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Razer Huntsman V2 Analog Keyboard Review

Tested using Methodology v1.3
Reviewed Mar 05, 2021 at 11:12 am
Latest change: Writing modified Sep 01, 2023 at 02:31 pm
Razer Huntsman V2 Analog Picture
8.6
Gaming
7.2
Office
0.9
Mobile/Tablet
7.8
Programming
3.8
Entertainment / HTPC
8.6
Raw Performance

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is an exceptional gaming keyboard that features Analog Optical switches. These switches allow you to adjust the pre-travel distance or 'sensitivity' of individual switches. You can also customize the switch reset point using 'Rapid Trigger' mode or enable an analog mode that mimics the feel of an analog joystick. This keyboard also has full RGB backlighting, macro-programmable keys, and a USB passthrough.

Note: We uncovered unexpected additional latency when testing this keyboard with its companion software running in the background. We recently highlighted this issue in our Test Bench 1.3 Changelog. For more details, see single key latency.

Our Verdict

8.6 Gaming

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is an amazing gaming keyboard. It has very low and consistent latency, full RGB backlighting, and macro-programmable keys. It features Analog Optical switches that are easy to actuate, and it allows you to customize the pre-travel distance to your liking. You can also use its analog mode for finer movement control; however, it only works in games that support gamepads, and it might take a while to train your fingers to apply the appropriate amount of force.

Pros
  • Customizable pre-travel distance and low operating force.
  • Macro-programmable keys.
  • Full RGB backlighting.
  • Acceptable ergonomics.
  • Very low and consistent latency performance.
Cons
  • Analog mode only works if game supports gamepads.
7.2 Office

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is great for office use. It has acceptable ergonomics and provides a light typing experience. However, its Analog Optical switches are linear and don't give any tactile feedback, making it harder to know if a keystroke is registered. Also, typing noise is on the louder side and might not be ideal for quiet offices.

Pros
  • Excellent typing quality.
  • Acceptable ergonomics.
Cons
  • Loud typing noise.
0.9 Mobile/Tablet

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is a wired-only keyboard that can't be used with mobile devices.

7.8 Programming

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is great for programming. It's very well-built, and it provides a light and comfortable typing experience. Every key is macro-programmable, and there's full RGB backlighting if you like working in the dark. Unfortunately, it's a wired-only keyboard with no multi-device pairing feature, which might disappoint those working on two computers. Also, while most keys work on macOS and Linux, there's no software for customization on those platforms.

Pros
  • Macro-programmable keys.
  • Full RGB backlighting.
  • Excellent typing quality.
  • Acceptable ergonomics.
Cons
  • Wired-only.
  • No multi-device pairing.
3.8 Entertainment / HTPC

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is inadequate for use with a home theater PC. It's a wired-only keyboard, so you need to run a cable from the couch to your PC, which isn't ideal if you're worried about kids or pets tripping over wires. Also, there's no trackpad, which means you need a separate mouse to navigate the user interface. On the upside, it has dedicated media controls and backlighting.

Pros
  • Full RGB backlighting.
Cons
  • Wired-only.
  • No trackpad.
  • Large size.
8.6 Raw Performance

This keyboard has amazing raw performance, with excellent single-key and multi-key latency. It also has full n-key rollover and an effective update rate of 1000Hz, providing an extremely responsive and consistent experience for gaming in any genre at a casual or competitive level.

  • 8.6 Gaming
  • 7.2 Office
  • 0.9 Mobile/Tablet
  • 7.8 Programming
  • 3.8 Entertainment / HTPC
  • 8.6 Raw Performance
  1. Updated Sep 01, 2023: We've added new text to the Single Key Latency section of this review, with details about this keyboard's newly-added Rapid Trigger mode and the unexpectedly high latency results while Razer Synapse 3 is running in the background that we uncovered while developing our recent 1.3 Test Bench Update.
  2. Updated Aug 30, 2023: We've added text to this review for the new tests added in TBU 1.3.
  3. Updated Aug 30, 2023: We've fixed a mistake in the Macro Keys and Programming section of this review. The Dedicated Media keys test result was No but has been corrected to Yes.
  4. Updated Aug 30, 2023: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.3, which overhauls how key input is evaluated. We've added new tests for Single Key Latency, Multi Key Latency, Data Transmission, and Chord Split. We've also introduced a new Raw Performance usage and adjusted how the Gaming and Office usage scores are calculated. You can see the full changelog here.
  5. Updated May 12, 2023: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.2. This update introduces new Backlight Features and Backlight Clarity test boxes. We've also added a new Switches test box, added additional test comparisons to our Hardware Customizability test box that we introduced with our last Test Bench. For an in-depth look at our changes, you can see our full changelog here.
  6. Updated Apr 26, 2023: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.1. This update adds several new tests addressing Hardware Customization, Macro Keys And Programming, and Wireless Mobile Compatibility. We've also added new objective evaluations to the Typing Noise test, and we've simplified several tests and removed several others that were no longer relevant. For an in-depth look at all our changes, you can see our full changelog here.
  7. Updated Aug 31, 2022: Updated the "White Shot" to better reflect real-life observations of poor color mixing; the text and backlighting score has been updated accordingly.
  8. Updated Aug 15, 2022: Updated review to add comparison to the newly reviewed SteelSeries Apex Pro Mini Wireless.
  9. Updated Mar 05, 2021: Review published.
  10. Updated Mar 03, 2021: Early access published.
  11. Updated Mar 01, 2021: Our testers have started testing this product.
  12. Updated Feb 26, 2021: The product has arrived in our lab, and our testers will start evaluating it soon.
  13. Updated Feb 15, 2021: We've purchased the product and are waiting for it to arrive in our lab.

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Black Huntsman V2 Analog
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Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the Razer Huntsman V2 Analog in black, and there are no other variants. You can see our unit's label here.

Compared To Other Keyboards

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is an exceptional mechanical keyboard. However, its analog mode has some limitations, and it might take a long time to train your fingers to apply the appropriate amount of force, as most gamers are likely to bottom out the keys in the heat of the moment.

For more options, check out our recommendations for the best gaming keyboards, the best mechanical keyboards, and the best RGB keyboards.

Razer Huntsman V2

The Razer Huntsman V2  and the Razer Huntsman V2 Analog are very similar boards, but each has unique features. The V2 is Razer's first board with an 8000Hz polling rate, and its latency is lower than the V2 Analog's. It's available with Razer Linear Optical and Razer Clicky Optical switches. On the other hand, the V2 Analog has Razer Analog Optical Switches, which you can set to act as an analog joystick. This makes the switches reactive to the amount of pressure you apply as you move the key downwards. The V2 Analog has a USB passthrough and an RGB strip that wraps around the sides of the board and the wrist rest.

SteelSeries Apex Pro

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the SteelSeries Apex Pro are exceptional gaming keyboards with fairly similar features. Razer's Analog Optical and SteelSeries' Omnipoint switches are both linear with adjustable pre-travel distances. The difference is that the Analog Optical lets you program two actions in one keypress or use it like an analog joystick. Other than that, the SteelSeries has a customizable OLED screen and software support for macOS, which the Razer lacks.

Razer Huntsman Elite

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is essentially the Razer Huntsman Elite, but with Analog Optical switches as they're nearly identical in their exterior designs. The difference between the Analog Optical and the linear optical switch is that the Analog Optical has an adjustable pre-travel distance and lets you use the keyboard like an analog joystick. Also, it allows you to program the keys to perform two functions with one keypress. The Elite's linear optical switch requires less force to actuate, which is both a good and bad thing because even though it makes it easier to actuate, it's overly sensitive for general typing, leading to more typos.

Corsair K100 RGB

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the Corsair K100 RGB are both exceptional wired gaming keyboards; however, they're also quite different. The Razer uses Analog Optical switches that can function like an analog joystick, and you can customize the pre-travel distance to your liking. On the other hand, the Corsair uses more traditional Cherry MX Speed switches and is available with Corsair OPX switches as well. That said, the Analog Optical and the Cherry MX Speeds are both linear switches that require about the same amount of force to actuate and don't provide any tactile feedback. Feature-wise, the Corsair has an extra column of dedicated macro keys that the Razer lacks and a dial that you can customize to perform various functions.

Wooting 60HE

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the Wooting 60HE are mechanical gaming keyboards with outstanding gaming performance and Hall effect analog switches that allow you to adjust the pre-travel on a per-key basis. The Razer is a full-size keyboard with an included wrist rest. On the other hand, the Wooting has a smaller, Compact (60%) form factor. The Wooting also includes several additional software features the Razer lacks, including a Rapid Trigger mode, a low latency Tacyhon Mode, the ability to assign up to four inputs to a single keypress, customizable reset points, and an Analog Mode that mimics the gradual input of a controller's joystick.

SteelSeries Apex Pro TKL (2023)

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the SteelSeries Apex Pro TKL (2023) are mechanical gaming keyboards with switches that allow you to adjust the actuation point of individual keys. The Razer is a full-size model that uses Razer Analog Optical switches. In addition to being able to adjust the actuation point, this keyboard also allows you to set an analog mode which makes keys mimic analog joystick controls. On the other hand, the SteelSeries has a smaller TKL (80%) form factor and has OmniPoint 2.0 switches. While these switches don't have an analog mode, the adjustable actuation points are more precise and predictable than those on the Razer, and you can adjust the action points within a wider range. The SteelSeries also has an OLED screen which the Razer lacks.

Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition

The Razer Huntsman Tournament Edition and the Razer Huntsman V2 Analog are both fantastic gaming keyboards. They both come with linear optical switches, but the Tournament Edition has the Razer Linear Optical switches, while the V2 Analog has the Razer Analog Optical switches, which are a bit heavier to press but offer a much better typing experience. As the name suggests, the V2 Analog has a feature that allows you to control the keys like an analog joystick, providing greater control over fine movements. It's also a full-size option with a wrist rest, while the Tournament Edition is TKL and doesn't come with a wrist rest.

Wooting two HE

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the Wooting two HE are premium wired-only gaming keyboards with adjustable pre-travel distances and an analog mode that mimics joystick controls. However, the Wooting implements this technology much better than the Razer, as it performs more consistently and accurately. Also, the range in which you can adjust your pre-travel distance is much wider on the Wooting as it uses a different type of switch than the ones found in the Razer.

Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro

The Razer BlackWidow V3 Pro and the Razer Huntsman V2 Analog are both outstanding full-size gaming keyboards. The Huntsman V2 is wired-only and comes with unique Analog Optical switches, which are very light to press and have a linear feel for a responsive gaming experience. They also have an analog feature, allowing you to use the keys like a joystick. The V3 Pro, on the other hand, is available with two types of mechanical switches, so you can get the ones you prefer, and it's wireless, so you can connect it with up to three devices at once.

Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the Logitech G915 LIGHTSPEED are very different keyboards. The Razer is a wired-only keyboard that features Analog Optical switches, while the Logitech is a low-profile, wireless keyboard that's available with tactile, clicky, or linear switches. The Razer lets you customize the pre-travel distance, perform two actions in one keypress, or use the keyboard like an analog joystick. On the flip side, the Logitech has an extra column of dedicated macro keys and a multi-device pairing feature. The Logitech has better compatibility because it can be used with mobile devices and has software support for macOS.

Razer BlackWidow Elite

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the Razer BlackWidow Elite are very similar overall. The main difference is that the Huntsman has linear analog switches that let you use the keyboard like an analog joystick, while the BlackWidow uses more traditional mechanical switches and is available in three switch types, tactile, clicky, and linear. The only other difference is that the Huntsman has LED lighting on the sides to create an underglow effect. Both keyboards offer an excellent typing experience, but the Huntsman's switches might be too sensitive for some and might cause more typos.

ASUS ROG Claymore II

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the ASUS ROG Claymore II are both full-size gaming keyboards, but the Razer is wired, and the ASUS is wireless. The ASUS has a modular numpad that you can place on either side of the board or remove it completely for a TKL size. Also, it has a volume control, a USB passthrough, four dedicated macro keys, a plushy wrist rest, and lower latency. You can use it wirelessly via its USB receiver, and it's available with linear and clicky ROG RX Optical Mechanical switches. On the other hand, the Razer has proprietary linear Razer Analog Optical switches, which let you use the keys like an analog joystick, and you can customize the pre-travel distance to your liking.

SteelSeries Apex Pro Mini

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the SteelSeries Apex Pro Mini are both gaming keyboards with an adjustable pre-travel distance. The Razer is a full-size wired unit that uses Optical switches, while the SteelSeries is a compact (60%) keyboard with magnetized Hall Effect switches. The SteelSeries is more consistent with their implementation of this adjustable pre-travel distance feature, but the Razer has an Analog Mode, so keypresses emulate joystick controls on a gamepad.

Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog and the Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini HyperSpeed are both outstanding mechanical gaming keyboards. If you prefer full-size wired boards, the V2 Analog is a better choice. It has a Numpad, dedicated media keys, a volume control knob, a USB passthrough, and a detachable wrist rest. It's available with Razer Analog Optical Switches, which are linear and let you adjust the pre-travel distance. They also have an analog mode, which lets you use the keys like an analog joystick. On the other hand, the HyperSpeed is better if you prefer a 65% compact wireless board that can pair with up to three devices at once via Bluetooth. It's available with linear Razer Yellow and clicky Razer Green switches.

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Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Dimensions
Size
Full-size (100%)
Height
1.7" (4.4 cm)
Width 17.5" (44.4 cm)
Depth
5.5" (14.0 cm)
Depth With Wrist Rest
9.1" (23.1 cm)
Weight
2.64 lbs (1.198 kg)

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is a larged full-size keyboard, and it takes up even more space if you use the wrist rest. If you'd prefer a more compact option that still has Analog switches, check out the Razer Huntsman Mini Analog.

8.5
Design
Build Quality
Keycap Material PBT

The Razer Huntsman V2's build quality is excellent. It has a plastic frame reinforced with a metal plate that feels rigid, exhibiting little to no flex. The PBT keycaps are textured and feel high-quality, but not all the keys are stable as there's some rattle on the spacebar and right Shift. The feet aren't very grippy, so it's easy to move the keyboard around, but it's not bad enough to be an issue in regular use. The incline feet are stable and don't collapse when pushing the keyboard.

6.0
Design
Ergonomics
Curved/Angled
No
Split Keyboard
No
Key Alignment
Staggered
Minimum Incline
Medium Incline
Maximum Incline
Home Row Height
37.5 mm (1.5")

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog has acceptable ergonomics. Without any incline setting, it naturally sits at a 3-degree angle. There are two incline settings, and it includes a leatherette wrist rest. It's comfortable to type on and shouldn't cause fatigue over time.

3.8
Design
Hardware Customizability
Replaceable Cherry Stabilizers
No
Stabilizer Fixation
Non-Customizable Design
Spacebar Stabilizer Size
6.25u
Size Of Right Mod Keys
1.25u
Hot-Swappable Switches
No
Switch Stem Shape
Cherry MX Style
Switch PCB Socket
Soldered
North-Facing Cherry MX Interference
Yes
10
Design
Backlight Features
Backlighting Yes
RGB
Yes
Per-Key Backlighting
Yes
Effects
Yes
Software Controllable
Yes

The Razer Huntsman V2 has full RGB backlighting with individually-lit keys. Like the Razer Huntsman Elite, there are light strips on the sides of the keyboard and the wrist rest to create an underglow effect. The wrist rest has connectors to draw power from the keyboard, so you can't position it further away if you want the strips to light up. You can control the brightness directly on the keyboard, but you need the Synapse 3 software to customize the colors and effects.

8.0
Design
Backlight Clarity

The Backlight clarity is impressive. Unfortunately, when the keyboard displays white backlighting, it has a red hue, which is very visible through the key legends.

Design
Cable & Connector
Connectivity Wired
Detachable
No
Length 6.7 ft (2.0 m)
Connector (Keyboard side)
Not Detachable

The cable is braided and has two connectors, a USB-A and a USB-C. Both need to be connected to use the USB passthrough. If you don't have a USB-C port on your computer, a USB-C to USB-A adaptor is included in the box.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Bluetooth
No
Bluetooth Multi-Device Pairing
No
Proprietary Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries

The Razer Huntsman V2 is a wired-only keyboard.

5.5
Design
Macro Keys And Programming
Dedicated Macro Keys Count 0
Onboard Macro Programming
Yes
Macro Programming With Software
Yes
Design
Extra Features
Media Keys
Dedicated
Trackpad / Trackball No
Scroll Wheel
No
Control Knob
Yes
USB Passthrough
Yes
Numpad Yes
Windows Key Lock
Yes
Lock Indicator Caps, Scroll & Num lock

The Razer Huntsman V2 has many features. It has dedicated media controls at the top right corner of the keyboard and a USB-A passthrough on the left side. Every key is programmable through software, and you can also set macros on-the-fly.

Design
In The Box

  • Razer Huntsman V2 Analog Gaming Keyboard
  • Wrist rest
  • USB-C to USB-A adaptor
  • USB connector covers
  • User guides

Typing Experience
8.5
Typing Experience
Typing Quality
Key Spacing
19.0 mm (0.748")

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog provides an excellent typing experience. The keys are stable, except for the spacebar and Right shift, which descend unevenly and rattle a bit. The PBT keycaps are textured and feel comfortable to type on. The keys are well-spaced, so it requires very little adaptation to type accurately. However, it isn't recommended to set the actuation point too low as it becomes overly sensitive and can lead to more typos. Also, there's no tactile feedback since the switches are linear. On the upside, typing on it feels light and responsive and shouldn't cause fatigue over time.

6.7
Typing Experience
Typing Noise
Average Loudness
56.3 dBA
High Pitch Clicks
No

Even though the Razer Huntsman V2 Analog uses linear switches, typing noise is still on the loud side, so it might not be ideal for quiet office environments.

Typing Experience
Switches
Switch Name
Razer Analog Optical Switches
Switch Type
Optical
Feel
Linear
Typing Experience
Keystrokes
Operating Force
45 gf
Actuation Force
47 gf
Pre-Travel
1.0 mm
Total Travel
4.0 mm

Razer's Analog Optical Switches are linear, which means they don't provide any tactile feedback, and they're very easy to actuate due to their light operating force. You can adjust the pre-travel distance from 1.5 mm to 3.6 mm; however, the results are very different from the actual settings. For example, we set the pre-travel at 1.5 mm, but the keys actuated at 1 mm in real usage, and when it's set to 3.6 mm, the real actuation point is 2.98 mm. Also, it seems like there's no difference between the various settings below 2 mm. You can see the differences between the settings and real usage here.

The analog mode lets you use the keys like an analog joystick, which is meant to provide finer movement control in some types of games, like racing games, FPS, and flight sims. It makes the keys feel like pedals, so you move faster as the key travels downwards. However, this feature only works in games that support gamepads, and Synapse 3 has to be running in the background. Some games can only receive inputs from a controller or a mouse/keyboard combo, but not both at the same time. In this case, you have to remap all of the controller's functions to the keyboard for the analog mode to function properly and not use the mouse at all, as any mouse input can cause erratic movements in-game.

If you'd prefer a keyboard that has a more consistent application of this adjustable pre-travel distance feature, check out the SteelSeries Apex Pro Mini Wireless.

Performance
8.8
Performance
Single-Key Latency
Best Connection
5.0 ms
Best Connection Std Dev ±0.5 ms
Wired
5.0 ms
Receiver
N/A
Bluetooth
N/A

This keyboard has amazing single-key latency performance and delivers an extremely consistent and responsive-feeling experience for playing games in any genre at a casual or competitive level.

Razer added a 'Rapid Trigger' mode to this keyboard via a firmware update post-launch. This mode allows you to adjust the sensitivity of switch reset points, which Razer claims can allow you to release and repeatedly press keys much faster. This mode requires the Razer Synapse 3 configuration software running in the background to function.

The listed test results were achieved with the actuation point set to its lowest setting (1.5mm), with Rapid Trigger Disabled, and with this keyboard's configuration software, Razer Synapse 3, not running in the background. This was done intentionally, as this keyboard produces higher latency results with Razer Synapse 3 running in the background.

Additional latency with Razer Synapse 3: We conducted tests with the software running and with the Rapid Trigger mode enabled and disabled. In both cases, with the software running and with Rapid Trigger enabled or disabled, this keyboard produces a latency result of ~9.0ms., which is unexpected and markedly higher compared to the ~5.0ms latency result with Razer Synapse 3 not running in the background. You can see a graph of these test runs here.

We suspect that when the software is running, the Razer Huntsman V2 Analog no longer reports normally as a keyboard to your computer and, instead, acts as a raw position device that is read by its software. The software then processes the position of each switch and emulates a virtual keyboard to send key presses to the host, which adds considerable latency. With the software open, this keyboard sends 6 End Points per Input, as seen here. With the software not running, this keyboard only sends a single End Point per Input as seen here.

To ensure the lowest latency with this keyboard, we recommend not enabling the Rapid Trigger function and not running Razer Synapse 3 software in the background while gaming. Also, we haven't found that running Razer Synapse 3 in the background adds additional latency for any other Razer keyboard models. But this is something we'll be checking going forward.

8.5
Performance
Multi-Key Latency
Connection Evaluated Wired
Key Press
5.0 ms
Key Release
9.7 ms

This keyboard has amazing multi-key latency performance that's also very consistent, making it very well-suited for playing any games that require new inputs while multiple keys are already pressed and held down.

This keyboard has a 'Rapid Trigger' feature. For more details, see the Singe Key Latency section.

This test was conducted with the actuation point set to its lowest setting (1.5mm), with Rapid Trigger Disabled, and with this keyboard's configuration software, Razer Synapse 3, not running in the background.

8.7
Performance
Data Transmission
Connection Evaluated Wired
USB Polling Rate
1,000 Hz
Effective Update Rate
1,000 Hz
N-Key Rollover (NKRO)
Yes
Multiple Keys Per USB Report
Yes

This keyboard has excellent data transmission performance. It can send multiple keys per USB report and has full n-key rollover. It also has an effective polling rate of 1000Hz, making it capable of taking full advantage of its 1000Hz polling rate.

8.1
Performance
Chord Split
4 Chord Split Delay
5.1 ms
8 Chord Split Delay
12.5 ms

This keyboard has impressive and consistent chord split performance, with very low 4-chord delay and reasonably low 8-chord split delay, making it a good candidate for playing rhythm games requiring many simultaneous inputs.

Software and Operating System
Software and Operating System
Configuration Software
Software Name Razer Synapse 3
Software Windows Compatible
Yes
Software macOS Compatible
No
Onboard Memory
Yes
Profiles
6+

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog is customizable through the Synapse 3 software. In addition to customizing the backlight, you can adjust performance settings such as the actuation point and the debounce height. You can also program keys to perform two actions: one when the key is pressed, and the other when the key is released. Enabling the analog mode lets you use the WASD keys like an analog joystick, but it only works in games that support gamepads.

10
Software and Operating System
Computer Compatibility
Windows
Fully Compatible
macOS
Fully Compatible
Linux (Ubuntu 22)
Fully Compatible
Media Key Compatibility
Windows, MacOS & Linux

The Razer Huntsman V2 Analog has decent compatibility. On macOS, the Pause/Scroll Lock key doesn't work, and there's no software for customization. All keys work on Linux, but like macOS, there's no software support.

0
Software and Operating System
Wireless Mobile Compatibility
Android
Not Compatible
iOS
Not Compatible
iPadOS
Not Compatible
Media Key Compatibility
Not Compatible