The aluminum plate has a soft finish to it, and the keyboard uses doubleshot ABS keycaps, which is great for the durability of the key legends. The key stabilizers are excellent, and there's no sign of wobbling or rattling. It comes with a wrist rest with a soft finish that attaches to the keyboard magnetically. Unfortunately, this wrist rest is a dust magnet, but the overall build feels durable and shouldn't cause any issues with long-term use.

7.5
Design
Ergonomics
Board Design
Straight
Minimum Incline
Medium Incline
N/A
Maximum Incline
10.5°
Wrist Rest Detachable

This keyboard has good ergonomics. Although it only has one incline setting, it comes with a wrist rest that attaches to the keyboard magnetically and has a soft finish that's very comfortable, although it's a bit of a dust magnet. The keys feel very light to type on, and it's unlikely to cause any fatigue if you're typing for an extended period of time.

10
Design
Backlighting
Backlighting Yes
Color
RGB
Individually Backlit Keys
Yes
Color Mixing
Great
Effects
Yes
Programmable
Yes

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL has full RGB lighting, and it can be customized via SteelSeries' Engine software, where each key can be customized individually. The backlight is bright enough to see in a well-lit room and perfect for those with dark rooms.

Design
Cable & Connector
Detachable
No
Length 6.2 ft (1.9 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
Not Detachable

This keyboard's cable is not removable and has two USB connectors. Both need to be connected to use the USB passthrough feature. If you want a TKL keyboard with a detachable, replaceable cable, check out the Cooler Master MK730 or the Fnatic miniSTREAK.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
No
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
No
Proprietary Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries

This is a wired-only keyboard.

Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Dedicated
Macro Programmable Keys
All
Trackpad / Trackball No
Wheel Yes
USB Passthrough
Yes
Numpad No
Windows Key Lock
Yes
Lock Indicator Caps Lock

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL has dedicated media control keys, and all keys are macro-programmable directly on the keyboard or with SteelSeries' Engine software. The wheel controls volume controls and provides navigation for the keyboard's OLED screen while the menu button is held. This OLED screen allows you to change settings and profiles without minimizing games, or you can customize it in certain games to display information such as K/D ratios.

Design
In The Box

  • SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL keyboard
  • Wrist rest
  • User guide

Typing Experience
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Key Switches
SteelSeries Brown
Feel
Tactile
Operating Force
44 gf
Actuation Force
37 gf
Pre-Travel
2.4 mm
Total Travel
4.1 mm

The unit we tested has SteelSeries Brown switches. They require very little force to operate, have a slight tactile bump to overcome and provide a very light typing experience overall. The pre-travel distance is slightly higher than the advertised 2 mm, though most people likely won't notice the difference. This keyboard is also available with linear SteelSeries Red and clicky SteelSeries Blue switches as well.

8.0
Typing Experience
Typing Quality

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL's typing experience is great. Our unit has tactile SteelSeries Brown switches, which are somewhat similar to Cherry MX Brown switches; however, the tactile bump is less pronounced and feels softer. The keys are stable, and they have a fairly standard spacing, which is great for typing accuracy, but they also feel less responsive, as they don't spring back as quickly. Overall, these switches feel light to type on and shouldn't cause any fatigue, even when typing for long periods, but they may feel too mushy for some.

Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Noise
Quiet

The tactile SteelSeries Brown switches on our unit are quiet and shouldn't be bothersome to those around you, even in a quiet office setting. We expect the SteelSeries Red switches to be quieter and the SteelSeries Blue switches to be louder.

8.5
Typing Experience
Latency
Latency Wired
6.8 ms
Latency Receiver
N/A
Latency Bluetooth
N/A

This keyboard has excellent latency, and most people are very unlikely to notice any delays.

Software and Operating System
10
Software and Operating System
Software & Programming
Software Name Steelseries Engine
Account Required
No
Profiles
5
Onboard Memory
Yes
Cloud Sync
Yes
Macro Programming
Software and Onboard
Ease Of Use
Easy
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
Yes

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL has outstanding software support. The SteelSeries Engine software lets you program the RGB backlighting, remap keys, and set macros. You can save up to five different profiles onboard, and there's a cloud sync feature that allows you to carry your settings over to another computer, though this feature requires an account.

7.8
Software and Operating System
Keyboard Compatibility
Windows Full
macOS Full
Linux Partial
Android No
iOS No
iPadOS No

The Steel Series Apex 7 TKL has good compatibility. It has full functionality with all major desktop operating systems, but the SteelSeries Engine software isn't available for Linux; as such, Linux users won't be able to customize the keyboard or import profiles from the cloud, though all the keys work and you can save certain settings to the onboard profiles.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is part of the SteelSeries Apex lineup that also includes the SteelSeries Apex 3, the SteelSeries Apex 5 Hybrid Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, and the SteelSeries Apex Pro. These keyboards share many similarities, but only the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the SteelSeries Apex 7, which is the full-sized version, have different switch types available. Both the Apex 7 TKL and Apex 7 are available with tactile SteelSeries Brown, clicky SteelSeries Blue, or linear SteelSeries Red switches. With the exception of typing quality, we expect our test results to be applicable to the other switch type variants as well.

Compared To Other Keyboards

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL, and its full-sized counterpart, the SteelSeries Apex 7, are the only keyboards in the SteelSeries Apex lineup available with multiple switch types. While it's primarily designed as a gaming keyboard, the Apex 7 TKL is more versatile than most dedicated gaming keyboards and should please people looking for a mechanical keyboard that's well suited to gaming and office use. For more options, see our recommendations for the best keyboards for programming, the best keyboards, and the best gaming keyboards.

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is a more versatile keyboard than the Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition, but they're both outstanding TKL options for gaming. The Razer uses a detachable USB-C cable for its connection which can be helpful for transportation, and it has Razer Linear Optical switches, very little pre-travel, and exceptionally low latency. However, it isn’t available with any other switch types. On the other hand, the SteelSeries doesn't have a detachable cable but is more comfortable to use thanks to its included wrist rest. It also has a small OLED screen, though this is unlikely to add much functionality for most people. Our unit has tactile SteelSeries Brown switches, though it’s also available with linear SteelSeries Red and clicky SteelSeries Blue switches.

SteelSeries Apex Pro

The SteelSeries Apex Pro and SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are wired, mechanical gaming keyboards with very similar build qualities and many features in common. Their major differences are in size and available switch types. The Apex Pro has OmniPoint linear switches that allow you to adjust the pre-travel distanced needed to input keystrokes to your liking. While the version we tested was the full-sized version, there’s also a TenKeyLess variant available. On the other hand, the Apex 7 TKL we tested is a TenKeyLess design, but a full-sized variant, the SteelSeries Apex 7, is also available. The unit we tested has tactile SteelSeries Brown switches that feel similar to Cherry MX Brown switches, and It’s also available with clicky SteelSeries Blue or linear SteelSeries Red switches.

Corsair K70 RGB TKL

The Corsair K70 RGB TKL and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are both fantastic gaming keyboards. They're both well-made and offer great typing quality; however, the SteelSeries is available with tactile, linear, and clicky switches, so you can get the ones you prefer, but the Corsair is only available with linear switches. The SteelSeries comes with a wrist rest, which the Corsair doesn't. The Corsair has lower latency, but the difference between both shouldn't be very noticeable.

Corsair K70 RGB MK.2

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Corsair K70 RGB MK.2 are both outstanding gaming keyboards. The Corsair is a full-size keyboard with companion software that’s compatible with Windows and macOS. The unit we tested has tactile Cherry MX Brown switches, and it has many variants available with a range of Cherry MX switch types, as well as a variant with low profile switches. The SteelSeries has an OLED screen that you can use to adjust settings without minimizing games, and it has onboard memory for storing configuration profiles from the companion software. The unit we tested had SteelSeries Brown switches, though it’s also available with linear Reds and clicky Blues.

HyperX Alloy Origins

The HyperX Alloy Origins is slightly better than the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL for gaming, mainly because the HyperX has lower latency, and its linear switches have a shorter pre-travel distance. However, the SteelSeries has more features, like an OLED screen, a volume wheel, a USB passthrough, and onboard memory. Also, it comes with a wrist rest. The HyperX provides a better typing experience, but its linear switches don't give tactile feedback, which the SteelSeries Brown switches do.

SteelSeries Apex 5 Hybrid Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the SteelSeries Apex 5 Hybrid Mechanical Gaming Keyboard are wired mechanical keyboards with similar features but a few important differences. The Apex 7 we tested is a TenKeyLess keyboard, though there’s also a full-sized variant. It’s available with tactile SteelSeries Brown, linear SteelSeries Red, or clicky SteelSeries Blue switches. On the other hand, the Apex 5 is a full-sized keyboard without any smaller variants and is only available with clicky Hybrid Blue Mechanical switches that feel similar to Cherry MX Blue switches. Unfortunately, it also has extremely high latency, which likely won't be a problem for slower-paced gaming, but it's less suitable for competitive and reaction-based games.

Ducky One 2 RGB TKL

The Ducky One 2 RGB TKL and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are very similar, but the SteelSeries has many more features. The SteelSeries has a wrist rest, an OLED screen, a USB passthrough, and dedicated media controls. It also has better compatibility with macOS. They have roughly the same latency, and both are available in various switch options.

Razer Huntsman Mini

The Razer Huntsman Mini and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are both fantastic gaming keyboards. The Razer is a compact keyboard that has much lower latency. It's available with linear and clicky optical switches, while the SteelSeries is available with linear, tactile, and clicky switches. Also, the SteelSeries is TKL-sized and has dedicated media keys, including a wheel for volume control.

ASUS ROG Strix Scope TKL

The ASUS ROG Strix Scope TKL and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are both wired TenKeyLess gaming keyboards. The SteelSeries is better for the most part because it has more features, like an OLED screen, dedicated media controls, a USB passthrough, and it comes with a wrist rest. Also, it has lower latency and customization software for macOS. Both keyboards are available in multiple switch options.

Logitech G PRO Keyboard

The Logitech G Pro Mechanical Gaming Keyboard and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are TenKeyLess mechanical keyboards with a few differences. The Logitech has better latency and slightly shorter pre-travel, but only some of its keys are macro programmable. The SteelSeries has a sturdier-feeling build, an included wrist rest, and all of its keys are macro programmable. The SteelSeries Brown switches on our unit have good tactile feedback with a light operating force to actuate the keys, and it’s also available with SteelSeries linear Reds and clicky Blues. The Logitech unit we tested has GX Blue Clicky switches, and more force is required to actuate keys. It’s also available with Romer-G Tactile switches.

Razer BlackWidow Elite

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the  Razer BlackWidow Elite are both amazing gaming keyboards with several key differences. The SteelSeries unit we tested was the TenKeyLess variant, but there’s a full-sized version as well. Our unit also has SteelSeries Brown switches that provide good tactile feedback, and It’s also available in clicky SteelSeries Blue and linear SteelSeries Red switches. On the other hand, the Razer is a full-sized keyboard with lower latency. The unit we tested has tactile Razer Orange switches that provide a heavier-feeling typing quality, but it’s also available with linear Razer Yellow or clicky Razer Green switches. Both keyboards feature full RGB lighting with individually backlit keys, but the SteelSeries suffers from significant color bleeding.

Razer Huntsman

The Razer Huntsman and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are outstanding mechanical gaming keyboards with a few noteworthy differences. The Razer is a full-sized keyboard with clicky Razer Optical switches that feel very responsive due to a low pre-travel and light force required to actuate keys. Unfortunately, its software isn’t compatible with macOS, and it doesn’t have an included wrist rest. The SteelSeries has companion software with support for Windows and macOS and has an included wrist rest. It also has several extra features, including an OLED screen, a volume wheel, and a USB passthrough. Our unit has SteelSeries tactile Brown switches, though it’s also available with clicky Blue and linear Red switches.

Glorious GMMK PRO

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Glorious GMMK PRO are both mechanical keyboards, but the SteelSeries is a prebuilt gaming board, and the Glorious is barebones and doesn't come with switches nor keycaps. The SteelSeries has an OLED screen and a USB passthrough, and it's available with SteelSeries Red, Brown, and Blue switches. Unlike the Glorious, the SteelSeries has amazingly low latency. On the other hand, the Glorious can be physically customized much easier, from its switches and keycaps to its cable and PCB switch plate. It's available in two colors, Black Slate and White Ice.

Ducky One 2 Mini V1

The Ducky One 2 Mini V1 and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are both excellent gaming keyboards with some noteworthy differences. The SteelSeries is a TenKeyLess keyboard with significantly better latency, an attached wrist rest, and several extra features, including an OLED screen, a volume wheel, and a USB passthrough. The unit we tested has tactile SteelSeries Brown switches, and it’s also available with linear Red and clicky Blue switches. The Ducky is a compact (60%) keyboard available in a wide variety of Cherry MX switches, including Cherry MX Red, Blue, Brown, Silver, and Silent Red. The unit we tested has tactile Cherry MX Brown switches that provide an outstanding typing quality but require slightly more force to actuate than those on the SteelSeries.

ASUS ROG Claymore II

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is a wired TKL board, while the ASUS ROG Claymore II is a full-size wireless model. The SteelSeries has a small OLED screen that can display nearly anything you want, including GIFs, settings, and K/D ratios. It's available with SteelSeries Brown, Red, and Blue switches. There's also a full-size variant of this board if you prefer a numpad. On the other hand, the ASUS has a modular numpad that you can put on either side of the board, and you can also remove it if you occasionally want a TKL size. You can use the board wirelessly via its USB receiver, and its wired latency is lower than the SteelSeries. It's available with ROG RX Red Optical Mechanical and ROG RX Blue Optical Mechanical switches.

Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is a TenKeyLess wired board, while the Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed is a 65% wireless board. The SteelSeries comes with a detachable wrist rest, a programmable OLED screen, a dedicated media key, a volume control wheel, and a USB passthrough. It's available with SteelSeries Brown, Red, and Blue switches. On the other hand, the Razer can pair with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth, and you can also use it with its USB receiver. Also, it has much lower latency. It's available with clicky Razer Green and linear Razer Yellow switches.

Corsair K95 PLATINUM

The Corsair K95 PLATINUM and the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL are both amazing keyboards, but for different reasons. The Corsair is a full-size board with extremely low pre-travel distance. It features linear Cherry MX Speed switches, while the SteelSeries is a smaller but better-built TKL board that has SteelSeries Brown switches. 

HyperX Alloy FPS RGB

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is a better overall keyboard than the HyperX Alloy FPS RGB, though both are exceptional for gaming. The SteelSeries is a TenKeyLess keyboard, so it’s smaller and lighter. It comes with a detachable wrist rest and has dedicated media keys, a volume wheel, and a USB passthrough. It’s also fully compatible with Windows and macOS. That said, the HyperX is full-sized, so it has a Numpad and a Windows key lock, and the companion software allows you to create more profiles than the SteelSeries.

ROCCAT Vulcan TKL

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the ROCCAT Vulcan TKL are similar TenKeyLess gaming keyboards, but the SteelSeries is slightly better overall. The SteelSeries has better ergonomics with an included wrist rest, all its keys are macro-programmable, and it has a mini OLED screen. It's available in either SteelSeries linear Red, tactile Brown, or clicky Blue switches. On the other hand, the ROCCAT has low-profile keycaps with exposed switch housings that showcase the RGB lighting, and it has a removable USB-C type cable. It's available with either ROCCAT Titan Tactile or Linear switches. Unfortunately, it has significantly higher latency, and only the alphanumeric keys on the left side of the board are macro-programmable.

Corsair K95 RGB PLATINUM XT

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Corsair K95 RGB PLATINUM XT are wired mechanical keyboards with very similar features, performance, and build qualities but notable differences in size and switch types. The SteelSeries is a TenKeyLess keyboard available with tactile SteelSeries Brown, linear SteelSeries Red, and clicky SteelSeries Blue switches. On the other hand, the Corsair is a full-sized keyboard with dedicated macro keys, which the SteelSeries lacks, and it’s available with tactile Cherry MX Brown, clicky Blue, and linear Speed Silver switches.

Corsair K70 RAPIDFIRE

For most uses, the SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is better than the Corsair K70 RAPIDFIRE. The SteelSeries has full RGB backlighting, a customizable OLED screen, and its build quality is significantly better. The typing experience is very different between the Cherry MX Speed switches on the Corsair and the SteelSeries Brown switches on the SteelSeries. The MX Speeds are linear, have a much shorter pre-travel distance, and don't make a lot of typing noise. The SteelSeries Brown switches act more like Cherry MX Browns, which are tactile but quiet. The SteelSeries is available with other switch options, but the Corsair is only available with the Cherry MX Speeds.

Obinslab Anne Pro 2

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Obinslab Anne Pro 2 are mechanical gaming keyboards with significant differences. The SteelSeries is a wired TenKeyLess (80%) keyboard with a detachable wrist rest and adjustable incline settings. It also features companion software that is fully compatible with Windows and macOS. The unit we tested has tactile SteelSeries Brown switches, though it's also available with linear Red or clicky Blue switches. The Obinslab is a compact (60%) keyboard that can be used wired or wirelessly and has a much lower wired latency. Unfortunately, its companion software isn’t compatible with macOS, and the RGB backlighting has poor coloring mixing. The unit we tested has tactile Gateron Brown switches, but it’s also available with a wide variety of other switch types.

Corsair K65 LUX RGB

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is better than the Corsair K65 LUX RGB. The SteelSeries feels better built, and it's fully compatible with macOS. Also, the SteelSeries Brown tactile switches on our unit might feel more responsive for gaming than the Cherry MX Red linear switches thanks to the lower actuation force and pre-travel distance. However, the Corsair has a Windows Key lock and might present better value for some people.

Ducky Mecha Mini V2

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is better than the Ducky Mecha Mini V2. The SteelSeries has dedicated software for customization, while all programming for the Ducky has to be done on the keyboard itself. It also has better ergonomics since it comes with a wrist rest. The Ducky is better-built and offers better typing quality, but both keyboards are available in different switches, so you can get the switch you prefer.

Cooler Master MK730

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is better overall than the Cooler Master MK730. Both keyboards are available with tactile, clicky, and linear switches, and the SteelSeries is better built. It also has better ergonomics, and the SteelSeries software is available on macOS. However, the Cooler Master has a detachable cable if you ever need to replace it.

Corsair K68 RGB

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is a significantly better keyboard than the Corsair K68 RGB in all aspects. Gamers will love the dedicated macro keys, the tactile switches provide good feedback, and they're quick to react at every keystroke. The SteelSeries is a silent keyboard when typing, so it's good for office use as well. The Corsair is bigger with a well-built design, but the clicky switches might be too loud for an office.

Razer BlackWidow Lite

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Razer BlackWidow Lite are wired TenKeyLess mechanical keyboards with several standout differences. The SteelSeries features lower latency, full RGB backlighting, an included wrist rest, and companion software compatible with Windows and macOS. The unit we tested has tactile SteelSeries Brown switches, but it’s also available with linear SteelSeries Red and clicky SteelSeries Blue switches. The Razer only has white backlighting, does not have an included wrist rest, and its companion software is only compatible with Windows. It has tactile Razer Orange switches that have low pre-travel, require light force to actuate keystrokes, and are very quiet. There are no other switch types available.

Corsair STRAFE RGB MK.2

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Corsair STRAFE RGB MK.2 are both outstanding keyboards. The Cherry MX Red switches on our Corsair unit are provide no feedback and fairly light to type on, while the SteelSeries Brown switches do provide feedback and are even lighter to type on.  The Corsair has a Numpad since it's a full-sized keyboard, and the SteelSeries is fully compatible with macOS, unlike the Corsair.

Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL and the Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Gaming Keyboard are mechanical TenKeyLess gaming keyboards with several important differences. The SteelSeries has an OLED screen, a USB passthrough, and full RGB backlighting. Its companion software is also compatible with Windows and macOS, and it has a sturdier-feeling build. It's available with tactile SteelSeries Brown, linear Red, and clicky Blue switches. On the other hand, the Corsair can be connected wired or wirelessly, either with an included USB receiver or via Bluetooth. It's only available with Cherry MX Red switches that provide a responsive, linear typing quality without any feedback.

Das Keyboard X50Q

The SteelSeries Apex 7 TKL is better than the Das Keyboard X50Q. The SteelSeries has a much better build quality, and its customization software has a lot more options. Typing quality is very similar on both and they're equally comfortable, but the SteelSeries has more extra features, such as a USB passthrough, an OLED screen, and better compatibility with macOS.

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