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Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.6
Reviewed Mar 01, 2024 at 08:54 am
Latest change: Retest Apr 03, 2024 at 11:46 am
Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) Picture
7.8
Neutral Sound
4.9
Commute/Travel
5.7
Sports/Fitness
6.2
Office
5.3
Wireless Gaming
7.4
Wired Gaming
6.9
Phone Calls

Beyerdynamic sensibly refreshes the MMX line with the Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation), gaming headphones aimed at the discerning audio enthusiast. These straightforward headphones boast a mic and in-line controls and come covered in ample padding for long sessions. For the gamer who wants their headphones to take on multiple roles like listening to music and handling an online meeting while looking professional, these aluminum and light contrast cans look the part. Let's see if their simplicity and execution are enough to make them the right pick for you.

Our Verdict

7.8 Neutral Sound

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are very good for analytical listening. They output a neutral sound accurately representing your audio, although they skew towards very bright at the top-end. They feel comfortable, albeit slightly tight on some people, with velour ear pads and adjustable headband padding. In-line controls add some welcomed utility when connected to your audio player. However, the closed-back headphones don't have a very spacious passive soundstage like open-backs, so your audio sounds like it's coming from inside your head and not spread out, as if in the room.

Pros
  • Neutral frequency response.
  • Great wired connectivity with controls.
  • Good comfort.
Cons
  • Unimpressive noise isolation.
  • Not very spacious or immersive soundstage.
4.9 Commute/Travel

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are poor for traveling because they're meant for gaming. They're large and don't collapse down smaller, and while they have a case, it'll take up most of the real estate in your bag. In addition, their passive-only isolation doesn't block environmental noise comprehensively. They feel comfortable to wear and have an in-line remote, but you'll definitely stick out in a crowd with the gooseneck mic.

Pros
Cons
  • Unimpressive noise isolation.
  • Not portable.
5.7 Sports/Fitness

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) aren't designed for sports. Due to their large size and gooseneck mic, these gaming headphones aren't a practical choice for working out. Lots of movement exercises like burpees make them come loose and fall.

Pros
Cons
  • Not very stable.
  • Not portable.
6.2 Office

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are mediocre for office use. Their velour ear pads and adjustable headband padding feel comfortable, and the mic works well for meetings, but they can clamp down hard on some larger heads. While the colorway is work-appropriate, the headphones are large and imposing and don't effectively block out much environmental noise.

Pros
  • Very good mic.
  • Good comfort.
Cons
  • Unimpressive noise isolation.
  • Limited to wired-only connectivity.
5.3 Wireless Gaming

You can't use the Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) wirelessly.

7.4 Wired Gaming

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are decent for wired gaming. They come with two cables for different connectivity needs, with in-line remotes. You get an analytical tuning that helps you hear soundtracks, sound effects, and voices well, although it's bright at the top end. In addition, the comfortable fit allows you to adjust the headband for long sessions. The mic captures your speech with very good accuracy and handles noise well enough that your voice remains understandable.

Pros
  • Neutral frequency response.
  • Very good mic.
  • Great wired connectivity with controls.
Cons
  • Unimpressive noise isolation.
  • Not very stable.
  • Not very spacious or immersive soundstage.
6.9 Phone Calls

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) isn't designed for phone calls, although you can use it with a PC for work meetings.

Pros
  • Very good mic.
Cons
  • Limited to wired-only connectivity.
  • 7.8 Neutral Sound
  • 4.9 Commute/Travel
  • 5.7 Sports/Fitness
  • 6.2 Office
  • 5.3 Wireless Gaming
  • 7.4 Wired Gaming
  • 6.9 Phone Calls
  1. Updated Apr 03, 2024: The Microphone Style test has been corrected to indicate these come with a mic.
  2. Updated Mar 01, 2024: Review published.
  3. Updated Feb 26, 2024: Early access published.
  4. Updated Feb 21, 2024: Our testers have started testing this product.
  5. Updated Feb 05, 2024: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  6. Updated Jan 22, 2024: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.
  7. Updated Jan 22, 2024: The product has won our suggestion poll, so we'll buy and test it soon.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) headset comes in one variant, 'Black.' You can see the label for our unit. If you know of another variant, let us know in the forums.

Compared To Other Headphones

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) represent an update to the first-gen Beyerdynamic MMX 300 by the audiophile manufacturer, and besides an extra cable included with the latest version, they're pretty similar. This line stands out as one of the few entries into gaming headphones geared at critical listeners, alongside the Audeze Maxwell Wireless.

They're well-made and straddle the fence between gaming and audio enthusiast headphones, with a permanently attached mic. For more options, check out the best gaming headsets, and if you don't need a mic, check out our best wired headphones and best audiophile headphones.

Audeze Maxwell Wireless

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) and Audeze Maxwell Wireless are both manufactured with audio enthusiasts in mind, with great sounding mics and not particularly impressive noise isolation, but they have key differences. You can only use the Beyerdynamic wired, and their mic is permanently affixed. They sound neutral and bright and feel more comfortable because they weigh less, given that they lack batteries and use dynamic drivers. In contrast, the Audeze work wirelessly and wired, with a detachable mic. They sound more neutral with slightly less rumble in the bass. Their planar drivers add heft to the overall headphones as well.

Astro A50 Gen 4 Wireless 2019

The Astro A50 Gen 4 Wireless 2019 and Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are both comfortable gaming headphones equipped with good-sounding mics but with different priorities. The Astro only works wirelessly with a base and software to adjust the EQ and do updates. They have a neutral tuning which works for all genres. The Beyerdynamic can only connect via analog without any additional software. They sound neutral but with a touch more rumble and a very bright top-end that you can't adjust without third-party software.

Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO

The Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO and Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are both capable over-ears by the German manufacturer. The DT 770 PRO are aimed at analytical listeners and, depending on the variant, may need a headphone amp. They have a fairly neutral frequency response that spikes in the highs. They're equipped with velour ear pads, a wired-only connection, and passive isolation. Meanwhile, the MMX 300 (2nd Generation) differ most obviously with the inclusion of a non-removable microphone. They have additional in-line controls as well. Their tuning is similar, with slightly more low-end and a larger spike in the highs. They're bulkier with better headband padding.

Video

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Type Over-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless No
Transducer Dynamic

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) are large with closed-backs. They use a mixture of aluminum yokes and plastic with ample cushioning, looking like a cross between the audio-only Beyerdynamic DT 700 PRO X and Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO, but with a mic. You can remove and replace the velour earpads, and the headband's padding is held with hook-and-loop, which won't catch your hair.

There's a gooseneck mic connected to the left ear cup with some manufacturer's restrictions regarding how you adjust it. You can only bend it towards your mouth. You'll use its revolving hinge to move the entire microphone, which connects to the ear cup. These are wired headphones, and the detachable cable runs from the left ear cup with a three-button in-line remote. They only have a single colorway, 'Black.'

7.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.63 lbs
Clamping Force
1.3 lbs

These headphones feel good to wear. They have plenty of cushioning along the headband and cozy velour ear pads. You can also easily replace them. They distribute their average weight well, but if you have an average or larger head, you'll feel the clamping force more than people with smaller heads. The ear cups swivel up and down slightly to adjust the pressure and seal evenly, but the larger you set the fit, the more focused the clamping force becomes. For instance, if you have a medium-sized head, you can wear glasses without experiencing much pressure.

7.1
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
Not OS specific
Ease Of Use Good
Feedback Good
Call/Music Control Yes
Volume Control Yes
Microphone Control Mute/Unmute
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls Multi function

The controls are decent. You get a three-button in-line remote. There's a readily accessible mute indicated by a red line, and these are passive headphones, so you won't hear any announcement that your mic is muted. The controls include the basic suite of pause/play, track skipping, and answering and ending calls. It's clicky, so you can sense when commands register, and the volume knob has a maximum setting to monitor how high your volume is set. There's a quirk that when the mic is muted, you can only pause/play media, and it will also lower the volume (whether you want that or not).

Mic mute:

  • Slide up and down: Mutes and unmutes the mic.

Volume wheel:

  • Scroll up or down: Raises or lowers the volume.

Multi-function button:

  • Single click: Pause/pause, answer/end call.
  • Double click: Skip to next track.
  • Triple click: Skip to previous track.

5.4
Design
Portability
L 7.9" (20.0 cm)
W 6.0" (15.2 cm)
H 4.2" (10.7 cm)
Volume 198.55 in³ (3,253.64 cm³)
Transmitter Required No

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 2nd Gen are inadequate for portability. That makes sense, given that wired headphones for gaming typically don't travel far. Still, they take up considerable space wherever you stash them because they don't collapse down or have ear cups that fold flat. They have a case, which makes it less stressful to pop them in a bag, but they certainly take up a lot of real estate in any bag, too.

8.0
Design
Case
Type Hard case
L 9.4" (23.9 cm)
W 7.2" (18.4 cm)
H 5.5" (14.1 cm)
Volume 376.76 in³ (6,174.03 cm³)

They have a great case. It's a rather large semi-hardshell with a molded interior to accommodate the headphones, and it zips open with a good amount of padding. A small pocket, affixed with a hook-and-loop backing, can hold one spare cable. Although the pocket is small, you can move it around the interior of the case, which is interesting but not especially helpful. You can see in the interior view that it's about as small as the manufacturer can make the case considering the dimensions of the headphones. It'll offer protection from drops and bumps, but the fabric-covered exterior won't fully ward off water spills.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) have good build quality. You can remove and adjust the faux leather padding on the headband connected via hook-and-loop and the velour earpads. The metal yokes and hinges feel solid and don't creak. Both cables are functional and pose no issues.

The only point of concern is that the manufacturer warns you not to bend the gooseneck mic up or down. However, you can bend it towards your mouth. Otherwise, any position adjustments ought to be made where the mic's swiveling hinge connects to the ear cup's housing, which moves the entire mic. During an intense game, a user may absentmindedly bend the gooseneck and cause damage.

7.0
Design
Stability

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 2nd Generation are decently stable. They shift with small movements and come loose with dynamic head shakes. Nevertheless, for their usage—gaming—they're totally fine, barring an at-home Dance Dance Revolution session.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation)
  • Quick Start Guide
  • 1/8" TRRRS to 1/8" TRRS cable (for tablets, smartphones, and laptops)
  • 1/8" TRRRS to computer audio mic Y-splitter 1/8" TRS (PC cable)
  • 1/4" to 1/8" adapter
  • Hard case
  • Warranty paper

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
0.03 dB
Treble Amount
1 dB

These have a neutral and bright sound profile. They have some rumble in the bass, though it tapers off slightly. High-bass sounds gain some added thump for bassy sound effects, but not too much. Through the midrange, they sound natural, so spoken voices, lead parts of soundtracks, and sound effects playback without exaggerations. Details in the high registers of voices are gently recessed due to the de-emphasized low treble. Lastly, a prominent peak in the mid-treble causes sibilants like S and T sounds and splashy cymbals to sound shrill and piercing.

7.0
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.62 dB

These have decent frequency response consistency. For the most part, the midrange and treble sound very consistent between wears. However, they're fussy and inconsistent about fit placement when it comes to predictable bass output. You can experience a drop in bass delivery if you have long hair or glasses that break the headphones' seal. People with larger heads tend to get more consistent frequency response results, and that's likely related to the greater clamping force the headphones apply. You'll want to take the time to ensure they sit right because otherwise, you can end up with the bass sounding too loud or too quiet relative to the rest of the sound.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
9.2
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
1.06 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
21.81 Hz
Low-Bass
-1.51 dB
Mid-Bass
-0.86 dB
High-Bass
0.44 dB

These headphones have superb bass accuracy. While they very slightly roll off the lowest bass notes, they supply a good amount of thump and body for most people. You'll have no trouble hearing the rumbles of explosions going off or distant thuds and footsteps in your games.

8.8
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
1.63 dB
Low-Mid
0.01 dB
Mid-Mid
-1.3 dB
High-Mid
-2.2 dB

These headphones have excellent mid-accuracy. The lower mids are very neutral, with some scooped under-emphasis towards the high-mids. This means, for the most part, your friends in voice chat sound basically like themselves, and in-game characters do as well, but vocals can sound slightly recessed.

5.6
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
6.23 dB
Low-Treble
-3.08 dB
Mid-Treble
5.95 dB
High-Treble
-1.84 dB

The headphones have middling treble accuracy. Under-emphasis in the low and mid-treble ranges veil details of vocal articulation. Meanwhile, a significant peak in the mid-treble produces overly bright and shrill cymbal harmonics and vocal harmonics, which can fatigue your ears.

6.3
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
2.68 dB
Dips
1.51 dB

These headphones have passable peaks and dips performance. The frequency response is fairly neutral from the bass into the low-treble region, which encompasses most music. A small bump to the high bass adds a touch of body to bass. The mids are natural sounding if slightly recessed, despite the narrow bump that adds presence. However, the dip in the low treble dulls the details of vocals. The large peak in the mid-treble causes sibilants like S and T sounds and harmonics in cymbals to reproduce with shrillness, fatiguing your ears.

8.7
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.3
Weighted Phase Mismatch
2.2
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
0.73
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.69

The overall imaging performance is excellent. This is in keeping with other products we've tested from this manufacturer, indicating good ergonomics and quality control. Most group delay and phase of the bass, mids, and treble are well below the audibility threshold with generally well-matched L/R drivers. However, the peak in the mid-bass phase response is audible as a low rattle in both drivers when sweeping through the frequencies, but it's difficult to detect when listening to your usual media. Keep in mind these results can vary between units.

5.7
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
2.53 dB
PRTF Size (Avg.)
4.42 dB
PRTF Distance
12.55 dB
Openness
5.4
Acoustic Space Excitation
2.5

These headphones have a middling passive soundstage. With closed-back headphones, you can generally expect that audio will seem like it's coming from inside your head and close to you. This is unlike open-back headphones, like the Beyerdynamic DT 900 PRO X, which sound more spacious, wide, and open.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No App
7.7
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.254
WHD @ 100
0.150

These headphones have good weight harmonic distortion performance. They exhibit roughly the same weighted harmonic through the bass up to the mid-treble range, with a drop-off in the mid-treble. These fall well below the threshold of audibility, and your audio will sound clean without audible distortion or interference.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
No Firmware
Power
Passive
Connection
Wired
Codec
PCM, 24-bit, 48kHz
EQ
No EQ
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
Boom

These are the test settings used for these headphones. Our results are only valid when used in this configuration.

Isolation
4.5
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-11.21 dB
Noise Cancelling No
Bass
0.08 dB
Mid
-10.84 dB
Treble
-23.92 dB

These headphones have poor noise isolation. While it's not unusual that passive headphones like these don't suppress environmental noise as well as something with active noise cancellation, they still perform worse than their closed-back audio-only cousin, the Beyerdynamic DT 700 PRO X. Even so, they hush the high-pitched whine of computer fans somewhat, and ambient chatter is reduced.

7.8
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
34.93 dB

These have very good leakage performance. The sound that escapes your headphones is rather quiet and not particularly disruptive in environments louder than the average home. The bulk of the mids and highs leak evenly, so audio content sounds thin, but voices, snares, cymbals, and most lead instruments bleed. This all depends on how loud your environment is and how high you set your volume.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
No
In-Line
No
Boom
Yes
Detachable Boom
No
Mic Yes
8.0
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
LFE
20 Hz
FR Std. Dev.
4.34 dB
HFE
6,177.3 Hz
Weighted THD
0.371
Gain
32.7 dB

The Beyerdynamic MMX 300 (2nd Generation) has a great microphone. It captures your voice with a good amount of body and simultaneously doesn't sound bloated. This is unlike some headset mics, which commonly cut low frequencies to remedy overly boomy-sounding mics but end up sounding thin. In contrast, this mic's midrange sounds true-to-life too. While some sibilance (on S and T) is audible at the top end, it doesn't sound distracting. Higher register speaking voices can encounter some loss of harmonic detail, but it won't interfere with your understandability.

7.5
Microphone
Noise Handling
SpNR
37.77 dB
Noise Gate
Always On
Speech + Pink Noise Handling
7.5
Speech + Pink Noise Audio Sample
Speech + Subway Noise Handling
7.5
Speech + Subway Noise Audio Sample

The mic's noise handling performance is good. While some background noise remains present, your voice sits forward in the mix. The mic significantly reduces constant and droning kinds of noise compared to speech, but it's still audible in the background. At no point does the noise overwhelm your speech, but irregular sounds can still get loud and compete with your voice.

Active Features
0
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
No Battery
Continuous Battery Life
N/A
Additional Charges
N/A
Total Battery Life
N/A
Charge Time
N/A
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
No
Passive Playback
Passive Headphone
Charging Port None
0
Active Features
App Support
App Name No App
iOS No
Android No
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
No
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
No
Connectivity
9.9
Connectivity
Wired Connection
Analog Audio
Yes
USB Audio
No
Detachable
Yes
Length
4.33 ft (1.32 m)
Connector
1/8" TRRS
Latency - Analog
0.2 ms
Latency - USB
N/A
Recorded Latency
Recorded Latency Connection Analog

These have outstanding connectivity. You get two cables, one for use with laptops, tablets, and smartphones (if your phone still has a headphone jack) and a second cable for connecting to your PC with a Y-splitter. These each have in-line remotes with controls, plus there's an adapter when you need an analog connection with a larger 1/4" TRS jack.

0
Connectivity
Bluetooth Connection
Bluetooth Version
No Bluetooth
Multi-Device Pairing
No
Quick Pair (Android)
No
Quick Pair (iOS)
No
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Latency - SBC
N/A
Latency - aptX
N/A
Latency - aptX Adaptive (High Quality)
N/A
Latency - aptX Adaptive (Low Latency)
N/A
Latency - LDAC
N/A
Recorded Latency
N/A
Recorded Latency Codec No Bluetooth Audio
AAC Support
No
0
Connectivity
Wireless Connection (Dongle)
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Latency - Dongle
N/A
Recorded Latency
N/A
Connectivity
PC Compatibility
Analog
Audio + Microphone
Wired USB
No
Non-BT Wireless
No

You can use these headphones via analog for full audio and microphone support with your PC.

Connectivity
PlayStation Compatibility
PS4 Analog
Audio + Microphone
PS4 Wired USB
No
PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
PS5 Analog
Audio + Microphone
PS5 Wired USB
No
PS5 Non-BT Wireless
No

Connecting the headphones' analog jack to the PlayStation controller supplies you with full audio and microphone compatibility.

Connectivity
Xbox Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
Audio + Microphone
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
Xbox Series X|S Analog
Audio + Microphone
Xbox Series X|S Wired USB
No
Xbox Series X|S Non-BT Wireless
No

You can gain full microphone and audio support by plugging the headset's jack into your Xbox controller.

0
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
No Base/Dock
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
No Base/Dock