Get insider access
Preferred store
Your browser is not supported or outdated so some features of the site might not be available.

GameBall Mouse Mouse Review

Tested using Methodology v1.3
Updated Aug 29, 2022 at 03:01 pm
GameBall Mouse Picture
6.0
Office/Multimedia
5.1
Video Games (FPS)
5.5
Video Games (MMO)
4.3
Travel
Type
Trackball
Connectivity Wired

The GameBall Mouse is a trackball mouse designed specifically for gaming use. It has an ambidextrous shape that's well-suited for both left- and right-handed players, and its stationary design is especially good for players with limited mobility. The ergonomic supports feel comfortable, with a palm rest in the middle of the mouse for extra support. It has a fixed polling rate of 1000Hz and five preset CPI settings, which you can cycle through using a dedicated CPI button. Unfortunately, its click latency is very high compared to most dedicated gaming mice. There's no companion software available, though GameBall suggests using third-party software to fine-tune settings like acceleration or button remapping. Unfortunately, some of its plastic components feel flimsy, and its scrolling feature lacks precision.

Our Verdict

6.0 Office/Multimedia

The GameBall Mouse is a disappointing office mouse. Although it has a comfortable design suitable for long work days, its trackball design might take some time to get used to. It feels a bit flimsy, and it doesn't have any companion software available, so reprogramming buttons requires third-party software. While it has vertical and horizontal scrolling features, they don't feel very precise.

Pros
  • Ambidextrous and ergonomic shape feels comfortable to use.
  • Plug and play compatibility with both Windows and macOS.
Cons
  • Plastic body feels a bit flimsy.
  • No companion software available.
  • Scrolling doesn't feel very precise.
5.1 Video Games (FPS)

The GameBall Mouse scores subpar for gaming, but this is mostly because of its heavy weight and unconventional design. However, once you get used to it, it's very comfortable to use. It has a polling rate of 1000Hz but the click latency is significantly higher than most dedicated gaming mice, and you can't easily reprogram any of its buttons since it doesn't come with customization software. However, you can use a third-party one if you want.

Pros
  • Ambidextrous and ergonomic shape feels comfortable to use.
  • Higher polling rate than most trackball options.
Cons
  • Plastic body feels a bit flimsy.
  • No companion software available.
  • Buttons can't be reprogrammed easily.
  • Very heavy.
5.5 Video Games (MMO)

The GameBall Mouse performs passably well for MMO gaming. Although it doesn't have as many programmable inputs as dedicated MMO mice and lacks companion software to easily reprogram buttons, it feels comfortable to use thanks to its ambidextrous, ergonomic design. It also has a polling rate of 1000Hz. Unfortunately, it has high click latency, and some of its plastic components feel a bit flimsy.

Pros
  • Ambidextrous and ergonomic shape feels comfortable to use.
  • Higher polling rate than most trackball options.
Cons
  • Plastic body feels a bit flimsy.
  • No companion software available.
  • Buttons can't be reprogrammed easily.
4.3 Travel

The GameBall Mouse is a poor mouse for travel use. It's very heavy, and its shape won't easily fit into laptop bags. However, it feels comfortable to use, and since it's a stationary mouse, you don't require a lot of space to use it.

Pros
  • Ambidextrous and ergonomic shape feels comfortable to use.
  • Plug and play compatibility with both Windows and macOS.
Cons
  • Plastic body feels a bit flimsy.
  • No companion software available.
  • Bulky size won't fit in laptop cases.
  • 6.0 Office/Multimedia
  • 5.1 Video Games (FPS)
  • 5.5 Video Games (MMO)
  • 4.3 Travel
  1. Updated Sep 06, 2022: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.3. This update adds a new Sensor Latency test and makes minor changes to several of our existing tests, resulting in test result changes in several sections. For more information, you can check out our full changelog here.
  2. Updated Aug 19, 2022: We've made a small change to the video element in the CPI test box to indicate that the speed value isn't a single value but an average of the three test runs performed.
  3. Updated Aug 09, 2022: Following the update to Test Bench 1.2, some of our test results have changed within both the Weight and CPI sections. We've added or modified some of the text in this article to clarify these changes.
  4. Updated Aug 01, 2022: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.2. This update simplifies our Weight test and expands on our CPI test from Test Bench 1.1, resulting in changes to test results in both sections. For more details, you can see our complete changelog here.
  5. Updated Jul 20, 2022: We've converted this review to Test Bench 1.1. This update revamps our Click Latency test and results in changes to test results. For more details, you can see our full changelog here.
  6. Updated Jul 14, 2022: Added minor details to the Weight and Hand Size Recommendation sections for clarity and accuracy.
  7. Updated Dec 07, 2021: Review published.
  8. Updated Dec 01, 2021: Early access published.

Differences Between Sizes And Variants

We tested the GameBall with a dark gray trackball and a black plastic body. There's a limited edition variant with a ruby-red trackball, but this is no longer in production. There's also a similar-looking prototype version with a red trackball that isn't available for purchase. You can see the label of the unit we tested here.

Compared To Other Mice

The GameBall mouse is one of the few trackball mice designed for gaming rather than office or productivity tasks. With that said, it has an RGB lighting zone on the back and a fixed polling rate of 1000Hz, which is significantly higher than most trackballs. It also has an atypical design for an ambidextrous trackball mouse, with a hump in the middle for direct palm contact and extra support. Additionally, the design allows you to use it with more traditional gaming grip styles, like claw or palm grip. However, it lacks any companion software to fine-tune sensor settings, and its trackball design may take some getting used to.

For other options, check out our recommendations for the best gaming mouse, the best ergonomic mouse, and the best FPS mouse.

Kensington SlimBlade Trackball

The GameBall Mouse and the Kensington SlimBlade Trackball are both trackball mice, but they're for different uses. The GameBall is designed for gaming use, so it has lower click latency, a higher fixed polling rate, and an RGB zone. The SlimBlade is better suited for office or productivity tasks, so its scrolling feature feels more precise, though it doesn't have a horizontal scrolling ability. While both mice are ambidextrous, the GameBall has a palm rest in the middle for better ergonomic support.

ELECOM HUGE M-HT1DRBK

The GameBall Mouse and the ELECOM HUGE M-HT1DRBK are both stationary trackball mice, but the GameBall performs better and is designed for gaming. In contrast, the ELECOM is designed for productivity tasks. The GameBall connects wirelessly and uses a pair of AA batteries. It also has a better sensor, a higher polling rate, and a lower click latency. On the other hand, the ELECOM is a wired-only mouse with two additional buttons. It also has a thumb and pinky rest, a scroll wheel, and customization software, which are all features the GameBall lacks.

Kensington Expert Mouse Wireless Trackball

The GameBall Mouse and the Kensington Expert Mouse Wireless Trackball are both trackball mice, but they're designed for different uses. The GameBall is designed for gaming use and has significantly better click latency and a much higher polling rate. It also has an ambidextrous design with a palm rest for better comfort. On the other hand, the Kensington is better suited for office or productivity tasks. It has companion software, so buttons are easier to remap, and it has a physical scroll ring that feels much more precise to use.

Kensington Orbit Wireless Trackball with Scroll Ring

The GameBall Mouse and the Kensington Orbit Wireless Trackball with Scroll Ring are both stationary trackball mice, but they're for different uses. The GameBall is a wired trackball designed for gaming use, so it has a higher fixed polling rate of 1000Hz and significantly better click latency. On the other hand, the Kensington is a wireless trackball designed for office use. It has companion software, which the GameBall lacks, meaning you can reprogram buttons. It also comes with a detachable wrist rest and has a ring around the trackball, which you use to scroll vertically.

Kensington Orbit Fusion Wireless Trackball

The GameBall Mouse and the Kensington Orbit Fusion Wireless Trackball are both trackball mice, but they're for different uses. The GameBall is better suited to gaming thanks to its higher polling rate and significantly better click latency. It also has an ambidextrous design, while the Kensington has a right-handed shape. Conversely, the Kensington is better suited for office and productivity tasks. It has more precise-feeling scrolling features thanks to its scroll ring, and it has a thumb and pinky rest for extra support. It's also wireless-only and has companion software.

+ Show more

Test Results

perceptual testing image
Design
Design
Style
Type
Trackball
Lighting Color Multi-color

The GameBall has a simple, clean look with a matte black plastic body and a shiny, gray trackball. The middle click button and CPI button are both made of glossy black plastic, as is the scrolling trackpad around the trackball. There's one multi-color lighting zone located in the GameBall logo on the back, and you can cycle through seven colors using a button on the mouse.

Design
Shape
Length 6.4" (161 mm)
Height 2.0" (50 mm)
Width 4.7" (119 mm)
Grip Width
64 mm
4.4
Design
Portability
Volume
58.71 inยณ (962 cmยณ)
Cable/Receiver Storing
No
7.0
Design
Build Quality

The GameBall feels decently built. It feels solid, and there's no noticeable flex when the body is pressed or shaken, though there's a creaking sound. Unfortunately, the plastic trackpad around the trackball feels a bit cheap and flimsy, and the trackball itself feels loose in its housing.

4.2
Design
Weight
Lowest Weight
191.7 g
Default Weight
191.7 g
Weight Distribution
Front-heavy
Extra Weights
No

The GameBall mouse is heavy, but it's designed to remain stationary on your desk. By default, it has no weight customization options, though lighter aftermarket trackballs are available.

8.5
Design
Comfort Of Use
Left-Handed Friendly
Yes
Ambidextrous
True Ambidextrous
Coating
Matte
Finger Rest
No

The GameBall has an ergonomic shape that feels very comfortable to use. It has an ambidextrous design suitable for both left- and right-handed users. Also, it's a stationary mouse, which makes it very accessible to users with limited mobility since you don't need to move your wrist to operate it. There's a hump in the middle for the whole palm to lay on, which provides additional support and can cut down on overall fatigue when using the mouse for long periods.

Design
Palm Grip: Hand Size Recommendation
Small Hand
Yes
Medium Hand
Yes
Large Hand
Yes
X.Large Hand
Yes

Trackball models don't typically use the same grip type terminology as more conventional mice. However, a palm grip closely resembles how most people will use the GameBall, and this mouse is well suited for this grip type for all hand sizes.

Design
Claw Grip: Hand Size Recommendation
Small Hand
No
Medium Hand
Yes
Large Hand
Yes
X.Large Hand
Yes

If you have medium or larger-sized hands, you can use the GameBall mouse with a claw grip, but it isn't designed with this grip type in mind. With your fingers positioned towards the back of the trackball as pictured, it's possible to push it out of its housing. The GameBall is better suited for a grip with your fingers resting further forward on the trackball.

Design
Fingertip Grip: Hand Size Recommendation
Small Hand
No
Medium Hand
No
Large Hand
No
X.Large Hand
No

The GameBall mouse isn't suitable for a fingertip grip.

0
Design
Wireless Versatility
Maximum Of Paired Devices
Wired
Bluetooth
No
Receiver
No
Battery Type
No Batteries
Use When Charging
No
On/Off Activation
None
Receiver Extender
No
Battery Indicator No
0
Design
Cable
Connectivity Wired
Cable Length
6.6 ft (2.0 m)
Cable Type
Rubber
Permanent Kink
Yes
Port Type: Mouse End
No Port
Port Type: PC End
USB

The GameBall Mouse has a thick and rigid rubber cable. We didn't score the cable because this is a stationary mouse, so the cable's flexibility doesn't matter.

0
Design
Mouse Feet
Gliding Experience
Stationary
Material
Rubber
Extra Included
No

The mouse has four rubber feet on the bottom. However, they don't do a very good job keeping the mouse in place.

Design
In The Box

  • GameBall mouse
  • User documentation

Control
5.0
Control
Additional Buttons
Total Number Of Buttons
8
Number Of Side Buttons
6
Number Of Programmable Inputs
0
Profile Switching Button
No
Gesture Support
Yes

The GameBall has three physical buttons on each side of the mouse, for a total of six. It also has two tactile buttons, one above the trackball and one below. There's no native software, so you can't reprogram any of the buttons without using third-party software. That means all the buttons are locked to their default functions.

On the left side of the mouse, the top button navigates the page forwards, the middle acts as a middle click, and the bottom functions as the left click. On the right side, the top button works as the right click, the bottom navigates backward, and the small middle button works as the CPI-switching button, which allows you to cycle through five CPI presets. The top tactile button switches the mouse from right-handed mode to left-handed mode by swapping the button layout, and the lower tactile button cycles through different lighting colors. Since the ring around the trackball is touch-sensitive, it supports gesture controls to scroll.

3.9
Control
Click Latency
Expected Connection
33.8 ms
Wired
33.8 ms
Receiver
N/A
Bluetooth
N/A

The click latency is poor. It's suitable for casual gaming, but you may experience small but noticeable click delays, especially if you play fast-paced or reaction-based games.

6.9
Control
CPI
SRAV @ 1600 CPI
N/A
SRAV @ 800 CPI
-0.30%
SRAV @ 400 CPI
-1.56%
SRAV @ Fixed CPI
N/A
Precision Error Between Speeds
1.79%
Precision Error Between CPI
4.25%
Worst Tracking Error
25.11%
Minimum CPI
400 CPI
Maximum CPI
3,000 CPI
CPI Adjustment Steps
N/A
not tested
Control
Sensor Latency
Delay To Start Of Movement
N/A
Delay At Half Movement
N/A
Delay To End Of Movement
N/A
Control
Sensor Specifications
Sensor Technology
Optical (LED)
Sensor Model
Not Specified
Works On Glass
Yes
Minimum Lift Off Distance
N/A
Maximum Polling Rate
1000 Hz

The GameBall mouse has a fixed max polling rate of 1000Hz, making it well-suited for gaming. It has five CPI presets: 400, 800, 1200, 2000, and 3000. You can cycle through them using the CPI button. It uses a PixArt sensor; though we can't confirm its model, Using third-party software, you can adjust the acceleration curve and sensitivity, which should help you when gaming. Also, since the sensor is under the trackball, you can easily access and clean it with the trackball removed.

Control
Mouse Wheel
Scroll Wheel
Tactile Surface
Scroll Wheel Steps
No Step
Scroll Wheel Tilt
No
Thumb Wheel
No
Thumb Wheel Steps
No Thumb Wheel

The GameBall lacks a typical scroll wheel and instead uses a tactile ring around the trackball. The left side of the ring controls horizontal scrolling, while the right side of the ring controls vertical scrolling. However, it doesn't feel very precise.

Control
Noise
Click Noise
Quiet
Operating System And Software
0.3
Operating System And Software
Compatible Software Option
Software Name No software
Software Windows Compatibility
No
Software macOS Compatibility
No
Account Needed
No Software
On-Board Memory
No
CPI (DPI) Adjustment
No
Polling Rate Adjustment
No
Profile Configuration
No
RGB On/Off
No RGB

The GameBall lacks native software, so you can't adjust sensor settings. However, GameBall suggests third-party software like X-Mouse to remap buttons or Raw Accel to fine-tune acceleration.

10
Operating System And Software
Mouse Compatibility
Windows Compatibility Fully
macOS Compatibility Fully

This mouse is fully compatible with both Windows and macOS.

Discussions