Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.0
Reviewed Jul 23, 2021 at 10:53 am
Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II Picture
7.0
Gaming
7.7
Mobile/Tablet
7.8
Office
6.4
Programming
6.9
Entertainment / HTPC
Connectivity Wireless
Size
Compact (75%)
Mechanical
No

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II looks nearly identical to the keyboards you find on a Lenovo laptop. It has a rubber TrackPoint between the G, H, and B keys and the left, right, and middle-click buttons at the bottom of the board. It has a low profile with one incline setting, and it has chiclet-style keycaps and scissor switches, which feel light and responsive. You can pair it with one device via Bluetooth and one via its USB receiver. Unfortunately, it doesn't have any backlighting, which may be annoying to some people. Also, the Fn key is placed right below the Shift key, which may cause people who are used to the Ctrl key being there to accidentally hit it. There's no way to reprogram the two keys in the software.

Our Verdict

7.0 Gaming

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II scores decent for gaming, but it isn't for this use. It has high latency and no backlighting, and while it has dedicated software, you can only change the pointer speed and set macros to just the F12 key.

Pros
  • Low pre-travel distance.
  • Light operating force.
Cons
  • Only the F12 key can be reprogrammed.
  • No backlighting.
7.7 Mobile/Tablet

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is good for use with mobile devices and tablets. It's a wireless board that you can use via its USB receiver or Bluetooth. It's very compact and thin, and it has an integrated pointing stick and mouse click buttons, so you don't need to bring a mouse with you while traveling. Although some keys don't work on macOS, Linux, and mobile devices, all alphanumerical keys work on most operating systems. Unfortunately, there's no backlighting, and you can only pair it with one device via Bluetooth and one via USB receiver, which may not be enough for some people.

Pros
  • Good typing quality.
  • Has Bluetooth support.
  • Integrated pointing stick and mouse click buttons.
Cons
  • No backlighting.
7.8 Office

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is good for office use. While it isn't as ergonomic as some dedicated office boards, it should still feel comfortable to type on, thanks to its low profile, incline setting, and light-feeling scissor switches. It's very quiet, which is great for an office environment, and its compact size doesn't take up much space on a desk. Unfortunately, it doesn't have backlighting, and you can only pair it with one device via Bluetooth and one via USB receiver, which may not be enough for some people.

Pros
  • Good typing quality.
  • Has Bluetooth support.
  • Very quiet scissor switches.
Cons
  • Only the F12 key can be reprogrammed.
  • No backlighting.
6.4 Programming

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is mediocre for programming. You can only pair it with one device via Bluetooth and one via USB receiver, which may not be enough for some people. Also, there's no backlighting, and while it has customization software, you can only set macros to the F12 key. Its low profile should feel comfortable even without a wrist rest, and its scissor switches provide a light typing experience. Also, it's compatible with many operating systems, but some keys may not work on macOS or Linux.

Pros
  • Good typing quality.
  • Has Bluetooth support.
Cons
  • Only the F12 key can be reprogrammed.
  • No backlighting.
6.9 Entertainment / HTPC

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is okay for a home theater PC setup. While it doesn't have dedicated media keys or backlighting like other HTPC keyboards do, it does have media hotkeys, and you can control the cursor with the pointing stick nub above the B key and the mouse click buttons at the bottom of the board.

Pros
  • Good typing quality.
  • Has Bluetooth support.
  • Integrated pointing stick and mouse click buttons.
Cons
  • Only the F12 key can be reprogrammed.
  • No backlighting.
  • No volume control wheel.
  • 7.0 Gaming
  • 7.7 Mobile/Tablet
  • 7.8 Office
  • 6.4 Programming
  • 6.9 Entertainment / HTPC

Check Price

Black ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II
SEE PRICE
Amazon.com

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Height
0.6" (1.4 cm)
Width 12.0" (30.5 cm)
Depth
6.5" (16.4 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
N/A
Weight
1.17 lbs (0.532 kg)

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is a 75% board with a dedicated F-row and navigation keys, including arrow keys. Also, it has a TrackPoint and mouse click buttons.

7.0
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material ABS

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II feels decently well-built. It has a plastic chassis and baseplate that flex quite a bit, but they don't feel too flimsy or easily breakable. The pad-printed ABS keycaps feel stable and don't wobble, and they have the same chiclet style found on laptops. There are four rubber pads on the underside that hold the board in place, and there are also red rubber tips on the edge of the incline feet. While the incline feet don't feel very sturdy, they open sideways, which means they shouldn't fold in if you push the board forward. Some people have reported that the incline feet break easily, so let us know in the discussions if you have this problem, too.

7.5
Design
Ergonomics
Board Design
Straight
Minimum Incline
1.5°
Medium Incline
N/A
Maximum Incline
Wrist Rest No

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is straight and low-profile, with one incline setting. While it doesn't come with a wrist rest, the board is very flat and comfortable enough without one. The space below the keys isn't considered a wrist rest, and unless you have small hands, it's likely too narrow to place your wrists there.

0
Design
Backlighting
Backlighting No
Color
No Backlighting
Individually Backlit Keys
No
Color Mixing
No Backlighting
Effects
No
Programmable
No
Design
Cable & Connector
Detachable
Yes (Charge Only)
Length 3.6 ft (1.1 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
USB type-C

The USB-A to USB-C charging cable is made of rubber and retains packaging kinks.

7.5
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
Yes
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
No
Proprietary Receiver
Yes
Battery Type
Rechargeable

Lenovo claims that the battery lasts up to 2 months in a single full charge, but we don't test this. While it has Bluetooth, you can only pair it with one Bluetooth device at a time. However, you can switch between a Bluetooth device and a device connected via the USB receiver using the switch at the front of the board.

Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Hot Keys
Macro Programmable Keys
Dedicated only
Trackpad / Trackball Yes
Wheel No
USB Passthrough
No
Numpad No
Windows Key Lock
No
Lock Indicator Caps Lock

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II has similar features that a laptop keyboard has, like media hotkeys, screen brightness keys, messaging, display mirroring, and a key to open Keyboard Properties settings. It also has a TrackPoint nub above the B key to control the cursor, as well as left, right, and middle-click buttons at the bottom of the board, seen here.

Also, there's a slot next to the USB-C port to store the USB receiver when not in use. There are two switches at the front of the board. One is to switch between a Windows or Android layout, and the other is to change from a USB receiver connection to a Bluetooth one. To go into pairing mode, you can hold the slider to the complete left of the Bluetooth mode for a few seconds. Once you let it go, the slider automatically pulls back to the middle in Bluetooth mode. There's a Power On/Off slider on the upper right side of the board that you can see here.

Design
In The Box

  • Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II
  • USB-A to USB-C charging cable
  • USB receiver
  • User manual
  • Support and warranty manual

Typing Experience
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Key Switches
Scissor
Feel
Tactile
Operating Force
57 gf
Actuation Force
39 gf
Pre-Travel
1.5 mm
Total Travel
2.0 mm

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II uses scissor switches, which provide tactile feedback when a key is registered. They feel light and responsive, and the experience is nearly identical to typing on a Lenovo laptop keyboard.

7.5
Typing Experience
Typing Quality

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II provides a good typing experience. It feels nearly identical to typing on a Lenovo laptop keyboard, especially with its chiclet-style ABS keycaps, tactile scissor switches, and TrackPoint nub. While it doesn't have a wrist rest, the board is very low profile and shouldn't need one. The keys have standard spacing despite the board being compact, which should help prevent typos or mishits. However, the Fn key is on the far left below the Shift, so this may cause some issues if you're used to the Ctrl key being there. Unfortunately, there's no way to remap the two keys, either.

Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Noise
Very Quiet

Typing on the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is very quiet and shouldn't bother those around you in a quiet environment.

6.8
Typing Experience
Latency
Latency Wired
N/A
Latency Receiver
18.2 ms
Latency Bluetooth
37.8 ms

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II has fairly high latency, but this shouldn't matter too much since it isn't intended for gaming. It should feel responsive enough for office-related tasks.

Software and Operating System
5.1
Software and Operating System
Software & Programming
Software Name ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II Software
Account Required
No
Profiles
No Profile
Onboard Memory
No
Cloud Sync
No
Macro Programming
Software
Ease Of Use
Easy
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
No

You can't make many customizations on the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II. There's an application that, once installed, becomes a tab in the Keyboard Properties settings. It lets you control the pointer speed and set a macro to the F12 key only. You can set it to open a webpage, program, or file, or line of text. However, it's only compatible with Windows, and you can't customize any of the other keys.

8.5
Software and Operating System
Keyboard Compatibility
Windows Full
macOS Partial
Linux Partial
Android Partial
iOS Partial
iPadOS Partial

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is fully compatible with Windows, but a few keys don't work on macOS, namely Insert, Print Screen, Screen brightness, Display mirroring, Messages, and the F-row keys. Most of these keys also don't work on Linux, Android, iOS, and iPadOS. However, all of the alphanumerical keys and arrow keys work.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is only available in black. Our unit was produced in March 2021; you can see its label here.

Compared To Other Keyboards

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is an upgraded and wireless version of the Lenovo ThinkPad Wired USB Keyboard with TrackPoint. While we haven't tested the wired variant, the biggest difference is its lack of wireless connectivity and the macro programmable feature of the F12 key. This model is a great option if you don't have much space since you can use it without a separate mouse, thanks to its dedicated arrow keys, mouse click buttons, and TrackPoint cursor nub, and it doesn't take up as much space as boards with an integrated trackpad, like the Logitech K400 Plus or the Corsair K83 Wireless Entertainment Keyboard.

For other options, see our recommendations for the best keyboards, the best wireless keyboards, and the best iPad keyboards.

Keychron K6

The Keychron K6 and the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II are compact office keyboards. If you want a model with integrated mouse controls, the Lenovo has a TrackPoint to control the cursor and mouse click buttons at the bottom of the board, identical to what you'd find on a Lenovo laptop. Also, you can reprogram the F12 key to open a webpage, program, or file or insert a line of text. On the other hand, if you prefer a mechanical keyboard with backlighting, the Keychron is a better choice. It's available with a variety of Gateron and LK Optical switches, and it can pair with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth.

Logitech K780

The Logitech K780 is a full-sized keyboard, while the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is a compact 75% board. Both are well-suited for use with mobile devices and tablets, but the Logitech has a cradle to hold your device in place. It can pair with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth and another via its USB receiver. Comparatively, the Lenovo has a TrackPoint to control the cursor and mouse click buttons at the bottom of the board. You can reprogram the F12 key to open a webpage, program, or file or insert a line of text. Both have tactile scissor switches, but the Logitech requires more force to get over the actuation bump. Unfortunately, neither board has backlighting.

Logitech MX Keys

The Logitech MX Keys is a full-size office board with a numpad, while the Lenovo is a compact board with an integrated pointing stick and mouse click buttons. Both boards support Bluetooth, but the Logitech can pair with up to three devices at once while the Lenovo can only pair to one Bluetooth device. While the Lenovo has an incline setting, the Logitech feels much better built, and it has backlighting, which is helpful if you're typing in the dark.

Logitech K400 Plus

The Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II and the Logitech K400 Plus are compact boards with integrated mouse controls. While the Logitech uses a trackpad to move the cursor, the Lenovo uses a rubber pointing stick above the B key like Lenovo laptops tend to have. The Lenovo is better for use with mobile devices and tablets thanks to its Bluetooth support, but unfortunately, it can only pair to one device via Bluetooth and one via USB receiver, which may not be enough for some people. Neither board has backlighting, which isn't ideal if you need to use it in the dark.

Razer BlackWidow Elite

The Razer BlackWidow Elite is a full-size mechanical gaming keyboard, while the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is a compact wireless board well suited for use with mobile devices and tablets. The Razer has many extra features, like macro-programmable keys, dedicated media keys, a volume control wheel, a USB passthrough, and a Windows Key lock. It's available with Razer Orange, Razer Green, and Razer Yellow switches. Comparatively, the Lenovo has mouse click buttons and a TrackPoint nub to control the cursor without a separate mouse. It can pair with one device via Bluetooth and another via USB receiver. It's available with tactile scissor switches only.

Logitech G513

The Logitech G513 is a full-size wired gaming keyboard, while the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II is a 75% compact wireless board for mobile devices and tablets. The Logitech has RGB backlighting, incredibly low latency, a USB passthrough, and its keys are macro-programmable. Also, it's available with a variety of GX Blue, Red, and Brown switches. On the other hand, the Lenovo can pair with one device via Bluetooth and another via its USB receiver, and it has mouse click buttons and a TrackPoint nub to control your cursor without the need for a separate mouse. It uses tactile scissor switches, which feel light and responsive.

Logitech K480 Bluetooth Multidevice Keyboard

The Logitech K480 Bluetooth Multidevice Keyboard and the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II are compact and slim keyboards well-suited for use with mobile devices and tablets. The Logitech has a device cradle to sit your phone or tablet into, it has a knob for easy volume control, and it can pair with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth. On the other hand, the Lenovo has a rubber pointing stick to move your cursor without needing a mouse, along with mouse click buttons at the bottom center of the board. While it can't pair with more than one device via Bluetooth, it does have a USB receiver, which you can store in the keyboard when not in use.

Logitech K380

The Logitech K380 and the Lenovo ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II are compact, low-profile keyboards. The Lenovo looks like the keyboard you find on a laptop, and it has a rubber pointing stick above its B key and mouse click buttons at the bottom of the board. While both boards have Bluetooth support, only the Logitech can pair with up to three devices at once, while the Lenovo can only pair to one device via Bluetooth and another with its USB receiver. Both use scissor switches, but the Lenovo's switches require less force to get over the tactile bump.

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