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We've recently released our Test Bench 1.7 update for Headphones! Read the Noise isolation R&D Article to learn more.

Sennheiser HD 25 Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.6
Reviewed Feb 28, 2024 at 09:24 am
Latest change: Writing modified Mar 25, 2024 at 01:19 pm
Sennheiser HD 25 Picture
6.8
Neutral Sound
4.4
Commute/Travel
5.3
Sports/Fitness
5.0
Office
3.9
Wireless Gaming
5.9
Wired Gaming
1.7
Phone Calls

The Sennheiser HD 25 are no-fuss, lightweight, on-ear headphones. As wired-only headphones, their comfortable design with a neat headband that splits for added stability aims at DJs or anybody who wants to be the life of the party. Their long cable works for reaching around equipment while staying connected. You can flip your left ear cup back to help you mix and sync tracks without removing the headphones. Besides tweaks with useability in mind, these don't add much in the way of technological advances, but they're also an industry standard for DJs.

Our Verdict

6.8 Neutral Sound

The Sennheiser HD 25 are adequate for neutral sound. Their bassy profile with warm treble exaggerates the boom of your music and produces round vocals and cymbals. The mids sound fairly natural, although the bass pushes them down in the mix slightly. The sound works very well for dance and hip-hop genres, but you might want something else for audio engineering.

Pros
  • Replaceable parts for customization.
Cons
  • Fairly bass-heavy and warm.
4.4 Commute/Travel

The Sennheiser HD 25 are poorly suited to commutes and traveling. Despite their smaller on-ear design than most over-ear headphones, they aren't very portable. You can't collapse them, and there's no case. In addition, due to their on-ear design, they have poor noise isolation, so besides muffling crying babies on planes, they don't isolate you from the low rumbles of engines. On the upside, their comfortable fit means you can wear them for long stretches.

Pros
  • Comfortable design.
Cons
  • Poor noise isolation.
  • No controls or microphone.
5.3 Sports/Fitness

The Sennheiser HD 25 are inadequate for sports and fitness. They are wired headphones, so you don't gain the convenience of wireless listening, and the cable itself is quite long for personal devices. Besides that, the bassy sound works well for pumping up a workout session. In addition, the stability of the on-ear headphones, with the added benefit of a stabilizing split headband, works better than most on-ears. However, truly dynamic movements like box jumps will still knock the cans off. You also don't get any handy playback controls, which can interrupt your workout if you need to pause or skip a track.

Pros
  • Split headband for better stability.
Cons
  • No controls or microphone.
5.0 Office

The Sennheiser HD 25 are disappointing for in-office use. Their comfort, light weight, and long cable may suit most office spaces if you listen to music or podcasts. However, their noise isolation only suppresses high-pitched sounds, like fans and ambient chatter, and isn't very effective. You also don't get a mic, so if you need to hop on a call, you'll need an outboard mic.

Pros
  • Comfortable design.
Cons
  • Poor noise isolation.
  • No controls or microphone.
3.9 Wireless Gaming

You can't use the Sennheiser HD for wireless gaming because they only have analog connectivity.

5.9 Wired Gaming

The Sennheiser HD 25 are middling for wired gaming. They don't have an integrated microphone or onboard controls, so a separate mic is necessary if you need to speak with friends. Otherwise, their long cable offers flexibility with where you sit, and their bassy sound makes immersive elements like thumping and deep atmospheric effects more prominent. They don't offer much in the way of localization of sounds due to their closed backs and lack of surround sound.

Pros
  • Comfortable design.
Cons
  • No controls or microphone.
  • No additional surround sound or EQ.
1.7 Phone Calls

The Sennheiser HD 25 don't have an integrated microphone, so you would need a separate mic for calls.

  • 6.8 Neutral Sound
  • 4.4 Commute/Travel
  • 5.3 Sports/Fitness
  • 5.0 Office
  • 3.9 Wireless Gaming
  • 5.9 Wired Gaming
  • 1.7 Phone Calls
  1. Updated Mar 25, 2024: This review was updated to compare the Build Quality to the AIAIAI TMA-2 DJ and the Sound Profile to the Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless.
  2. Updated Mar 13, 2024: The V-MODA Crossfade 3 Wireless were added to the Sound Profile section for a bassy-sounding set of Bluetooth headphones.
  3. Updated Mar 05, 2024: Thanks to user feedback, we've clarified information about the headphones' noise floor.
  4. Updated Feb 28, 2024: Review published.
  5. Updated Feb 23, 2024: Early access published.
  6. Updated Feb 20, 2024: Our testers have started testing this product.
  7. Updated Jan 22, 2024: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  8. Updated Jan 19, 2024: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

Our unit is 'Black,' the most common color variant of the Sennheiser HD 25. Otherwise, they come in 'Blue' and a limited edition, 'White' color. Besides color palettes, they're all the same model. If you find another variant, please let us know in the forums.

Compared To Other Headphones

The Sennheiser HD 25 are plastic on-ear headphones with analog connectivity. Each model in the HD 25 line is quite similar, with minor differences in accessories and creative comforts. In the tier below are the more spartan Sennheiser HD 25 Light with a cumbersome Y-cable, and above are the Sennheiser HD 25 Plus, which uses a different connector to the ear cups and includes a carry pouch, and spare earpads and coiled cable. Sennheiser also produces a Bluetooth-capable entry, the Sennheiser HD 250BT. While you can use most analog headphones for DJ sets, this line has some unique features, like a splittable headband, that set them apart from other popular picks like the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x, which fit quite differently and sound more neutral with a less bassy tuning or the recording studio standard Sennheiser HD 280 Pro 2016, that are bulky and clamp down more, but provide a less boomy low-end.

For more analog headphones, check out our picks for the best wired headphones, and if you're setting the scene for the party, we've narrowed down the best DJ headphones. Searching for the smaller cans? Try the best on-ear headphones.

Sony MDR-7506

Both the Sennheiser HD 25 and Sony MDR-7506 have utilitarian designs prioritizing repairability. You can replace almost every part of these headphones. However, besides the metal hinge that flips the Sennheiser's left ear cup forward or backward, they're plasticky headphones but lightweight. Their long cable is straight and detachable, and they fit on-ears with a bassy profile. Whereas the Sony are plastic, they have metal integrated throughout the housing. While they're over-ears, they have shallow ear cups. Their long coil cable is surprisingly hefty but not detachable, even though you can unscrew and replace the drivers. They sound more neutral than the Sennheiser, particularly in the low end.

AIAIAI TMA-2 DJ

The AIAIAI TMA-2 DJ and Sennheiser HD 25 headphones are designed for DJs or fans of bass-heavy music with on-ear designs and swappable cables. The AIAIAI sound more bass-heavy and also roll off the high-mids and treble much more. Their design is modular, and you can swap out and replace nearly every component of the AIAIAI with other parts, but as is, they’re less comfortable, and you can’t pivot the ear cups at all. The Sennheiser cans still sound bassy but offer more treble. The unique splitting headband allows them to fit with better stability and comfort. For their overall better utility, the Sennheiser are the better pick for most DJs and bass fans, but if you’re willing to spend more on other components, the AIAIAI can offer you more flexibility.

Audio-Technica ATH-M50x

The Audio-Technica ATH-M50x and Sennheiser HD 25 are both popular wired headphones for enthusiasts and DJs alike. One distinction is that the Audio-Technica are over-ear headphones and weigh much more than the lightweight Sennheiser. They supply a more neutral amount of bass and can fold down smaller with a travel bag. You get two extra detachable audio cables, and both use different but proprietary cable connectors. In contrast, the Sennheiser fit on-ears. They feel comfortable and don't clamp as hard as the Audio-Technica. The headband can split, which is unique and helps to stabilize the fit. Their bass response is notably more prominent than the Audio-Technica.

Sennheiser HD 280 Pro 2016

The Sennheiser HD 25 and Sennheiser HD 280 Pro 2016 are both aimed at enthusiasts but have different sound profiles. As a set of on-ear headphones, the HD 25 fit and feel quite different, weighing quite a bit less, and have some added benefits like the left ear cup, which you can flip forward or backward. They have a detachable cable and unimpressive noise isolation but a unique splitting headband for added security on your head. They sound more boomy with a similarly warm top-end. The over-ear-fitting HD 280 Pro 2016 are also plasticky in build, notably chunkier in size, and clamp harder. You can collapse them down, which is handy. They are more neutral sounding than the HD 25 and less bloated in the high bass registers.

Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless

The Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless and Sennheiser HD 25 are on-ear headphones with prominent bass emphasis. You can use the Pioneer DJ over Bluetooth or via analog. Their build is plastic with hinges to collapse them down smaller. Because they house batteries, they weigh more, although they aren't heavy. The Sennheiser are passive-only headphones, which are lighter but don't collapse down smaller. While the Pioneer DJ headphones have rotating ear cups, the Sennheiser's right ear cup can pivot forward or backward instead. They use a unique split headband design to help with overall stability, but neither pair will stay put if you headbang.

V-MODA Crossfade 3 Wireless

The Sennheiser HD 25 and V-MODA Crossfade 3 Wireless are bass-heavy headphones. The Sennheiser cans are wired-only and fit on-ear. They're simple, lightweight, and you can replace parts, but they're mainly plastic. The V-MODA headphones are over-ears, and you can listen to them wirelessly or wired. They have an EQ, which the Sennheiser don't have, but it only works when you're listening over Bluetooth. Their build quality is more durable, and they fold up, but you can't articulate the ear cups to listen with one ear out like on the Sennheiser. The V-MODA are better for on-the-go use, but the Sennheiser are more suitable for DJing.

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Type On-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless No
Transducer Dynamic

The Sennheiser HD 25 headphones are lightweight on-ear headphones with closed backs. The housing and headband are plasticky with exposed, detachable cabling that runs through the right ear cup and along the headband to the left ear cup. They have faux-leather padding along the headband and ear padsโ€”which you can replace. Otherwise, these are minimalist in design. One of their most unique features is the headband, which can split for greater fit adjustments. One of the few pops of color is the red cable to differentiate the right ear cup at a glance. You can flip the left ear cup forward or backward. Our unit is 'Black,' and other colors include 'Blue,' and the limited edition 'White.'

7.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.3 lbs
Clamping Force
0.7 lbs

The Sennheiser HD 25 provide good comfort. They're very lightweight compared to other headphones popular with DJs and enthusiasts, and they don't clamp particularly hard, either. For on-ear headphones, they also feel comfortable for long stretches (even if you wear glasses), and despite the visually sparse padding along the headband, they don't add much pressure to the top of your head. You can also split the headband to distribute their weight better. Splitting the headband allows the headphones to stay in place better if you flip the ear cup and accommodate various head sizes. However, if you do wear glasses, flipping the ear cup forward can bump into your glasses. The downside of the headphones is that they warm up quickly, and on-ear headphones, by design, can only feel so comfortable because they apply pressure to your ears.

0
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
No Controls
Ease Of Use No Controls
Feedback No Controls
Call/Music Control No
Volume Control No
Microphone Control No
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls No
5.8
Design
Portability
L 7.6" (19.2 cm)
W 6.7" (17.1 cm)
H 2.7" (6.8 cm)
Volume 136.70 inยณ (2,240.08 cmยณ)
Transmitter Required No

The Sennheiser HD 25 are middling headphones for portability. They're not particularly large, but they don't collapse down to a smaller footprint, and the ear cups can't rotate flat either. However, their narrow, straight cable and lightweight frame aren't bulky, but they definitely take up space in a bag. Because they don't get more compact, their portability is on par with collapsible over-ears like the Audio-Technica ATH-M50x.

0
Design
Case
Type No case
L N/A
W N/A
H N/A
Volume N/A
6.5
Design
Build Quality

These headphones have alright build quality. While the lightweight frame and replaceable parts are positive build choices for the very practical design, they're also very plasticky, besides the metal hinge to pivot the left ear cup. The exposed cabling is useful for replacing the cable if the day comes that it breaks, but it also makes it more vulnerable to damage than if it were sealed into the housing. Our unit arrived out of the box with some slightly loose padding on the headband where it's glued to the headband's plastic. For slightly better build quality in a set of on-ears, the AIAIAI TMA-2 DJ feel more solid and are easier to repair and replace parts. However, you might miss the padded headband on the Sennheiser cans.

7.5
Design
Stability

These headphones have good stability. Unlike most headphones, the headband splits so you can dial in not only their weight distribution but also create essentially a second point of contact for the headband to grip on your head. This accommodates different hairstyles and head shapes. You can keep them on with small movements and bobs. They can come loose and fall off if you get into your music and headbang. In all, that's normal for on-ear headphones.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Sennheiser HD 25 headphones
  • TRS audio cable (x1)
  • 1/8" to 1/4" adapter

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
1.33 dB
Treble Amount
-3.1 dB

The Sennheiser HD 25 are tuned with exaggerated bass and an overall warm sound. You can use them for casual listening, and they work well for dance music, hip-hop, electro, and other bassy music genres. The significant bump in the mid-bass through the low-mids emphasizes the punch and boom of bass guitar notes struck and can sound slightly muddy with complicated song mixes. The sound of vocals is relatively well-balanced through the rest of the midrange and into the low-treble region. However, the exaggerated bass can push mids and treble somewhat to the back of the mix. A significant dip in the mid-treble de-emphasizes detail in cymbal hits and other sibilants like S and T sounds.

The tuning makes sense for DJs, considering that hearing bass and rhythm are key to synchronizing tracks, as are vocals. With the peak halfway through the mid-treble, you won't miss out on any high-pitched subtleties that can inform tracking decisions, but it can sound piercing. These headphones are sensitive, which makes them capable of getting loud, and if connected to a low noise source, they don't add any noise to your audio. However, due to their sensitivity, they will noticeably amplify any noise in the signal chain if it's already present. If you don't see yourself needing the sensitivity and want a more standard sensitivity and impedance in DJ-style headphones, you can also check out the Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1BT Wireless. If you want a broadly similar tuning but in a set of analog and Bluetooth headphones, the V-MODA Crossfade 3 Wireless can get you close with light EQ adjustments.

7.6
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.48 dB

These headphones have good frequency response consistency. They can exhibit consistent results with careful placement. However, on-ears can be slightly finicky compared to over-ears because they don't rest the ear pads around your ear, which is a smoother surface on virtually everyone, rather than the contours of an ear. So you'll want to pay attention when you put them on so that bass and treble parts don't vary between wears. In this regard, the ear cup, which you can pivot forward or backward to free your ear, can allow you to hear the room or someone who needs to chat in the middle of your DJ set without fully removing the headphones. This is convenient, but it can mitigate some instances where you'd have to remove the headphones and possibly hear an inconsistent frequency response between wears.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
7.0
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
4.79 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
16.58 Hz
Low-Bass
0.76 dB
Mid-Bass
4.89 dB
High-Bass
7.24 dB

The bass accuracy is decent. A sizeable exaggeration that peaks in the high-bass region yields punchy low-end, particularly, the attack of bass instruments like kick drums and plucked bass strings sound prominent with thump. These don't sound overly rumbly when compared to the bonkers amounts of low-bass in a product like the Skullcandy Hesh ANC Wireless (a brand well-known for testing the limits of how much you really like bassy headphones), and they liberally emphasize those low-bass frequencies.

8.2
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.41 dB
Low-Mid
3.15 dB
Mid-Mid
-1.05 dB
High-Mid
0.02 dB

These have great mid accuracy. A bump in the low mids that continues from the bass can make busy songs with a lot of bass and mid-range parts sound slightly bloated. However, throughout the rest of the mids, the sound is quite neutral, meaning that apart from the effects of bass exaggeration, which can overwhelm how well you can hear voices, guitars, and synth pads, it sounds fairly clear, if a bit recessed.

6.1
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
5.62 dB
Low-Treble
-1.72 dB
Mid-Treble
1.33 dB
High-Treble
-10.47 dB

The treble accuracy is mediocre. For roughly half of the low-treble region, the frequency response follows a neutral tuning and sounds like the highest notes of a guitar come across as balanced. However, the dip through the low-treble and the mid-treble dulls the harmonic content of vocals, for instance. This rounds out the overall treble with a warmer tone. The rest of the mid-treble has a prominent peak that can cause early fatigue with its piercing exaggeration of harmonics and sibilants like S and T. However, that can also lend some airiness to the top end of your audio.

6.1
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
2.82 dB
Dips
1.71 dB

The peaks and dips performance is passable. With the bump in the bass and low-mid regions, the sound is definitely bass-heavy and boomy. Compared to the somewhat recessed mid-mids, you'll notice that some lower-pitched vocals and rhythm guitars can sound slightly buried under the bass. A dip in the low treble warms up sibilant sounds like S and T. Meanwhile, a significant peak in the treble lends a somewhat piercing exaggeration to other high-pitched sibilants, harmonics, and attack on percussion, which can prematurely cause your ears fatigue.

8.1
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.21
Weighted Phase Mismatch
3.41
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
1.93
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.83

The headphones have very good imaging performance. This indicates that the quality control and ergonomics are very good, which aligns with other Sennheiser products we've reviewed. While there's some group delay, it's in sub-bass frequencies that you can't hear. There's a slight phase mismatch through the high-bass and mids, but it's not noticeable with real-life content and doesn't impact the overall listening experience.

3.6
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
4.61 dB
PRTF Size (Avg.)
1.64 dB
PRTF Distance
4.07 dB
Openness
6.0
Acoustic Space Excitation
1.9

These headphones have a poor soundstage overall. Most closed-back headphones, by design, have this trait, and these are somewhat spacious for the type of headphones. Sounds feel like they're inside your head, as opposed to spread around your head, as with open-back headphones.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No App
6.8
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.708
WHD @ 100
0.232

These headphones perform with reasonable amounts of weighted harmonic distortion. Most of the distortion resides in the low bass with a peak in the mid-treble that corresponds with the dip in the frequency response. The distortion predictably gets worse at high volumes, but you won't hear it unless you listen in a quiet room with extremely keen ears to audio with a ton of deep bass content. Because these headphones are sensitive, they noticeably amplify the noise floor of whatever they're connected to, so they can sound noisy if the source is noisy, but this isn't the same as harmonic distortion.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
No Firmware
Power
Passive
Connection
Wired
Codec
PCM, 24-bit, 48kHz
EQ
No EQ
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
No Microphone

These are the settings used to test these headphones. Our results are only valid when used in this configuration.

Isolation
3.9
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-9.65 dB
Noise Cancelling No
Bass
0.57 dB
Mid
-8.32 dB
Treble
-22.01 dB

The Sennheiser HD 25 have poor noise isolation. On-ear designs generally struggle with passive isolation because they essentially make do with clamping force and muffling materials to seal in your ears, unlike in-ear headphones that fully seal your canal. These headphones reduce the loudness of high-pitched sounds, like clinking glasses and some ambient chatter, but not by a lot. As with most passive headphones, they don't suppress bassy sounds whatsoever.

If you're a DJ, for instance, you'll still hear the thump and rumble of what you're playing in the room's speakers. While not the healthiest solution for your hearing, to combat poor isolation, the headphones can get loud.

8.3
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
31.85 dB

The leakage performance is great overall. Bass and midrange sounds are sealed in from those around you quite well compared to low conversation levels. All those lower notes and thumpiness stay in the headphones. With that said, a rather large section of high-mids and treble escapes, so folks nearby can hear the treble content of your music, including bright lead instruments and cymbals at average home levels. It's not perfect, but it's difficult to really seal in everything.

How well others can hear your audio depends on your environment: on the bus, the person next to you will hear your music (depending on how high you set the volume), but in an office, passersby won't hear it. If you're a DJ, it won't matter.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
No
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No
Mic No
0
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
N/A
LFE
N/A
FR Std. Dev.
N/A
HFE
N/A
Weighted THD
N/A
Gain
N/A
0
Microphone
Noise Handling
SpNR
N/A
Noise Gate
No
Speech + Pink Noise Handling
N/A
Speech + Pink Noise Audio Sample N/A
Speech + Subway Noise Handling
N/A
Speech + Subway Noise Audio Sample N/A
Active Features
0
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
No Battery
Continuous Battery Life
N/A
Additional Charges
N/A
Total Battery Life
N/A
Charge Time
N/A
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
No
Passive Playback
Passive Headphone
Charging Port None
0
Active Features
App Support
App Name No App
iOS No
Android No
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
No
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
No
Connectivity
9.9
Connectivity
Wired Connection
Analog Audio
Yes
USB Audio
No
Detachable
Yes
Length
4.82 ft (1.47 m)
Connector
1/8" TRS
Latency - Analog
0.2 ms
Latency - USB
N/A
Recorded Latency
Recorded Latency Connection Analog

The headphones have incredible wired connectivity. You get a single 1/8" TRS cable. It fits into the headband, connects to the ear cups, and hangs down along the right side of the headphones. You can replace the cable if it ever breaks because it's detachable. However, you may have to hunt down the same cable from Sennheiser because it's an uncommon connection. Also in the box is a 1/4" male to 1/8" female adapter.

0
Connectivity
Bluetooth Connection
Bluetooth Version
No Bluetooth
Multi-Device Pairing
No
Quick Pair (Android)
No
Quick Pair (iOS)
No
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Latency - SBC
N/A
Latency - aptX
N/A
Latency - aptX Adaptive (High Quality)
N/A
Latency - aptX Adaptive (Low Latency)
N/A
Latency - LDAC
N/A
Recorded Latency
N/A
Recorded Latency Codec No Bluetooth Audio
AAC Support
No
0
Connectivity
Wireless Connection (Dongle)
Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Latency - Dongle
N/A
Recorded Latency
N/A
Connectivity
PC Compatibility
Analog
Audio Only
Wired USB
No
Non-BT Wireless
No

You can connect the headphones to your PC. The generous cable length wonโ€™t hamper your ability to plug into a PC tower on the floor, either. Given that these headphones have a 70-ohm impedance, you can drive them without an amp.

Connectivity
PlayStation Compatibility
PS4 Analog
Audio Only
PS4 Wired USB
No
PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
PS5 Analog
Audio Only
PS5 Wired USB
No
PS5 Non-BT Wireless
No

These headphones can connect to your PlayStation's controller via an analog connection but only support audio. If you want to talk with friends, you'll need a separate microphone or a gaming headset.

Connectivity
Xbox Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
Audio Only
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
Xbox Series X|S Analog
Audio Only
Xbox Series X|S Wired USB
No
Xbox Series X|S Non-BT Wireless
No

Plugging in the cable to your Xbox controller for audio-only works fine with these headphones. However, you'll need a separate microphone if you want to speak with your friends while gaming.

0
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
No Base/Dock
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
No Base/Dock