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Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless Headphones Review

Tested using Methodology v1.5
Reviewed Mar 16, 2022 at 11:16 am
Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless Picture
4.9
Neutral Sound
5.7
Commute/Travel
7.5
Sports/Fitness
5.2
Office
4.9
Wireless Gaming
4.8
Wired Gaming
5.7
Phone Calls
Type Earbuds
Enclosure Open-Back
Wireless Truly Wireless
Noise Cancelling No
Mic Yes
Transducer Dynamic

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are unusual earbuds designed to let you hear ambient sound. The plastic ring sits around your ear and has a hole to allow you to hear what's going on around you. They're packed with quite a few features like automatic volume adjustment, virtual surround sound, and 'Wide Area Tap', which lets you register controls by tapping in front of your ear instead of on the earbuds. However, they don't fit everyone well, and depending on the shape of your ears, they may not be comfortable or stable. Because of their open design, they reproduce basically no bass, so your audio is missing rumble, punch, and body. The treble is also weak, so instruments lack detail, and mixes lack sparkle and brightness. That said, their sound is good for content like podcasts, and their app has a graphic EQ and presets that you can use to customize their sound. They're also well-built and come with a small case that easily fits into pants pockets.

Our Verdict

4.9 Neutral Sound

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are poor for neutral sound. Like most open headphones, their sound hardly has any bass, so your audio lacks thump, punch, and boom. The treble response is underemphasized, hurting the detail of instruments and vocals and making sibilants like cymbals seem dull. Their very accurate mid-range response makes them best-suited for vocal-centric content like audiobooks and podcasts. Their app includes a graphic EQ and presets that you can use to customize their sound profile, but they aren't a good choice if you're looking for neutral sound.

Pros
  • EQ and presets in-app.
Cons
  • Sound profile lacks bass.
  • Poor passive soundstage.
5.7 Commute/Travel

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are disappointing for commute and travel if you want headphones with good noise isolation. By design, they block out virtually no noise, meaning it may be hard to hear your music over the sound of rumbling bus and plane engines. That said, they have very small, portable design. If you walk to work, you may like that they let you hear ambient sound. They also work with Microsoft Soundscape, which is intended to help you navigate your surroundings with audio cues, which could be helpful in unfamiliar places. Unfortunately, whether or not you get a good fit depends on the shape of your ears, and they aren't comfortable or stable for everyone. Their six-hour battery life is also a bit short for long flights, but they come with a case that holds a couple of extra charges.

Pros
  • Small, portable design.
Cons
  • Relatively short battery life.
  • Designed to let you hear ambient sound.
7.5 Sports/Fitness

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are good for sports and fitness. It can be tricky to get a good fit in both ears, but they come with many different silicone wing tips to help. Once you find the right fit, they should stay in place during workouts. They're also small, well-built, and rated IPX4 for water resistance. They have decent controls, so you can change the song or turn up the volume without pulling out your phone. They also support Spotify Tap, which lets you control your music or podcast in that app with the onboard controls.

Pros
  • IPX4 rating for water resistance.
  • Good build quality.
Cons
  • Mediocre stability.
5.2 Office

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are sub-par for office use if you want to focus on your work and audio. However, they can be a suitable choice if you want to stay aware of your surroundings, like if someone's speaking to you, without removing your buds or pausing your audio. They let you stay aware of your surroundings, so you can hear if someone's talking to you, which you may prefer to noise cancelling headphones at work. Unfortunately, it's hard to get a comfortable fit, and the plastic rings can hurt your ears after a while. Their six-hour continuous battery life is a bit too short to last through a 9-5 workday, although you can top up the battery with the case, which holds about two extra charges.

Pros
  • Good build quality.
Cons
  • Relatively short battery life.
  • No multi-device pairing.
4.9 Wireless Gaming

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are Bluetooth earbuds and aren't compatible with Xbox or PlayStation consoles. You can use them with PCs, but their latency is too high for them to be suitable for gaming.

4.8 Wired Gaming

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are wireless-only headphones, and you can't use them wired.

5.7 Phone Calls

The Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless are disappointing for phone calls. You should be understandable if you use them for a phone call, but your voice sounds distorted and thin. While the mic has decent noise handling, ensuring your voice isn't drowned out even in a loud environment, the person you're talking to might hear a crackling noise when you talk. Since they don't isolate you from any noise, it may also be hard to hear your call if you're in a noisy place. Their control scheme also doesn't include any call-related functions, so you need your phone to answer a call.

Pros
  • Adequate overall mic performance.
Cons
  • Recorded speech sounds a bit distorted.
  • Control scheme lacks call-related functions.
  • 4.9 Neutral Sound
  • 5.7 Commute/Travel
  • 7.5 Sports/Fitness
  • 5.2 Office
  • 4.9 Wireless Gaming
  • 4.8 Wired Gaming
  • 5.7 Phone Calls
  1. Updated Mar 16, 2022: Review published.
  2. Updated Mar 08, 2022: Early access published.

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style

The Sony LinkBuds have a very unusual design. The buds are round, and instead of tips that go into your ears, there's a donut-shaped part that sits outside of your ear canal. It has a hole in the middle, so it doesn't block your ear. The earbuds come in 'Gray' or 'White', and both variants have a subtle speckled design.

6.5
Design
Comfort
Weight 0.02 lbs
Clamping Force
0 lbs

The Sony LinkBuds are adequately comfortable. They come with a lot of silicone sleeves that you can use to customize their fit, but it's still hard to find a good fit in both ears. The round buds also protrude slightly, and the rigid plastic rings can put pressure on the outside of your ear. If you can find a good fit, you don't feel them too much, but you may still have an issue getting them to fit properly. On the plus side, they have a 'Wide Area Tap' feature that lets you tap the front of your ear to register commands instead of the earbuds, so you can avoid pressing them into your ears when you want to change the track or turn up the volume.

7.1
Design
Controls
OS Compatibility
Not OS specific
Ease Of Use Decent
Feedback Good
Call/Music Control Yes
Volume Control Yes
Microphone Control No
Channel Mixing
No
Noise Cancelling Control No
Talk-Through
On/Off
Additional Controls Voice Assistant

The Sony LinkBuds have decent controls. The default control scheme is simple and easy to use, and you can remap the functions in the app. You can tap either the round part of the earbuds or the cartilage in front of your ear to register a command, and you can turn off this feature, which is called 'Wide Area Tap'. There are beeps each time a tap command is registered, but no voice prompts. You may need to tap several times to get to the volume you want, which is a bit inconvenient.

There's an auto-pause feature that pauses your audio when you remove the earbuds from your ears, a 'Speak-to-Chat' feature that pauses your audio when your voice is detected, and automatic volume adjustment, which turns up your audio when more ambient noise is detected. All of these features can be turned off in the app. Unfortunately, the earbuds lack call-related controls, and the app doesn't give you the option of adding any.

On the left earbud:

  • Double tap: Raises the volume.
  • Triple tap: Lowers the volume.

On the right earbud:

  • Double tap: Plays and pauses audio.
  • Triple tap: Skips the track forward.

9.6
Design
Portability
L 1.2" (3.0 cm)
W 1.3" (3.2 cm)
H 0.6" (1.5 cm)
Volume 0.88 in³ (14.40 cm³)
Transmitter Required No

Like most earbuds, the Sony LinkBuds are very portable. They're extremely small and easily fit into most bags and pants pockets, even inside their case.

7.5
Design
Case
Type Hard case
L 1.9" (4.8 cm)
W 1.6" (4.1 cm)
H 1.2" (3.1 cm)
Volume 3.72 in³ (61.00 cm³)

The Sony LinkBuds have a good case. It's very compact and is similar to the case that comes with the Apple AirPods Pro Truly Wireless. There's a latch mechanism that keeps the lid closed and an LED light that displays the case's battery life when the case is open. It has a pairing button on the back and magnets inside to hold the earbuds in place. Unfortunately, it's made of plastic that feels thin and cheap.

7.5
Design
Build Quality

The Sony LinkBuds have a good build quality. They're made of plastic that feels mostly sturdy and can survive a few accidental drops and bumps without damage. They're also rated IPX4 for resistance against splashes with water. Unfortunately, the wing tips that you can use to adjust their fit feel easy to rip.

6.0
Design
Stability

The Sony LinkBuds have mediocre stability. It's not easy to find a good fit for both ears, and they can easily fall out if you bend over or move your head. That said, if you can achieve a good fit with the included wing tips, they don't slip around at all and should be suitable for workouts. Overall, their stability depends on the shape of your ears.

Design
Headshots 1
Design
Headshots 2
Design
Top
Design
In The Box

  • Sony LinkBuds
  • 5x wing tips
  • Charging case
  • USB-C to USB-A charging cable
  • Manuals

Sound
Sound
Sound Profile
Bass Amount
-18.95 dB
Treble Amount
-3.45 dB

Βecause of their open-ear design, the Sony LinkBuds hardly reproduce any bass. Their treble is also underemphasized, which helps avoid harsh-sounding instruments and vocals but also means your audio lacks brightness and a bit of detail. They have a well-balanced mid-range, though, so vocal-centric content like audiobooks sounds clear and accurate. Their companion app also offers a graphic EQ and presets that you can use to customize their sound.

7.4
Sound
Frequency Response Consistency
Avg. Std. Deviation
0.52 dB

The Sony LinkBuds have decent frequency response consistency. Their treble and low-bass delivery can vary a bit depending on their fit and positioning. Fortunately, they come with a variety of stability fins to help you get a good fit.

Sound
Raw Frequency Response
1.0
Sound
Bass Accuracy
Std. Err.
18.85 dB
Low-Frequency Extension
343.96 Hz
Low-Bass
-33.54 dB
Mid-Bass
-17.41 dB
High-Bass
-6.53 dB

The Sony LinkBuds have terrible bass accuracy, which isn't surprising for open-ear headphones. The entire range is very underemphasized, so your audio lacks rumble, punch, and boom. Audio also lacks body compared to other open-ear options like the Bose Sport Open Earbuds Truly Wireless. Songs with a lot of low-bass, like Boom Boom Pow by the Black Eyed Peas, sound hollow instead of thumpy.

8.2
Sound
Mid Accuracy
Std. Err.
2.44 dB
Low-Mid
-2.66 dB
Mid-Mid
0.29 dB
High-Mid
1.89 dB

The Sony LinkBuds have great mid accuracy. The low-mids are underemphasized, so the low harmonics of instruments sound a bit thinned out. The response is very neutral otherwise, so elements like voices and lead instruments are present, clear, and intense.

4.9
Sound
Treble Accuracy
Std. Err.
7.22 dB
Low-Treble
-3.77 dB
Mid-Treble
-9.57 dB
High-Treble
-14.42 dB

The Sony LinkBuds have poor treble accuracy. The entire range is underemphasized, which veils the upper harmonics of vocals and lead instruments. Sibilants like S and T sounds are dull as well.

6.6
Sound
Peaks/Dips
Peaks
2.28 dB
Dips
1.68 dB

The Sony LinkBuds have alright peaks and dips performance. There's a deep dip in the low-bass that reduces thump and rumble in your audio, followed by a peak from the mid to high-bass that adds punch and boom. A peak across the mid-range is present more in the left driver and makes instruments sound a bit boxy or harsh. The low-treble is uneven, hurting the comprehensibility of vocals and lead instruments or making them sound harsh. The mid treble is also uneven in the left driver, so sibilant sounds like cymbals can be dull or bright.

7.2
Sound
Imaging
Weighted Group Delay
0.33
Weighted Phase Mismatch
22.86
Weighted Amplitude Mismatch
0.85
Weighted Frequency Mismatch
2.66

The Sony LinkBuds have a decent imaging performance. The weighted group delay falls below the audibility threshold for the entire range, resulting in tight bass and transparent treble reproduction. The L/R drivers are also well-matched in terms of amplitude. However, their phase response is mismatched in the mid range. There are also peaks in the low-bass and mid-treble. Some sounds in the mid-range seem louder in the right earbud, but it's hard to notice with regular content. Their frequency response is also slightly mismatched, which can create holes or inaccuracies in the stereo image. That said, imaging can vary between units and can indicate a manufacturer's quality control and ergonomics.

3.0
Sound
Passive Soundstage
PRTF Accuracy (Std. Dev.)
N/A
PRTF Size (Avg.)
N/A
PRTF Distance
N/A
Openness
9.6
Acoustic Space Excitation
3.6

The Sony LinkBuds have a poor passive soundstage, like most earbuds. By design, their sound bypasses your outer ear, so audio seems to come from inside your head instead of from speakers in the room around you. That said, you'll perceive the soundstage as very wide due to the open-back design.

4.1
Sound
Virtual Soundstage
Head Modeling
On/Off
Speaker Modeling
On/Off
Room Ambience
No
Head Tracking
No
Virtual Surround
360 Reality Audio

The Sony LinkBuds support 360 Reality Audio, creating a more immersive, 3D feel. However, you need to subscribe to a compatible streaming service (like TIDAL, 360 by Deezer, or nugs.net) and listen to music mixed with 360 Reality Audio to take advantage of it. You can also use the app to take pictures of your ears to be analyzed by Sony to optimize this feature to your ear shape.

7.1
Sound
Weighted Harmonic Distortion
WHD @ 90
0.384
WHD @ 100
0.342

The Sony LinkBuds have a decent weighted harmonic distortion performance. There is some distortion in the low-mids present in both earbuds when you're listening at high volumes. There's also a peak in the left earbud's mid-treble response at normal listening volumes. That said, most frequencies fall within good limits, so your audio is clean and pure at normal listening volumes.

Sound
Test Settings
Firmware
1.0.4
Power
On
Connection
Bluetooth 5.0
Codec
SBC, 16-bit, 44.1kHz
EQ
Off
ANC
No ANC
Tip/Pad
Default
Microphone
Integrated

These are the settings used to test the Sony LinkBuds. Our results are only valid with these settings.

Isolation
1.0
Isolation
Noise Isolation
Isolation Audio
Overall Attenuation
-1.9 dB
Bass
0.12 dB
Mid
1.25 dB
Treble
-6.79 dB

The Sony LinkBuds block out virtually no noise, which is by design. They don't cover or block your ears, which allows you to hear ambient sound while you wear them. You can easily hear conversations going on around you at work and oncoming traffic when you're outside for a walk.

6.9
Isolation
Leakage
Leakage Audio
Overall Leakage @ 1ft
39.88 dB

The Sony LinkBuds have an okay leakage performance. They leak more audio than closed earbuds like the Jabra Elite 4 Active True Wireless, so if you're listening to audio at high volumes at the office, people nearby can hear it. That said, they mostly leak sound in the treble range, so the audio that escapes sounds thin and tinny.

Microphone
Microphone
Microphone Style
Integrated
Yes
In-Line
No
Boom
No
Detachable Boom
No
6.6
Microphone
Recording Quality
Recorded Speech
LFE
226.27 Hz
FR Std. Dev.
3 dB
HFE
6,088.74 Hz
Weighted THD
7.972
Gain
-9.86 dB

The mic has an alright recording quality. Speech lacks body, and there's some distortion present. However, your voice still sounds clear and intelligible to whoever you're speaking to.

7.1
Microphone
Noise Handling
SpNR
9.56 dB
Noise Gate
Always On
Speech + Pink Noise Handling
7.5
Speech + Pink Noise Audio Sample
Speech + Subway Noise Handling
6.5
Speech + Subway Noise Audio Sample

The mic has a decent noise handling performance. It can separate your voice from moderate background noise and even manages to reduce the sound of loud noise like a passing train. You should be understandable if you take a call from somewhere like a busy office, but unfortunately, there may be some crackling noise when you speak, which could be distracting.

Active Features
7.0
Active Features
Battery
Battery Type
Rechargable
Continuous Battery Life
6.1 hrs
Additional Charges
2.0
Total Battery Life
18.3 hrs
Charge Time
1.6 hrs
Power-Saving Feature
Auto-Off Timer
Audio While Charging
Yes
Passive Playback
No
Charging Port USB-C

The Sony LinkBuds have a decent battery performance. They can last for just over six hours off of a single charge, which is a bit longer than the advertised 5.5. While that won't get you through an entire workday without recharging, they come with a case that holds about two extra charges. The manufacturer advertises them to provide 90 minutes of continuous use from 10 minutes of charging, and you can use one earbud while the other charges in the case. You can also use the app to set up an auto-off timer that switches off the earbuds when they're not in your ears for a certain amount of time.

8.0
Active Features
App Support
App Name Sony| Headphones Connect
iOS Yes
Android Yes
macOS No
Windows No
Equalizer
Graphic + Presets
ANC Control
No
Mic Control No
Room Effects
No
Playback Control
Yes
Button Mapping Yes
Surround Support
Yes

The Sony LinkBuds have a great app. It has a graphic EQ and a few presets like 'Bass Boost' and 'Relaxed' that you can use to customize their sound profile. You can also set up head tracking for the 'Soundscape' feature, which the manufacturer advertises to help you navigate with audio cues that seem to "come from" a destination, based on the position of your head. It can also give you audio prompts to indicate points of interest like an intersection or the name of a building as you walk by. You need to download the separate 'Microsoft Soundscape' app to use it, though.

It's possible to remap the controls on both earbuds, but you lose some functions if you do. You can add a command to skip the track backward, but you lose the play/pause function. You can add commands to activate your device's voice assistant, Amazon Alexa, or choose 'Quick Access', which lets you use Spotify Tap to play music from that app.

You can enable or disable some other features, including 'Automatic Power Off' (turns off the headphones when you're not wearing them), smart pause (pauses your audio when you're not wearing them), and 'Speak-to-Chat' (pauses your audio when the headphones detect your voice). You can also turn on automatic volume adjustment, which turns up the volume when there's ambient noise and lowers it again when you're in a quieter environment. You can toggle 'Wide Area Tap' on or off, so you can decide if you want to tap your ear to register commands. You can also set up the 360 Reality Audio feature and perform a test to analyze your ear shape.

Connectivity
6.7
Connectivity
Bluetooth
Bluetooth Version
5.2
Multi-Device Pairing
No
NFC Pairing
No
Line Of Sight Range
129.59 ft (39.50 m)
PC Latency (SBC)
222 ms
PC Latency (aptX)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX HD)
N/A
PC Latency (aptX-LL)
N/A
iOS Latency
70 ms
Android Latency
129 ms

The Sony LinkBuds have adequate Bluetooth connectivity. They don't support multi-device or NFC pairing, although if you're using Windows 10 or 11, they support Google Fast Pair, so you can tap a prompt on your computer or tablet to pair them. Their latency with PCs is also high, so you may notice audio syncing issues if you use them for a video call on your computer. That said, they have lower latency with iOS and Android devices, so they're more suitable for watching videos on your phone. Some devices and apps also compensate for latency.

0
Connectivity
Non-Bluetooth Wireless
Non-BT Line Of Sight Range
N/A
Non-BT Latency
N/A
0
Connectivity
Wired
Analog Audio
No
USB Audio
No
Detachable No
Length N/A
Connection
No Wired Option
Analog/USB Audio Latency
N/A

You can't use the Sony LinkBuds wired. They only come with a USB-A to USB-C cable for charging the case.

Connectivity
PC Compatibility
Analog
No
Wired USB
No
Non-BT Wireless
No

The Sony LinkBuds can connect to PCs via Bluetooth but can't connect any other way.

Connectivity
PlayStation Compatibility
PS4 Analog
No
PS4 Wired USB
No
PS4 Non-BT Wireless
No
PS5 Analog
No
PS5 Wired USB
No
PS5 Non-BT Wireless
No
Connectivity
Xbox Compatibility
Xbox One Analog
No
Xbox One Wired USB
No
Xbox One Non-BT Wireless
No
Xbox Series X|S Analog
No
Xbox Series X|S Wired USB
No
Xbox Series X|S Non-BT Wireless
No
2.2
Connectivity
Base/Dock
Type
Charging Case
USB Input
No
Line In
No
Line Out
No
Optical Input
No
RCA Input
No
Dock Charging
Yes
Power Supply
USB-C

The Sony LinkBuds come with a small portable case with a USB-C port for the charging cable. It doesn't have any other inputs and doesn't support wireless charging.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

The Sony LinkBuds come in two colors, 'Gray' or 'White'. Both versions have a speckled design. We tested them in 'Gray', and you can see the label for the unit we tested here.

If you come across another variant, please let us know in the discussions, and we'll update our review.

Compared To Other Headphones

The Sony LinkBuds have a very unconventional design, but similar to earbuds like the Bose Sport Open Earbuds Truly Wireless or the Shokz OpenRun Pro Bone Conduction, they're designed to keep your ears open so you can hear your surroundings. However, the manufacturer markets them more for everyday, office, and casual use than for sports. They have a great app with many features like an EQ, virtual surround sound, automatic volume adjustment. They also support Microsoft Soundscape, a feature that tracks your head position and can give you audio cues to help you find a destination. Unfortunately, it's hard to find a good fit, and depending on the shape of your ears, you may not be able to. If you're looking for open-back headphones that are more likely to be comfortable, the Apple AirPods (2nd generation) Truly Wireless or Apple AirPods (3rd generation) Truly Wireless are worth considering.

If you want to see other options, check out our lists of the best earbuds and in-ear headphones, the best wireless Bluetooth earbuds, and the best wireless earbuds for Android.

Sony WF-1000XM4 Truly Wireless

The Sony WF-1000XM4 Truly Wireless are better than the Sony LinkΒuds Truly Wireless for most purposes. They have an ANC feature that blocks out a lot of noise, a better-balanced default sound profile, a more comfortable fit, and a longer continuous battery life. On the other hand, the LinkΒuds are designed to let you hear your surroundings, so you may prefer them at the office or for a run outside. 

Beats Solo Pro Wireless

The Beats Solo Pro Wireless and the Sony LinkΒuds Truly Wireless are very different and you may prefer either depending on what you're looking for. The Beats are on-ear headphones with a good noise isolation and a more neutral sound profile with a much more accurate bass response. They also have a longer continuous battery life. They're designed to not block your ears and let you hear your surroundings. They struggle to reproduce bass, but are more customizable, since they have a graphic EQ and presets in their app. 

Apple AirPods Pro Truly Wireless

The Apple AirPods Pro Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkΒuds Truly Wireless. The Apple have a much more comfortable, stable fit, a more neutral sound profile, and an excellent noise isolation performance. They also have lower latency via Bluetooth and an h1 chip for easier pairing with iOS devices. On the other hand, the LinkΒuds have an open design and let you hear ambient sound, which you may prefer. Their continuous battery life is also a bit longer. 

Apple AirPods (3rd generation) Truly Wireless

The Apple AirPods (3rd generation) Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. The Apple headphones are much more comfortable for most people, better built, and have a more neutral sound profile, which some may prefer. Their case also holds a greater number of extra charges. The Sony headphones have a better overall mic performance. While it can be hard to get a good fit, they come with several silicone sleeves in different sizes, while the Apple are one-size-fits-all.

Sony WF-1000XM3 Truly Wireless

The Sony WF-1000XM3 Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. The WF-1000XM3 have a much more comfortable, stable fit and a better build quality. They isolate you from much more noise, thanks to their ANC feature, and they have a more neutral sound profile that some may prefer. They also support NFC for easier pairing. On the other hand, the LinkBuds are designed to let you hear your surroundings when you're walking around outside or working at the office. 

Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro Truly Wireless

The Samsung Galaxy Buds Pro Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. The Samsung are much more comfortable, stable, and have a more neutral sound profile. They're also equipped with an ANC feature and isolate you from more noise. On the other hand, the Sony have a longer continuous battery life and more sound customization features in their app. Their open design is meant to let you hear ambient sound as well. 

Samsung Galaxy Buds2 Truly Wireless

The Samsung Galaxy Buds2 Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. The Samsung are much more comfortable, stable, and well-built. They have an ANC feature with an impressive performance and a much more accurate bass response, thanks to their closed-back design. On the other hand, the Sony are meant to let in ambient sound, so you can hear what's going o around you. They have more sound customization features and a longer continuous battery life.

Samsung Galaxy Buds+ Truly Wireless

The Samsung Galaxy Buds+ Truly Wireless are better than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless for most purposes. The Samsung are much more comfortable, well-built, and stable. They have a much more neutral, versatile sound profile and a longer continuous battery life. They can also passively isolate you from some ambient sound. Ηowever, the Sony are designed to let you hear ambient sound. Their app also offers more robust sound customization features and they support virtual surround sound.

Samsung Galaxy Buds Live Truly Wireless

The Samsung Galaxy Buds Live Truly Wireless and the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless have different strengths, so you may prefer either depending on what you're looking for. The Samsung have a much more comfortable, stable fit and an ANC feature, so they isolate you from more noise. Their continuous battery life is longer and they have a much more neutral sound profile, which some may prefer. On the other hand, the Sony are designed to let you hear your surroundings. They have a better onboard control scheme and an in-app graphic EQ and presets for sound customization, while the Samsung only has presets.

Bose QuietComfort Earbuds Truly Wireless

The Bose QuietComfort Earbuds Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. The Bose have an ANC feature with a great performance, a more neutral sound profile, and a longer continuous battery life. They're also much more comfortable and stable. Ηowever, the Sony are designed to let you hear your surroundings while you wear them, which some may prefer. 

Apple AirPods (2nd generation) Truly Wireless

The Apple AirPods (2nd generation) Truly Wireless are better for most purposes than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. The Apple headphones have a more comfortable, stable fit for most, a better build quality, and a more neutral sound profile, although neither pair reproduces much bass. Their case holds more extra charges. On the other hand, the Sony headphones' continuous battery life is a few hours longer. They also support virtual surround sound and come with a graphic EQ and presets for sound customization.

Bose Sport Open Earbuds Truly Wireless

The Bose Sport Open Earbuds Truly Wireless are better for sports than the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless. They have a significantly more comfortable, stable fit and a much better build quality. They reproduce a bit more bass and have longer continuous battery life. On the other hand, the Sony headphones have a smaller design that you may prefer if you can get a good fit. They also come with sound customization features and a case that holds extra charges, unlike the Bose.

Shokz OpenRun Bone Conduction

The Shokz OpenRun Bone Conduction and the Sony LinkBuds Truly Wireless have different strengths. Both headphones are designed to let you hear ambient sound, but the Shokz have a much more comfortable, stable fit. Their continuous battery life is also significantly longer. On the other hand, if you can get a good fit with the Sony headphones, you may prefer their smaller design. Their companion app also offers more features, like an EQ for sound customization and virtual surround sound.

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