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Mixcder E9 Wireless Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.4
Reviewed Oct 03, 2019 at 10:44 am
Mixcder E9 Wireless Picture
7.0
Mixed Usage
7.3
Neutral Sound
7.4
Commute/Travel
7.1
Sports/Fitness
7.1
Office
5.5
Wireless Gaming
7.1
Wired Gaming
6.5
Phone Calls
Type Over-ear
Enclosure Closed-Back
Wireless Yes
Noise Cancelling Yes
Mic Yes
Transducer Dynamic

The Mixcder E9 are good budget headphones that perform quite well. They have a good overall audio reproduction and their ANC system is quite decent as well. They have a long enough battery life for a full day and their design is quite comfortable to wear for hours. However, they do feel a bit plasticky, though they aren’t quite as cheap as some other headphones in their price range. On the upside, they have a great and easy to use control scheme and have surprisingly low latency for Bluetooth headphones.

Our Verdict

7.0 Mixed Usage

Decent for mixed usage. The Mixcder E9 have a good audio reproduction that will suit most music genres. They also have a decent isolation performance, which is good for commuting and at the office. They might not be the best sports option due to their size and lack of breathability, but on the upside, they can perform quite well regardless of the use you make out of them. Their wireless design might not be ideal for watching video content or gaming, but their latency is quite low for Bluetooth headphones, so people might not notice the delay.

Pros
  • Good audio reproduction.
  • Decent isolation performance.
  • Low latency for Bluetooth headphones.
  • Comfortable design.
Cons
  • Slightly plasticky build, not the most durable.
  • Old Bluetooth version.
  • Bulky design.
7.3 Neutral Sound

Good for critical listening. These headphones have a good frequency response and are versatile for a wide variety of music genres, but will be better suited for bass-heavy music. Their bass is well-balanced and accurate and the mid-range is flat and follows our target curve well. However, there’s a bit of unevenness in the treble range which affects the brightness and detail of vocals and leads, but this won’t be heard the same way by everyone. They're quite comfortable and will be a good option if you want good sound quality while on the go.

7.4 Commute/Travel

Decent for commuting. These headphones are quite comfortable for long rides and their ANC is decent for blocking out ambient noise. They’re good at reducing the noise from a bus or plane engine, which is great for your daily commute to work or long flights. The long battery life should be more than enough for the longest trips as well.

7.1 Sports/Fitness

Passable for sports. They're a bit bulky and over-ears are usually not recommended for sports due to their size and lack of breathability. You will sweat more than usual when training with these, which can be bothersome. You’ll have to carry them around your neck or slide them into a bag if you want to bring them to gym. On the upside, they're comfortable and their controls are easy to use.

7.1 Office

Decent for the office. They have decent noise isolation and you should be able to drown out most of the ambient noise like ambient chatter with these headphones. They're also quite comfortable to wear for a work shift and their battery should last you a few days. They also don’t leak too much but be sure not to blast your music at a very high volume if there’s not a lot of noise in your environment.

7.1 Wired Gaming
6.5 Phone Calls
  • 7.0 Mixed Usage
  • 7.3 Neutral Sound
  • 7.4 Commute/Travel
  • 7.1 Sports/Fitness
  • 7.1 Office
  • 5.5 Wireless Gaming
  • 7.1 Wired Gaming
  • 6.5 Phone Calls
  1. Update 2/12/2020: Converted to Test Bench 1.4.
  2. Update 11/21/2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.1.
  3. Update 11/21/2019: Converted to Test Bench 1.3.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style

The E9 have a sleek style thanks to the metal-looking cup design. These over-ears are fairly bland otherwise since they only come in black. The cups are rather large as well. They're quite bulky but, on the upside, the padding is thick and comfortable.

7.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.6 lbs
Clamping Force
1.3 lbs

The Mixcder E9 are comfortable headphones that can be worn for a while. They aren’t too heavy and the padding of the cups is good and comfortable. The headband design resembles that of the Bose QuietComfort 35 II and is nicely padded. The cups could be slightly deeper, but should be large enough for most ear shapes and sizes. The headphones are a bit bulky but don’t clamp too much, and the cups have a good range of motion, which is great.

7.4
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
Not OS specific
Ease Of Use Good
Feedback Great
Call/Music Control Yes
Volume Control Yes
Microphone Control No
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control On/Off
Talk-Through
No
Additional Controls No

These headphones have a great control scheme. The physical buttons are large and clicky, making them quite easy to use. The power button can also be used to play/pause your music and take calls as well. You can easily raise or turn down your volume, and there's an audio cue when reaching maximum or minimum volume. Holding the volume buttons will skip tracks forward and backward. However, you need to be quick if you want to go to the previous tracks, as it might just restart your song instead. The power button could also be in a better position. On the left cup, you also have a dedicated ANC switch which is independent of your power, so be sure to turn it off after powering off the headphones.

6.4
Design
Breathability
Avg.Temp.Difference 5.9 C

Like most over-ears, the Mixcder E9 are not the most breathable option. Due to their design, they trap heat inside the ear cups and will more than likely make you sweat more than usual when working out. These are not the best option for sports, but you shouldn’t have any issues for casual listening.

5.9
Design
Portability
L 5.0 "
W 6.7 "
H 3.4 "
Volume 114 Cu. Inches
Transmitter Required No

The E9 are quite bulky over-ears, but thankfully, they can be folded in a more portable design, which is easier to carry around. Their cups also swivel to lay flat, making it easier to slide into a bag or to hang them around your neck. They also come with a nice hard case for when you’re on the move.

7.5
Design
Case
Type Hard case
L 8.5 "
W 8.0 "
H 2.7 "
Volume 184 Cu. Inches

The E9 come with a nice hard case. It's a bit thin and feels a bit cheaper than some other models, but still feels durable. It provides the headphones decent protection against scratches, drops, and water.

7.0
Design
Build Quality

The build quality of the E9 is decent. The hinges are good and don’t feel like they’ll break, and the headband is reinforced by a thin metal plate. However, the overall build is a bit plasticky and the ear cups are covered in cheap-feeling faux leather material.

7.0
Design
Stability

The Mixcder E9 are decently stable but won’t be the best option for sports. They stay on the head fairly well, but enough head movement can make them fall quite easily. They shouldn’t be used for running, but thanks to their wireless design, they get rid of the risk of getting a cable stuck or hooked on something and yanking the headphones off your head.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Mixcder E9 headphones
  • 1/8” TRS audio cable
  • Micro-USB charging cable
  • Carrying case
  • Airplane adapter
  • Manuals

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
1.53 db
Treble Amount
-3.2 db
8.0
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.39 dB

The frequency consistency of the E9 is very good. Like some other similar noise cancelling headphones, the E9’s ANC system seems to help with bass consistency. Some people with glasses might have a drop in bass, though, especially if there’s a break in the seal.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
9.4
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
0.78 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
11.89 Hz
Low-Bass
0.14 dB
Mid-Bass
0.47 dB
High-Bass
1.18 dB

The bass performance of the Mixcder E9 is excellent. It's flat, well-balanced, and almost follows our target curve flawlessly. There's a bit of an overemphasis in the low-bass range, resulting in a bit of extra thump and rumble common to bass-heavy music.

7.8
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.87 dB
Low-Mid
1.36 dB
Mid-Mid
0.15 dB
High-Mid
-3.22 dB

The Mixcder E9 have a very good mid-range performance. The response is well-balanced throughout the range. This results in an accurate reproduction of vocals and lead instruments. However, there’s a small overemphasis in the low-mid, which can clutter vocals and leads a bit, though this won’t be very audible. There’s also a dip in high-mid which negatively affects the intensity and projection of instruments.

5.6
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
5.9 dB
Low-Treble
-5.45 dB
Mid-Treble
-3.3 dB
High-Treble
-6.43 dB

The treble performance of the E9 is decent. The response doesn’t show too much deviation from our curve, but the response is quite uneven. Some frequencies are under our curve while others show a small overemphasis. Overall, the treble lacks detail and brightness, especially in the low-treble.

7.2
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
1.65 db
Dips
1.83 db
8.8
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.18
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
0.53
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
1.8
Weighted Phase Mismatch
3.36

The stereo imaging is excellent. Their weighted group delay is very low, which is good. The group delay graph also shows that the entire response is below the audibility threshold. This ensures a tight bass and a transparent treble reproduction. Also, the L/R drivers of our test unit were well-matched in frequency, amplitude, and phase response. This is important for the accurate placement and localization of objects (voices, instruments, video game effects) in the stereo image. Note that these results are only valid for our unit and yours may perform differently.

5.1
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
2.6 dB
PRTF Size (Avg.)
3.69 dB
PRTF Distance
12.23 dB
Openness
2.4
Acoustic Space Excitation
3.4

The soundstage of the E9 is sub-par. The graph shows a good amount of pinna interaction and a decent level of accuracy. There’s also a decent PRTF distance, which results in a wide soundstage. However, due to the closed-back design of these over-ears, the soundstage won’t feel very natural and will be situated inside the listener’s head rather than in front.

0
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
No
Speaker Modeling
No
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
No App
7.1
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.411
WHD @ 100
0.303
Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
Unknown
Power
On
Connection
Bluetooth 4.2
Codec
SBC, 16-bit, 48kHz
EQ
No EQ
ANC
On
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
Integrated
Isolation
7.6
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-20.97 dB
Bass
-15.13 dB
Mid
-12.81 dB
Treble
-34.35 dB

The noise isolation performance of the Mixcder E9 is decent. It does a good job against bass frequencies, where the rumble of engines sit, making them a viable option for commuting and traveling. They also do a decent job against ambient chatter, which can be useful in an office setting. Against high frequencies like S and T sounds and the noise coming from an A/C system, they do a pretty good job at blocking out noise.

7.0
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
39.56 dB

The leakage performance of the E9 is decent. The leakage sounds fuller and more comprehensible than that of in-ears and earbuds. However, the overall level of leakage is not too loud. This shouldn’t be an issue in most situations unless you blast music in a very quiet environment.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
Yes
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No
6.3
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
LFE
246.75 Hz
FR Std. Dev.
4.27 dB
HFE
3368.2 Hz
Weighted THD
2.312
Gain
8.51 dB

The recording quality of the E9’s integrated mic is mediocre. The recorded/transmitted speech sounds thin, noticeably muffled, and lacking in detail. This won’t be the best option for phone calls.

6.1
Microphone
Noise Handling
Speech + Pink Noise
Speech + Subway Noise
SpNR
14.08 dB

The E9's microphone doesn’t fare well in noisy environments. It struggles to separate speech from ambient noise and therefore will be better suited for quiet environments.

Active Features
7.8
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
Rechargable
Continuous Battery Life
18.3 hrs
Additional Charges
0.0
Total Battery Life
18.3 hrs
Charge Time
2.0 hrs
Power-Saving Feature
No
Audio While Charging
Yes
Passive Playback
Yes
Charging Port micro-USB

The E9 has about 18 hours of battery life with ANC on, which is good, but slightly disappointing as it's below the 24 advertised hours of continuous playback. With ANC off, the manufacturer mentions a 30-hour battery life. They also take about 3 hours to charge, which is slightly longer than most headphones but shouldn’t be an issue if you just charge your headphones at night. You can also use them while they're charging or wired when they're completely dead, which is very useful.

0
Active Features
App Support
App Name No App
iOS No
Android No
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
No
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
No
Button Mapping No
Surround Support
No

Unfortunately, this pair of headphones doesn’t have a companion app with dedicated customization options.

Connectivity
6.8
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth Version
4.0
Multi-Device Pairing
No
NFC Pairing
No
Line Of Sight Range
162 ft
PC Latency (SBC)
117 ms
PC Latency (aptX)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX HD)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX-LL)
N/A
iOS Latency
219 ms
Android Latency
132 ms

The E9 are Bluetooth compatible, but they're on the older 4.0 version. They don't support multi-device or NFC pairing, which is disappointing, and their latency is fairly high on all devices. If you want a pair of similarly-performing headphones that also support aptX-LL for a low latency connection, check out the TREBLAB Z2 Wireless.

0
Connectivity
Non-Bluetooth Wireless
Non-BT Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Non-BT Latency
N/A
9.5
Connectivity
Wired
Analog Audio
Yes
USB Audio
No
Detachable Yes
Length 4.9 ft
Connection 1/8" TRS
Analog/USB Audio Latency
0 ms

You can use the included audio cable to use the E9 wired. You’ll get audio when connecting the headphones to a headphone jack, regarding of the console or device. However, you can’t use the integrated mic when the audio cable is plugged in.

Connectivity
PC / PS4 Compatibility
PC/PS4 Analog
Audio Only
PC/PS4 Wired USB
No
PC/PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
Connectivity
Xbox One Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
Audio Only
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
0
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
No Base/Dock
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
No
Power Supply
No Base/Dock

These headphones don’t have a base/dock.

Compared To Other Headphones

Comparison picture

The Mixcder E9 are quite good budget ANC over-ear headphones, which set themselves apart by their good audio reproduction. They also have a pretty decent isolation performance when compared to similar budget models. See our recommendations for the best noise cancelling headphones, the best noise cancelling headphones under $200, and the best noise cancelling headphones under $100.

Cowin E7 Wireless

The Mixcder E9 Wireless are better headphones than the Cowin E7 Wireless. They are noticeably more comfortable, better built and they offer a superior sound quality. The controls are also better and the overall noise attenuation of the Mixcder is better than the Cowin. They also come with a nice hard case that protects the headphones better than the Cowin’s pouch. On the other hand, the Cowin offer more battery life and have NFC pairing, but that’s about it.

Anker Soundcore Life Q20 Wireless

The Mixcder E9 Wireless and the Anker Soundcore Life Q20 Wireless are both decent wireless over-ear headphones with ANC. The Mixcder come with a much nicer carrying case, have a more consistent frequency response among different users, lower latency on Android or PC, and a much better-balanced sound profile. On the other hand, the Anker have better microphone performance, lower iOS latency, and a significantly longer battery.

Mpow H10 Wireless

The Mixcder E9 Wireless is a slightly better sounding option than the Mpow H10 Wireless and is also better built. They feel better made than the cracking H10 and the controls are easier to use. On the other hand, the H10 have a slightly better ANC performance and they offer a bit more battery life than the E9.

TaoTronics TT-BH060 Wireless

The Mixcder E9 Wireless are better headphones than the TaoTronics TT-BH060 Wireless. Their sound quality is better and out BH060 unit had a noticeable mismatch. The audio reproduction of the E9 is, therefore, more balanced and accurate. However, the TT-BH060 are Bluetooth 5.0, their noise isolation performance is better, and they offer more battery life than the E9. However, they do have higher latency than the impressive E9.

Anker SoundCore Life 2 Wireless

The Mixcder E9 Wireless and Anker Soundcore Life 2 Wireless are two decent budget headphones. The Mixcder are a better option when you want a balanced and neutral sound, but the Anker will be better for fans of bass. Isolation-wise, the Mixcder have a slight upper hand, especially in the bass range isolation, which is good for commuting. On the other hand, the Anker have a better continuous battery life and an in-line microphone, which the Mixcder lacks.

Mpow EM12 Wireless Earphone Bluetooth Headset

The Mixcder E9 Wireless and the EM12 Wireless Earphone Bluetooth Headset are meant for different uses. The E9 are wireless over-ear headphones for listening to music, while the EM12 is a mono Bluetooth headset for phone calls. The E9 also have a microphone built-in, which allows you to easily take phone calls, and their over-ear design is quite a bit more comfortable. Their battery lasts a lot longer, and they have ANC to give you peace and quiet on the bus or in the office. Overall, the E9 are a better choice if you're looking for a versatile pair of over-ears for regular use, but if you want something small and discrete just for phone calls, you might be happier with the EM12.

TREBLAB Z2 Wireless

The Mixcder E9 Wireless are marginally better headphones than the TREBLAB Z2 Wireless. The Mixcder are more comfortable, have a better mic, and have much better ANC. On the other hand, the TREBLAB have a better-balanced sound profile, support multi-device pairing, and last a tiny bit longer off a single charge.

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